Situational Leadership II

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Teaching Others

Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

Purpose of Situational Leadership® II
D I R E C T I O N S

1. Explain the Purpose of Situational Leadership II (page 2).

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2. Share The Three Skills of a Situational Leader (page 3). 3. Explain Diagnosing Development Level (page 3) and share The Five Key Diagnosis Questions (page 4). 4. Explain Choosing the Appropriate Leadership Style (page 5). 5. Show how to match development level and leadership style, using The Situational Leadership II Model, and explain oversupervision and undersupervision (page 6).
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Situational Leadership II (SLII ) is a model for developing individuals, over time, so they can reach their highest level of performance on a specific goal or task. It is a process for helping individuals become self-motivated and self-directed. SLII is based on the relationship between an individual’s development level (competence and commitment) on a specific goal or task and the leadership style (direction and support) the leader provides. Effective leadership lies in matching the appropriate leadership style to the individual’s development level.
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The purposes of Situational Leadership II are to
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1. Open up communication—increase the frequency and quality of conversations about performance and development 2. Help others develop competence and commitment 3. Teach others how to provide their own direction and support 4. Value and honor differences

6. Teach Partnering for Performance (pages 7 and 8).

Ken Blanchard first developed Situational Leadership with Paul Hersey in the late 1960s. In 1985, Blanchard and the Founding Associates of The Ken Blanchard Companies —Marjorie Blanchard, Don Carew, Eunice Parisi-Carew, Fred Finch, Laurence Hawkins, Drea Zigarmi, and Patricia Zigarmi—created a new generation of the theory called Situational Leadership II. The leadership model used in this product is based on the Founding Associates’ second generation thinking and research, and is used with their permission.
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© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

The Three Skills of a Situational Leader
Diagnosis—Assessing an individual’s need (development level) for direction and support 1 Flexibility—Using a variety of leadership styles comfortably 2 Partnering for Performance—Reaching agreements on what the leader and the individual need 3 from each other as they work together

Diagnosing Development Level
Development level is a combination of two factors: Competence—the individual’s demonstrated task-specific and transferable knowledge and skills on a goal or task; and Commitment—the individual’s motivation and confidence on a goal or task. Development level is goal or task specific. It is not an overall rating of an individual’s skills or attitude. There are four development levels.

D4
Self-Reliant Achiever High Competence High Commitment

D3
Capable, but Cautious, Performer Moderate to High Competence Variable Commitment

D2
Disillusioned Learner Low to Some Competence Low Commitment

D1
Enthusiastic Beginner Low Competence High Commitment

Development Level Descriptors
• Justifiably confident • Consistently competent • Inspired/inspires others • Expert • Autonomous • Self-assured • Accomplished • Self-reliant/self-directed • Self-critical • Cautious • Doubtful • Capable • Contributing • Insecure • Tentative/unsure • Bored/apathetic • Overwhelmed • Confused • Demotivated • Demoralized • Frustrated • Disillusioned • Discouraged • Flashes of competence • Hopeful • Inexperienced • Curious • New/unskilled • Optimistic • Excited • Eager • Enthusiastic

© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

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Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

Diagnosing Development Level

D4
Self-Reliant Achiever High Competence High Commitment

D3
Capable, but Cautious, Performer Moderate to High Competence Variable Commitment

D2
Disillusioned Learner Low to Some Competence Low Commitment

D1
Enthusiastic Beginner Low Competence High Commitment

D4 Self-Reliant Achiever • Recognized by others as an expert • Consistently competent; justifiably confident • Trusts own ability to work independently; self-assured • Inspired; inspires others • Proactive; may be asked to do too much

D3 Capable, but Cautious, Performer • Is generally self-directed but needs opportunities to test ideas with others • Sometimes hesitant, unsure, tentative • Not always confident; self-critical; may need help in looking at skills objectively • May be bored with goal or task • Makes productive contributions

D2 Disillusioned Learner • Has some knowledge and skills; not competent yet

D1 Enthusiastic Beginner • New to the goal or task; inexperienced Eager to learn; willing to take direction Enthusiastic, excited, optimistic Don’t know what they don’t know, so they may do the wrong thing

• • Frustrated; may be ready to quit • • Discouraged, overwhelmed, confused • • Developing and learning; needs reassurance that mistakes are part of the learning process • Unreliable, inconsistent

• Confidence based on hopes and transferable skills, not reality

The Five Key Diagnosis Questions 1. What is the specific goal or task? 2. How strong or good are the individual’s demonstrated task knowledge and skills on the goal or task? 3. How strong or good are the individual’s transferable skills? 4. How motivated, interested, or enthusiastic is the individual? 5. How confident or self-assured is the individual?
K E Y L E A R N I N G

Development level is goal or task specific!

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© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

Choosing the Appropriate Leadership Style
Leadership style is a pattern of behaviors leaders use, over time, as perceived by others. There are two basic leadership style behaviors: Directive Behavior—telling and showing people what to do, when to do it, how to do it, and providing frequent feedback on results; and Supportive Behavior—listening, facilitating self-reliant problem solving, encouraging, praising, and involving others in decision making. There are four leadership styles consisting of four different combinations of Directive and Supportive Behaviors.

Style 1—Directing—High Directive Behavior and Low Supportive Behavior The leader provides specific direction about goals, shows and tells how, and closely tracks the individual’s performance in order to provide frequent feedback on results. Style 2—Coaching—High Directive Behavior and High Supportive Behavior The leader explains why, solicits suggestions, praises behaviors that are approximately right, and continues to direct goal or task accomplishment. Style 3—Supporting—Low Directive Behavior and High Supportive Behavior The leader and the individual make decisions together. The role of the leader is to facilitate, listen, draw out, encourage, and support. Style 4—Delegating—Low Directive Behavior and Low Supportive Behavior The leader empowers the individual to act independently with appropriate resources to get the job done.

Leadership Style Descriptors
• Allowing/trusting • Confirming • Empowering • Affirming • Acknowledging • Challenging • Asking/listening • Reassuring • Facilitating self-reliant problem solving • Collaborating • Encouraging feedback • Appreciating • Exploring/asking • Explaining/ clarifying • Redirecting • Sharing feedback • Encouraging • Praising • Defining • Planning/prioritizing • Orienting • Teaching/showing and telling how • Checking/monitoring • Giving feedback

© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

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Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

The Situational Leadership® II Model
High
Low Directive and High Supportive Behavior High Directive and High Supportive Behavior

P OR TI

N

G

C

O

AC

SUPPORTIVE BEHAVIOR

HIN

SUP

G

-----------------------------------

TIN G

----------------------------E

L DE

N

G

Low Directive and Low Supportive Behavior

High Directive and Low Supportive Behavior

-----------------------------

S4

-----------------------------------

S3

S2 S1
TI

DIR

EC

GA

Low

DIRECTIVE BEHAVIOR

High

D4
High Competence High Commitment DEVELOPED

D3
Moderate to High Competence Variable Commitment

D2
Low to Some Competence Low Commitment

D1
Low Competence High Commitment DEVELOPING

Development Level of the Individual

The goal is a MATCH S1 ➔ D1 S2 ➔ D2 S3 ➔ D3 S4 ➔ D4 Over time, with a match, individuals learn to provide their own direction and support.

Two types of MISMATCH Oversupervision S1/S2 with D3/D4 Undersupervision S3/S4 with D1/D2

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© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

Partnering for Performance
Prework • Teach the SLII Model
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Different strokes for different folks. Different strokes for the same folks, depending on the task. Don’t work harder—work smarter.

• Identify overall business outcomes The Steps in Partnering for Performance Get 1 agreement on SMART goals. • Are written goals Specific and measurable, Motivating, Attainable and aligned, Relevant, and Trackable? What does a good job look like? Get agreement on diagnosis 2 Level (D1, D2, D3, or D4).of Development • What is the person’s demonstrated competence and commitment on each SMART goal and task? • Identify Performance Trend(s) Get agreement on 3 Leadership Stylecurrent and future (S1, S2, S3, or S4). Get agreement 4 behaviors foron appropriate leadership each goal. Get agreement 5 stay in touch.on how and how often you will

All good performance starts with clear goals.

Development level is goal or task specific.

There is no best leadership style; it depends on the situation.

Situational Leadership® II is not something you do to people; it’s something you do with people. Good performance is a journey, not a destination.

© 2000 The Ken Blanchard Companies. All rights reserved. Do not duplicate • Item # 13538 • V051602

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Situational Leadership II Teaching Others
®

Partnering for Performance

Diagnose Development Level Chart Use this chart to identify an individual’s development level on one or more actual goals or tasks.
Diagnose Development Level
COMPETENCE
TASK KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS TRANSFERABLE SKILLS

COMMITMENT
MOTIVATION CONFIDENCE

LEVEL

D4
H H I G LO W HIG HIG HIG H H H
LOW

D4/3 D3/4 D3 D3/2 D3/2 D2/3 D2 D1/2 D1/2 D2/1 D2 D1 D1/2 D2/1 D2

H IG H LOW
H IG H LOW

LO W

H IG H

LO W

HI GH

LO W
LO W

LOW

HIG H

HIG H
LOW

HIG H
HIGH
LOW

LOW
HIGH
LOW
HIGH

LOW

H IG H
LOW

Example 1 On a specific goal or task an individual has
TASK KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS TRANSFERABLE SKILLS MOTIVATION CONFIDENCE

Example 2 On a specific goal or task an individual has
TASK KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS TRANSFERABLE SKILLS MOTIVATION CONFIDENCE

—High

—Low

—Low

—Low

—High —Low

—High —High

This individual’s development level is D3/2 and your leadership style should be S3/2.

This individual’s development level is D1 and your leadership style should be S1.

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