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Leopard Gecko

Magazine
Also See:

Blue Tails

Inside This Issue:

Kids & Geckos

Ask the Breeder


Gecko Games
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Volume 1, Issue 2
May 2, 2008

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does it get the food into its mouth?


How does your gecko drink?
Has your gecko chosen a poop
spot? Where is it?
Look at your geckos poop. What
2 main colors do you see? One of
those colors is actually the geckos
pee. Which do you think it is? Do you
know any other kind of animal who
poops and pees like that?
If your gecko comes out, do you
notice it licking things? Why do you
think its doing that?

Kids and Geckos


Activities & Information
Aliza Arzt

Bringing Home Your Gecko


When you first get your gecko, you
need to give it some time to get
used to its new home. At first, it
may wander around the cage licking
everything, but then it will probably
go into its hiding area and may not
come out for a long time. When it
does come out, it will probably happen in the evening because geckos
sleep during the day and come out
at night. Here are some things you
can do while you are waiting for you
gecko to get more comfortable:
1. Before the gecko gets into the
cage, set up the hiding areas so you
will be able to look into them from
the side of the cage. That way you
can see your gecko easily when it is
in the cage.
2. Feeding: count how many
worms you put in your geckos dish.
Every day, count how many worms
are left. That way you can see how
much your gecko is eating.

3. Getting your gecko used to you:


talk to your gecko so it can get used
to your voice. Look at your gecko in
its hiding area and see if its looking
at you. Put your hand in the cage
where your gecko can see it. Dont
try to touch the gecko, just let it see
your hand.
4. Observing your gecko: if you see
your gecko come out, here are some
things you can look for:
Find your geckos ears.
Find its tongue.
How many toes does it have on
each foot?
Find its toenails
How many stripes does it have?
What color are they? Does it have
any spots? Learn where all the
stripes and spots are, because the
coloring will change as the gecko
grows up.
How does your gecko eat? How

After you have had your gecko for


at least a week, you may be able to
start to handle it. Keep talking to
your gecko. Keep putting your hand
in the cage for a few minutes at a
time. Eventually your gecko should
come out to investigate. You can
try putting a mealworm on the floor
in front of the gecko. It might eat
it. Put another mealworm a little
further away and maybe your gecko
will come out a little to eat it. Eventually it may begin to connect your
hand with food. At first your gecko
may be shy. If you move your hand
a little it may zip back into its hiding spot. Some geckos are friendlier
than others. As the gecko gets more
comfortable it should come over and
check out your hand. After awhile
it will climb on your hand and then
you can take it out. This may take
awhile; be patient.

Taking your gecko out


Different geckos behave in different
ways. Some like to burrow, some like
to climb, some like to sit and watch
things, and some like to explore.
Most young geckos (less than 6
months) move very quickly and can
get away from you before you know
it. Most adult geckos move more
slowly and are easier to control.
Young geckos
To play with a young gecko, make
sure to put it in a place where you
can keep it from getting away. The
best choice may be a large box or

bin. You could also play with it on


the couch, bed, or table, but young
geckos will walk right off the edge of
these things, so you have to be ready
to put your hand in front of it to stop
it.
Here are some activities you can try
with your gecko. They are probably
best to do when the gecko is at least
4-5 months old:
Let your gecko walk on you and
explore you. It could walk up your
arm, ride on your shoulder or even sit
on your head. Remember that young
geckos in particular will just walk or
jump off you, so always be ready to
trap it with your hands before it gets
away.
Crumple up a large towel or some
clothing and put it on the bed or
the couch. Let your gecko explore
the nooks and crannies that youve
made. Some geckos like to crawl all
over and find their own caves and
hiding places.
Put your gecko on the couch and let
it explore behind the couch pillows.
Geckos like to crawl behind the pillows and also to climb up the back of
the couch. Watch it carefully when it
does this.
Put your gecko on the stairs. Sit
with it and see what it does. This
works best if the stairs are carpeted.
Some geckos will actually climb up
or down the stairs. Some will peer
over the edge but wont go down.
Some will just crouch in the corner of
the stairs. See what yours does.
Make a gecko carnival for your
gecko. Get a large box or a bin and
put some gecko toys in there like
paper towel tubes, climbing branches, and pieces of carpet. Let your
gecko explore and see what it does.
Some people put their geckos in a
hamster ball, which is a clear plastic
ball that can come apart. The animal
is put in the ball and then the ball
is put on the floor. When thanimal
walks, it rolls the ball and can move
around safely that way. Try it out in

This is a Super Snow being held by its owner. Notice how the gecko is being
held, but not squeezed.
a box first to make sure your gecko likes
it. Never do this around stairs or any
other place where your gecko can fall.

Contribute to the
Leopard Gecko Magazine

See what else you can think of to do


with your gecko

The Leopard Gecko Magazine


is looking for your help! We
are looking for Leopard Gecko
related pictures and articles. If
you wish to contribute in anyway, please e-mail the Leopard
Gecko Magazine at,
info@mkgeckos.com

IMPORTANT DOS & DONTS


DO let your gecko get used to the
sound of your voice and your hand.
DO wait until your gecko has had time
to adjust to its new home before picking it up.
DO make sure there are no other animals around (like cats or dogs) when
you take your gecko out of the cage.
DONT pick up or hold your gecko by
the tail. The tail may come off. This will
not kill your gecko but wont feel good
for either you or the gecko.
DONT leave your gecko out of the cage
unsupervised or let it roam through the
house.
DONT take your gecko outside in cold
weather (it should be at least 70F).

Ask the Breeder


In the section, readers have submitted questions to breeders to receive
answers. The questions will all be
Leopard Gecko related. If you wish
to submit a question to the Leopard
Gecko Magazine, simply send an
e-mail to info@mkgeckos.com with
your question and your first name.
In the e-mail, please note that you
wish to have the question published.
Question: How come I can breed one
male to many females but I cannot
breed one female to many males?
Answer: Leopard Gecko females can
retain sperm. This is the reason why
they can lay many fertile clutches
after breeding. Although you can
breed a female to many different
males, there is no way to know
which males sperm the female is
using.
Question: My Leopard Gecko is not
eating, why is that?
There are many things that could
keep a Leopard Gecko from eating.
The first thing to check is cage temperatures. The hot side should have
a floor temperature between 88
and 92 degrees Fahrenheit. During
breeding season, male geckos may
stop eating because they can smell

females and become more interested in breeding than eating. There


is no way around this, just be sure to
monitor their weight and be patient
until they start eating again. The
same applies for females. If females
are ovulating, they may stop eating
until they breed. Continue to offer
food and they will eat when ready.
Some geckos get bored with their
diet. If you suspect this is happening
with you gecko, try different foods.
For example, if you are feeding crickets and the gecko goes on a hunger

strike, try feeding mealworms or


vice versa. If none of these solutions
takes care of the problem, a local
reptile vet should be contacted in
case the gecko has parasites. The
only way to know 100% about parasites is to have a fecal test done. If
the fecal test is positive, the vet will
prescribe the correct medication for
the Leopard Gecko.
If these steps are followed, your
Leopard Gecko should be eating in
no time!

Breeder Spotlight:

Marcia McGuiness

Bottom Left: This iis one of Marcia


McGuiness famous Murphy Patternless Carrot Tail Leopard Geckos
(McGuiness).
tropical and humid than the other
geckos I work with.

Matthew Kammerer from Reptile


Network was able to talk with Marcia
McGuiness from Golden Gate Geckos
and give the Leopard Gecko Magazine some insight on Marcias passion for Leopard Geckos and other
reptiles.
Marcia, how did you get started
with reptiles?
In 1994, I worked with a guy who
had several reptiles and I was curious about why people would keep
them as pets. He brought in one of
his leopard geckos to work, and I was
instantly smitten! I started doing research on them, but back then there
was not much available... nothing
online. I went to pet stores and asked
lots of questions, and picked up a
small pamphlet/book on geckos. I
got a 10-gal tank, a UTH, a cave and
water bowl to be ready for my new
pet.
There was an upcoming reptile show
at the Cow Palace in San Francisco,
and I went looking for a leopard
gecko. I wound up with two tiny
babies, which turned out to be both
female. I adored my geckos, Lucy and
Lizzy! They grew and thrived, and

were sooo tame because I handled


them all the time!
After about a year, I thought if would
be fun to see if I could breed them,
and searched for a nice male. I got
Larry, and put him in with the girls.
They beat him up! I had to house
him on his own for a few months,
and then finally they all got along
and I had eggs. Every egg failed
for the first half of the season, but
eventually I got the incubation and
medium right, and had my first
hatchlings. I sat on the floor and
cried like a baby, I was so thrilled.
The rest is history!
What species do you currently
breed?
I now work with 7 species of terrestrial geckos: Leopard Geckos (of
course!) for 13 years, Desert Bandeds
(Coleonyx variegatus) for about 5
years... which are just like miniature
Leopard Geckos in their care and
behavior. I also have 3 breeding
groups of Coleonyx elegans (Yucatan Banded Geckos) which are very
lovely creatures, but their environmental requirements are much more

I also have been breeding 4 Australian gecko species for the past
3 years. Who can resist those big
eyes? I really enjoy my Nephrurus
levis levis (Smooth Knobtails) which
were a little bit of a challenge at first
because their specific temperature
and humidity requirements are
very different than that of Leopard
Geckos. My Underwoodisuarus milii
(Thick-tailed Geckos) are a delight to
raise, and actually quite hearty and
easy to keep. They are very social and
prolific!
I am new to the Rough Knobtails
this year, and have a small colony
of Nephrurus wheeleri cinctus and
Nephrurus amyae, which I will keep
for at least another year before starting any breeding projects.
What is your daily care routine you
have for your geckos?
After I read and answer all of my
email and read the forums with my
morning coffee, I prepare all invoices,
shipping labels, and boxes for geckos
going out that day. I answer lots of
phone calls routinely throughout the
day, too!
I check each and every gecko to
make sure all are eating, have water,
and any that have shed have all their
residual skin removed. I check all
temperature controllers, and verify
that the heat in all enclosures is correct using my Raytek inferometer.
During the 10 months of breeding
season, twice a day I check for newly
laid eggs, document clutches laid,
and put them in the incubators. I
remove all the new hatchlings from
the incubators, document them, and

put them in their clean tubs twice a


day as well.
I have 12 large rack systems, and
clean 2-3 racks each day by wiping
out every tub, replacing paper towels, refilling mealworm bowls, adding
calcium powder, and giving fresh water. I keep my C. elegans, U.milii, and
C. variegatus in naturalistic vivariums,
and clean those out twice weekly. I
mist the Coleonyx elegans daily, and
the cool end of the enclosures for the
Aussie geckos every other day. All
my cricket eaters get fed 2-3 times
weekly, and all babies are fed daily.
I receive about 10,000 - 14,000 feeders each week, and they usually get
put up the same day they arrive. The
cricket bin gets cleaned out every
2-3 days, and mealworms weekly. All
feeders get fed fresh gut-load, produce, and water every 2-3 days.
I wash and disinfect all used tubs,
hides, and bowls weekly. I take photos and update my website monthly. I

vend at 4 shows per year.


How did you go about making
Golden Gate Geckos a business,
and what are some tips that you
would recommend to people who
are looking to make a career out of
their hobby?
Over the last 13 years, Golden Gate
Geckos just naturally evolved into
a business because I had more and
more geckos! Obtaining a business
license was the most difficult task,
as the City had to contact all of my
neighbors asking them if it was OK
that I raised reptiles. (Fortunately,
many of my neighbors have my
geckos as pets!) The State of California issues a Resale Permit, and my
taxes are paid quarterly.
Breeding reptiles as a career is
extremely difficult, especially since
there are so many people breeding geckos now that the market is
saturated. Most people are lucky to
have enough income generated from

gecko sales to cover the expenses of


maintaining their ever-growing collection! I am fortunate that I started
a long time ago when there were not
many people breeding geckos, and
I think just being around for awhile
keeps me grand-fathered in. I can
only think of a handful of people that
breed reptiles as their sole source of
income.
For folks wanting to build a career
out of their hobby, my advice is to set
realistic goals and stay focused on
your projects. Start small, and build
over time. Learn as much as possible
about the reptiles you work with,
and dont get too set in your ways. Be
open to all the new information and
methods that come up. Build a stellar
reputation with your customers by
providing the very best customer service you can, producing the very best
reptiles you can, Be prepared to work
6-12 hours a day, 7 days a week! Most
of all, do it for the love of the animals.
What are you most excited about
this upcoming breeding season?
I am most excited this season about
my Enigma leopard gecko projects,
and continuing to learn as much as I
can about the new Australian geckos
I am working with.
Be sure to check out Marcias amazing
geckos at goldengategeckos.com
Left: This is a Bold Stripe
Leopard Gecko produced by
Marcia McGuiness of Golden
Gate Geckos (McGuiness).

Article Credits
Kammerer, Matthew. The Reptile Network. <http://reptilenetwork.com>.
McGuiness, Marcia. Golden Gate Geckos.
<http://goldengategeckos.com>.

Upcoming Shows
May 3, 2008
Chicagoland All Animal & Reptile
Expo - 10AM to 3 PM; Dupago Co.
Fairgrounds, Wheaton, IL; (630)-2136050; $5 for 11 & Older;
www.allanimalexpo.com
All Maryland Reptile Show - 9AM
to 3 PM; 100 Lagaret Lane, Harve de
Grace, MD; (717)-432-5807;
www.mdreptilefarm.com/shows

May 10, 2008


Kalamazoo Reptile & Exotic Animal Show - Kalamazoo County Fairgrounds, 2900 Lake St., Kalamazoo,
MI 49048; (269)-779-9851; $4 Adults,
$2 Kids 6-10;
www.kalamazooreptileshow.com
Lake County Reptile Show - Grayslake, IL; (847)-872-2775, Ron Levin
www.lakecountyreptileshow.com
Northern VA Reptile Expo - 9AM to
3 PM; WM Co Fairgrounds, Manassas,
VA; (717)-432-5807
www.mdreptilefarm/shows
Rocky Mountain Reptile Expo 10AM to 5PM; (720)-685-9557, Lynn
Kubic; $5 Adults & $3 Kids;
www.rockymountainreptileexpo.
com

May 12, 2008


Northern VA Reptile Expo - 9AM to
3 PM; WM Co Fairgrounds, Manassas,
VA; (717)-432-5807
www.mdreptilefarm.com/shows

May 17, 2008


7th Austin Reptile & Amphibian
Expo - 10AM to 5PM; Wingate Inn &
Conference Center, Austin, TX; (512)83-SNAKE, Tim Cole; $7 for 6 & older,
$10 for both days;
www.austinreptileexpo.com
Repticon Orlando - Central Fl.
Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Dr.,
Orlando, FL;

This is a Mack Snow from Paul Allen photographed by Matthew Kammerer.


www.repticon.com/orlando/

May 18, 2008


7th Austin Reptile & Amphibian
Expo - 10AM to 5PM; Wingate Inn &
Conference Center, Austin, TX; (512)83-SNAKE, Tim Cole; $7 for 6 & older,
$10 for both days;
www.austinreptileexpo.com
Chicagoland All Animal & Reptile
Expo - 10AM to 3 PM; Dupago Co.
Fairgrounds, Wheaton, IL; (630)-2136050; $5 for 11 & Older;
www.allanimalexpo.com
All Cleveland Reptile Sale & Swap
- 10AM to 4 PM; U.A.W. Hall Local
1250, 17250 Hummel Road, Brookpark, OH 44142; (614)-492-8415; $4
Admission
Repticon Orlando - Central Fl.
Fairgrounds, 4603 W. Colonial Dr.,
Orlando, FL; www.repticon.com/
orlando/

May 24, 2008


Lansing Reptile & Exotic Animal
Expo- www.geocities.com/rincksreptiles

May 31, 2008


Chicagoland All Animal & Reptile
Expo - 10AM to 3PM; Dupago Co.
Fairgrounds, Wheaton, IL; (630)-2136050; $5 for 11 & Older;
www.allanimalexpo.com

June 7, 2008
All Maryland Reptile Show - 9AM
to 3PM; 100 Lagaret Lane, Harve de
Grace, MD; (717)-432-5807;
www.mdreptilefarm.com/shows
Repticon Ft. Myers - 10AM to 4PM;
Araba Shrine, 2010 Hanson St.,
Fort Myers, FL 33901; $8 Adults,
Children(5-12) $5, Children(4&under)
free;
www.repticon.com
Texas Reptile Expo- 10AM to 5PM;
8101 Pat Booker @ HWY 1604, San
Antonio, TX;
www.texasreptiles.com

June 8, 2008
Repticon Ft. Myers - 10AM to 4PM;
Araba Shrine, 2010 Hanson St.,
Fort Myers, FL 33901; $8 Adults,
Children(5-12) $5, Children(4&under)

Classifieds, Shows, and Ads


Do you have a show you would
like listed? Looking to gain more
hits on your website? Trying to
sell a Leopard Gecko? Look no
further than the opprotunity to be
seen in Leopard Gecko Magazine.
Leopard Gecko Magazine is selling Advertisement spots throughout the magazine. For more information, contact Leopard Gecko
Magazine at info@mkgeckos.com.
This is a juvenile Tangerine Leopard Gecko.
(Show Cont.)
www.allanimalexpo.com
free;
www.repticon.com

June 21, 2008

Texas Reptile Expo- 10AM to 5PM;


8101 Pat Booker @ HWY 1604, San
Antonio, TX;
www.texasreptiles.com

South Carolina Reptile & Exotic


Animal Show - 10AM to 4PM; Jamil
Temple, 206 Jamil Rd, Columbia, SC
29210; $8 Adults, Children(5-12) $5,
Children(4&under) free;
www.repticon.com

June 14, 2008

June 22, 2008

Lake County Reptile Show - Grayslake, IL; (847)-872-2775, Ron Levin


www.lakecountyreptileshow.com

All Cleveland Reptile Sale & Swap


- 10AM to 4 PM; U.A.W. Hall Local
1250, 17250 Hummel Road, Brookpark, OH 44142; (614)-492-8415; $4
Admission

June 15, 2008


Chicagoland All Animal & Reptile
Expo - 10AM to 3 PM; Dupago Co.
Fairgrounds, Wheaton, IL; (630)-2136050; $5 for 11 & Older;

South Carolina Reptile & Exotic


Animal Show - 10AM to 4PM; Jamil
Temple, 206 Jamil Rd, Columbia, SC
29210; $8 Adults, Children(5-12) $5,
Children(4&under) free;

To run ads in the classified, simply e-mail the Leopard Gecko


Magazine at info@mkgeckos.com.
Classified ad space is $2.50 per 25
words.
www.repticon.com
June 28, 2008
Reptile Super Show - 10AM to 6PM;
San Diego Concourse, 202 C St (@3rd
& B), San Diego, CA 92101; $7 Adults
& $5 Kids;
www.reptilesupershow.com
June 29, 2008
Reptile Super Show - 11AM to 5PM;
San Diego Concourse, 202 C St (@3rd
& B), San Diego, CA 92101; $7 Adults
& $5 Kids;
www.reptilesupershow.com

Gecko Games
Word Search

Guess the Morph

Rekowski

Word Search Word Bank


APTOR

Blizzard

Creamsicle

Ember

Giant

Hypo

RAPTOR

Snowglow

Tangelo

Wild Type

Rekowski

Johnson

Guess the Morph Photo Credits


Holler, Jim. Reptilian Gems. Reptilian Gems. <http://reptiliangems.com>.
Johnson, Kyle. Leopard Gecko Wiki. <www.leopardgeckowiki.com>.
Rekowski, Mike. Reptiles by Rekowski. < http://www.reptilebyrekowski.com>.

Holler

Morph Spotlight

Blue Tail History

The Blue Tail morph was developed


by Helena Nova from the Czech
Republic in 2005 when she paired
a male normal het Tremper Albino
with a hypomelanistic female. The
pairing brought Helena a female Blue
Tail named Mango. In 2006, Helena
crossed Mango with a Tremper Albino male. From the pairing, two eggs
were produced; one was a Tremper
Albino and the other was a Normal.
This proved Mango to be heterozygous for Tremper Albino. In 2007, two
Blue Tails were produced by original
pairing that created Mango. One of
the hatchlings was a male and will be
bred in 2008 to Mango, the original
female Blue Tail.

Blue Tails

Below: Two Blue Tail Hatchlings (Nova).

Blue Tail Genetics

It is currently unknown how the Blue


Tails work genetically. So far, all three
Blue Tails have come from the original pairing, male normal het Tremper
Albino and a hypomelanistic female.
Helena from Macularius web will
have a breeding group this year to
help learn more about this amazing
morph.
This is Mango, the original Blue Tail as a juvenile (Nova).

Gecko Game Answer Keys

Word Search Answers

Guess the Morph Answers


1) Eclipse Enigma

2) Tangelo

3) Tremper Hybino

4) Tremper Albino Gem Snow

Blue Tail Credits


Nova, Helena. Macularius Web. <http://
macularius.wz.cz/english/mango_ en.htm>.

Magazine Credits

Design: Kyle Johnson, Leopard Gecko Wiki

Cover: Kyle Johnson, Leopard Gecko Wiki

Editor: Aliza Arzt

The Leopard Gecko Wiki


www.LeopardGeckoWiki.com

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