America Responds

THE WAR ON TERRORISM IS NO LONGER CONFINED TO THE MILITARY AND FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT. SEPTEMBER 11TH CRUELLY REVEALED JUST HOW DOMESTICATED TERRORISM HAS BECOME. WHILE THE ATTACKS ON AMERICA CULMINATED IN WASHINGTON AND NEW YORK CITY, THEY WERE PREMEDITATED IN PLACES LIKE VENICE, FLORIDA; EAGAN, MINNESOTA; SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA AND WAYNE, NEW JERSEY. THIS IS THE REALM OF LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT – AND WITH HUNDREDS OF SUSPECTED TERRORISTS STILL LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES – THE THIN BLUE LINE NOW FINDS ITSELF ON COUNTER-TERRORISM’S FRONTLINE. THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF VETERAN POLICE OFFICERS AND THE POLICE PROTECTIVE FUND ARE COMMITTED TO RECOGNIZING AND EXPANDING THE AUTHORITY OF LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT – NOT ONLY AS FIRST RESPONDERS - BUT AS EQUALS IN THE MONUMENTAL TASK OF PREVENTING FURTHER ATTACKS. UNIQUELY QUALIFIED TO GATHER INTELLIGENCE AND INVESTIGATE THESE NEW HOME BASED TERRORISTS, THE ROLE OF THE LOCAL POLICE IN THE WAR ON TERRORISM IS CRITICAL. AFTER ALL, WHAT IS “HOMELAND DEFENSE” IF NOT THE LOCAL POLICE? PHIL LECONTE EXECUTIVE OFFICER

SINCE SEPT. 11TH, WE HAVE BEEN WORKING WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT EXPERTS AND FEMA TO HELP THE NATION’S LAW ENFORCERS FACE DOMESTIC TERRORISM. THE FOLLOWING PAGES PROVIDE INFORMATION ABOUT THESE ONGOING EFFORTS.

America Responds
LAW ENFORCEMENT’S MOMENT TO ACT

BY SR. SGT SAM COX (RET), SENIOR ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER
As police officers we often deal with society’s darkest and most disturbing secrets. We know that it is our duty to handle these situations with strength and dignity so that others will not have to. Even those of us most hardened by our years on the streets, however, could not escape the heartbreak and bewilderment that followed the tragic events of September 11th. When the shock of the attacks passed, many Americans realized that they are not untouchable, that there are people who will hurt indiscriminately and without cause. This change in attitude has led to a dramatic increase in law enforcement related legislation being discussed and acted upon at the Capitol. For police officers, this change in attitude means an opportunity to honor the lives of those who died by making this country a safer place to live. Now that we have finally been given the floor and people are taking the time to listen, it’s important that we push for essential law enforcement programs and avoid a situation where scared people spend our nation’s resources on every harebrained safety scheme that is introduced in Congress. We level headed lawenforcers need to ban together and tell this country’s leaders where our dollars can best be spent to ensure the safety of our citizens and our way of life.

Sam Cox at the center of Austin, Texas’ state-of-the-art technology at the TX Dept. of Transportation.

I am sure that we could, if given the opportunity, produce a massive list of changes that need to be made if we wish to make our country a safer place to live. But if we choose to fight on too many fronts, we’ll get nothing done. If we’re going to fight, let’s fight for a few changes that everyone can get behind- cops, citizens and politicians alike. Criminal Analysis Our first order of business should be to push for more enabling legislation. That is, legislation that lets us do our jobs. In particular, I’m talking about criminal analysis. In the past, our opponents (who definitely know how to play the political game) spun the term criminal analysis, calling it racial profiling or giving it some other narrow definition in an attempt to turn public favor against it. They ignored the fact that many issues other than race are used when determining who is most likely to commit a crime. By focusing on the race issue, they were able to convince politicians and the public that criminal analysis is bad. That’s just foolishness and for once we may have a chance to show that not only does criminal analysis work, it’s legal and people want it. The way I see it, criminal analysis is no more than an extension of an officers god given senses. When computer databases calculate characteristics most closely associated with offenders, these calculations are no more than an extension of an officer’s brain. Law Enforcement Technology It is difficult to justify the cost of embracing every new technology that is presented as a support for law enforcers. But there is absolutely no excuse for our failure to completely embrace at least a few of the new tools that are out there. The two that seem to be the most important and the most effective are DNA fingerprinting and surveillance cameras equipped with face recognition software. DNA fingerprinting, while expensive initially, will pay for itself a thousand times over once adopted. When we can eliminate the legal and

THERE IS NOTHING IN OUR CONSTITUTION THAT SAYS THAT WE HAVE A RIGHT TO BE ANONYMOUS

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scientific doubt still presented by traditional fingerprints, everyone will save time, effort and money. Face identification software will help us to catch those criminals who know how to beat the system. These careful fugitives avoid those situations that would allow us to get close to them. But they cannot, unless they hide away forever, avoid the tireless eye of the surveillance camera. Even the most elusive of criminals will have to come out somewhere and if we are watching, we’ll get’ em. Today’s law enforcement technology is essential and refusal to adopt it is a sure way to encourage aggressors. The criminals are using advanced technology and we better do the same if we want to keep up. National I.D. Card
LAW ENFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY TODAY IS ESSENTIAL AND REFUSAL TO ADOPT IT IS A SURE WAY TO E N C O U R A G E AGGRESSORS

Time and time again potential criminals have been apprehended because they made the mistake of ignoring traffic laws. It isn’t hard to understand, people who are willing to break the big rules hardly notice the little ones. Stop signs, speed limits, no right on red – it is here that we have the greatest chance of stopping potential criminals because it is here that they are most likely to make a mistake. A national I.D. card is the first step towards catching those criminals who present Today’s law enforcement technology is themselves to officer scrutiny essential and refusal to adopt it is a sure through traffic mistakes. Behind that card we need a way to encourage aggressors. The criminals universal system through are using advanced technology and we which law enforcers can share information. better do the same if we want to keep up. Imagine if we were all connected, law enforcers from all over the country - municipal, county, federal –no arguments over jurisdiction, just cops working together. Imagine that you could touch a button and see that a person was driving with a suspended license from a state 1500 miles away or that a federal warrant had been issued on this person but never served. When making a traffic stop with that type of information at our disposal, we might be able to catch that little quirk that says, ‘Hey, something isn’t right here, this guy doesn’t fit.” With that type of information, we might be able to hold onto those criminals who would have otherwise driven away with a speeding ticket and a laugh at our expense. Strict Enforcement of Immigration Law Depending on where you live, this issue may not seem like an everyday concern, but I’ll tell you that for a large percentage of officers, it is. Because we have been so relaxed about enforcing our visas and protecting our borders, there is an undue financial strain on the system and that strain is definitely affecting our ability to do a good job. We can’t afford to have open borders. When we do, all public services suffer, especially law enforcement. Until immigrants have signed in at the border and are prepared to pay the same taxes that you do, they don’t deserve the same privileges that you enjoy.

The Heritage Foundation has published an excellent action plan entitled “Defending the American Homeland”. To receive a copy, visit www.Heritage.org.

The Need to Act I’ve said in the past that the best session of Congress is one when they leave law enforcement alone. I now think that the tables have turned and its time to tinker with the system a bit. Believe me, I share this nation’s concern for privacy. And immigration is not bad, it just needs to be better controlled so that we can anticipate our growth and prepare accordingly. I think that the best government is the least government. But there are times when you have to have rules and there are scarier times when you have to enhance what you’ve already got.

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America Responds

NAVPO JOINS FEMA TO PROMOTE IMPORTANT NEW COURSE ON TERRORISM
Working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Police Protective Fund & NAVPO have launched a yearlong campaign to promote and encourage law enforcement officers to enroll in FEMA’s “EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO TERRORISM”. A Top Priority Because of the importance of this information, NAVPO & PPF are making access and knowledge of this course a top priority -- promoting the course through publications, news releases, a promotional poster and a high-profile link from our website (PoliceUSA.com). “I want to congratulate NAVPO in being the first major law enforcement group to recognize this course and highlight it to the national police community,” stated FEMA Director, Joe Allbaugh. “I hope others will follow NAVPOs lead in educating and preparing first responders on terrorism.”

“I want to congratulate NAVPO in being the first major law enforcement group to recognize this course and highlight it to the national police community.” Director Joe Allbaugh, FEMA

Director Allbaugh

Vital Source of Information The course is a vital source of information for all first responders and includes a wealth of critical information regarding terrorism and its impact on the safety of law enforcement officers. A self-study course, it is designed to provide a general introduction to first responder awareness at the scene of a potential terrorist incident. “What’s unique about this course” says Allbaugh, “is a fundamental awareness of terrorism: What it is, how to recognize it and how to prepare for it. With that awareness, first responders are safer and better prepared.”

To learn more, visit PoliceUSA.com

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Training is Invaluable “I have always felt that training officers is the most important function of any police department,” adds NAVPO Special Consultant Jim Lyde. “Training is invaluable for officers both young and old. It’s vital to help officers reach that goal of, “Protect and Serve.” A Gold Mine of Information “For the police officer concerned about the dangers that terrorism represents to his safety -’Emergency Response to Terrorism’ is a gold mine of information,” says Lyde. “This course will help officers prepare for the possibility of being a first responder to incidents of terrorism. As we all know, being an officer means long stretches of boredom, punctuated by infrequent explosions of extreme stress. This course will help officers prepare for the really big crisis, when lack of preparation means that people might die.“ “Courses like this help officers to visualize the scenarios they may face before they face them. By Jim Lyde planning their responses to a variety of situations before they arise, officers will “For the police officer concerned about the be better prepared to deal with the situations in which all order breaks dangers that terrorism represents to his down,” explains Lyde. Every Officer’s Responsibility “We are not miracle workers and we cannot solve every problem. But it is Jim Lyde, NAVPO Special Consultant every officer’s responsibility to prepare as best they can for the dangers that lay ahead. I’m confident that FEMA’s ’Emergency Response to Terrorism’ will help them to do just that. Law enforcers who wish to take the course or simply review the material, can do so online at www.FEMA.gov or can link directly to the site at www.PoliceUSA.com Certificate of Completion There is a final examination, located at the end of the course materials that will test the knowledge gained from the course. To receive an NFA Certificate of Completion, the completed examination form is mailed to the address provided on the form. Law enforcers must score 70 percent or higher in order to receive the certificate. Upon successful completion, certificates will be mailed within six to eight weeks.

safety -- ‘Emergency Response to Terrorism’ is a gold mine of information.”

The internet, postcards & posters have been used to promote the course. For more information about course certification, visit www.PoliceUSA.com

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America Responds

W

e, as a nation, have suffered a collective sorrow. Whether we were watching it on television from two thousand miles away, or we were in Manhattan when the first plane struck the World Trade Center, we all had a stake in the attacks of 9-11. We all experienced grief and bewilderment, but as time passed it is now possible to make it through a day without constantly thinking about the attacks.

Officer Suzanne D’Ambrose

Who Will Stand Guard Tomorrow? by Officer Suzanne D’Ambrose
Senior Advisory Board Member

However, there are some who have not been able to recover, many of whom are police officers, firefighters and civilians who were at or near ground zero during and after the attacks. For these men and women, the healing process is complicated by severe cases of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Counselors are receiving calls daily from the public safety workers unable to shake the gruesome images waiting for them every time they close their eyes. This inability to let go of those images and feelings is forcing many officers to leave their posts because stress and fatigue are interfering with their jobs. And they aren’t the only ones leaving. There are other officers, veterans with twenty-five years of duty served, who are leaving the force as well. These qualified veterans may have stayed on for The stress & fatigue linger. another five or ten years, but after the attacks, many have decided that this a good time to move along and try something different. Whatever their reasons, we all start to worry when good cops leave. Someone asked me the other day if I thought it was best for all involved if those who are suffering too much to do a good job would just go ahead and retire. While I’m not a counselor, I do know that we need to make certain all options have been exhausted before an officer walks out the door. Specifically, we need more counselors out there, both in the police departments and in the academies. Above all, we must offer both the opportunity and the strength to talk out their problems. Once they’ve been given the opportunity to grieve, without the fear that they will be seen as weak or unfit, then they will be in a better position to know if they can still be a benefit to law enforcement. Despite this crisis in the ranks, the events of September 11th have had one surprising effect. Here in New Jersey and across the country, there are scores of new recruits showing up to test for one or two patrol positions. Even more reassuring to me, is the excitement of young people I meet who are now anxious to get out there and do their part. While the scars of 9/11 are still healing, it is reassuring to know that there is a new generation of young citizens ready to take up the colors and fight.

The images remain.

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T

he terrorist attacks of September 11 affected all aspects of U.S. law enforcement, including my work at the Florida Dept. of Law Enforcement.

Initial Changes Just after the attacks, we were all forced to Dennis Haley & the Florida Keys’ develop alternative vulnerable coastline. methods for investigating the relatively unfamiliar crime of terrorism.

• All casework not directly linked to the attacks was suspended and all personnel was directed to investigate any activity that may have been tied to the terrorists. • FDLE established the Office of Special Investigations to funnel all information concerning the terrorists and disseminate it to law enforcement agencies all over the state.
Changes I Could Do Without Some of the other changes that continue to affect us are not so easy to embrace: • The duty agent must wear rubber gloves and a mask when retrieving the mail. Mail without a return address or suspicious boxes are opened outside the office. • As drug smugglers find themselves unable to cross the tighter Mexico/Texas border, their usual routes, many of them are rerouting through Southern Florida. Changes Here to Stay While things are slowly returning to normal, there are a few changes that are most likely here to stay: • In each region select agents are now assigned to do nothing but review and gather intelligence on terrorists, while Special Task forces made up of U.S. Customs, FDLE, FBI, border patrol, and local police have been established to respond to any threat or suspicious activity. Changes Long Over Due Before 9-11 there was a tendency to hide sensitive information until the last minute. For instance, it was only after the World Trade Center attacks that officials discovered that four of the September 11th hijackers had been stopped for speeding at various times. If police officers had known that the FBI was looking for the men, law enforcement officials would have had a better chance at tailing them — and perhaps uncovering the terror plot. Information is now flowing freely between the federal and local agencies. Under a directive issued by Attorney General John Ashcroft, the FBI has begun posting thousands of names of individuals identified by intelligence agencies as “suspected terrorists” but not charged with any U.S. crime on the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), a powerful FBI-sponsored law enforcement database. Accessible to 650,000 federal state and local law enforcement officers, the NCIC fields as many as 3.3

Changes - Post 9/11 by Special Agent Dennis Haley
Senior Advisory Board Member

The new face of law enforcement.

million queries a day, the vast majority during routine traffic stops. Finally, local officers have the right to know if they’re about to give a traffic ticket to someone who may have been trained to kill. Under the new system terrorist suspects cannot be detained if there is no criminal warrant filed against them, but the NCIC will give the inquiring officer specific instructions about what to do — for instance, call the local FBI office and stall for time until agents can get to the scene and begin tailing their quarry. This is a powerful new tool for law enforcers and a welcome change.

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