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URBAN FOREST

CASE STUDY
ARUNYIKA KHONGNURAT
SORNKETRAT SORNKAMRON

The Southern Ridges


Urban Forest Rehabilitation

PART : Introduction

STATUS OF LAND USE AND FOREST


IN SINGAPORE
The Republic of Singapore is an island city-state of 699 km2
and approximately 4.4 million people.
Despite being one of the most urbanized and built-up
countries in Southeast Asia, Singapore is also renowned for its
national mission of making Singapore

a Garden

City.

http://www.steveonleave.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/view-from-marina-bay-sands.jpg

PART : Introduction

STATUS OF LAND USE AND FOREST


IN SINGAPORE
Singapore was covered with lush forest, with more than 80%
lowland dipterocarp forest, 5% freshwater swamp forest and 13%
coastal mangroves.
Today, more than 50% of the island is urbanized. There are less
than 2,000 ha of primary forest. The largest single expanse of
primary forest (70 ha) is found in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve. Other
primary forest fragments are found in the West of Singapore, and
on a few of the larger offshore islands.

http://www.plansandpolitics.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Singapore-60s-1024x524.jpg

PART : Introduction

STATUS OF LAND USE AND FOREST


IN SINGAPORE
The forestry in Singapores context can be broadly
categorized as:
Forests in Nature Reserves, consisting mainly of remnant
primary forests and regenerating secondary forests
Urban streetscapes, consisting mainly of closely planted
roadside trees along 95% of
Singapores roads, and trees in urban developments, urban parks
and vacant lands

PART : Introduction

Forests in Nature Reserves


The Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, the Central Catchment
Nature Reserve, the Labrador Nature Reserve and the Sungei
Buloh Wetland Reserve.
the Nature Reserves are very diverse. For example, the Bukit
Timah Nature Reserve and the Central Catchment Nature Reserve
support 840 species of flowering plants and more than 380 species
of vertebrate animals
The Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve is an important site for
migratory birds on the East Asian-Australasian flyway. Developed
from an old prawn farm, efforts have been made to improve the
secondary and mangrove forest in the Reserve.

PART : Introduction

Urban Streetscapes
The roadside urban forests alongside approximately
3,130 km of paved roads are managed by arborists who provide
expert tree care and management services.
In Bukit Timah and Changi, where trees above 1m girth over
bark are protected by law.
The urban forests are mainly under the care and
management of NParks and a few other government.
These government agencies implement and manage urban
forests provided for under the prevalent guidelines Some
examples of such :

PART : Introduction

Urban Streetscapes
To provide green space of 0.8 ha per 1,000 population
Open car parks to provide the necessary tree plantings for
shade and aesthetics; and
The Road Code provisions for designating tree planting verges
along roads.

PART : CASE STUDY

The Southern Ridges


Developer: The Urban Redevelopment Authority of Singapore
Owner: Ministry of National Development, Singapore
Architect: RSP Architects Planners & Engineers, IJP Corporation Ltd
Location: Singapore

PART : CASE STUDY

The Southern Ridges


The Southern Ridges is a nine-kilometre chain of green, open
spaces spanning the rolling hills of Mount Faber Park,
Telok Blangah Hill Park and Kent Ridge Park, before ending at West
Coast Park at the south-western part of Singapore.
The project has innovatively linked up three isolated existing
hill parks into a large expanse of nature reserve through simple
structures such as bridges, elevated walkways, as well as nature
trails, and a new attraction for the public to enjoy and learn about
horticulture and nature.

PART : CASE STUDY

The Southern Ridges


Objectives :
1. To establish a one-stop gardening hub or horticultural park,
transform the Southern Ridges into a new recreational
destination.
2. The park connector networks forming a round-islandroute.
3. Linking the small parks together.
4. Easily accessible.
5. Opens up nature area for public enjoyment.

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The Southern Ridges

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The Southern Ridges


Henderson Waves bridge across Henderson road.
It offers visitors a panoramic view of the southern waterfront
on one side, and great views of the city.
A sculptural wave-form and materials that relates to the rustic
environment.

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The Southern Ridges


Alexandra Arch bridge across Alexandra Road.
The Alexandra Arch is conceptualised as a Gateway to
Nature. The design drew inspiration from a folded leaf that
sweeps diagonally across this major
road as it gradually enters the tranquility of the Forest Walk which
links to Telok Blangah Hill Park.

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The Southern Ridges

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The Southern Ridges


Forest walk the elevated walkway

The elevated walkway is inspired by nature and is derived from


the triangular-shaped leaves of the Mile-a-Minute plant found in
the area.
At Forest Walk offers visitors a journey of exploration, as it
deftly traverses the hilly terrain, offering breathtaking views of the
city and the southern coastline.
The raised walkway brushes against the tops of tree canopies,
offering a birds eye view of the forest, whilst ground-level earth
trails facilitate the observation of wildlife thriving on the forest floor.
The design was modular to enable prefabrication, so that there
was minimal impact on the environment during construction.

PART : CASE STUDY

The Southern Ridges

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The Southern Ridges

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Forest walk Singing Forest

Native trees fruit are being planted to attract insects, which in


turn attract birds, the project aims to intensify the already high
diversity of native bird species in the Southern Ridges.
In the first phase are trees fruit that include members of the
mahang tree family and the bean family. These trees fruit soon after
planting. Their fruits are small and this would attract both small and
large native bird species.
In the second phase are trees that include members of the wild
nutmeg family and forest mangosteens. These trees produce larger
fruits, which in turn attract larger birds. such as green pigeons, and
hornbills. These trees need more time to grow.
In turn, the birds will disperse the seeds of these and other plants.
Thus in the long term, the planting will help to regenerate the
Southern Ridges forests.