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SECTION

TITLE

Introduction

Structures

Equipment Centers

Flight Deck

Airplane Information Management System

Communications

Navigation

Autopilot Flight Director System

Electrical Power

10

Fuel

11

Power Plant

12

Auxiliary Power Unit

13

Hydraulics

14

Landing Gear

15

Flight Controls

16

Environmental Systems

17

Ice and Rain Protection

18

Fire Protection

19

Cabin Systems

20

Lights

21

Cargo

Table of Contents

Introduction
About This Book

Other features include:

Principal Characteristics

This book supplies an introduction to


the 777 airplane systems. This book
uses a basic airplane configuration,
but it has data on some usual
options. The description of the
systems includes:

Payload Capabilities

Ground Operations

Turning Radius

Component location
Component installation
System operation.

To get more system data, refer to


other Boeing publications such as
the Airplane Flight Manual,
Operations Manual, Airplane
Maintenance Manual, and Detail
Specification. If the data in this book
does not agree with the data in these
publications, use the publications.

Fly-by-wire technology
ARINC 629 data buses
Ultrasonic fuel quantity
measurement
Six-wheel landing gear trucks
with steering
An air data inertial reference
system (ADIRS)
A cabin services system
An electrical load management
system (ELMS)
Composite structures.

This book shows the design of the


airplane as of the date of printing. It is
for training purposes only.
Features
The 777 design is for ETOPS
(extended range operation with twoengine airplanes).
The 777 has an advanced flight
compartment for two crew operation.
It has digital avionics and flat panel
liquid crystal displays.
An airplane information management
system (AIMS) supplies these
functions:

Primary display functions


Flight management computing
functions
Data conversion gateway
functions
Central maintenance functions
Communications management
Airplane condition monitoring
Flight data acquisition
Thrust management functions.

June 2003

1-1

777 - 200

777 - 200ER

777 - 300

537,000 (243,600)
535,000 (242,700)
445,000 (201,900)
420,000 (190,500)

634,500 (287,800)
632,500 (286,900)
460,000 (208,700)
430,000 (195,000)

662,000 (300,300)
660,000 (299,400)
524,000 (237,700)
495,000 (224,500)

Pratt & Whitney

74,600 - 77,200

84,600 - 90,600

98,000

General Electric

76,400 - 90,000

90,000 - 94,000

N/A

Rolls Royce

73,400 - 76,900

84,900 - 90,000

95,000

31,000 (117,300)

45,220 (171,200)

45,220 (171,200)

305
375
440

305
375
440

368
451
550

5,656 (160)

5,656 (160)

7,552 (214)

Maximum Weight, Lb (Kg)


Taxi
Takeoff
Landing
Zero Fuel
Engines Thrust, Lb

Fuel Capacity
U.S. Gal (L)
Seating
Three Class
Two Class
All Economy (10 Abreast)
Lower Hold Volume
Cubic Feet (Cubic Meters)
Maximum Operating
Speed Knots CAS (Mach)

330 (0.87)

Principle Characteristics
Principal Characteristics

Payload Capabilities

Ground Operations

The 777 is a twin-engine airplane. It


is for medium and long range flights.
The 777 size is between a 767-300
and a 747-400.

Seat combinations include:

Doors, service connections, and


access panels give easy access. It is
possible to do servicing of these
locations at the same time. This
decreases turnaround times.

Boeing has these three 777


airplanes:

The 777 gives better passenger


comfort and appeal with a new
entertainment system and flexible
cabin configuration.

Six-abreast first class


Seven or eight-abreast business
class
Nine or ten-abreast economy
class.

Two new versions of the 777 will go


into service. These are:

The central maintenance computing


function (CMCF) of the airplane
information management system
(AIMS) collects fault data and
supplies a central location for access
to maintenance data and system
test. This decreases turnaround
times.

A powered cargo system decreases


load and unload times.

777-200 (4000 to 5000 miles)


777-200ER (6000 to 7000 miles)
777-300 (777-200ER stretched).

777-300ER (6000 to 7000 miles)


777-200LR (10,000 miles).

Data on these new models is not in


this document.

1-2

June 2003

Introduction

London
Warsaw

632,500 lb MTOW
305 Tri-class Passengers
(9 Abreast Economy)
328 Tri-class Passengers
(10 Abreast Economy)

Tripoli
Cairo
Nairobi

Miami
Chicago

Los Angeles
Anchorage

Teheran
Bahrain

Honolulu

Bombay

535,000 lb MTOW
375 Dual-class Passengers
(9 Abreast Economy)

Mexico City

Seattle

Moscow

Tokyo

Bangkok
Singapore
Mauritius

400 Dual-class Passengers


(10 Abreast Economy)
Perth

Sydney

Typical Mission Rules


Standard Day
Cruise Mach = 0.83
85% Annual Winds
Airways And Traffic
Allowances Included

Delhi

Auckland

Bombay

Beijing
Seoul
Moscow

Bahrain
Teheran
Cairo
Warsaw

632,500 lb MTOW
305 Tri-class Passengers
(9 Abreast Economy)
328 Tri-class Passengers
(10 Abreast Economy)

London

Anchorage
Honolulu

Nairobi

Lagos
Chicago
New York

Johannesburg

Caracas

535,000 lb MTOW
375 Dual-class Passengers
(9 Abreast Economy)

Bogota
Lima

400 Dual-class Passengers


(10 Abreast Economy)
Typical Mission Rules
Standard Day
Cruise Mach = 0.83
85% Annual Winds
Airways And Traffic
Allowances Included

Range Capability
June 2003

1-3

199 ft 11 in (60.9 m)
70 ft 7.5 in
(21.5 m)

36 ft
(11 m)

2 ft 11 in (0.9 m)

777

61 ft 8 in (18.8 m)

7 ft 9 in (2.4 m)

84 ft 11 in (25.9 m)

209 ft 1 in (63.7 m)
777 - 200

60 ft 8 in (18.5 m)

102 ft 5 in (31.2 m)
242 ft 4 in (73.8 m)
777 - 300

777 Dimensions
1-4

June 2003

Introduction
Hydrant Fuel
Truck (Option)
Galley Truck,
Door No. 2

Utility Tug and


LD2/LD3 Trailers
Lower Cargo Hold Loader

Utility Tug and


Pallet Trailers

Utility Tug and


Bulk Trailers
Bulk Cargo Loader

Lower Cargo
Hold Loader

Galley Truck
Potable Water
Truck

Galley Truck
Electrical
Power
Tow Tractor

Passenger
Bridge
Lavatory
Service
Truck

Air Conditioning
Truck
Cabin
Cleaning
Truck

Air Start
Truck
Hydrant
Fuel Truck
777 - 200

Utility Tug and


Pallet Trailers

Galley Truck,
Door No. 2
Hydrant Fuel
Truck (Option)

Utility Tug and


LD2/LD3 Trailers

Utility Tug and


Bulk Trailers

Lower Cargo
Hold Loader

Bulk Cargo
Loader
Galley Truck

Lower Lobe
Loader

Potable Water
Truck

Galley Truck
Electrical
Power

Tow Tractor

Passenger
Bridges

Air Conditioning
Truck

Galley Truck

Air Start
Truck

Lavatory
Service
Truck
Cabin
Cleaning
Truck

Hydrant Fuel
Truck
777 - 300

Ground Operations
June 2003

1-5

Steering
Angle
(Deg)

R1
Inner Gear

R2
Outer Gear

R3
Nose Gear

R4
Wingtip

R5
Nose

45o

Main Gear
Centerline Projection

R6
Tail

FT

FT

FT

FT

FT

FT

30

123

37.5

165

50.3

168

51.3

247

75.3

177

53.8

209

63.6

35

98

29.7

140

42.6

147

44.8

222

67.6

157

47.8

187

57.1

40

78

23.7

120

36.6

131

40.0

202

61.7

142

43.4

171

52.2

45

62

18.9

104

31.7

120

36.4

187

56.9

132

40.2

159

48.5

50

49

14.8

91

27.7

111

33.7

174

52.9

124

37.7

150

45.6

55

37

11.2

79

24.1

103

31.5

162

49.5

118

35.8

142

43.2

60

27

8.1

69

21.0

98

29.9

152

46.5

113

34.4

135

41.2

65

17

5.3

60

18.2

94

28.6

143

43.7

109

33.3

130

39.5

70 (Max)

2.7

51

15.6

90

27.6

135

41.2

107

32.5

125

38.1

50o

24 Inches
(0.61 mm)

55o
Turning Center
Steering Angles
(Example)

62o
70o

Note: Actual turn radii can be more than shown.


Dimensions are to nearest foot and 0.1 meter.

R1
Steering Angle

R2

R3
R5

R6

R4

777-200 Turning Radius


Steering
Angle
(Deg)

R1
Inner Gear

R2
Outer Gear

R3
Nose Gear

R4
Wingtip

R5
Nose

45o

Main Gear
Centerline Projection

R6
Tail

FT

FT

FT

FT

FT

FT

30

153

46.5

196

59.6

202

61.7

277

84.3

211

64.4

243

73.9

35

122

37.2

165

50.3

177

53.9

247

75.1

187

57.0

217

66.1

40

98

30.0

141

43.1

158

48.1

223

68.0

169

51.6

198

60.2

45

79

24.1

122

37.2

144

43.8

204

62.2

156

47.7

183

55.7

50

63

19.2

106

32.3

133

40.4

188

57.4

147

44.7

171

52.2

55

49

14.9

92

28.0

124

37.8

175

53.2

139

42.4

162

49.3

60

37

11.1

80

24.2

118

35.8

163

49.6

133

40.6

154

46.9

65

25

7.8

68

20.8

112

34.3

152

46.3

129

39.2

148

45.0

70 (Max)

15

4.6

58

17.7

108

33.1

142

43.3

125

38.2

142

43.3

50o

24 Inches
(0.61 mm)

55o
Turning Center
Steering Angles
(Example)

62o
70o

Note: Actual turn radii can be more than shown.


Dimensions are to nearest foot and 0.1 meter.

R1
Steering Angle

R3

R2

R5

R6

R4

777-300 Turning Radius


1-6

June 2003

Structures
Features

CORROSION PROTECTION

Fuselage

STRUCTURAL DESIGN

The corrosion protection for the 777


includes:

Wing

Composite Structure

Stabilizers

Corrosion Prevention

The design of the fail-safe structure


includes:

Relevant experience from the


Boeing aging fleet program
Redundant structural load paths
Fatigue tests.

A plan for scheduled structural


inspections and coordination with the
airlines completes the design
process.

Better drainage
Increased use of corrosion
resistant materials
Special protective coatings and
sealants.

Corrosion prevention procedures are


continuously updated for the latest
technology and in-service
experience. This helps to keep a
structurally-durable airplane.

COMPOSITE MATERIAL USAGE


The use of new composite materials
on the 777 helps:

Improve resistance to damage


Prevent corrosion
Reduce overall airplane weight.

June 2003

2-1

Section 44
(Upper Lobe)
Section 41

Section 43

Section 46

Section 45
(Lower Lobe)

Section 47

Aft Pressure
Bulkhead

Passenger Entry Doors (-300 has Overwing Doors)

Section 48

APU
Firewall
APU
Inlet Door

Forward
Pressure
Bulkhead

APU
Exhaust

APU Access
Doors
Forward Cargo
Door

Radome

Wing Center
Section

Keel Beam

Nose Gear
Wheel Well
Forward
Equipment
Center

Main Gear
Wheel Well

Forward Cargo
Compartment

Main Equipment
Center

Aft Cargo Bulk Cargo


Door
Door
Aft Cargo
Compartment

Stabilizer
Compartment
Bulk Cargo
Compartment

NOTE: The 777-300 has an overwing door.

Fuselage
Fuselage
The fuselage is a pressurized semimonocoque structure. It is made with
circumferential frames, longitudinal
stringers, stressed skin, and
pressure bulkheads.
The fuselage includes many
improvements that were identified by
the Boeing aging fleet program.

Nose gear wheel well


Main equipment center
Forward cargo door (right side)
Forward part of the forward cargo
compartment.

Section 43 (STA 655 - 1035). This


section contains the aft part of the
forward cargo compartment

FUSELAGE SECTIONS

Section 44/45 (STA1035 - 1434).


This is the center portion of the
fuselage. It contains these items:

These are the major fuselage


sections and their station numbers
(STA).

Section 41 (STA 92.5 - 655). This


section contains these items:

Section 46 (STA 1434 - 1832). This


section contains these items:

Radome
Flight deck
Forward pressure bulkhead
Forward equipment center

2-2

Wing center section


Keel beam
Main gear wheel wells.

Section 47 (STA 1832 - 2150). This


section contains these items:

Bulk cargo door (right side)


Bulk cargo compartment.

Section 48 (STA 2150 - 2570). This


section contains these items:

Aft pressure bulkhead


Stabilizer compartment
APU firewall
APU inlet and exhaust
APU compartment.

All sections except sections 45 and


48 contain parts of the passenger
compartment.

Aft cargo door (right side)


Aft cargo compartment.

June 2003

Structures

Side-of-Body Rib

Dry Bay
Access Panel
Leading Edge Slat (7)
Wing Center Section
Front Spar

Tank End Rib

Flaperon

Landing
Gear
Beam

Spoiler (7)
Flaps

Rear Spar
Aileron
Wing Tip

Wing
Wing

WING SECONDARY STRUCTURE

WING ACCESS PANELS

The wing stores fuel, contains fuel


system components, and includes
the attachment points for the engine
strut, landing gear, and flight control
surfaces.

The wing secondary structure


includes the leading edge, trailing
edge, and aerodynamic fairings. The
leading edge slats attach to the front
spar. These items attach to the rear
spar and auxiliary structure:

Access panels are on the lower


surface of the wing. The wing center
section has a single access panel.
Openings in some ribs and the center
section spanwise beams permit
movement inside the tank.

WING PRIMARY STRUCTURE


The wing primary structure is
aluminum alloy and includes:

Front and rear spars


Skin panels
Stringers
Ribs.

Trailing edge flaps


Aileron
Flaperon
Spoilers.

The wing tip is an aerodynamic


fairing that covers the end of the
wing.

Tank end ribs are sealed and form


the ends of the fuel tanks. The sideof-body rib joins the outboard wing
section to the wing center section.
The main landing gear is attached to
the wing rear spar and the landing
gear beam.

June 2003

2-3

Legend:
Carbon Fiber
Reinforced Plastic

Torque Box

Carbon Fiber
Reinforced Plastic
+ Nylon

Aileron

Rudder
Torque Box

Fiberglass

Leading and Trailing


Edge Panels

Wing Fixed Leading Edge

Outboard Flap

Elevator

Trailing Edge Panels

Strut Fairings
Wing-to-Body Fairing
Floor Panels

Inboard Flap

Floor Beams

Flaperon
Inboard and
Outboard Spoilers
Main Landing
Gear Doors

Radome

Wing Landing
Gear Doors

Nose
Gear Doors

Engine Cowling

Composite Structure
Composite
Some of the airplane structure is
made of composite materials to
improve resistance to corrosion and
to reduce weight.
Composite materials are layers or
plies of high strength fibers (carbon
fiber or fiberglass) in a mixture of
plastic resin. Components made of
composite materials use laminations
or combine layers of the composite
materials with a honeycomb core to
form a sandwich construction.
The structural repair manual
contains the necessary inspections,
damage limits, and repair
procedures for each component.

CARBON FIBER REINFORCED


PLASTIC
These structural components are
made of carbon fiber reinforced
plastic:

These structural components are


made of fiberglass:

Leading and trailing edge panels


Wing-to-body fairing
Wing and main landing gear
doors
Floor panels
Radome.

These structural components are


made of carbon fiber reinforced
plastic + nylon (toughened carbon
fiber reinforced plastic):

2-4

Elevators
Rudder
Ailerons
Flaperons
Flaps
Spoilers
Strut fairings
Engine cowlings
Nose gear doors.

FIBERGLASS

Torque boxes
Floor beams.

June 2003

Structures
Tip

Rudder
Leading Edge

Torque Box
Tip

Tab

Trailing Edge Panels

Vertical Stabilizer
Leading Edge

Elevator

Horizontal Stabilizer

Torque Box

Stabilizers
Stabilizers

VERTICAL STABILIZER

Major structural parts of the


stabilizers are made of composite
materials.

These components of the vertical


stabilizer are made of toughened
carbon fiber reinforced plastic:

HORIZONTAL STABILIZER

These components of the horizontal


stabilizer are made of toughened
carbon fiber reinforced plastic:

Torque box spars


Ribs
Stringers
Skins.

The elevators are made of carbon


fiber reinforced plastic.

Torque box spars


Ribs
Stringers
Skins.

Auxiliary structure is aluminum or


titanium. The leading edge and tip
are removable. All panels are
fiberglass.
Only the panels on the left side of the
stabilizer are removable for access.
The rudder and tab structure are
made of carbon fiber reinforced
plastic.

June 2003

2-5

Two Coats
of Primer
Finishes

Titanium Seat Track

Frame
Fiberglass
Floor Panels

Stringer
Drainage

Corrosion Resistant Materials

Corrosion Prevention
Corrosion Prevention

FINISHES

The 777 includes several corrosion


prevention features.

These improve the airplane finish:

DRAINAGE
These features improve drainage:

Increased use of primer


Corrosion inhibiting compounds.

Access for inspection is improved to


permit better corrosion surveillance.

Centerline drain path


Stringer drain holes
Drainage clearance at frames,
stringer splices and fittings
Increased number of skin
centerline drain holes.

CORROSION RESISTANT
MATERIALS
These items are new:

Better aluminum alloys (2524-T3)


Titanium seat tracks
Toughened carbon fiber
reinforced plastic floor beams
Fiberglass floor panels.

2-6

June 2003

Equipment Centers
Features

Antenna Locations

EASE OF ACCESS

Electronic Equipment Centers

Equipment racks contain most of the


electronic equipment in the airplane.
The access to the racks is from the
ground, passenger cabin, or cargo
compartments.

Shelf-Mounted Equipment

REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION


The equipment centers have line
replaceable units (LRUs). The LRUs
are easy to remove and replace.
PASSIVE COOLING
Forced air cooling is not necessary
for some LRUs. These LRUs use
passive cooling. Passive cooling
gives better reliability because it
permits system operation with no
equipment cooling operation.

June 2003

3-1

TV
(Option)
SATCOM
(Top Mounted)
ADF

VHF L
ATC

GPS

VOR

SATCOM
HF
(Top Mounted)
(Dual Option)
VHF C

TCAS
Weather Radar
ILS Glideslope
Capture
and Localizer
Telephone Antenna (L, R)

ILS Glideslope
Track
DME R
Marker Beacon
ATC

SATCOM
(Side Mounted)
(Option)

VHF R

DME L
TCAS

RA

Antenna Locations
Antenna Locations

Shelf-mounted Equipment

The basic communication and


navigation antenna locations show
above.

Easy to remove shelf-mounted


equipment permits simple
modification and troubleshooting of
electronic equipment. The shelves
contain standard ARINC 600 line
replaceable units (LRUs). The
arrangement of the LRUs is in
relation to use and ease of access.
Cooling to some LRUs is by forced
air; and some LRUs have passive
cooling.

Electronic Equipment Centers


Electronic equipment racks are in
different locations in the airplane.
The main equipment center is below
the passenger cabin floor. Access to
the main equipment center is:

From the forward cargo


compartment
Through a door on the bottom of
the airplane
Through a hatch in the
passenger cabin.

3-2

June 2003

Equipment Centers

E7 Rack
E17 Rack
E11 Rack

E12 Rack
E10 Rack
E6 Rack

E5 Rack
E15 Rack
E16 Rack

Main Equipment Center


Forward
Equipment
Center

Equipment Center and Rack Locations

P210 Right Power


Management Panel
P300 Auxiliary
Power Panel

E1/E2 Rack
P110 Left Power
Management Panel
P100 Left Power Panel
P320 Ground Service/
Handling Power Panel
(Looking Aft)
P310 Standby Power
Management Panel

P110 Left Power


Management Panel

P210 Right Power


Management Panel
P200 Right Power Panel

(Looking Forward)

E3/E4 Rack

Main Equipment Center


June 2003

3-3

RIGHT
AIRPLANE INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (AIMS)
CABINET

ACTUATOR
CONTROL
ELEC
(ACE)
LEFT 2

E2-1

GENERATOR
CONTROL
UNIT
(GCU)
LEFT

BUS
POWER
CONTROL
UNIT

TRANSFORMER
RECTIFIER
UNIT
(TRU)
LEFT

E1-1

CABIN
TEMPERATURE
CONTROLLER
(CTC)
RIGHT

QUICK
ACCESS
RECORDER
(QAR)

E2-2

DISTANCE
TRAFFIC ALERT MEASURING
EQUIPMENT
& COLLISION
AVOIDANCE SYS INTERROCOMPUTER
GATOR
(TCAS)
(DME)
LEFT

CABIN
TEMPERATURE
CONTROLLER
(CTC)
RIGHT

AIR
VHF
SUPPLY
COMM
CABIN
XCVR
PRES CTL
(VHF)
(ASCPC)
CENTER
LEFT

INSTR
LAND
SYS
RCVR
(ILS)
LEFT

ADF LEFT

WINDOW
HEAT AND
CNTRL
UNIT
FWD AND
LEFT SIDE

GENERATOR
CONTROL
UNIT
(GCU)
RIGHT

AIR
SUPPLY
CABIN
PRESSURE
CONTROL
(ASCPC)
RIGHT

SEL CAL
DEC UNIT

TRANSFORMER
RECTIFIER
UNIT
(TRU)
RIGHT

E1-2

INSTR
LAND
SYS
RCVR
(ILS)
RIGHT

VOR
RCVR
MKR
BCN
(VOR)
RIGHT

VHF
COMM
XCVR
(VHF)
RIGHT

AIR
TRAFFIC
CONTROL
TRANS
(ATC)
RIGHT

DISTANCE
MEASURING
EQUIPMENT
INTERROGATOR
(DME)
RIGHT

VHF
COMM
XCVR
(VHF)
LEFT

APU
GENERATOR
CONTROL
UNIT
(APU-GCU)

INSTR
LAND
SYS
RCVR
(ILS)
CENTER

VOR
RCVR
MARKER
BEACON
(VOR)
LEFT

AIR
TRAFFIC
CONTROL
(ATC)
LEFT

AUTOPILOT FLIGHT
DIRECTOR
COMPUTER
(AFDC)
LEFT

E1-3

E2-3

ARBRN
VIBRATION
MON
UNIT
RIGHT

AUDIO
PASSENGER
PRE-REC
ENTERINFLIGHT
ANNOUNCE- INFORMATION TAINMENT
MENT
PLAYER
COMPUTER
2

AUDIO
ENTERTAINMENT
PLAYER
1

AUDIO
ENTERTAINMENT
ENTERMULTIPLEXER
TAINMENT
CONTROLLER
MULTIPLEX
(EMC)
1

AUDIO
ENTERTAINMENT
MULTIPLEX
2

AUDIO
ENTERTAINMENT
PLAYER
3

CABIN
SYSTEM
MANAGEMENT
UNIT
(CSMU)

PASS ADDRESS
CABIN
INTERPHONE
CONT
(PACI)

AUDIO
MANAG
UNIT

GRND PROX
WARN COMP

ADF RIGHT

WINDOW
HEAT
CNTRL
UNIT LFWD
AND RSIDE

ARBRN
VIBRATION
MON
UNIT
LEFT

E1-4

E2-4

ACTUATOR
CONTROL
ELEC
(ACE)
CENTER

FCDC
BATTERY
CENTER

AUTOPILOT FLIGHT
DIRECTOR
COMPUTER
(AFDC)
RIGHT

WEIGHT
BAL
COMP
A

CALIB
MODULE
WEIGHT
A
BAL
COMP
CALIB
B
MODULE
B

E2-5

PROXIMITY
SENSOR ELECTRONICS
UNIT
(PSEU)
1

ENGINE
DATA
INTERFACE
UNIT
(EDIU)
LEFT

WARNING
ELECTRONICS
UNIT
(WEU)
LEFT

ACTUATOR
CONTROL
ELEC
(ACE)
LEFT 1

E1-5

PRIMARY FLIGHT
COMPUTER
(PFC)
CENTER

FLIGHT CONTROL POWER


SUPPLY ASSEMBLY
(PSA)
CENTER

E2-6

FLAP/SLAT
ELECTRONICS
UNIT
(FSEU)
1

SECONDARY ATTITUDE
AIR DATA REFERENCE UNIT
(SAARU)

E2-7

FLIGHT CONTROL POWER


SUPPLY ASSEMBLY
(PSA)
LEFT

FCDC
BATTERY
LEFT

PRIMARY FLIGHT
COMPUTER
(PFC)
LEFT

E1-6

E2 Rack
(Looking Aft)

E1 Rack
(Looking Aft)

Main Equipment Center Racks

PORTABLE MAINTENANCE
ACCESS TERMINAL (PMAT)
COOLING EXHAUST HOOD

COOLING EXHAUST HOOD

LEFT
AIRPLANE INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (AIMS)
CABINET

PROXIMITY
SENSOR ELECTRONICS
UNIT 2
(PSEU)

E3-1

STATIC
INVERTER

AUTOPILOT
FLIGHT
DIRECTOR
COMPUTER
(AFDC)
CENTER

ENGINE
DATA
INTERFACE
UNIT
RIGHT
(EDIU)

FLAP/SLAT
ELECTRONICS
UNIT
2
(FSEU)

E4-1

STATIC
INVERTER
TOWING
(PROVISION)

MAIN
BATTERY
CHARGER

TRANSFORMER
RECTIFIER
UNIT
(TRU)
CENTER 1

TRANSFORMER
RECTIFIER
UNIT
(TRU)
CENTER 2

SERVER
INTERFACE
UNIT

E3-2

E4-2

AIR DATA
INERTIAL REFERENCE
UNIT
(ADIRU)
E3-3

WARNING
ELECTRONICS
UNIT
(WEU)
RIGHT

BACKUP
CONVERTER
(VSCF)

E4-4

MAIN
BATTERY

E4-3

E3 Rack
(Looking Forward)

E4 Rack
(Looking Forward)

Main Equipment Center Racks


3-4

June 2003

Equipment Centers
Right Primary Flight
Computer (PFC)

Right Flight Control Power


Supply Assy (PSA)

Right FCDC Battery


Right Actuator
Control Electronics
Forward Cargo Handling
Accessory Panel P35

Right Radio Altimeter


Fuel Quantity
Processor Unit

Forward Cargo System


Controller

Center Radio Altimeter


Left Radio Altimeter

E16 Rack
(Fwd Cargo Door)
(Looking Forward)

E5 Rack
(Fwd Cargo Door)
(Looking Aft)

Forward Cargo Door Racks

Left HF
Right HF
Brake System
Control Unit
Brake Temperature
Monitor Unit
Aft Cargo Handling
Accessory Panel P39

Aft Axle Steering


Control Unit
Tire Pressure
Monitor Unit

Aft Cargo System


Controller

E6 Rack
(Aft Cargo Door)
(Looking Aft)

E17 Rack
(Aft Cargo Door)
(Looking Forward)

Aft Cargo Door Racks


June 2003

3-5

Voice Recorder
Flight Data Recorder

Satellite Data Unit


Radio Frequency Unit

APU Controller

High Power Amplifier

FWD

FWD
E7 Rack
(Overhead Passenger Compartment)
(Right Side Looking Outboard)

E11 Rack (Basic SATCOM)


(Overhead Passenger Compartment)
(Left Side Looking Inboard)

Overhead Racks in the Passenger Compartment

Left Telephone
Transceiver
Disc Drive Unit

E12 rack

Right Telephone
Transceiver

Cabin
Telecommunications
Unit

Cabin File Server

E10 Rack
(APU Battery
and Charger)
Bulk Cargo
Door

Speaker Drive
Modules

FWD

FWD

E15 Rack
(Overhead Passenger Compartment)
(Left Side Looking Outboard)

E10 and E12 Racks


(Bulk Cargo Compartment)
(Looking Outboard)

E10, E12, E15 Racks


3-6

June 2003

Flight Deck
Features

FLAT PANEL LIQUID CRYSTAL


DISPLAY UNITS

OVERVIEW
The 777 has a two-pilot flight deck
and room for two observers. The
flight deck supplies airline and flight
crew needs into the 21st century.
The 777 flight deck has flat panel
liquid crystal display (LCD)
technology and the digital flight deck
technology shown successful on the
747-400, 767, and 757.
The LCDs replace cathode ray tube
(CRT) displays used in other Boeing
airplanes.
The manual operations on the 777
flight deck are made easier. Many of
the manual flight crew operations
done before are automatic in the 777.
Easier manual operations and more
automatic operations decrease the
flight crew work load.

Less power is necessary for the flat


panel liquid crystal display units
(DUs), and they have a larger display
area than the usual CRT displays.
The standby indicator is also a flat
panel LCD.
CONTROL DISPLAY UNITS
Three LCD control display units
(CDUs) in the flight deck have
multicolored displays.
MAINTENANCE ACCESS
TERMINAL
The maintenance access terminal
(MAT) in the flight deck makes it easy
for the maintenance crew to isolate
system faults and load airplane
systems software.

Flight Deck Panels

Main Instrument Panels

Center Forward Panel

Glareshield Panels

Control Stand

Aisle Stand Panels

Overhead Panels

Cursor Control Device

Maintenance Access Terminal

Crew Seats

Control Wheels and Visibility

Other Flight Deck Components

CURSOR CONTROL DEVICE


The flight crew and maintenance
crew use the cursor control devices
to request flight and other data to
show on the display units that use the
multi-function (MFD) formats. The
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
also has a cursor control device.

June 2003

4-1

P61 Overhead Maintenance Panel


P11 Overhead
Circuit Breaker Panel

P5 Overhead Panel
P2 Center
Forward Panel

P55 Glareshield Center Panel

P7 Glareshield Panel

P7 Glareshield Panel

P3 Right
Forward Panel

P1 Left Forward Panel

P14 Right Side Panel

P13 Left Side Panel

P18 Maintenance
Access Terminal

P9 Forward Aisle
Stand Panel

P8 Aft Aisle
Stand Panel

P10 Control Stand

Flight Deck Panels


Flight Deck Panels
The 777 flight deck decreases and
makes flight crew operations better.
System control location gives easy
access.
The main instrument panels of the
flight deck include six 8" X 8" flat
panel liquid crystal display (LCD)
display units (DUs) that are the same
and interchangeable. The DUs
supply a larger display area than the
usual cathode ray tube (CRT)
displays.

The upper center DU shows the


EICAS display.
The lower center DU normally shows
the MFD formats. It can also show
the EICAS display or the ND.
The arrangement of the captain and
first officer main instrument panels
decreases pilot head and eye motion
and gives full visibility.
The maintenance access terminal
(MAT) is a new panel that the
maintenance technicians use to do
many maintenance related functions.

The left and right outboard DUs show


the primary flight display (PFD)
format.
The left and right inboard DUs
usually show the navigation display
(ND) format. They can also show the
multi-function display (MFD) formats.

4-2

June 2003

Flight Deck

Instrument Source
Select Switches

Left Outboard
Display Unit

Right Outboard
Display Unit

Clock (2)

Left Inboard
Display Unit

Brake
Accumulator
Pressure
Indicator

Right Inboard
Display Unit

Heading Reference
Switch
P1 Left Forward Panel

Instrument Source
Select Switches

Left Inboard
Display Selector

FMC Selector
Right Inboard
Display Selector

P3 Right Forward Panel

Main Instrument Panels


Left Forward Panel
The left forward panel has these
displays:

The PFD normally on the


outboard display unit
The ND normally on the inboard
display unit.

The inboard display selector permits


different formats to show on the
inboard display unit.
Also, the left forward panel has these
components:

The instrument source select


switches make it possible to select
the primary or alternate source of the
display data for the PFD and an
alternate source of navigation data
for the ND.
Right Forward Panel
The right forward panel is almost the
same as the left forward panel,
without the brake pressure indicator
and the heading reference switch.
Also, there is an FMC selector.

Brake pressure indicator


Heading reference switch
Clock
Instrument source select
switches.

June 2003

4-3

P2 Center Forward Panel

Ground Proximity Light


and Override Switches

Landing Gear Lock


Override Switch
Landing Gear
Lever
Alternate Gear
Switch

Integrated Standby
Flight Display

Autobrake Selector

Upper Center Display Unit

Lower Center Display Unit


Control Display
Unit (2)
Center Display
Control Source Switch
EICAS Event
Record Button

Center Panel
Brightness Control

P9 Forward Aisle Stand Panel

Center Forward Panel and Forward Aisle Stand Panel


Center Forward Panel

Forward Aisle Stand Panel

These are the components on the


center forward panel:

These are the components on the


forward aisle stand panel:

Upper center display unit


Standby instrument for attitude,
airspeed, altitude, and heading
Ground proximity light and
override switches
Landing gear lever
Alternate gear switch
Autobrake selector
Landing gear lock override
switch.

The standby instruments use the


same flat panel liquid crystal display
(LCD) technology as the DUs.

4-4

Lower center display unit


Display brightness controls
Control display units (CDUs)
Center display source switch and
brightness control
EICAS event record button.

The CDUs use the same flat panel


LCD technology as the DUs. The
CDUs have a multicolored display.
The multicolored CDUs show a
highlight for pilot inputs, flight
management command data, and
other important data.

June 2003

Flight Deck

Master Warning and Caution


Lights and Reset Switch (2)

Mode Control Panel


EFIS Control Panel (2)
Microphone
Switch (2)

Map Light
Control (2)

Clock
Switch (2)
P55 Glareshield Center Panel

P7 Glareshield
Panel

Data Uplink Accept,


Reject, and Cancel
Switches (2)

Display Select
Panel

P7 Glareshield
Panel

Glareshield Panels
Glareshield Panels
These are the components on the
glareshield panels:

Mode control panel


Left and right EFIS control panels
Display select panel
Master warning and caution
lights and reset switches
Accept, reject and cancel
switches for data uplink
information
Map light controls
Clock switches
Microphone switches.

June 2003

4-5

Speedbrake
Lever

Thrust Reverser
Flap Lever

Cursor Control
Device (2)
Stabilizer Position
Indicator (2)
Alternate Flaps Arm Switch
Alternate Pitch
Trim Levers

Alternate Flaps Selector

Parking Brake Lever

Stabilizer Cutout Switches

P10 Control Stand

Thrust Levers
Fuel Control Switches

Control Stand
Control Stand
The control stand has controls that
are easy to reach by either pilot.
These are the components on the
control stand:

Thrust levers
Flap lever
Stabilizer position indicators
Alternate flaps controls
Fuel control switches
Stabilizer cutout switches
Parking brake lever
Alternate pitch trim levers
Speedbrake lever.

The control stand also has two cursor


control devices. The cursor control
devices let the flight crew make
selections on some multi-function
displays.

4-6

June 2003

Flight Deck
Center Control
Display Unit

Engine Fire
Panel
Radio Tuning Panel (3)

Audio Control Panel (3)

Transponder Panel

Weather
Radar
Panel

Emergency
Evacuation Panel

Aileron and Rudder


Trim Panel

Flight Deck Door


Lock Switch

Light Controls

Observer
Audio
Selector

Flight Deck Printer

Pilot Handset
Printer Paper

Aft Aisle Stand Panel


Aft Aisle Stand Panel
The aft aisle stand has easy to reach
controls and easy to see indications.
These are the components on the aft
aisle stand panel:

Engine fire panel


Three radio tuning panels
Three audio control panels
Transponder panel
Emergency evacuation panel
Aileron and rudder panel
Light controls
Full size 8 1/2" x 11" flight deck
printer
Pilot handset
Observer audio selector
Flight deck door lock switch
Weather radar control
A multicolored CDU.

June 2003

4-7

Standby Power
Flight Control
Hydraulic Power

APU and EEC


Maintenance Panel

Backup
Window Heat
Cargo
Temperature
Ground Test
Switch
Voice Recorder

CARD FILE

CARD FILE

P61 Overhead Maintenance Panel

Overhead Maintenance Panel


Overhead Maintenance Panel
The overhead maintenance panel
has the controls that are set before
takeoff or during ground
maintenance and do not require
adjustment during flight.
These are the functions on the
overhead maintenance panel:

Backup window heat controls


Standby power
Flight control hydraulic power
controls
APU and EEC maintenance
controls
Cargo temperature control
Ground test switch
Voice recorder
Card files.

4-8

Each card file has two interface


cards. These interface cards are the
interface between the switch signals
from the overhead panels and two
overhead panel bus controllers. The
bus controllers convert the switch
signals into ARINC 629 data and
send them on the ARINC 629 buses
to the airplane systems.
Two panel data concentrator units
under the main instrument panels,
supply the interface between the
switch signals from the instrument
panels and the overhead panel bus
controllers.

June 2003

Flight Deck
CARGO FIRE

APU BTL
DISCH

11

ARM

FWD

AFT

ARMED

ARMED

FWD

AFT

DISCH

DISCH

FIRE/
OVHT
TEST

EQUIP
COOLING

AIR CONDITIONING
GASPER

AUTO

DISCH

ON
RECIRC FANS
UPPER LOWER

OVRD

SERV
INTPH

OFF

ON

EMER
LIGHTS

ADIRU
ON BAT

OFF

PASS
OXYGEN

ALTN

ARMED

PRIMARY FLIGHT
COMPUTERS

SIDE
DISC

OFF
AUTO

FWD

ON

ON

INOP

ON

ON

OFF

OFF

OFF

FAULT
P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

R BUS TIE

AUTO

AUTO
SECONDARY
EXT PWR

PRIMARY
EXT PWR

ON

ON

AVAIL
L
GEN L MAIN
CTRL

OFF

ISLN

ON

ON

ON

OFF

OFF

OFF

L ENG
ON

ON

ON

FAULT

FAULT

R ENG
ON
FAULT

CAMERA
LTS

ON

ON

VALVE

VALVE

DECR

ARM

ARMED

INCR

FAULT

ON

INT
LOW

ON

ISLN

AUTO

AUTO

CLOSED

CLOSED

CLOSED

17

WAI

OFF

ON

FWD

PRESS
VALVE

10

AFT

CENTER
PUMPS R

ON

ON

PRESS

PRESS

14

ANTI-ICE

SEAT BELTS
AUTO
OFF
ON

WING
AUTO
OFF

L
AUTO
ON

ON

OFF

OFF

PRESSURIZATION

PRESS

PRESS
AFT

R ENG

ON

AFT

ON
D
E
M
A
N
D

APU
AUTO

R PUMPS
FWD

VALVE

PASS SIGNS

OFF

ISLN

AUTO

ON

CROSSFEED
FWD

L PUMPS
FWD

FAULT

NO SMOKING
AUTO
OFF
ON

OFF

WAI

FUEL

FAULT

FAULT

OFF

AUTO

ON
FAULT

BLEED AIR

13

L WIPER

TRIM AIR
ON
FAULT

L ENG

C2

FAULT

FAULT

ELEC

PULL ON
P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

C1
C2
AIR
L ELEC
R ELEC
AUTO
AUTO
ON
OFF
ON OFF
D
AUTO
AUTO
OFF
ON
ON
E OFF
M
A
N
D

R
GEN
CTRL

DRIVE
DRIVE DISC

AUTO
OFF

FUEL TO
REMAIN

L NOZZLE R

HYDRAULIC
C1

W
R PACK

OFF

PRESS
R MAIN

BACKUP GEN
L
R

DRIVE
L

12

INOP

AVAIL
R XFR

L XFR

ON

ON

16
C

ON

UNLKD

OFF

MAN

FUEL JETTISON

START

ON

ISLN

INOP

PRESS

APU GEN

CON

AUTOSTART

SIDE

RAM AIR
TURBINE

APU
ON
OFF

ON

L BUS TIE

ON

INOP

ELECTRICAL
BATTERY

FWD

CABIN
TEMP

L PACK

START

CON

START

R
NORM

START/IGNITION

WINDOW HEAT

DISC

IFE/PASS CABIN/
SEATS UTILITY

ALTN

L
NORM

ON

AIR COND
RESET

ON

ON

AUTO

FLT DECK
TEMP
AUTO

R
NORM

NORM

ON
THRUST
ASYM COMP

ENGINE
EEC MODE

OFF

ON

ENGINE

OFF

ON

15

R
AUTO

OFF

ON

OUTFLOW
VALVE

AFT

AUTO

AUTO

MAN

MAN

OPEN

OPEN

MAX
P,11 PSI
TAKEOFF & LDG

LDG ALT
DECR

18

INCR

PULL ON

MANUAL
CLOSE

CLOSE

R WIPER
OFF

INT

LOW

HIGH

HIGH

OVHD/
CB

777-300

DOME

STORM

MASTER
BRIGHT

ON
OFF

GLARESHIELD
PNL/FLOOD

MIN

NOSE
OFF

ON

RIGHT
OFF

ON

NAV

LOGO

WING

ON

ON

ON

ON

IND LTS
TEST
BRT

PUSH
ON/OFF

LANDING
LEFT
OFF

BEACON

19

DIM
RUNWAY TURNOFF
L OFF R

TAXI
OFF

STROBE
OFF

ON

ON

ON

ON

P5 Overhead Panel

Overhead Panel
Overhead Panel
Because of its central location, either
pilot can reach any of the systems
controls. The two outboard columns
of the overhead panel have a fivedegree angle inward. This increases
the visibility across the panel.

The overhead panel includes


controls and indications for these
functions:

June 2003

1 - Air data inertial reference


system control
2 - Primary flight computer
disconnect
3 - Electrical system/APU
4 - Wiper control
5 - Emergency lighting
6 - Passenger oxygen
7 - Window heat
8 - Ram air turbine switch
9 - Hydraulic system
10 - Passenger signs
11 - APU and cargo fire control
12 - Engine start
13 - Fuel jettison
14 - Fuel management
15 - Anti-ice
16 - Air conditioning
17 - Bleed air
18 - Pressurization
19 - Lighting.

4-9

Cursor Location
Switches

Touch Pad

Hand/Palm
Support

Cursor Select Switch

Cursor Control Device


Cursor Control Device
Two cursor control devices (CCDs)
on the control stand make it possible
to access some communication
systems and get real-time
maintenance information from the
MFD.

The touch sensitive pad of the cursor


control device permits control of the
cursor position on the active display.
When the cursor is in the desired
position, push the cursor select
switch to activate the selection.

With the CCDs on the control stand,


the flight crew or maintenance crew
uses the cursor location switches to
select the inboard displays or lower
center display for maintenance
information.

4-10

June 2003

Flight Deck

Maintenance
Access Terminal
(MAT)

MAT Display

MAT Cursor
Control Device

MAT Disk Drive


and Mass
Storage Device

Maintenance Access Terminal


Maintenance Access Terminal
The maintenance access terminal
(MAT) at the second observer
position makes it possible for the
maintenance crew to do these
functions:

Request system and component


fault and maintenance
information
Do ground tests of airplane
systems and components
Load software into the
components that need onboard
software loads.

June 2003

The MAT includes these


components:

Display
Cursor control device
Disk drive
Mass storage device
Keyboard.

There are several portable MAT


(PMAT) interfaces in various
positions on the airplane.

4-11

Second Observer
Seat

First Observer Seat


Captain and
First Officer Seats

Crew Seats
Crew Seats
Crew seats in the 777 are made for
comfort and convenience. The
captain and first officer seats
electrically adjust in the vertical and
forward/aft directions. The captain
and first officer seats have these
adjustments:

Recline
Vertical
Forward and aft
Thigh support
Lumbar region of the back.

The captain and first officer seats


have these features:

Arm rests that fold


Crotch strap
Inertia-reel shoulder harness with
manual lock
Lap belt
Headrest.

4-12

The first observer seat mounts on a


pedestal. It adjusts manually in the
vertical and forward/aft directions.
The first observer seat has these
features:

Arm rests that fold


Crotch strap
Inertia-reel shoulder harness
Lap belt
Headrest.

The second observer seat is not


adjustable.The second observer seat
has these features:

Arm rests that fold


Crotch strap
Shoulder harness
Lap belt
Headrest.

June 2003

Flight Deck
Pitch Trim Switch

Push-to-Talk
Switch (Not Visible)

Eye Reference Point

22 degrees
Autopilot
Disconnect
Switch

Clear
View

Control Wheel and Visibility


Control Wheel and Visibility
Each control wheel includes these
functions:

Pitch trim switches


Autopilot disconnect switch
Oxygen mask or boom
microphone push-to-talk (PTT)
switch.

When the pilots adjust their seats so


that their eyes are at the eye
reference point (ERP), the control
column design permits a clear view
of all flight instruments.

June 2003

4-13

Overhead Stowage
Spare Bulb
Stowage

Oxygen Mask
Stowage

Emergency
Equipment
Sunvisor
Stowage

Cupholder

Smoke Goggle
Stowage

Headset
Stowage

Oxygen Mask
Stowage
Cupholder

Side Display
(Option)
Stowage,
Chart Holder

Oxygen
Mask

Cupholder

Manual/
Diskette
Stowage

Quick
Reference
Handbook
Stowage

Keyboard
Stowage

Map Stowage
Fold-Down
Worktable

Crew
Closet

Flight Kit Stowage

Suitcase
Stowage

Manual Stowage

Ashtray
Fold-Down
Worktable

Left Sidewall

Sunvisor Stowage
Flight Kit
Stowage

Manual Stowage

Right Sidewall

Flight Deck Components


Other Flight Deck Components
Necessary equipment in the flight
deck includes:

Emergency equipment
Manual stowage
Flight kit stowage
Smoke goggles
Oxygen masks
Suitcase stowage
Cup holders.

Optional side displays on the P13


and P14 panels show flight crew
selected data such as aeronautical
charts.

4-14

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


Features

FLIGHT CREW INTERFACE

Airplane Information
Management System

INTEGRATED FUNCTIONS

These components are used with the


AIMS:

Data Conversion Gateway


Function

Primary Display System

Flight Management Computing


System

Thrust Management
Computing System

Central Maintenance
Computing System

Airplane Condition Monitoring


System

Flight Data Recording System

Ground Manuever Camera


System

Data Communication
Management System

The airplane information


management system (AIMS) is a
new system introduced on the
Boeing 777 airplane. Advancements
in technology, microelectronics, fault
tolerance, and software permit the
development of highly integrated,
digital avionics. The AIMS integrates
the avionics functions that require
large quantities of data collection,
processing, and calculations. On
other model airplanes, many LRUs
are necessary to handle these
avionics functions.

EFIS control panel (2)


Display select panel
Control display unit (CDU) (3)
Display switching panels (2)
Cursor control device (2).

The two cursor control devices


(CCDs) in the flight deck are new
features. The flight crew uses the
CCDs to:

Control menus
Select items on the multi-function
display
Manage communications.

AIMS CABINETS

The AIMS has two cabinets. Each


cabinet has eight line replaceable
modules (LRMs), four of these are
input/output modules (IOMs) and
four are core processor modules
(CPMs). The AIMS cabinets operate
as the main computer for several
avionics systems.

MAINTENANCE INTERFACE

The AIMS cabinet integrates the


computing functions for the avionics
systems. Software partitioning keeps
a necessary separation between
computing functions. The software
partitioning allows the integration of
multiple computing functions in a
single core processor module.
SYSTEM INTERFACES
The AIMS cabinets interface with
approximately 130 LRUs, sensors,
switches, and indicators. The large
quantity of interfaces permits the
AIMS to integrate the information
from a majority of airplane systems in
one place. It is efficient to integrate
this information for central
maintenance computing, flight data
recording, airplane condition
monitoring flight management, thrust
management and displays.

June 2003

The onboard maintenance system


uses the AIMS cabinets for the
computing function. The
maintenance crew uses a
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
to control the central maintenance
computing system and the airplane
condition monitoring system. The
MAT is a station with a display
module, disk drive module,
keyboard, and cursor control
module. The MAT is at the second
observer position.
ENGINEERING INTERFACE
Engineers use the ground based
software tool (GBST) to create airline
modifiable information (AMI). The
AMIs allow the airline to customize
information. The AMI software is
loaded into these functions:

ACMF
CMCF
DCMF
FDCF
FMCF
PDF.

5-1

Primary Display System

AIMS

AIMS
Data Conversion
Gateway Function

AIMS
Data Conversion
Gateway Function

Central Maintenance
Computing System
Central Maintenance
Computing Function

Flight Management
Computing System
Flight Management
Computing Function
Data Communication
Management System
Data Communication
Management Function
Flight Deck
Communication Function

Data Conversion
Gateway Function

Primary Display
Function

Thrust Management
Computing System

Airplane Condition
Monitoring System

Thrust Management
Computing Function
Flight Data
Recorder System
Digital Flight Data
Acquisition Function

Airplane Condition
Monitoring Function
Airplane Condition
Monitoring System
Quick Access
Recorder Function

Airplane Information Management System


Airplane Information Management
System (AIMS)

The LRMs do the main calculation for


these seven avionic systems:

These are the functions that the


LRMs in the AIMS cabinet calculate:

The AIMS has two cabinets in the


main equipment center. Each
cabinet has eight line replaceable
modules (LRMs.) They are the:

Core processing
module/communications
(CPM/Comm)
CPM/graphics generator
(CPM/GG) (2)
Input output module (IOM) (4)
CPM/basic (right AIMS cabinet
only)
CPM/airplane condition
monitoring function (CPM/ACMF)
(left AIMS cabinet only).

Primary display system (PDS)


Flight management computer
system (FMCS)
Thrust management computer
system (TMCS)
Central maintenance computer
system (CMCS)
Airplane condition monitoring
system (ACMS)
Data communication
management system (DCMS)
Flight data recorder system
(FDRS).

PDF
FMCF
TMCF
CMCF
ACMF
QARF
DCMF
FDCF
DFDAF.

The LRMs also do other functions to


change data between non-ARINC
629 and ARINC 629 data.

There is a backplane bus in each


AIMS cabinet. This bus controls all
data communication between the
eight LRMs in the AIMS cabinet.

5-2

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


ARINC 717 and RS 422
(DFDR)
(QAR)

Recorders

Flight Controls ARINC 629 Bus (3)


ARINC 453
26 LRUs

VHF
Radios

Systems ARINC 629 Bus (4)

40 LRUs

Analog

ARINC 618

ARINC 429

RF
56 LRUs

Weather
Radar/
EGPWS

14LRUs

Display
Units (6)

AIMS Intercabinet
Ethernet Bus (4)

MAT

PMATS

Ethernet

Ethernet

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Airplane Information Management System Interfaces


AIMS Interfaces
The AIMS has interfaces with many
airplane systems with different types
of data formats. These are the data
formats that AIMS uses:

ARINC 629
ARINC 429
ARINC 618
ARINC 453
ARINC 717
RS 422
Analog
Radio frequency (RF).

There are different isolated ARINC


629 buses in relation to the type of
data and the redundancy
requirements. The flight controls
buses have flight critical data
necessary for the primary flight
control system and the autopilot flight
director system. The systems buses
give data to and receive data from
many other systems for system
operation and for display. The AIMS
June 2003

intercabinet buses have data that the


AIMS cabinets give to each other and
the CDUs.

The interface between the AIMS


cabinets and the MAT and the
portable MATs is with an Ethernet
connection.

The data used for downlink on the


VHF communication system is
ARINC 618.
Many systems transmit and receive
ARINC 429 data.
The weather radar system and
enhanced ground proximity warning
system use ARINC 453.
The flight data recorder and quick
access recorder use ARINC 717 and
RS 422 data.
The AIMS cabinets receive discrete
switch data and some engine sensor
data with analog interfaces.
The display units receive an RF
signal from the AIMS cabinets.

5-3

DCGF - Seven types of data transfers


1

Type 1: Non-ARINC 629 to FC 629 buses


Type 2: Non-ARINC 629 to Systems 629 Buses
Type 3: FC 629 Buses to Systems 629 Buses
Type 4: Systems 629 Buses to FC 629 Buses
Type 5: FC 629 Buses to Non-ARINC 629
Type 6: Systems 629 Buses to Non-ARINC 629
Type 7: Systems 629 Bus to Systems 629 Bus
Analog or to ARINC 429

ARINC 429
Analog
Analog discrete

ARINC 429
Analog
Analog discrete

Analog
ARINC 429

AIMS
Cabinet (2)
1

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)
Systems ARINC 629 Bus (4)

Data Conversion Gateway Function


Data Conversion Gateway
Function
The data conversion gateway
function (DCGF) moves data
between:

Buses and analog discrete


signals
Buses and analog signals
Buses of different formats
Buses of the same format.

The DCGF supplies seven types of


data conversions and transfers.
These are:

Type 1 - receive ARINC 429


data, analog signals, and analog
discrete signals and transmit this
data to the flight controls (FC)
ARINC 629 buses
Type 2 - receive ARINC 429
data, analog signals, and analog
discrete signals and transmit this
data to the systems ARINC 629
buses

5-4

Type 3 - receive data from the FC


ARINC 629 buses and transmit
this data to the systems ARINC
629 buses
Type 4 - receive data from the
systems ARINC 629 buses and
transmit this data to the FC
ARINC 629 buses
Type 5 - receive data from the FC
ARINC 629 buses and transmit
ARINC 429 data, analog signals,
and analog discrete signals
Type 6 - receive data from the
systems ARINC 629 buses and
transmit ARINC 429 data, analog
signals, and analog discrete
signals
Type 7 - data transfers between
same types of buses and data
transfers between analog and
ARINC 429 buses.

For systems with higher levels of


importance, like engine data, the
DCGF supplies redundant and
isolated paths for the data.
June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


ND

PFD
Left Remote
Light Sensor

Left
Outboard
DU

Left
Inboard
DU

ND

PFD

Upper
Center
DU

Right
Inboard
DU

Right
Outboard
DU

To Inboard
& Lower
Center DUs

MFD

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)
All
Airplane
Systems

EICAS

Lower
Center
DU

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)

Right Remote
Light Sensor

TAXI
CAMERA
INTERFACE
UNIT

C
A
M
E
R
A

L CAM

A
D
J
U
S
T

N CAM

NORMAL
L
R CAM
N
R
CAMERA SELECT

DSP

ARINC 429
Analog
Discretes

CAMERA
POWER

VIDEO OUT
75

OPAS

CDU (3)

EFIS
CP (2)

Cursor
Control
Device (2)

Taxi Camera
Interface Unit
(777-300)
Coax
Coupler

(6)

Coax
Coupler

(6)

ARINC 429
BITE Monitoring

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Primary Display System


Primary Display System
The primary display system shows
data on six flat panel liquid crystal
display (LCD) display units (DUs).
The DUs show these four types of
displays:

Primary flight display (PFD)


Navigation display (ND)
EICAS
Multi-function display (MFD) that
includes the secondary engine,
status, synoptic, maintenance
page, electronic checklist, and
flight deck communication
function (FDCF) formats.

June 2003

These are the components of the


display systems:

Primary display function in the


AIMS cabinets
LCD display units (6)
Remote light sensors (2)
Electronic flight instrument
system (EFIS) control panels (2)
Cursor control devices (2)
Display select panel
Coax couplers (4)
Center display control panel (not
shown)
Display switching panels (not
shown) (2)
Instrument source select panels
(not shown) (2).

5-5

INBOARD DSPL

HDG REF

NAV

SELCAL

NORM

AUTO

MFD

L
EICAS

PFD

INBOARD DSPL

FMC

NORM

MFD

NORM

NAV
PFD

EICAS

SELCAL

TRUE

Captain Display Switching Panel


MINS
RADIO

BARO

FPV

MTRS

First Officer Display Switching Panel


BARO
IN
HPA

RST

VOR L

INBD

SIDE

NAV

STD
VOR MAP
APP
PLN

40 80
20

CTR

OFF

10

TFC

160
320

DSPL
CTRL

VOR R

640

ADF L

WXR

LWR
CTR

OFF

AIR
DATA
/ATT

ADF R

STA

WPT

ARPT

DATA

POS

Instrument Source
Select Panel

Cursor Control
Device

TERR

EFIS Control Panel

L
INBD

R
INBD

LWR
CTR

CTR PNL BRIGHTNESS


DSPL
CTRL

UPR DSPL

ENG

LWR DSPL
/WXR

STAT

ELEC

HYD

FUEL

AIR

DOOR

GEAR

FCTL

CAM

CHKL

COMM

NAV

777-300

EICAS
EVENT RCD

CANC/RCL

Center Display Control Panel

Display Select Panel

Display Control Panels


Display Control Panels
The display system has these control
panels:

General controls
EFIS controls
EICAS controls.

The general controls include:

The captain and first officer


display switching panels to select
the display format on the inboard
display units
The cursor control device to
select and activate items on the
MFD.

The EFIS controls include:

The instrument source select


panel to select the source of
EFIS data
The EFIS control panel to control
the PFD and ND.

5-6

The EFIS control panel has these


controls for the PFD:

The EICAS controls include:

Barometric altitude reference in


inches of mercury or
hectopascals
Radio altitude decision height
value or barometric minimums
Flight path vector on or off
Altitude reference in feet or in
feet and meters.

For the ND, the EFIS control panel


selects these functions:

Display mode format (map, plan,


approach, or VOR)
Range
VOR and ADF pointers on or off
Weather radar on or off
TCAS on or off
Other navigation data.

The center display control panel


to control the display source and
event recording
The display select panel to
control the EICAS and MFD
formats.

On the EICAS display, the display


select panel does these functions:

Scrolls through message field


Shows compacted format in a
limited mode.

On the MFD format, the display


select panel does these functions:

Selects display format


Scrolls the status message field.

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

EFI S

EFI S CONTROL
BARO

SET

MO D E

< WXR

V OR >

< ST A

TERR

>

M AP >

<WPT

MTRS

>

PL N >

< A RP T

TFC >

CT R >
- - - - - - - - - - OPTIONS >

< DAT A

SEL
A DF / V OR
OF F
ADF
V OR

< P OS

- - - - - - - - - - - C ON T R OL >

< M INS RESET


< R A N GE

< FM C

EFI S

CT L

OF F

ON >

I N CR

1 6 0 NM

< RA NGE DE CR

FPV>

APP >

2 9 . 9 2 IN
< SEL >
RA D/ B A RO S E L
RA D < B A RO>
MI N S S E T
35 0FT

M EN U

OP T I ONS

EF I S>
DSP

CT L

OF F

ON >
DS P >

MA I N T

I NF O

DISPLAY MODES

DI SPL AY>
SEL

<L

D I SPL AY

I NB D

< R I NB D

SEL

CHK L >

< L WR C T R

Alternate Control Panel


Functions on CDUs

DISPLAY SYNOPTICS
MO D E

HY D >

< L W R CT R

NAV >

< R I NB D

CAM >

< DOOR

E I CAS

< E NG

EL EC >

< L I NB D

C OM M >
< SEL >

D I SPL AY

< ST AT
CA NC/ RCL >
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SYNOPTICS >

< SEL >

F UE L >
AI R >

< GE A R
F CT L >
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - M ODE S >

777-300

Alternate Control Panels


Alternate Control Panels
The left and right CDUs operate as
alternate EFIS control panels. Any
CDU can operate as an alternate
display select panel. The flight crew
selects this alternate function from
the CDU main menu. The left CDU
operates as the left EFIS control
panel, the right CDU operates as the
right EFIS control panel. The center
CDU is a backup for the left or right
CDU.

June 2003

5-7

PFD

ND

EICAS

ND

PFD

MFD
SPD

139
200

IBFI

/130

DME

3.3

LOC

G/S

ROLLOUT

FLARE

2000
LAND 3

180

800
160

0
139
8

2
1

00
0580
60

REF

120

400

560

100

6
RADIO

200

100

80

130 H

29.89

600

IN

MAG

Primary Flight Display

Primary Flight Display


Primary Flight Display
The captain and first officer have a
primary flight display (PFD). The
PFD normally shows on the outboard
display units. The PFD can also
show on the inboard display units.
The PFD integrates, on a single
format, the primary state of the
airplane as well as autoflight, flight
management, and thrust
management command information.
The PFD shows this information:

Attitude
Airspeed
Barometric altitude
Vertical speed
Heading
Flight modes
Radio altitude
ILS data
TCAS resolution advisory
Time critical warning (TCW).

5-8

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


GS 338 TAS 326

156/15

PFD

ND

EICAS

HDG

090 MAG

VOR R 116.80
CRS 055
DME 13.5

PFD

ND

MFD

VOR Mode
GS 338 TAS 326

HDG

156/15

090 MAG

ILS L 110.10
CRS 055
DME 13.5

GS 338 TAS 326

156/15

TRK

140

GRH
0838.4 Z
32.5 NM

MAG

GS 338 TAS 326

156/15

320

T/D

CHRIS
1230 Z
110 NM

KGEG
BILL

160

FRED
A

40

KMWH

CHRIS

KYKM

YKM

WX+T
+5
VAR

160

ELN
STEVE

VOR L
116.00
DME 121

APP Mode

A
A

KMAT

GRH

VOR R
ELN
DME 28.5

Map Mode

320

Plan Mode

Navigation Display
Navigation Display
The captain and first officer each
have a navigation display (ND). The
ND normally shows on the inboard
display units. An ND can also show
on the lower center DU. The ND
provides flight and navigation
information in one of several formats.
The ND shows these four display
modes:

VOR
APP (approach)
Map
Plan.

June 2003

5-9

GS 315 TAS 312


156 /15

HDG

090

MAG

VOR R

116.80
CRS 055
DME 13.5

315 TAS 312


156 /15

VOR R

GS

HDG

FROM

Expanded VOR Mode

090

116.80
CRS 055
DME 13.5

MAG

FROM

Centered VOR Mode

Navigation Display - VOR Mode


VOR Mode
The VOR mode shows in a centered
or expanded display format.
The centered VOR mode shows 360
degrees of the compass rose with the
airplane symbol and lateral deviation
bar in the center. The expanded VOR
mode shows 80 degrees of the
compass rose with the airplane
symbol and the deviation bar at the
bottom.

The VOR deviation shows only when


the flight crew tunes the VOR
manually. Both displays are heading
up displays.
Additional VOR data shows in the
lower corners of the display. Select
VOR on the EFIS control panel to
show bearing pointers on the
compass rose.

The VOR mode shows this


information:

System source annunciation


VOR deviation
TO/FROM annunciation
Station identification and
frequency
Station bearing
Selected course
DME distance
TCAS data
Weather radar (expanded only).

5-10

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

GS 315 TAS 312


156 /15

HDG

090

ILS L

MAG

110.10
CRS 055
DME 13.5

ILS L

315 TAS 312


156 /15

GS

HDG

Expanded Approach Mode

090

110.10
CRS 055
DME 13.5

MAG

Centered Approach Mode

Navigation Display - Approach Mode


Approach Mode
The APPROACH mode shows as an
expanded or centered display. The
centered APPROACH mode shows
360 degrees of the compass rose
with the airplane symbol and lateral
deviation bar in the center. The
expanded APPROACH mode shows
80 degrees of the compass rose with
the airplane symbol and the
deviation bar at the bottom.
Glideslope deviation shows on the
side of the display. Both displays are
heading up displays.

June 2003

The approach mode show this


information:

System source annunciation


Localizer deviation
Glideslope deviation
Station identifier and frequency
Selected runway heading
DME distance
TCAS data
Weather radar (expanded only).

5-11

124
130 /7

GS

TAS

131

TRK

130

RW13R
1838.4 Z
6.3 NM

MAG

315 TAS 312


156 /15
GS

1230.0 Z
0110 NM

320

TRAFFIC

KGEG
GHI

160

KMWH

20
VAMPS

DEF

KYKM

KMAT

NOLLA

13R

160
ABC

NOLLA
E/D

ADF L
BF

VOR R
SEA
12.2

CF13R

320
S

VOR-DME DME

Expanded Map Mode

Plan Mode

Navigation Display - Map Mode and Plan Mode


Map Mode

The map mode shows this data:

Plan Mode

The map mode shows the part of the


flight plan in the selected range. The
range is up to 640 NM. The map
mode shows as an expanded or
centered display. The centered MAP
mode shows 360 degrees of the
compass rose with the airplane
symbol in the center. The expanded
MAP mode shows 80 degrees of the
compass rose with the airplane
symbol at the bottom. The displays
can be track up or heading up.

The flight crew uses the plan mode to


make, see, or change a flight plan.
The display is a north up display. The
airplane symbol shows present
position and FMC track.

5-12

FMC route
Active waypoints
Distance to go
Estimated time of arrival (ETA)
Vertical deviation
Lateral deviation
Trend vector
Tuned NAVAIDS
Weather radar
FMCS NAV data
TCAS traffic.

This plan mode shows this data:

FMCS route
TCAS data.

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

PFD

ND

EICAS

ND

PFD

MFD
TAT +15c

+21c

TO

1.380

1.380

1.004

1.004

ENGINE FIRE L
ENGINE SHUTDOWN L
CABIN ALTITUDE AUTO
CARGO HEAT AFT

EPR
EAI

EAI

21.9

21.9

N1
WAI

WAI

394

GROUND CALL
COM
SEATBELTS ON
RECALL STATUS PG 1
FL 0 180-360
KTS

DOWN

394

GEAR

F
L
A
P
S

EGT

40
CAB ALT
LDG ALT

DUCT PRESS40
0
RATE
0

MAN P

0
0

FWD AFT
OP
M
CL

62.3

FUEL QTY
83.1
62.3

TOTAL FUEL 207.7


TEMP +10c

LBS X
1000

EICAS Display

EICAS Display
EICAS Display
The engine indication and crew
alerting system (EICAS) display
normally shows on the upper center
display unit. It can also show on the
lower center DU or the inboard DUs.
The EICAS display shows this data:

Engine pressure ratio (EPR)


N1 rotor speed
Exhaust gas temperature (EGT)
Total air temperature (TAT)
Thrust mode
Selected temperature for derate
ECS duct pressure
Cabin altitude and rate of change
Landing altitude
Cabin differential pressure
Crew alert messages
Status Alert
In-flight start information
Landing gear position
Flap/slat position

June 2003

Total fuel quantity (lbs or kg)


Fuel temperature.

EICAS CREW ALERTING


The crew alerting part of the EICAS
monitors airplane systems. If a fault
occurs, EICAS shows a crew alerting
message on the upper center display
unit. As well as the messages, some
crew alerts have aural tones, and the
master warning or caution lights
come on.
Messages are in one of these
groups:

Warnings
Cautions
Advisories
Communications
Memos.

Messages show on the display in the


order of importance and occurrence.
Warnings show in red at the top of

the message field. Cautions show in


amber below warning messages.
Advisories show in amber below
caution messages. Advisories have
a one-space indent. Communication
and memo messages are white. A
bullet () shows before each
communication message.
Different aurals come on with
warning and caution level alerts.
Warning aurals can be a bell, a voice,
or a siren. All caution aurals are a
beeper that comes on four times in
one second and stops. Some
communication messages have a
chime. All aurals stop automatically
when the alert condition stops.
The master warning or caution lights
come on for a warning or caution
alert. The lights stay on for the time of
the warning or caution. Push one of
the switch/lights to put off and set the
two lights for future alerts.
5-13

HYDRAULIC
L

81.1

QTY

81.1

PRESS

ND

EICAS

17.6

FF

0.90
3000

0.72 RF
3000

APU

N2

PFD

0.91
3000
RPM 100.1

OIL PRESS

17.6

82 PSI

560 C
75 C OIL QTY 7.9

EGT

OIL TEMP

OXYGEN

185

MFD

OIL
PRESS

CREW PRESS 1950

185

ELEC GEN SYS L


FLAP/SLAT CONTROL #2

120
15

OIL
TEMP

120

OIL QTY

15

VIB

1.2

1.2
N2

N2

Secondary Engine Display

ATC
REVIEW

Maintenance Page
(Typical)

FLIGHT
INFORMATION
MANAGER

Status Display

Synoptic Display
(Typical)

Electronic Checklist

Ground Maneuver Camera


System Display (777-300)

COMPANY
NEW MESSAGES

Communication Display

Multi-Function Display
Multi-Function Display
The multi-function display (MFD)
format normally shows on the lower
center display unit. The format can
also show on the inboard display
units. The MFD format shows
auxiliary information to the flight crew
and maintenance crew.
These are the MFD formats:

Secondary engine display


Status display
Synoptic display
Maintenance page
Communication display
Electronic checklist
Ground maneuver camera
system display (777-300).

5-14

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

HYDRAULIC
L

81.1

81.1

QTY
PRESS

0.91
3000

N2

17.6

.090 LO
3000

0.72 RF
3000

APU

FF

17.6

145

OIL
PRESS

145

150

OIL
TEMP

150

RPM 100.1
OIL PRESS

82 PSI

560

EGT

75

OIL TEMP

C
OIL QTY

7.9

OXYGEN
CREW PRESS

1950

ELEC GEN SYS L


FLAP/SLAT CONTROL 2

15
1.2
N2

OIL QTY

VIB

15
1.2
N2

Secondary Engine Display

Status Display

MFD Formats
Secondary Engine Display

Status Display

The secondary engine display shows


automatically at power up. The
format also shows when the flight
crew selects the ENG switch on the
display select panel.

The status display shows on the


MFD when the flight crew selects the
STAT switch on the display select
panel.

The secondary engine display shows


this information:

N2 rotor speed
Fuel flow
Oil pressure, temperature, and
quantity
Engine vibration.

June 2003

The status display shows this


information:

Hydraulic quantity
Hydraulic pressure
APU EGT
APU rotor speed
APU oil quantity
Crew oxygen pressure
Status messages.

5-15

FLAPS
L REV
FLT CTRL

NOSE GEAR
& STEERING

MAIN GEAR
& STEERING

ALTN/RSV
BRAKES

CANCEL
PG MENU

NORM BRKS
R REV
FLT CTRL

AC-V

FLT CTRL

FREQ
LOAD
ISLN

L
ENG

L
ELEC

SOV

P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

ELECTRICAL

L IDG

R IDG

APU GEN

PRI EXT
PWR

SEC EXT
PWR

BACKUP
CONV

115
400
0.50

115
400
0.40

0
0
00.0

115
400
0.00

115
400
0.00

0
0
0.00

MAIN
BAT

L TRU

C1 TRU

C2 TRU

R TRU

APU/
BAT

RAT
GEN

0
0
0.00

ISLN

ELEC
C1

P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

ELEC
C2

AIR
C1

AIR
C2

RAT

D
E
M
A
N
D

D
E
M
A
N
D

0.90

0.90

DC-V
DC-A

R
ENG

R
ELEC

0.68

29
45

PRESS

3010

Synoptic Display (Typical)

PRESS

29
32

L IDG

R IDG

RISE TEMP

92
10

93
12

OIL LEVEL

NORMAL

OIL FILTER

NORMAL

OUT TEMP

SOV

27
38 CHG

DC-A

SEND
PRINT
OVERTEMP IDG L

29
38

L GEN

27
2 DIS
BACKUP
R GEN

0
0

SERVICE

NORMAL

NORMAL

BLOCKED

BLOCKED

NORMAL

3010

29
8

0
0

RF
DC-V

2990

AUTO PAGE 1/2

28
15
ERASE

FBW
C

R PREV
28PAGE
28
15
15
RECORD NEXT
DATE 20 AUGPAGE
90 UTC

CONV

70
---PREV
MENU
MAIN
MENU
18:54:04

Maintenance Page (Typical)

MFD Formats
Synoptic Display

Maintenance Page

The synoptic display shows a picture


of systems status.These are the
systems that have synoptic displays:

Initial access to maintenance pages


is through a prompt on the CDUs.
The cursor control devices give other
controls.

Electrical
Fuel
Air (environmental control)
Flight control
Hydraulic
Doors
Landing gear.

5-16

The maintenance page shows


airplane system data for use by
maintenance crews. The data helps
in troubleshooting and repair of
airplane systems. A maintenance
page records automatically when an
exceedance occurs for a parameter
on that maintenance page. This data
is available to the maintenance crew
after the end of the flight to help
make an analysis of a fault.

These are the maintenance pages


available by ATA chapter:

21 Air Conditioning
24 Electrical
26 Fire Protection
27 Flight Controls
27 Flap/slat
28 Fuel Quantity
28 Fuel Management
29 Hydraulic
30 Ice Protection
31 Maintenance Task
32 Landing Gear Actuation/
Indication
32 Landing Gear Brakes/
Steering
36 Air Supply
49 APU
71 Performance
71 EPCS
71 Propulsion Data Limits
71 Engine Exceedance.

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

ATC
REVIEW

FLIGHT
INFORMATION
MANAGER

COMPANY
NEW MESSAGES

Electronic Checklists

Communication Display

MFD Formats
Communication Display

Electronic Checklist

The communication display provides


the crew interface with the data
communication management system
(DCMS).

The electronic checklists are


available for all the checklists that
show in the Operations Manual.
These are the checklists available:

Normal checklists
Non-normal checklists
Unannunciated checklists.

Normal checklists show in order for


the current flight phase.
Non-normal checklists show in order
of critically and time of occurrence.
A white box adjacent to an EICAS
message shows that there is a
related non-normal checklist for that
message.
Unannunciated checklists are
available for non-normal conditions
that do not cause an EICAS
message.

June 2003

5-17

Ground Maneuver Camera System Display


(777-300)

MFD Formats
Ground Maneuver Camera
System Display
This display shows the video from
three cameras. This display lets the
flight crew or the ground taxi crew
see the main and nose landing gear
from the flight compartment during
ground maneuvers of the 777-300
airplane.
This display is a three-view split
screen.

5-18

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


Master Dim &
Test Module

SDU

Navigation Radios

PA/CI
DME (2)
ILS (3)
VOR (2)
ADF (2)

CDU
(3)

AFDC
(3)

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)
All
Airplane
Systems

OPAS

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)
ARINC 429
Analog
Discretes

SELCAL

MCP

ISSP (2) F/O Display Switching


Panel

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Displays (6)

Flight Management Computing System


Flight Management Computing
System
The flight management computing
system (FMCS) decreases flight
crew work load. To do this, it gives
vertical and lateral guidance for all
phases of flight but takeoff and
landing. The FMCS also gives
navigation data to the flight crew on
the forward displays and does an
autotune of the navigation radios.
The two AIMS cabinets have the
same flight management computing
function (FMCF). The active FMCF
sends lateral guidance commands
and vertical guidance commands to
the AFDCS with mode requests from
the MCP. The other FMCF operates
as a standby.
The primary crew interface for
the flight management computing
system are the three CDUs. The
flight crew puts data in on the left or
right CDU. The center CDU operates
June 2003

as a back-up if the left or right CDU


has a failure. If the FMCF has a
failure, the CDUs can calculate
lateral guidance commands and let
the crew manually tune on-side
radios. The two AIMS cabinets use
the data entries. The CDUs have
interfaces with other systems for
control and display.
The FMCF has these functions:

Navigation
Flight planning
Performance management
Navigation radio tuning.

The navigation function calculates


airplane position and velocity.
The FMCF memory contains a
navigation database. This database
has data for:

NAVAID locations
Waypoints
Departure/arrival procedures

Company flight plans.

The flight planning function uses


flight crew entries to make the lateral
flight plan.
The FMCF performance
management function uses the
airplane aerodynamic model and
flight crew entries to calculate the
most economical vertical flight path.
The flight crew entries are:

Cost index
Cruise altitude
Airplane gross weight.

The FMCF navigation radio tune


function does an autotune of the NAV
radios for position and display
update.
The GBST gives AMI for:

FMCF software option code


Performance factors
AMI P/N.
5-19

AFDC (3)
ASCPC (2)
ASG (2)
CTC (2)
EDIU (2)
FSEU (2)
OPBC (2)
PSEU (2)
WEU (2)
ADIRU
SAARU
PFC (3)

CDU (3)

TO/GA
Switches

A/T Disconnect
Switches

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)
RA (3)

ASM (2)

ARINC 429
N1/N2 (4)
Fuel Shutoff
Switch (2)
Master
Caution (2)

Analog
Discretes

MCP

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Displays (6)

Thrust Management Computing System


Thrust Management Computing
System

The thrust management computing


system (TMCS) moves the thrust
levers, gives the thrust limit displays,
and shows the autothrottle modes
during takeoff and all flight phases.
The TMCF also supplies trim
commands to the engines.

These are the components in the


TMCS:

Thrust management computing


function (TMCF) of AIMS
Autothrottle servo motors (ASM)

5-20

EDIUs to the EECs. To do this, the


TMCF monitors engine thrust
differences. This occurs for all
phases of flight when the engines are
at idle power or above to decrease
engine thrust differences.

The TMCF has these outputs:

The two AIMS cabinets have the


same thrust management computing
function (TMCF). The active TMCF
sends autothrottle commands to the
autothrottle servo motors (ASMs)
and trim commands to the engine
electronic controllers (EECs). The
other TMCF operates as a standby.

Autothrottle arm and mode


switches on the mode control
panel (MCP)
TO/GA switches
A/T disconnect switches.

Autothrottle commands for all


flight phases (1 or 2 engines)
Engine trim equalization
commands through the EDIUs to
the electronic engine controllers
(EECs)
Thrust limits for display and
control
Autothrottle modes for display.

The TMCF calculates autothrottle


commands with crew entries from
the flight deck and inputs from the
FMCF and external sensors. The
TMCF sends thrust lever position
commands to the ASMs.

The TMCF supplies autothrottle


modes and calculates thrust limits.
These outputs go to the display
system. The flight crew selects
autothrottle modes from the mode
control panel (MCP) and the TO/GA
levers. The flight crew selects the
thrust limit mode from the thrust limit
page on the CDU. Thrust limit mode
selection also occurs automatically
when the flight management system
engages in the vertical navigation
mode.

The TMCF calculates and sends


engine trim commands through the
June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)
All
Airplane
Systems

MAT

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)
ARINC 429
Analog
Discretes

PMAT

PMAT
Receptacle (5)

PMAT

GND
TEST
NORM

ENABLE

Ground Test Switch


AIMS Cabinet (2)

Central Maintenance Computing System


Central Maintenance Computing
System

other locations on the airplane that


have a PMAT receptacle:

The central maintenance computing


system (CMCS) collects, keeps, and
shows maintenance data for most of
the airplane systems. Use the CMCS
to do fault isolation and testing.

These are the components of the


CMCS:

Central maintenance computing


function (CMCF) in the AIMS
cabinets
Ground test switch
Side display (2) (optional)
MAT and its keyboard
PMAT receptacles (5)
PMAT.

The crew uses a maintenance


access terminal (MAT) in the flight
deck or a portable MAT (PMAT) in
the main equipment center to
operate the central maintenance
computing system. These are the
June 2003

Nose wheel well


Aft of main wheel well
Jack screw area
Flight deck.

The MAT and PMAT connect with the


CMCF in the AIMS cabinet through
Ethernet connections.
There is a CMCF in each AIMS
cabinet. Only one CMCF operates at
a time. The other CMCF is a back-up.
The CMCF gets fault reports from
systems and records this data in fault
history. When the primary display
system shows a fault, the CMCF
does a correlation of the fault with a
maintenance message. This
maintenance message shows what
had a failure.

PMAT. The CMCS also does the


data load gateway function that
permits software to load from a
diskette in the MAT to an LRU that
must have a software load.
These are the other functions of the
CMCS:

LRU software loading


Input monitoring
Configuration reporting
Access to LRU shop faults
Onboard engine balancing
PSEU and air/ground rigging
Report capabilities.

The CMCS also permits ground tests


on many systems from the MAT or a
5-21

LINE
MAINTENANCE

EXTENDED
MAINTENANCE

OTHER
FUNCTIONS

HELP

REPORT

ONBOARD MAINTENANCE
Left Central Maintenance Computing Function (CMCF)

MAT
INBOUND FLIGHT
DECK EFFECTS

PRESENT
LEG FAULTS

EXISTING FLIGHT
DECK EFFECTS

EXISTING FAULTS

GROUND TESTS

FAULT HISTORY

INPUT MONITORING

SCREEN HELP

CENTRAL MAINTENANCE
OPTIONS

GENERAL HELP

ENGINE BALANCING

SYSTEM
CONFIGURATION
EXIT MAINTENANCE

DATA LOAD
HARD DRIVE
SOFTWARE PART NUMBER MANAGEMENT
MAINTENANCE
PLANNING
MAINTENANCE
ENABLE/DISABLE

REPORT PAGE DATA


PRESENT LEG FAULTS
SUMMARY REPORT

SHOP FAULTS

FAULT HISTORY
SUMMARY REPORT

PSEU AND AIR /


GROUND RIGGING

EXISTING FAULTS
SUMMARY REPORT
ALL SYSTEMS CONFIGURATION
SUMMARY REPORT

CENTRAL MAINTENANCE
COMPUTER SWITCH CONTROL

CABIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ALL


SUMMARY REPORT

SPECIAL FUNCTIONS
EXIT MAINTENANCE

CABIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM


CONFIGURATION SUMMARY REPORT

EXIT MAINTENANCE

OUTPUT STATUS

Maintenance Access Terminal


Maintenance Access Terminal
The maintenance crew uses the
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
to operate the central maintenance
computing system.

The LINE MAINTENANCE menu


supplies access to these:

Inbound and existing flight deck


effects, and their correlated faults
Airplane systems tests
Configuration information.

The MAT includes a:

Cabinet
Display module
Cursor control device
Keyboard
Disk drive module.

The crew selects items on a menu


with a cursor control device. The
maintenance crew can also use the
keyboard to key in data.
The five main menu selections are:

LINE MAINTENANCE
EXTENDED MAINTENANCE
OTHER FUNCTIONS
HELP
REPORT.

5-22

The EXTENDED MAINTENANCE


menu supplies access to these:

Present leg faults, existing faults,


and historical faults
Data load procedures
Maintenance memos
Maintenance enable/disable of
the flight leg and the
maintenance phase.

procedures
PSEU and air/ground rigging
procedures
Central maintenance source
switching.

The HELP menu supplies access to


help for the MAT and for each
function.
The REPORT menu supplies access
to reports. The crew can send the
report to the flight deck printer, MAT
disk drive, or a ground station.
The PMAT has the same menu
structure as the MAT.
The GBST provides AMI for:

The OTHER FUNCTIONS menu


supplies access to these:

Input monitoring
CMCF options
activation/deactivation
LRU shop faults
Engine balancing information and

Notes for specific information


Help pages for general
information
Automatic downlink table to
define data reports
Airplane identification cross
reference table.
June 2003

Airplane Information Management System

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)
All
Airplane
Systems

QAR (Optional)
MAT

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)

Printer

ARINC 429
Analog
Discretes

SDU

AIMS Cabinet (2)

VHF

Airplane Condition Monitoring System


Airplane Condition Monitoring
System
The airplane condition monitoring
system (ACMS) monitors, records,
and give reports for selected airplane
data such as:

Maintenance data
Performance data
Troubleshooting data
Trend monitoring.

These are the components of the


ACMS:

Airplane condition monitoring


function (ACMF) of AIMS
Quick access recorder function
(QARF) of AIMS
Quick access recorder.

The airlines can use the ground


based software tool (GBST) to set
the report format, content, logic, and
destination. The destination of a
report can be one of these:

Quick access recorder


Printer
Diskette in disk drive
Ground station through the data
communication management
function.

The quick access recorder (QAR) is


an optional unit. The QAR records
data from the ACMF to an optical
cartridge.
The software for the quick access
recorder operates in the left AIMS
cabinet only.

The ACMF software function is in the


left AIMS cabinet only.

June 2003

5-23

Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)
All Airplane
Systems

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)
ARINC 429
Analog
Discretes

FDR

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Flight Data Recorder System


Flight Data Recorder System
The flight data recorder system
(FDRS) records mandatory and
optional flight data for the most
recent 25 hours of operation. These
are the components of the FDRS:

Digital flight data acquisition


function (DFDAF) in the AIMS
cabinet
Flight data recorder (FDR).

The FDR records the data in a fire


and crash resistant LRU. The FDR
operates when at least one of the
engines are on, or the airplane is in
the air.
The DFDAF also monitors FDR
faults. The DFDAF sends these
faults to the central maintenance
computing function and the primary
display systems function.

The DFDAF in the AIMS collects and


does a format of the data and sends
it to the FDR. The DFDAF receives
data in ARINC 429, ARINC 629,
analog, and discrete formats. The
DFDAF changes this data into one
digital format to send to the FDR.
There is no dedicated FDRS
accelerometer on the airplane. The
ADIRU supplies longitudinal, lateral,
and vertical accelerations. The FDR
records these accelerations.

5-24

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


TAXI
CAMERA
INTERFACE
UNIT

Nose Landing Gear


Taxi Camera

Left Main Landing


Gear Taxi Camera

C
A
M
E
R
A

L CAM

A
D
J
U
S
T

N CAM

Left Inboard
Display Unit

NORMAL
L

Right Inboard
Display Unit

R CAM
N
R
CAMERA
CAMERA SELECT POWER

Right Main Landing


Gear Taxi Camera

VIDEO OUT
75

S3110B
CAMERA
SYSTEM
ON

OFF

Taxi Camera
Kill Switch

Lower Center
Display Unit
Camera System
Control Relay

AIMS Cabinet (2)


Taxi Camera
Interface Unit

Ground Maneuver Camera System (777-300)


Ground Maneuver Camera
System (777-300)
Because of the size of the 777-300
airplane, the ground maneuver
camera system (GMCS) helps the
flight crew or taxi crew maneuver the
airplane on the ground. The system
has these three cameras:

Nose landing gear taxi camera


Left main landing gear taxi
camera
Right main landing gear taxi
camera.

The main landing gear cameras are


in the leading edge of the left and
right horizontal stabilizer. They give a
view of the landing gear, engine, and
the ground on each side of the
airplane.
The taxi camera kill switch is on the
P56 main wheel well electrical
service panel on the bottom of the
airplane in the aft part of the wing-tobody fairing. This switch gives the
ground crew the capability to turn off
the camera system.

The taxi camera interface unit sends


the three-view split screen video
directly to the three display units that
can show an MFD.
The primary display function in the
AIMS gives the display unit(s) the
command to show the GMCS video
when the crew member pushes the
camera (CAM) switch on the display
select panel.

The nose landing gear camera is on


the bottom of the airplane. It gives a
view of the nose landing gear and the
ground in front of the airplane.

June 2003

5-25

Data Communication
Management System
The data communication
management system (DCMS)
supplies these three functions:

Printer driver control


Ethernet interface
ACARS datalink management.

ETHERNET INTERFACE
The Ethernet interface supplies
communications between the AIMS
functions and these units:

MAT
Portable maintenance access
terminals (PMATs).

ACARS DATALINK
The DCMS uses these two AIMS
functions:

Data communication
management function (DCMF)
Flight deck communication
function (FDCF).

The DCMS connects to many


components of other systems to do
its functions. These include:

Flight deck printer


Maintenance access terminal
(MAT)
Accept / reject / cancel buttons
Control display units (CDUs)
Cursor control devices (CCDs)
Display units (DUs)
Radio tuning panels (RTPs)
VHF radios
Satellite data unit (SDU).

PRINTER DRIVER

The DCMS controls the aircraft


communications addressing and
reporting system (ACARS) datalink
data.
The FDCF supplies the flight crew
interface for control of ACARS
operations.
The DCMF finds if the VHF or the
SDU is available for the ACARS. The
DCMF transmits the digital data
through the available system.
GROUND BASED SOFTWARE
TOOL
The airlines can use the ground
based software tool (GBST) to set
these:

Frequency selections
Routes for data
Message reject criteria.

The print driver function controls all


printing requests from the AIMS
functions. It sends print jobs from
AIMS functions to the flight deck
printer and sends printer job status
and errors back to the AIMS
functions.

5-26

June 2003

Airplane Information Management System


Printer Driver

Flight Deck Printer

SDU

MAT
Ethernet Interface
VHF (2)
PMAT

PMAT
Receptacle (5)

Radio Tuning
Panel (2)

PMAT

ACARS Datalink
DCMF
To AIMS Cabinet

To AIMS Cabinet

Input/Control
Accept / Reject /
Cancel Buttons (2)

CCD (2)
EICAS
Flight
Deck
Comm
Display
CDU (3)

MFD

FDCF
To DCMF

To DCMF
Systems
ARINC 629 Bus (4)

AIMS Cabinet (2)

Data Communication Management System


June 2003

5-27

Communications
Features

CABIN SERVICES SYSTEM

ARINC 629 Communication


System

ARINC 629

A cabin services system (CSS) puts


these functions together:

Flight/Service Interphone
Systems

Cabin Services System

Ground Crew Call System

Voice Recorder System

VHF/HF Communication
Systems

SELCAL System

SATCOM System

The 777 airplane uses ARINC 629


data buses. ARINC 629 data buses
permit faster transfer of data
between LRUs than ARINC 429 data
buses. ARINC 629 data buses
operate at a rate of 2 megabits per
second. The buses are bi-directional
and permit more than one transmitter
on the same bus.

The integration of these systems


permits:

SATELLITE COMMUNICATION

The 777 has a satellite


communication (SATCOM) system
as standard equipment. SATCOM
supplies reliable long range voice or
data communication. The system
can transmit and receive data that
includes:

Passenger address
Cabin interphone
Passenger service
Cabin lighting.

The airline to set many


passenger cabin configurations
A central location for test and
fault reports.

The CSS has a standard ARINC 628


interface that lets you add an in-flight
entertainment (IFE) system.

Flight crew voice


Passenger voice
Data communication
Telex
Facsimile services.

June 2003

6-1

LRU No. 2

Termination
Resistor

Data Bus Cable

LRU No. n

Current Mode
Coupler No. 2
Stub Cable
Current Mode
Coupler No. 1
Current Mode
Coupler No. n
(46 maximum)
Termination
Resistor
Terminal
Controller
Serial
Interface
Module

OPAS

Line Replaceable
Unit No. 1

Flight Deck Panels

ARINC 629 Communication System


ARINC 629 Communication
System
The ARINC 629 communication
system has these characteristics:

Two way transmission


Multiple transmitters
Broadcast type
Autonomous terminal access
Time division multiplex.

It permits data communication


between many terminals over the
same bus. There are seven ARINC
629 buses on the 777.
The primary flight control system has
three dedicated ARINC 629 flight
control buses that connect with
approximately 26 line replaceable
units (LRU).

6-2

Four ARINC 629 system buses


supply the main communication path
between these systems:

Avionics
Electrical
Electro-mechanical
Environmental control
Propulsion.

The ARINC 629 system buses


connect with approximately 53
LRUs. These buses operate
independently from the flight control
buses.
ARINC 629 components include
terminal controllers and serial
interface modules. These
components are internal to the
LRUs. As well as the LRU ARINC
629 components and the eleven
ARINC 629 data bus cable
assemblies, the ARINC 629
communication system includes stub
cables and current mode couplers.

The LRUs use a coupler and terminal


(terminal controller and serial
interface module) to connect with the
bus. Each terminal monitors the bus
and does not transmit until there is a
quiet period. Only one terminal on a
bus transmits at a time. After a
terminal transmits, three different
timers make sure that it does not
transmit again until all of the other
terminals on the bus has an
opportunity to transmit.
The overhead panel ARINC 629
system (OPAS) does a multiplex of
the flight deck panel switch positions
for transmission on the ARINC 629
system buses.

June 2003

Communications
OBS AUDIO

NORM
CAPT
F/O

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON USA

Service Jack Locations

Observer
Audio
Selector

MIC
CALL
L
VHF

ON

Captain
Flight Deck
Speaker
MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

HF
L R

INT

MIC
CALL

FLT

MIC
CALL

VOR R L ADF
L
R

Glareshield Mic
Switch

MIC
CALL

R
VHF

MIC
CALL

MIC

Control Wheel
Mic Switch

OFF

MIC
CALL

C
VHF

MIC

CAB

PA

MIC
CALL
SPKR

SAT
1 2
APP
R
LC

V B R

MKR

CAUTION
THIS ASSEMBLY
CONTAINS
ELECTROSTATIC
SENSITIVE
DEVICES

Captain Audio
Control Panel

HEAD
PHONE

AIMS Cabinet (2)


ARINC 629
System Bus (4)

Service
Interphone
Switch
Voice Recorder System
Navigation Receivers
Communication Radios
Service Interphone Jacks
MEC Jack Panel
Service and APU
Shutdown Panel
SELCAL decoder
PA System
SATCOM
Cabin Interphone
System

BOOM MIC
HEADSET

Captain Jack
Panel

Headset

SERV
INTPH

First Officer
First Observer
Second Observer

Headphone
Audio Management Unit
Oxygen Mask
Microphone

Hand
Microphone

Flight/Service Interphone Systems


Flight Interphone System
The flight interphone system permits
the flight crew members on the flight
deck to communicate with each other
and with:

Audio communication systems


Ground crew members.

There are four systems. The captain


system is shown.
Switches on the audio control panels
(ACPs) permit selection of the
following types of audio:

Communication transceiver
audio
Navigation receiver audio
Cabin interphone audio
Passenger address (PA) audio
Flight interphone audio
SATCOM audio.

Hand microphones, boom


microphones, or oxygen mask
June 2003

microphones can be connected


through the audio management unit
(AMU) to the radio transceivers,
cabin interphone system, or PA
system. Functions selected on the
ACP go digitally to the AMU.

Service Interphone System

The AMU uses new technology


digital signal processing for clear
sound quality. The AMU sends the
selected audio to and from the flight
deck.

Jacks for plug-in microphone and


headsets are at various locations on
the airplane. When the service
interphone switch is ON, the service
and flight interphone systems
connect together.

The service interphone permits


communication between the pilots,
ground crew, and maintenance
personnel.

Each flight crew member station has


a jack outlet for a boom
microphone/headset and
headphones. There can be an
optional fourth ACP for the second
observer.
Mic switches are on each pilot
glareshield and control wheel for the
boom and oxygen mask
microphones. Interphone switches
are on the audio control panels.

6-3

Cabin Services System


The cabin services system (CSS)
integrates many cabin and
passenger systems. CSS controls
these systems:

Passenger address
Cabin interphone
Passenger service
Cabin lighting.

There is a zone management unit


(ZMU) in each zone.

Each passenger seat can have any


of these IFE components:

Each ZMU connects to the overhead


electronics units (OEUs) and to the
IFE through an ARINC 628 zone
interface bus. Each ZMU also
connects to one cabin area control
panel (CACP) and up to five cabin
attendant handsets (CAHs). These
are the functions of the ZMU:

The CSS also monitors and controls


many cabin functions.

The integration of these systems


permits control, monitor, and test of
the system from a central location.

The CSS has a standard interface


(ARINC 628) that allows the addition
of an in-flight entertainment (IFE)
system. The interface to the IFE is
through a head-end interface and
through a zone interface. The IFE
controls functions of the passenger
entertainment system and of airline
applications.

The ZMUs monitor the configuration


database for the correct state of each
light. They also have interfaces with
the OEUs to control the lights.

Software controls the CSS. The CSS


uses a configuration database to
define the cabin interior
configuration. Interior configuration
changes are easy to do by changing
the configuration database. The
configuration database generator
(CDG) is a menu-driven database
editor that operates on a personal
computer (PC). The CDG changes
the database. After the change, the
operator loads the database into the
cabin services system through the
cabin system control panel (CSCP).
The CSCP stores many databases
and operational software in memory.

Flight attendants use the CSCP for


CSS functions and maintenance
technicians use the CSCP for test
and program functions.

Seat video display


Telephone handset
Passenger controls
Joystick
Credit card reader.

Analog to digital and digital to


analog audio conversion for the
cabin interphone system
Control the passenger service
selections from the IFE and cabin
light selections from the CACP.

The airlines can add any of these IFE


components and functions:

Audio entertainment to the


passengers
Interactive video for passenger
games and applications
Video entertainment to the
passengers
Video on demand
Passenger in-flight information
computer (PIIC) to show
navigation and flight data
Prerecorded announcements
and boarding music for the
passenger address system
Passenger telephone
Facsimile equipment
Cabin printer to supply paper
copies of CSS data
Keyboard/track ball/credit card
reader for airline applications
Airplane configuration
information in the airplane
configuration database
Status and control.

The passenger address/cabin


interphone (PA/CI) controller
controls the passenger address (PA)
and cabin interphone (CI) functions.

6-4

June 2003

Communications
CAH

CSCP

Audio Entertainment
Video Entertainment
Passenger In-Flight Information
Prerecorded Announcements
Boarding Music
Telephone and FAX Equipment
Printers
Keyboard and Trackball
Credit Card Readers
Configuration Database Information
Status and Control
In-Flight Entertainment System

CDU-C

CSS
Intersystem
Bus

ZMUs

Components and Functions

ARINC 628
Head-End
Interface
Right
ARINC
629 Sys
Bus

Cabin Illum
Pass Info
Call Lts
RDG Lts
Discrete
Analog

CACP

Master
Call Lts

OEUs
ARINC 628
Zone Interface
Passenger Services Functions
Attendant Call
Reading Light Control
In-Seat Passenger Info Signs

CSMU

Passenger Entertainment
ARINC 628
Head-End
Interface

In-Flight Entertainment System

Left
ARINC
629 Sys
Bus

ANS
FDH

PA/CI

ARINC 429
SDMs

Flight
Interphone

Audio

AMU

Speakers

Zone 1

Zone 2

Zone 3

777-200

Zone 1

Zone 2

Zone 3

Zone 4

777-300

Cabin Services System


June 2003

6-5

Cabin Interphone System

Passenger Address System

The cabin interphone (CI) function


permits communication between
cabin attendants and between cabin
attendants and the flight crew.

The passenger address (PA)


function sends announcements to
the passenger cabin.

The cabin interphone function uses


these components:

The passenger address function


uses these components:

Passenger address/cabin
interphone (PA/CI) controller
Cabin attendant handsets (CAH)
Zone management units (ZMU)
Flight deck handset (FDH).

The cabin attendants use the CAH to


communicate on the cabin
interphone.
Each CAH station has a two-number
dial code. Any station can dial any
other station. A cabin station that
receives a call gets a chime and a
call light. The flight deck gets a
chime, a call light on each audio
control panel (ACP) and a message
on the center control display unit
(CDU).
The ZMU is the interface between
the CAH and the PA/CI controller.
The flight crew uses the flight
interphone or the FDH to interface
with the CI. The audio management
unit (AMU) processes the flight
interphone audio and sends it to the
PA/CI.
The PA/CI controller does these
functions:

Receives, prioritizes and


distributes multiplexed audio and
data to and from the ZMU
Interfaces with the CDU to send
messages and get dial data
Sends and gets audio to and
from the FDH and AMU
Sends AIMS a signal to generate
a flight deck chime and message.

The configuration data base software


controls the cabin interphone
function.

6-6

Passenger address/cabin
interphone (PA/CI) controller
Ambient noise sensors (ANS)
Speaker drive modules (SDM)
Zone management units (ZMU)
Cabin system control panel
(CSCP)
Cabin system management unit
(CSMU).

Announcements come from the flight


crew, the cabin attendants, or the IFE
system. The IFE system sends.

The attendants can also make


manual adjustments from the CSCP
or a CACP.
The PA/CI controller has two
identical circuits for the PA function
and two identical circuits for the CI
function. Each has a primary and
alternate circuit. The attendant
selects an alternate circuit from the
attendant switch panel if a primary
circuit fails.
Passenger Service System
The passenger service system
(PSS) controls reading lights, call
lights, and passenger information
signs.
The PSS uses these components:

Prerecorded announcements
Boarding music
Video entertainment audio.

The airline can configure the


passenger cabin into as many as six
PA areas for announcements.

The PA/CI controller receives all


audio inputs and selects the input
with the highest priority. It digitizes
the audio and sends it to the SDMs.
The SDMs convert the digital audio
back to analog. Each SDM can drive
one or two speakers.

The in-flight entertainment (IFE)


system lets passengers control their
reading lights and passenger-toattendant call functions. The IFE
system sends status information and
configuration database information
to the PSS.

Chimes are superimposed over


existing audio so both are heard at
the same time.

The ZMU supplies an interface from


the IFE system to the OEU. The OEU
controls the light and the attendant
call function.

There are three ways to control


PA volume:

By the configuration database


Automatically
Manually.

The configuration database defines


the normal reference level for each
speaker in flight.
Automatic control adjusts the normal
reference level due to flight
conditions or ambient noise levels.
The ANSs supply ambient noise
level measurements.

Zone management unit (ZMU)


Cabin area control panel (CACP)
Cabin system control panel
(CSCP)
Cabin system management unit
(CSMU)
Overhead electronics unit (OEU).

The lavatories interface with the


OEU for these functions:

Lavatory call
Lavatory occupied
Smoke detection
Return to seat.

The cabin attendants control


passenger reading lights, cabin lights
and reset attendant calls from the
CACP or the CSCP.

June 2003

Communications
To Flight
Interphone
System

Center Control
Display Unit

To AIMS

Attendant Switch
Panel

Flight Deck
Handset

Cabin System
Management Unit

Boarding
Music

Other Zone Speaker Drive Modules

Prerecorded
Announcements
Video
Entertainment
Audio

Zone 1

Speaker Drive
Module

Cabin
Speakers

PA Audio
PA Pause
In-Flight
Entertainment
System

Ambient Noise
Sensor

Passenger Address/Cabin
Interphone Controller

Cabin Attendant
Handsets

Zone Management
Units

Cabin Area Control


Panel or Cabin System
Control Panel

Speaker Drive
Module

Cabin
Speakers

To Other Zone 1
Speaker Drive
Modules

Cabin Interphone and Passenger Address Functions


System Interface
CDB Information
Status
Control
In-Flight Entertainment
Center

Cabin System
Management Unit
Passenger Address/
Cabin Interphone
Controller

No Smoking
Fasten Seat Belts
Decompression

CSS
Intersystem
Bus
ARINC 629
System Bus (2)

Master Call Lights


Cabin Area Control
Panel or Cabin System
Control Panel

Passenger Seat Functions


Attendant Call
Reading Light On/Off
In-Seat Passenger Information
Signal
In-Flight Entertainment System

Zone Management Unit

Lav (Call, Door Sw, Smoke Det)


Passenger Information Signs,
Reading Lights, Call Lights
Remaining Zone 1 OEUs

To Other
OEUs

Overhead Electronics
Unit Zone 1

Passenger Service Functions


June 2003

6-7

AIMS Cabinet (2)

EICAS

Aural Warning
Speaker (2)

ARINC 629
System Bus (4)
Warning
Electronic Unit (2)

ARINC 629
System Bus (4)

Ground Crew
Call Horn

Standby Power
Management
Panel

MIC
CALL

Flight
Deck Call

L
VHF

MIC

MIC
CALL

C
VHF

MIC
CALL

INT
VOR R L ADF
L
R

MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

R
VHF

MIC
CALL

FLT

MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

HF
L R

MIC

CAB

SPKR

SAT
1 2
V B R

PA

MIC
CALL

APP
R
LC

MKR

Audio Control
Panel (3)

Passenger Address/
Cabin Interphone Controller
Audio
Management
Unit

Flight Deck Call Switch


(P40 Service and APU
Shutdown Panel)
Center CDU

Ground Crew Call System


Ground Crew Call System
The flight crew and the ground crew
use the ground crew call system to
alert each other. The system
supplies aural and visual signals in
the flight deck and in the nose wheel
well area.

The ground crew call horn also


comes on when the airplane is on the
ground and one of these occurs:

There is an equipment cooling


failure
The air data inertial reference
unit (ADIRU) is on and there is no
ac power on the airplane.

When the flight crew selects the


ground crew call code on the cabin
interphone menu of the center
control display unit (CDU), the
ground crew call horn sounds in the
nose wheel well.
There is a flight deck call switch on
the P40 Service and APU shutdown
panel. When the ground crew
operates this switch:

The audio control panels FLT call


lights come on
A message is shown on EICAS
A chime sounds through the
aural warning speakers.

6-8

June 2003

Communications

Captain
First Officer
First Observer

Audio
Management
Unit
Cockpit Voice
Recorder Microphone

TEST

Airplane On Ground

ERASE

HEADSET
600 OHMS

Parking Brake Set

COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER

Cockpit Voice Recorder Panel

Cockpit Voice Recorder

Voice Recorder System


Voice Recorder System
The four-channel, solid-state cockpit
voice recorder with flight deck area
microphone records the most recent
30 minutes of flight crew
communications. A cockpit voice
recorder that records for 120 minutes
is also available.
Input to the voice recorder is from the
cockpit voice recorder microphone
and from the captain, first officer, and
first observer audio hot microphone
inputs to the AMU.

There is a voice recorder jack on the


service and APU shutdown panel
that permits the ground crew to
monitor flight deck conversation.
The recorder unit is in the E7
equipment rack. It includes an
underwater locator beacon (ULB).
To do a bulk erase of the cockpit
voice recorder, the airplane must be
on the ground, and the parking brake
set.

The cockpit voice recorder panel has


test and erase buttons and is on the
maintenance panel in the flight deck.
The cockpit voice recorder
microphone is on the overhead panel
in the flight deck.

June 2003

6-9

Speakers, Headsets
MIC
CALL

Microphone/PTT Inputs

L
VHF

MIC

COLLINS

MIC
CALL

C
VHF

MIC
CALL

INT

LRU FAIL

MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

R
VHF
MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

HF
L R

VOR R L ADF
L
R

MIC
CALL

FLT

MIC

CAB

PA

MIC
CALL
SPKR

SAT
1 2
APP
V B R

LC

R
MKR

KEY INTERLOCK

HF Antenna

CONTROL INPUT FAIL

Antenna
Coupler (2)

SQL/LAMP TEST
HFS-900

ACTIVE

STANDBY

VHF L

VHF C

VHF R

OFF

HF L

AM

HF R

Audio Control
Panel

HF Transceiver (2)
Collins

HF SENS
P
N
L

PHONE MIC

Audio
Management
Unit

LRU

Radio Tuning Panel (3)

CONTROL
ANTENNA

PHONE

MIC
VHF-900

AIMS Cabinet (2)

VHF Antenna (3)

SELCAL
Decoder

VHF Transceiver (3)

VHF/HF Communication Systems


VHF/HF Communication Systems
The very high frequency (VHF)
communication system supplies lineof-sight voice and data
communication from air to ground or
air to air. The short to medium range
of VHF keeps interference with
distant stations at the same
frequency to a minimum.
Each VHF communication system
includes a transceiver and a
dedicated antenna.
The high frequency (HF)
communication system permits voice
communication over distances much
farther than line-of-sight radio
systems. Communication from
aircraft to ground stations or other
aircraft is provided during long over
water flights.
Each HF communication system
includes a transceiver, an antenna
coupler, and a common antenna.
6-10

The antenna is on the leading edge


of the vertical stabilizer. The antenna
couplers are in the vertical stabilizer
behind the antenna. The antenna
coupler matches the impedance of
the transmission line to that of the
transceiver.
Frequency selection for each
transceiver is from any of the three
radio tuning panels (RTPs). Any RTP
can provide tuning data to any of the
VHF or HF transceivers.
A radio tuning switch selects one of
the five transceivers. The frequency
selectors select the desired
frequency. This shows on the liquid
crystal display standby frequency
window. The frequency transfer
switch toggles between active and
standby frequencies.

RTPs. This frequency shows on the


RTPs standby frequency window.
The flight crew selects that frequency
to tune the VHF radios.
The audio control panels supply
microphone selection, headphone
monitoring, and PTT functions.
The central maintenance computing
function (CMCF) of the AIMS tests
and monitors the VHF and HF
communication systems.
The digital flight data acquisition
function (DFDAF) of the AIMS
receives microphone keying
information. The flight data recorder
records the microphone keying
information.

The VHF radios interface with the


AIMS data communication
management function (DCMF). The
DCMF supplies tuning data to the
June 2003

Communications

ARINC 629
System Bus (4)

ARINC 629
System Bus (4)
Aural
Warning
Speaker
(2)

COLLINS
LRU FAIL
KEY INTERLOCK
CONTROL INPUT FAIL
SQL/LAMP TEST
PHONE MIC

HFS-900

Warning Electronic
Unit (2)
Audio
Management
Unit

HF Transceiver (2)

EICAS

Collins
LRU
CONTROL

AIMS
Cabinet (2)

ANTENNA

PHONE
MIC
CALL
L
VHF

MIC
VHF-900

MIC

MIC
CALL

C
VHF

MIC
CALL

INT

SELCAL
Coding Switch
VHF Transceiver (3)

VOR R L ADF
L
R

MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

R
VHF

MIC
CALL

FLT

MIC
CALL

MIC
CALL

HF
L R

MIC

CAB

SPKR

SAT
1 2
V B R

PA

MIC
CALL

APP
R
LC

MKR

Audio Control
Panel (3)

SELCAL
Decoder

SELCAL System
SELCAL System
The selective calling (SELCAL)
system monitors all communication
radios in the airplane. The system
alerts the flight crew when it receives
a ground call with the correct airplane
code. This removes the need for
continuous monitoring of the
communication radios by the flight
crew.
The SELCAL decoder receives audio
signals from the VHF and HF
communication systems.
The SELCAL decoder processes the
SELCAL messages and sends them
to the audio management unit. The
audio management unit sends a
signal to the ACP and to AIMS.

June 2003

The ACP turns the call light on. AIMS


makes a COMM medium message,
SELCAL, which shows on the EICAS
display. AIMS sends a signal to the
warning electronic unit (WEU) which
causes the hi/lo chime to sound.
These are the SELCAL indications:

A call light on the ACP


An EICAS message
A hi/lo chime.

The SELCAL supplies indications


only if the signal received has the
airplane unique SELCAL code.
The flight crew pushes the
appropriate transmit switch on the
ACP or the appropriate PTT to stop
the indications.

6-11

Satellite
Network

Aircraft Earth Station (AES)

Passenger
Telephone
System

High
Gain
Antenna

LNA/Diplexer

BSU

Combiner

AIMS
Cabinet (2)

Note: Side mount


antenna system
shown.
High
Gain
Antenna

SDU

AMU

RFU

High Power
Amplifier

High
Power
Relay

LNA/Diplexer

BSU
Ground Earth Station (GES)

SATCOM System
Satellite Communication
(SATCOM) System

systems and the ground earth


stations.

The SATCOM system transmits and


receives data and voice messages.
The system uses satellites as relay
stations for long distances. SATCOM
is more reliable than the HF
communication system because
atmospheric interference does not
have an effect on it.

AIRCRAFT EARTH STATION


DESCRIPTION

The system has the satellite network,


the ground earth stations (GES), and
the aircraft earth stations (AES).
The satellite network does a relay of
radio signals between the AES and
the GES. Each GES is a fixed radio
station that has interfaces with
communication networks through
ground links and the aircraft earth
stations through the satellite. The
AES is the SATCOM system on the
airplane that has interfaces with
different airplane communication
6-12

The basic SATCOM configuration


has a high-gain system that uses
side-mounted antennas.
The satellite data unit (SDU) is the
interface between all other related
airplane systems and the SATCOM
system. The radio frequency unit
(RFU) changes the signal from the
SDU to an L-band signal for the high
power amplifier (HPA). The HPA
supplies sufficient radio frequency
power to the antenna. The low noise
amplifier (LNA) and diplexer are one
unit. The diplexer connects transmit
signals from the HPA to the antenna.
It also connects receive signals from
the antenna to the LNA. The LNA
does an amplification of the low level
L-band signal from the antenna. The
SDU sends directional control

signals to the beam steering unit


(BSU). The BSU electronically
controls the antennas to point the
beam at the necessary satellite.
The AES has interfaces with the data
communication management system
(DCMS) for transmission and
reception of data messages. The
AES also has interfaces with the
passenger telephone system and the
audio management unit (AMU) for
voice call audio and control signals.

June 2003

Navigation
Features

COMMON COMPONENTS

NEW AVIONICS

The 777 uses many common


avionics LRUs that the 747-400, 767,
and 757 use. The use of common
avionics equipment decreases the
cost of maintenance and spares.

Air Data Inertial Reference


System (ADIRU, SAARU, ADM/
Pitot-Static)

Navigation Radios (VOR,


Marker Beacon, ILS, ADF,
DME)

Global Positioning System

Radio Altimeter System

Air Traffic Control/Mode S


System

Traffic Alert and Collision


Avoidance System

Ground Proximity Warning


System

Weather Radar System

Warning Electronic System

Clock System

The 777 uses some new avionics


systems such as the highly fault
tolerant, air data inertial reference
system (ADIRS). The ADIRS
combines the air data system and the
inertial reference system into two line
replaceable units (LRUs), the air
data inertial reference unit (ADIRU)
and the secondary attitude air data
reference unit (SAARU).
HIGH RELIABILITY
Because there are only two main
LRUs in this system instead of three
ADCs and three IRUs, there is less
weight. Also, the high reliability of the
air data inertial reference system
decreases the need for maintenance
and spares.
SATELLITE NAVIGATION
The 777 uses the newest in satellite
navigational systems, the global
positioning system (GPS). GPS
gives improved navigation accuracy.
This saves fuel and improves the
airline on-time performance.

June 2003

7-1

Air Data Inertial Reference


System

Inertial altitude
Vertical speed.

The ADIRS consists of:

If failures occur, all IRU functions are


available with:

IRU and Air Data Functions


The SAARU uses:

One ADIRU
One SAARU
Six air data modules (ADMs)
Two standby air data modules
(SADMs)
A standby attitude indicator
The air data sensors.

The ADIRS operates the same as a


system of three IRUs, two ADCs and
pressure, temperature, and angle of
attack sensors. The ADIRS sends
primary, secondary, and standby air
data and inertial reference
information to the flight deck
displays, flight controls, autopilot
system, and other airplane systems.

Four gyros
Four accelerometers
Two power supplies
One processor
A single ARINC 629 interface.

The ADIRU has one ON/OFF switch


on the overhead panel. When the
switch is ON, the ADIRU gets power
and then goes through many
operational modes before it begins
navigation.
When the On/Off switch is OFF, the
ADIRU goes off when the airplane is
on the ground and less than a certain
ground speed.

Three of the gyro and


accelerometers sensors are on the
pitch, roll, and yaw axes and the
fourth sensor pair is on a skewed
axis.
The SAARU calculates these
parameters:

Air Data Inertial Reference Unit


(ADIRU)
The ADIRU has these components:

Six ring laser gyro sensors


Six linear accelerometer sensors
Four processors
Three power supplies
Three dual-channel ARINC 629
interfaces.

The ring laser gyros and linear


accelerometers are along six nonparallel, symmetrically skewed axes.
This orientation gives a fault-tolerant
system.

ADC Function
The four processors get air data from
the air data modules. The ADIRU
gives these air data outputs:

Altitude rate
Pressure altitude
Computed airspeed
Mach number
True airspeed
Static air temperature
Total air temperature
Impact pressure
Total pressure
Static pressure
Angle-of-attack.

IRU Function
The ADIRU uses ring laser gyros and
accelerometers to sense angular
rates and linear accelerations. The
ADIRU calculates this data:

Attitude (pitch, roll, and yaw)


Position (latitude and longitude)
True heading
Magnetic heading
Inertial velocity vectors
Linear accelerations
Angular rates
Track angle
Wind speed and direction

7-2

Secondary Attitude Air Data


Reference Unit (SAARU)

Four fiber optic rate gyros


Four analog linear
accelerometers
Two processors
Three ARINC 629 interfaces.

Pitch and roll attitude and


heading
Angular rates about the airplane
pitch, roll, and yaw axes
Linear accelerations along the
pitch, roll, and yaw axes
Barometric inertial altitude
Vertical speed
Computed airspeed
True airspeed
Altitude
Altitude rate
Static air temperature
Total air temperature
Mach number
Angle of attack.

The SAARU sends pitch and roll


attitude information on an ARINC
429 data bus to the standby attitude
indicator.
The SAARU has no manual mode
control for operation. It begins
operation when power is applied to
the airplane.

The SAARU supplies pitch and roll


attitude to the standby attitude
indicators. It is also the secondary
source of inertial navigation and air
data for the PFDs, primary flight
controls system (PFCS), autopilot
flight director system (AFDS) and
other airplane systems.

ADIRS Interface

During a catastrophic failure of the


ADIRU, the SAARU gives the AFDS
reduced navigation data.

There are two AIR DATA/ATT source


select switches on the flight deck.

The captain or first officer enters


barometric correction on the onside
EFIS control panel. If one of the EFIS
control panels fail, barometric
corrections can come from the
onside CDU.

June 2003

Navigation

CDU (3)

Right AOA
Sensor

Right Pitot
Probe

Center Pitot
Probe

Center
Pitot
ADM

Pitot
SADM

Right
Pitot
ADM

To
PFDs

Static Ports

Right TAT
Probe (Option)

Left
AIMS
Cabinet

Right
AIMS
Cabinet

Flight Controls
ARINC 629
Bus (3)

AFDC
(3)

PFC (3)
SAARU

Center
Static
ADM

Left
Static
ADM

Right
Static
ADM

ADIRU
Left
Pitot
ADM

Static
SADM

C MMR
ISFD

Pneumatic
Lines

Left
Left
AOA Sensor
Pitot Probe

Left TAT
Probe

Static Ports

Air Data Inertial Reference System


ADIRS Interface (Continued)
The switches control the source of
display data for the on-side PFD. The
primary source of display data is the
ADIRU, and the secondary source of
display data is the SAARU.
The ADIRU sends data on the left
and right ARINC 629 flight control
buses and gets data from all three
ARINC 629 flight controls buses.
The SAARU sends data on the
center flight controls bus and gets
data from the left, center, and right
flight controls buses.

AIMS sends the inertial reference


data and air data to many other
airplane systems and systems
components. These include:

The center pitot probe and the center


static ports also have a standby air
data module (SADM). The ISFD gets
the 429 air data from the SADMs.

STANDBY DISPLAY

GPS
WES
TCAS
EEC
APU.

The ADIRU and SAARU store fault


data in their nonvolatile memory. You
use the maintenance access
terminal (MAT) to get the fault data.

AIMS
AFDS
PFCS
CDUs.

June 2003

Attitude
Indicated airspeed
Altitude
ILS deviation
Heading.

Air Data Sensors


Air Data Modules

The ADIRU and the SAARU send


inertial reference data and air data to
these units:

The ISFD shows this data:

Each pitot probe and static port


connects to an air data module
(ADM). The ADMs change the air
pressure into ARINC 629 digital data.
The ADIRU and SAARU get the 629
air data from the ADMs.

The AOA sensors send analog


signals to the on-side AIMS cabinet.
The TAT probe is a dual element
probe with two analog outputs. One
output goes to the right AIMS
cabinet, and the other goes to the left
AIMS cabinet.

7-3

Navigation Radios
The navigation radios supply
reference data for instrument
navigation. The flight management
computing function (FMCF) of AIMS
supplies most of the control for the
navigation radios.
VHF Omnidirectional Ranging
System
The VHF omnidirectional ranging
(VOR) system supplies bearing and
deviation signals relative to ground
stations to the FMCF and the NDs.

Automatic Direction Finder


System
The automatic direction finder (ADF)
receives radio signals from a ground
station. It supplies bearing
information to the NDs and audio to
the flight deck. Some ADF stations in
major terminal areas provide
weather information.
Each ADF system has an integral
sense and loop antenna and a
receiver. The ADF data shows on the
NDs.
Instrument Landing System

The FMCF uses VOR data to


calculate airplane position.
A dual element VOR antenna is on
the top of the vertical stabilizer.
Marker Beacon System
The marker beacon system gives
displays and aural tones in the flight
deck when the airplane passes over
a particular geographical location.
The marker beacon receiver is a
module in each VOR receiver. The
marker beacon function operates in
the left system only.

The instrument landing system (ILS)


supplies precision approach
guidance during instrument
approaches to the NDs, PFDs, and
AFDCs. The FMCF uses ILS data to
calculate airplane position.

Navigation Radio Tuning


The flight management computing
function (FMCF) of AIMS tunes the
VOR, ILS, DME, and ADF systems.
The onside control display units
(CDUs) supply manual tuning if
AIMS fails.
Audio Interface
Audio from the VOR, ILS, DME, ADF,
and marker beacon systems goes to
headsets and speakers in the flight
deck through the audio management
unit.
Fault Reporting And Testing
The central maintenance computing
function (CMCF) of AIMS supplies
test and fault reporting functions for
the navigation radio systems.

The PFDs show localizer and


glideslope deviation. When the EFIS
control panels are in the APP mode,
the NDs show:

ILS course pointer


ILS source annunciator
DME distance
Localizer and glideslope
deviation
Selected ILS course
ILS frequency/identifier.

Distance Measuring Equipment


System

The distance measuring equipment


(DME) system supplies slant range
distance between the airplane and a
ground station to the FMCF and the
NDs. The distance shows on the
NDs. The FMCF uses DME distance
to calculate airplane position.

When the airplane is on approach,


the AFDCs send a discrete to each
multi-mode receiver (MMR). This
discrete prevents ILS test and tuning.
The AFDCs also control the position
of the localizer and glideslope
antenna switches.

The DME system supplies


suppression pulses to the ATC
transponders and TCAS. This is
because DME frequencies are in the
ATC and TCAS frequency range.

The ILS system uses the localizer


radome antennas during approach.
The system uses the VOR antenna
to help the pilot maintain a straight
track during takeoff.
The system uses the glideslope track
antennas on the leading edge of the
nose landing gear doors when the
landing gear is down and locked.

7-4

June 2003

Navigation
Alternate
Tune

Systems
ARINC 629
Bus (3)

Manual Tune
CDU (3)
A

DME
Antenna (2)
Primary Flight
Display

To AMU
DME Interrogator (2)
A
ADF Antenna (2)

5
+10
+02
TFC

To AMU

AIMS

ADF Receiver (2)

+02

-10

Navigation Display

Marker Beacon
Antenna
RF
Power
Dividers
VOR Antenna

A
To AMU
VOR/MB Receiver (2)

Localizer
Antenna
Switches

Localizer Antenna (2)


(Radome)

Glideslope
Capture
Antenna (2)
(Radome)

Glideslope
Antenna
Switches

To AMU

MMR (3)

AFDC (3)

GPWC

Glideslope
Track Antenna (2)
(Leading Edge, Nose
Gear Doors)

Navigation Radios
June 2003

7-5

Flight Controls
ARINC 629
Bus (3)

ADIRU

Left GPS
Antenna
Left MMR

AIMS

Right GPS
Antenna
Right MMR

Global Positioning System


Global Positioning System
The global positioning system (GPS)
uses navigation satellites to supply
accurate airplane position to the
FMCF, ADIRU, and the flight crew.
The GPS calculates this data:

Airplane latitude
Airplane longitude
Airplane altitude
Time.

The GPS receiver is a card in the


multi-mode receivers (MMR).

The ADIRS uses GPS position data


to aid in the automatic calibration of
the inertial sensors in the ADIRU.
This reduces ADIRU position drift as
the airplane flies.
The FMCF uses GPS position as the
prime source for the calculation of
airplane position. It is also the source
for accurate time.
The GPS reports faults and test
results to the central maintenance
computing function (CMCF) of AIMS.

The ADIRU supplies inertial


reference position and air data
parameters, through the data
conversion gateway function of
AIMS, to the GPS. The GPS uses
these parameters to find the best
satellites during system initialization.

7-6

June 2003

Navigation

RA
Antennas

Left
AFDC

Left RA
Transceiver

GPWC
AIMS
RA
Antennas

Center
AFDC
Center RA
Transceiver

Primary Flight
Display
TCAS
Computer

RA
Antennas

Right
AFDC

Right RA
Transceiver

Radio Altimeter System


Radio Altimeter System
The radio altimeter (RA) system
supplies the pilots and airplane
systems with altitude above the
terrain. The system operates at low
altitude (0 to 2,500 feet).

The RA system also supplies radio


altitude data to these units:

The system has three transceivers


each with its own transmit and
receive antennas. The transceivers
calculate the radio altitude, which
shows on the primary flight display
(PFD).

Autopilot flight director computers


(AFDCs)
Ground proximity warning
computer (GPWC)
Traffic alert and collision
avoidance (TCAS) computer.

The central maintenance computer


function (CMCF) of AIMS does a test
of the RA system.

Each pilot can select a radio


minimums altitude on the onside
EFIS control panel. The radio
minimums show on the onside PFD
above the radio altitude display.
When the radio altitude is equal to or
less than the radio minimums, the
radio minimums display and the
radio altitude change color and
momentarily flash.

June 2003

7-7

TCAS Directional
Antenna (Top)

TCAS Directional
Antenna (Bottom)

Transponder Panel
MODE S

BENDIX/KING
TPR
ALT

ATC Antenna
(Top)

WES

BENDIX/KING

DATA IN
TOP
BOT

TP TCAS PROCESSOR
T1 TOP ANTENNA EL1
B1 BOTTOM ANTENN

TCAS
MAINT
RESERVED
RESERVED

RA RADIO ALTIME
PT PITCH ATITUA
RL ROLL ALTIATA
HD HEADING DATA
RD RA DISY #1 & #2
PP PROGRAM PINS
OK NO FAILURE

066-50000- 8101
TCAS PROCESSOR

TPA-81A

TEST

CAUTION

SW MOD

01/01

Left, Right
Radio Altimeter
Transceivers

GPWC

ATC Antenna
(Bottom)

ATC Coaxial
Switches

TCAS Computer
ATC Mode S
Transponder (2)

MINS
RADIO
BARO

IN
FPV

BARO
HPA

MTRS

RST

STD

VOR MAP
APP
PLN
VOR L
CTR

OFF

40 80 160
20
320 VOR R
10

OFF
640
ADF R

TFC

ADF L
WXR

STA

WPT

ARPT

DME
Interrogator
(2)

AIMS

DATA

+02

POS

EFIS Control Panel (2)

5
+10

TFC

Primary Flight Display

+02

-10

Navigation Display

Air Traffic Control/Mode S System and Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System
Air Traffic Control/Mode S
Transponder System
The ATC/Mode S transponder
system lets ground facilities monitor
airplane movement through
controlled airspace. The ground
facilities monitor airplane location
and altitude:
The transponder panel permits the
flight crew to select the:

Left or right ATC/Mode S


transponder for operation
Altitude reporting mode
Airplane ATC identification code
Initiation of the identification
pulse.

The ATC/Mode S transponder gets


ADIRS altitude data from AIMS and
uses it for the altitude reporting
function.

The ATC/Mode S system supplies


suppression pulses to the DME
interrogators and TCAS.

maneuver to prevent a collision. If the


other airplane has TCAS, a
maneuver coordination is done
through the ATC/Mode S data link.

Traffic Alert and Collision


Avoidance System

The TCAS computer sends data to


the NDs and the PFDs through
AIMS. The traffic button on the EFIS
control panel causes the location and
track of other airplanes to show on
the NDs. The PFDs show the flight
crew how to change or hold vertical
speed. Aural alerts come on in the
flight deck through the WES.

TCAS gives alerts to the flight crew of


possible collisions with other
transponder airplanes. TCAS uses
the ATC/Mode S transponder system
to send TCAS data to other TCASequipped airplanes. TCAS gives two
types of advisories to the flight crew.
One type of advisory is the traffic
advisory (TA) that gives indication of
other airplanes in the area. The other
type of advisory is the resolution
advisory (RA). The RA gives an
indication to the flight crew to change
the direction of the airplane or hold
the present course to prevent a
possible collision.
If an airplane is a collision threat, the
TCAS computer selects the best

7-8

TCAS antennas are on the top and


bottom of the airplane. The antennas
are directional.
Fault Reporting and Testing
The central maintenance computing
function (CMCF) of AIMS supplies
test and fault reporting functions for
the ATC/Mode S transponder and
TCAS systems.
June 2003

Navigation
GS 315 TAS 312
190 o/15

HDG

131

MAG

Inertial Reference Data

VOR L 116.80
DME 82.5

12

15

Air Data

TERRAIN

18

GPWC

20

TERR

AIMS

Central Maint Data


General Purpose Data
PFD and ND
Faults, Results, Displays
WX RADAR

Aural
Warning
Speakers

WES

Bendix
Air Transport Avionics

R/T
ANT
IND

WARNING
WARNING

CON
WG SW
GYRO
AIR
TEST

CAUTION
CAUTION

WXR R/T
GND PROX
G/S
INHIBIT

RA
Transceiver (3)

GND a

FLAP
OVRD

GEAR
OVRD

OVRDw

OVRDw

PROX

G/S INHB a

RETRACT
270K-.82M

TCAS Computer

TERR
OVRD
OVRD

Glideslope Deviation and GPS


Ground Proximity
Warning Computer

Ground Proximity
Warning Module

MMR (2)

Ground Proximity Warning System


Ground Proximity Warning
System
The ground proximity warning
system (GPWS) gives alerts or
warnings to the flight crew of not safe
terrain clearance. Alerts and
warnings have aural and visual
indications. These indications
continue until the pilots correct the
condition that started the warning or
alert.
The GPWS uses these inputs to start
alerts and warnings:

The GPWS supplies these prioritized


modes when the airplane is between
30 and 2450 feet of radio altitude:

AIMS - includes air data, inertial


data, flight management data,
central maintenance data, flap
position, landing gear position,
and stall warning data
Instrument landing system
Radio altimeter.

GPWS outputs go to these functions:

data and failure data


GND PROX annunciator light
Warning electronic system for
audio amplification and control of
the warning lights.

Mode 1 - too much descent rate


Mode 2 - too much terrain closure
rate
Mode 3 - too much descent after
takeoff or go-around
Mode 4 - not safe terrain
clearance when not in the landing
configuration
Mode 5 - below glideslope
deviation
Mode 6 - radio altimeter aural
callouts with gear down
Mode 7 - windshear condition
Terrain awareness mode
Terrain clearance floor mode.

The system supplies voice warnings


to help the pilots identify the cause of
the warning or alert.
The guarded FLAP OVRD and
GEAR OVRD switches prevent some
modes. The FLAP OVRD switch
gives a signal that is the same as
flaps extended. The GEAR OVRD
switch gives a signal that is the same
as landing gear down.
The GPWS sends discretes to TCAS
and to the WXR. These discretes put
a priority on the warnings that can
come from the three systems.
The terrain awareness mode uses a
world-wide terrain data base to give
warning of terrain proximity.
The terrain clearance floor mode
uses data for the landing airport to
make a safe approach.

AIMS - includes PFD and ND

June 2003

7-9

5
+10
+02

Weather Radar
Antenna Assembly

TFC

+02

-10

Navigation Display
Bendix
Air Transport Avionics

WX RADAR

ARINC 453

R/T

Inhibit

ANT

AIMS

Systems
CDU (3)
ARINC 629
Bus (3)

IND
CON
WG SW
GYRO

GPWC

AIR

MINS
RADIO
BARO

TEST

ARINC 429
General Purpose
and IRS Data

RADAR TRANSCEIVER
RTA-4A

WES

Weather Radar RT

Aural
Warning
Speakers

IN
FPV

RST

STD

VOR MAP
APP
PLN
VOR L
CTR

OFF

40 80 160
20
320 VOR R
10

TFC

OFF
640
ADF R

ADF L

WX RADAR
NORM

BARO
HPA

MTRS

WXR

STA

WPT

ARPT

DATA

POS

TEST
SYS L

SYS R

TILT
5

MID
PCIP
LEVEL
MAX

EFIS Control Panel (2)

15
UP

DOWN

GND RTN

TURB DET
PRECIP

DOPPLER

15
5
OFF

RA Xcvr (3)

ON

ONLY BOTH ONLY

Weather Radar Control Panel

Weather Radar System


Weather Radar System
The weather radar system shows the
flight crew weather conditions along
the flight path. This lets them change
the flight path to go around bad
weather conditions. The flight crew
also uses the weather radar system
as a navigational aid.
The weather radar
receiver/transmitter (RT) sends
weather display data to the AIMS on
a ARINC 453 data bus. AIMS then
shows a four-color weather display
on the NDs.
The on-side EFIS control panel
selects weather returns to show on
the ND and also controls the range
for the weather display.
The weather radar button on the
EFIS control panel selects weather
returns to show on the on-side ND.

The flight crew selects the operation


mode, receiver gain, and antenna tilt
angle on the weather radar panel.
When the flight crew selects the
weather mode on the weather radar
panel:

Heavy rainfall shows in red


Moderate rainfall shows in yellow
Light rainfall shows in green
In the turbulence mode,
turbulence from heavy rainfall
shows in magenta
Windshear conditions show with
a special symbol to give a
warning to the flight crew.

The map mode can show coastlines


or large bodies of water.

conditions that cause a windshear. If


it finds these conditions, it makes an
aural warning and shows a special
display on the ND. Because a
windshear is most dangerous when
the airplane is at low altitude, the
weather radar comes on
automatically on the ground during
takeoff and when the airplane goes
below 2200 feet during approach.
Antenna attitude stabilization is done
by the ADIRS for horizontal scan.
You put the mode selector switch of
the weather radar control panel in the
TEST position to do a system test.
The CMCF of AIMS stores weather
radar system faults.

Weather returns show on the ND in


all EFIS modes but PLAN, full rose
APPROACH, and full rose VOR.
The weather radar has a predictive
windshear mode that can find

7-10

June 2003

Navigation
WARNING

ARINC 629
System Buses (3)

CAUTION

Left Master
Warning Light

Left Aural
Warning Speaker

Left Warning
Electronic Unit
TCAS Computer
Discrete
Analog
Inputs

Weather Radar

Left Stick
Shaker
Actuator

Ground Proximity
Warning Computer

AIMS

WARNING
CAUTION

Right Master
Warning Light

Right Aural
Warning Speaker
Right Warning
Electronic Unit

Right Stick
Shaker
Actuator

Warning Electronic System


Warning Electronic System

WES performs these functions:

The warning electronic system


(WES) supplies visual and aural
indications of incorrect airplane
system conditions to the flight crew.
The system also turns on the stick
shaker actuators when the airplane
is near a stall condition.

The system has two warning


electronic units (WEUs). Each WEU
has two internal channels. The
channels do the same functions. The
system receives inputs from sensors,
airframe, and avionics systems. The
ARINC 629 system buses supply
most of the data.

June 2003

Master warning lights control


Landing and takeoff configuration
warning
Altitude alert
Alert and warning aurals control
and amplification
Stall warning
Speed tape parameters
calculations
Auto-slat deployment
Stabilizer green band calculation
and selection.

Outputs go to these:

The aural warning speakers


The master warning lights
The stick shakers
The AIMS for displays and
maintenance functions.

7-11

MAN
UTC

CHR

DAY

MO/YR
DATE

MIC
MAP

TIME

CLOCK

AIMS

ET/CHR
Glareshield Panel (2)

RUN

RUN

HLD

HLDY
MM
HD
RESET

Clock (2)

Clock System
Clock System
There are two clocks in the flight
deck, one on the captain and the
other on the first officer instrument
panel.

The AIMS supplies global positioning


system (GPS) time to the clock. The
flight crew selects UTC manual input
or GPS UTC time to show on the
clock.

Each clock shows:

Universal time (coordinated)


(UTC)
Date (Day, month, and year)
Elapsed time in hours and
minutes
Chronograph time in minutes
and seconds.

The airplane information


management system (AIMS)
receives clock UTC through ARINC
429 data buses.

7-12

June 2003

Autopilot Flight Director System


Features

System Description

SYSTEM REDUNDANCY

Controls

The autopilot flight director system


(AFDS) has three channels that
supply automatic control of the
airplane and flight director guidance.
When selected, the system controls
the airplane on the selected flight
path and at the selected speed.

Indication

SIMILARITIES
The 777 autopilot flight director
system is like the autoflight system
on Boeing 757/767 and 747-400
airplanes.There are differences in
the way the AFDS interfaces with the
flight control system.

June 2003

8-1

Autopilot Engage
Switch

Autopilot Engage
Switch

Legend:
Mechanical Connection

Mode Control Panel


(P55)
AIMS
Airplane
Sensors

Nav
Sensors

Systems ARINC
629 Bus (3)

Backdrive
Actuator (6)

Position Transducers

TO/GA
Switch (2)

PFC (3)

ACE (4)

PCU
Elevator
Aileron
Rudder

AFDC (3)

Flight Controls ARINC 629 Bus (3)


Disengage
Switch (2)

ADIRU

SAARU

AIMS

AFDS Block Diagram


System Description
The autopilot automatically controls
airplane heading, track, speed,
altitude, navigation paths, and goaround. The flight director provides
guidance commands for these
functions plus for takeoff. The
autopilot can do fail-operational and
fail-passive approach and landings.
These are the AFDS components:

One mode control panel (MCP)


Three autopilot flight director
computers (AFDCs)
Six backdrive actuators
Two control wheel disengage
switches
Two takeoff/go-around switches
(TO/GA).

The AFDS does not have servos to


move the primary flight control
surfaces. The primary flight
computers (PFCs), the actuator
control electronics (ACEs), and
8-2

power control units (PCUs) control


the movement of the surfaces.
There are two autopilot engage
switches on the MCP. All available
autopilot channels engage when the
flight crew pushes either switch.
The AFDS autopilot commands go to
the PFCs through the flight controls
ARINC 629 buses. The PFCs select
which signal to use by mid-value
selection.
The PFCs process and change the
autopilot commands to surface
commands that go to the ACEs and
backdrive commands that go to the
AFDCs.
The backdrive commands operate
the backdrive actuators. The
actuators move the control columns,
control wheels, and rudder pedals to
a position that represents the
autopilot command.

Autopilot commands go to the rudder


system only during automatic
approach and landings.
The AFDS does not control the
horizontal stabilizer. Pitch trim
control is from the primary flight
control system.
Controls
Mode selection and engage switches
for the autopilot, flight director, and
autothrottle are on the MCP. The
TOGA switches are on the thrust
levers.
Indication
The PFDs show the AFDS selected
values, mode annunciations, and
AFDS status annunciations.
Warning, caution, and advisory
messages show on the EICAS.

June 2003

Autopilot Flight Director System


A/T ARM
L
R

IAS

IAS

A/P

TRK

HDG

MACH

LNAV

TRK

OFF

5
F/D
ON

OFF

CLB
CON

VNAV

A/T

FLCH

FPA

V/S

ALTITUDE

FPA

A/P
AUTO

25

AUTO

SEL

BANK
LIMIT

LOC

HOLD

DISENGAGE

1000

DOWN

VS/FPA

APP

HOLD

UP

F/D
ON

OFF

Mode Control Panel

TO/GA Switches

P10 Control Stand

Autothrottle
Engage Status
Mode
Roll Mode
Pitch Mode
Selected
Speed

SPD

138

LNAV

VNAV

LOC

G/S

5 100

Selected
Altitude

110.90/120
DME 25.3

200

A/P

Altitude
Tape
6

180
5 000

2
1

160
Speed
Tape

14

3
2

4 800

Selected
Vertical
Speed

REF

120
4 600
100

2400

2
6

1000

Actual
Vertical
Speed

RADIO

150
L

135 H

MAG

29.86

IN

Selected
Heading
(or Track)

Primary Flight Display

Controls and Indications


June 2003

8-3

Electrical Power
Features

Electrical Power System


Components

Electrical Power System


Schematic

Electrical Power System


Control

Controls and Indication

NO BREAK POWER TRANSFER


Two power sources momentarily
supply power to the same bus
(parallel sources) when a bus
switches from one source to another.
This permits no-break power
transfers.
THE ELECTRICAL LOAD
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (ELMS)
The ELMS is responsible for the
distribution of electrical power to the
airplane. It also supplies control logic
for some airplane systems. Thus, the
ELMS replaces complex relay logic
and circuit cards that are on existing
airplanes.
TWO EXTERNAL POWER
CONNECTORS
There are two external power
connectors on the 777. Each can
receive 90 kVA of electrical power
for ground operations.
BACKUP GENERATORS
Each engine has a 20 kVA generator
as a backup power source for the
transfer buses.
RAT GENERATOR
A ram air turbine (RAT) 7 kVA
generator is a backup power source
for the flight instrument buses.
SYNOPTIC DISPLAY
The electrical power synoptic display
shows a real time picture of the
electrical power system
configuration.

June 2003

9-1

E10 Rack
RAT
IDG

E5 Rack
P30 External
Power Panel

APU Generator

Main Equipment
Center

RAT Generator

Backup Generator

Electrical Power System Components


Electrical Power System
Components
The electrical power system supplies
115 volt ac and 28 volt dc electrical
power to the airplane. These are the
power sources:

Two integrated drive generators


(IDGs)
APU generator
Two backup generators
Ram air turbine (RAT) generator
Main and APU batteries
External power.

There is one IDG on each engine.


They are the primary source of
ac power in flight. An additional
source of ac power is the APU
generator. Each generator supplies
up to 120 kVA.

9-2

There is one backup generator on


each engine. They are variable
speed variable frequency
generators. Each supplies up to 20
kVA of ac power. A backup converter
changes the variable frequency
power to constant frequency power.
Each backup generator also contains
two permanent magnet generators
(PMGs) that supply power to three
flight control dc (FCDC) power
supply assemblies.
A RAT generator is another source
of backup ac power. It supplies up to
7 kVA.
For ground operations, there are two
external power connectors. These
are on the forward, right side of the
fuselage. Each external power
connector is rated for 90 kVA of
ac power.

These electrical system components


are in the main equipment center:

Generator control units (GCU) (4)


Bus power control unit (BPCU)
Backup converter
Electrical load management
system (ELMS) panels (7)
FCDC power supply assemblies
(PSA) (2)
Transformer rectifier units (TRU)
(5)
Battery charger
FCDC batteries (2).

One FCDC PSA and its related


battery are in the E5 rack.
The main battery is in the main
equipment center. The APU battery
and charger are in the E10 rack. Both
batteries supply 28 volt dc power.

June 2003

Electrical Power
L IDG

BU
Gen

PMG

APU
Gen

L Main AC Bus

L UB
ELCU

Backup
Converter

Main Bat
Charger

GH AC Bus

R TBB
R UB
ELCU
R Xfr Bus

GH TRU

Gnd Svc
Xfr Rly

TRU C2
R TRU
Rly

GH DC Bus
Gnd Svc
Sel Rly

TRU C2
R DC Bus

L DC Bus

Gnd Svc Bus


Main
Bat Rly

AC Stby
Pwr Rly

Main
Battery
L FCDC PSA

Capt- F/O
Bus Tie Rly

Bat - Capt
Iso Rly

Cpt Flt Inst Bus

Bat Bus

Hot Bat Bus

PMG
(L1)
Bat

R Util Bus

TRU C1
Rly
DC Bus
Tie Rly TRU C1

L TRU

Gnd
Hdlg
Rly

R GCB

R CCB

L CCB

R IDG

R Main AC Bus

R BTB

L Util Bus

BU
Gen

PEPC

L BTB

L TBB

PMG

Rat
Gen
SEPC

APB

L GCB

L Xfr Bus

SEC
EP

Standby Bus

APU Bat
Charger

F/O Flt Inst Bus

APU Bat Bus

Gnd Pwr
Bat Rly
Static
Inverter

APU
Battery

Bat Bus #2
C FCDC PSA

Bat
PMG
(L2,R2)

Bat
PMG
(R1)

R FCDC PSA

Electrical Power System Schematic


Electrical Power System
The electrical power system normally
operates as two independent left and
right power channels. Each channel
has a main ac bus. The left main ac
bus receives power from the left IDG
and the right bus receives power
from the right IDG. The APU
generator and external power
connections are also sources of ac
power for either main bus.
The right main ac bus supplies power
to the ground service bus. When the
right bus does not have power, the
APU generator or primary external
connector can supply power to the
ground service bus.
On the ground, the APU generator or
primary external power source
supply power to the ground handling
bus.
Five TRUs make 28 volt dc power
from the ac power.
June 2003

The hot battery bus and APU battery


bus receive power from the ground
service bus through the main and
APU battery chargers.
The standby bus normally receives
power from the left main transfer bus.
If no ac power is available, the
standby inverter supplies power to
the standby bus.
Backup generators operate when the
engines are running. They supply
power to the backup converter. If a
main ac bus loses power, the
converter supplies power to the
related transfer bus.

Small batteries prevent power


interruptions during power transfers.
These are the acronyms for the
above electrical power system
components:

If the backup generators are not


available, the RAT generator
supplies power to the flight
instrument buses.
Three FCDC PSAs receive power
from the dc buses, hot battery bus,
and PMGs in the backup generator.

APB - auxiliary power breaker


BTB - bus tie breaker
BU - backup
CCB - converter circuit breaker
ELCU - electrical load control unit
FCDC - flight control dc
GCB - generator circuit breaker
IDG - integrated drive generator
PEPC - primary external power
contactor
PMG - permanent magnet
generator
PSA - power supply assembly
RAT - ram air turbine
SEPC - secondary external
power contactor
TBB - transfer bus breaker
TRU - transformer rectifier unit
UBR - utility bus relay
XFR - transfer.
9-3

L IDG

APU
Gen

L GCU

R IDG
APU
GCU

BU
Conv

Sec
EP

Pri
EP

R GCU

BPCU
P100
Left Power
Panel

Large
Loads

P300
Auxiliary Power
Panel

P200
Right Power
Panel

Large
Loads

Large
Loads
P320
Ground Hdlg/Svc
Distribution Panel

P110
Left Power Mgmt
Panel
CCU/SIUs

Small
Loads

Small
Loads

P310
Stby Power Mgmt
Panel
CCU/SIUs

P210
Right Power Mgmt
Panel
CCU/SIUs

Small
Loads

ELMS
Small
Loads
Airplane
Systems
Legend:
Control and Communication
Power

Main
Battery

RAT Generator

RAT
GCU

ARINC 629
System Bus (3)

Electrical Power System Control


Electrical Power System Control

BACKUP CONVERTER CONTROL

GCU AND BPCU CONTROL

The backup converter monitors,


gives protection, and controls the
backup generators and power
switching for the transfer buses. The
backup converter controls the
backup generator voltage, the TBBs,
and the CCBs.

The generator control units (GCUs)


and bus power control unit (BPCU)
monitor, give protection, and control
switching for the main ac buses. The
left and right GCUs control:

Generator control relays (GCR)


GCBs
BTBs
IDG voltage
IDG frequency.

The APU GCU controls the APB and


the APU voltage and frequency.
The bus power control unit controls:

EPCs
Ground handling relay
Ground service select relay
Ground service transfer relay.

9-4

ELECTRICAL LOAD
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (ELMS)
The ELMS has seven panels for
distribution, monitor, and protection
of electrical power. The ELMS
computers replace complex relay
logic and circuit cards used on other
airplanes. ELMS components are in
the power panels and the power
management panels.
POWER PANELS

breakers and contactors are in the


power panels. The GCUs and BPCU
control these breakers and
contactors.
POWER MANAGEMENT PANELS
The three power management
panels send power to loads that use
less than 20 amps. They have a
computing and communications unit
(CCU) and signal interface units
(SIUs) that monitor loads and control
many switching components in the
seven ELMS panels.
GROUND SERVICE/HANDLING
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
The ground service/handling
distribution panel sends power to the
ground handling and ground service
buses. They do not have processors.

The three power panels receive


power and send power to loads that
use 20 amps or more. The main
June 2003

Electrical Power
BACKUP
WINDOW HEAT

ELECTRICAL
APU
ON

BATTERY
IFE/PASS CABIN/
SEATS UTILITY

ON

LEFT

OFF

RIGHT

START
OFF

ON

OFF a
ON

OFF

ON

AUTO

OFF

APU GEN

OFF a

L BUS TIE

ON

OFF

FAULT

ON

L MAIN

ON

w
a

OFF

w
a

R XFR

R
GEN
CTRL

R MAIN

BACKUP GEN
L
R

ON

ON

OFF a

OFF

ON

OFF a

DRIVE

ISLN a

AVAIL

L XFR

ON

Backup Window Heat Panel (P61)

AUTOw
PRIMARY
EXT PWR

SECONDARY
EXT PWR

AVAIL
L
GEN
CTRL

BAT

R BUS TIE

AUTOw
ISLN a

STANDBY
POWER

DRIVE

DRIVE DISC

Electrical Panel (P5)

Controls and Indications


Controls and Indications

SYNOPTIC DISPLAY

MAINTENANCE PAGE

CONTROLS

The electrical power synoptic display


shows a real time summary of the
electrical power system
configuration. This synoptic has
indications for these functions:

The maintenance page shows


electrical system data. This page
includes these indications:

The electrical power system control


panel is on the P5 overhead panel. It
includes controls and indications for
these electrical system functions:

Main battery
IFE/passenger seats
Cabin/utility
APU generator
Left and right bus tie
Primary and secondary external
power
Left and right backup generator
Left and right generator
Left and right generator drive
disconnect.

IDGs
APU generator
Backup generators
External power
Bus tie breakers
Main ac buses
Transfer buses
Main and APU batteries.

AC and dc voltages
AC frequencies
AC loads
DC currents
Generator oil temperatures
Oil level status
Oil filter status
Fly-by-wire (FBW) voltage and
current.

The panel also has the APU start


selector.
A guarded, standby power switch is
on the P61 overhead maintenance
panel.
June 2003

9-5

APU
GEN

ISLN

R BUS TIE

L BUS TIE

PRI
EXT PWR

SEC
EXT PWR

R MAIN
R UTIL

L XFR

R XFR

L GEN
CTRL

R GEN
CTRL

DRIVE

BACKUP
GEN

R DRIVE

MAIN BAT

28
12 CHG

VOLTS
AMPS

VOLTS
AMPS

27
10 DISCH

Electrical Power Synoptic Display

Synoptic Display

PAGE 1/2

ELECTRICAL

L IDG

R IDG

APU GEN

PRI EXT
PWR

SEC EXT
PWR

BACKUP
CONV

RAT
GEN

AC-V

115

115

115

FREQ

400

400

400

LOAD

00.0

0.50

00.0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

L TRU

C1 TRU

C2 TRU

R TRU

MAIN
BAT

APU/
BAT

DC-V

28

28

28

28

28

27

DC-A

12 CHG

25

12

11

30

10 DIS
BACKUP
R GEN

L IDG

R IDG

OUT TEMP

27

57

25

62

33

RISE TEMP

12

14

--

OIL LEVEL

SERVICE

NORMAL

NORMAL

NORMAL

--

OIL FILTER

NORMAL

NORMAL

NORMAL

BLOCKED

--

L GEN

FBW
C

DC-V

28

28

28

DC-A

14

15

15

DATE

20 AUG 96

UTC

CONV

18:54:04

Electrical Power Maintenance Page

Maintenance Page
9-6

June 2003

Fuel
Features

WATER DETECTION

Fuel Tanks and Vent System

FUEL CAPACITY

Ultrasonic sensors find water in the


bottom of a tank. The primary display
system shows a maintenance page
message as an alert to the ground
crew of water in a tank.

Fuel Quantity Indicating


System

Controls and Indications

One center tank and two main tanks


hold 306,000 pounds (139,000 kgs)
in the 777-200ER and the 777-300.
The 777-200 has a smaller center
tank, so the airplane holds 209,000
pounds (94,700 kgs).
FUEL TANK COMPONENT
REPLACEMENT WITHOUT
DEFUELING
Many fuel system components are
removable from the rear spar without
removal of fuel.
AUTOMATIC CENTER TANK
SCAVENGE
When the fuel in the center tank gets
low, the main tanks supply the
engines. The remaining fuel in the
center tank moves to the main tanks.

Pressure Refuel System

FUEL SYSTEM SYNOPTIC


DISPLAY

Engine and APU Fuel Feed


Systems

This synoptic display shows a


schematic of the fuel feed system.

Jettison and Defuel Systems

AUTOMATIC FUEL JETTISON


SYSTEM
The fuel jettison system moves fuel
overboard to decrease airplane
gross weight. This prevents an
overweight landing. The pilots start
the jettison system operation.
Operation stops automatically at the
maximum landing weight. The pilots
can also manually select the quantity
of fuel for jettison.

WATER SCAVENGE
Each tank has water scavenge
pumps that operate continuously.
ULTRASONIC FUEL QUANTITY
INDICATING SYSTEM (FQIS)
The FQIS uses an ultrasonic system
and an advanced microprocessor to
measure fuel quantity.

June 2003

10-1

777- 200ER and - 300 Fuel Tank Capacities


Main Tank (each)
Center Tank
Totals

Gallons
9,560
26,100
45,220

Liters
36 200
98 800
171 200

Lbs.*
64626
176,436
305,687

Kgs.*
29 322
80 028
138 672

* Density = 6.76 lb/gal (.81 kg/l)


Vent Surge
Tank
Right Main
Tank

Dry Bay
Left Main
Tank
Vent Surge
Tank

Dry Bay
Center Tank

Fuel Tanks and Vent System


Fuel Tanks

Fuel Vent System

The fuel system has three fuel tanks:


two main tanks and one center tank.
The tanks are part of the wing
structure and the center wing
section.

The fuel vent system keeps the fuel


tanks near ambient pressure during
all flight phases, airplane attitudes,
and refueling/defueling operations.
Each fuel tank is vented, through
channels in the wing, to the surge
tanks.

Most fuel system components are


inside the tanks. These are the
components on the rear spar:

Boost pumps
Scavenge jet pumps
Valve actuators.

The vent channels also permit fuel


overflow into the surge tank if
necessary.

You can remove these components


on the rear spar without defueling.

10-2

June 2003

Fuel
TOTAL FUEL 155.8
TEMP + 15C

155.8

62.7

30.4

62.7

LBS X
1000

FQIS
Processor Unit
EICAS Display
AIMS

P28 Integrated Refuel Panel

ARINC 629
System Buses (3)

Temperature
Sensor

Densitometer (3)
Water
Detector (3)

Tank
Unit (60)

Fuel Quantity Indicating System


Fuel Quantity Indicating System
(FQIS)
COMPONENTS
The fuel quantity indicating system
(FQIS) does these functions:

Measures the fuel quantity


Calculates the fuel weight
Controls fueling operations
Shows when there is water in the
tanks.

These are the FQIS components:

Tank units
Densitometers
Wiring harnesses
Water detectors
FQIS processor unit.

tank. The wiring harnesses go from


the tank units and densitometers to
electrical connectors on the front and
rear spars. Wiring from the
connectors go to the processor.
OPERATION
The processor sends a signal to each
tank unit to find the fuel height. The
tank unit transmitter sends a sound
pulse from the bottom of the tank to
the fuel surface. The processor
measures the fuel height by the time
for the pulse to give a reflection back
to the bottom. The processor uses
fuel height to calculate the fuel
volume and then multiplies fuel
volume and density to calculate the
fuel weight.

The processor sends fuel quantity


data to the AIMS and the integrated
refuel panel.
There is an ultrasonic water sensor
at the bottom of each tank. They
send a signal to the processor if there
is water in the tank.
BITE
The processor has a different
channel for each tank so that a single
fault does not cause loss of indication
in more than one tank. Built-in test
equipment (BITE) finds the FQIS
faults and sends the data
to the AIMS.

There are 60 tank units in the three


tanks. Each tank unit is an ultrasonic
transmitter/receiver that measures
fuel height. The densitometers
measure the fuel density in each
June 2003

10-3

Controls and Indications

FUEL JETTISON CONTROL

FUEL MANTENANCE PAGE

CONTROLS

Controls on the fuel jettison panel


include:

There is one fuel maintenance page


for the left and right tanks, and one
page for the center tank. The
maintenance pages show this
information:

Controls on the fuel management


panel include:

Forward and aft boost pump


switches for each main tank
Forward and aft crossfeed valve
switches
Left and right override/jettison
pump switches for the center
tank.

Fuel pump and crossfeed valve


switch positions go through the
ARINC 629 system buses to the
ELMS. When the fuel pump switches
are on, the ELMS supplies power to
the pumps. When a valve switch is
on, the ELMS supplies power to open
the valve.

Left and right nozzle valve


switches
Fuel to remain selector
ARM switch.

The ELMS monitors fuel jettison


switch positions through the ARINC
629 system buses. When the jettison
system is armed and at least one
jettison nozzle valve is commanded
open, the ELMS supplies power to
the main tank jettison pumps and the
jettison isolation valves.

FUEL QUANTITY INDICATION

REFUEL SYSTEM CONTROL

FUEL SYNOPTIC DISPLAY

Both the FQIS processor and the


ELMS control refueling and
defueling. The integrated refuel
panel sends load select quantity,
load select control, and valve switch
positions to the FQIS processor. The
processor stores the load select fuel
quantity in memory. The processor
sends valve switch positions to the
ELMS through the ARINC 629
system buses. The ELMS supplies
power to open and close the refuel or
defuel valves.

The fuel synoptic display shows a


schematic of the fuel system. This
schematic shows the configuration of
the fuel feed system. It includes this
information:

Surge tank overfill sensors send a


signal through the IRP to the ELMS.
If too much fuel is in the surge tank
the ELMS removes power from the
refuel valves to close the valves.
10-4

Fuel quantity
Fuel density
Maintenance messages
Fuel height at each tank unit
Velocity of sound at each tank
unit.

The ELMS also calculates the


maximum landing weight and time to
complete jettison and sends them to
the AIMS.

The ELMS monitors the pump


pressure switches and valve
positions. If there is a disagreement
or fault, the ELMS turns on a light on
the fuel management panel and
sends fault data to the AIMS.

ELMS monitors valve positions and


sends them on ARINC 629 to the
FQIS processor. The processor
sends the valve position signal to the
refuel panel for indication.

The EICAS display shows total fuel


quantity. When the jettison system is
operating, the EICAS display shows
fuel to remain.

Fuel tank quantities


Fuel pump on/off indication
Fuel flow path
Crossfeed valve positions
Fuel valve positions.

When the jettison system is in


operation, the fuel synoptic display
shows this information:

Jettison pump on indication


Isolation valve positions
Jettison nozzle valve position
Fuel to remain
Jettison time.

June 2003

Fuel
FUEL JETTISON
FUEL TO
REMAIN

L NOZZLE R
ON

ON

VALVE

VALVE

DECR

Valves
Pumps
ARM

INCR

ARMED

Overfill
Sensors

FAULT
PULL ON
FUEL
CROSSFEED
FWD

L PUMPS
FWD
ON

ELMS
R PUMPS
FWD

OPAS

ON

VALVE

PRESS

155.8

PRESS
AFT

ON

62.7

30.4

62.7

ON

PRESS

PRESS
VALVE

AFT

AFT

CENTER
PUMPS R

ON

ON

PRESS

PRESS

Integrated Refuel Panel

Fuel Panel

AIMS

To
EICAS
Displays

FQIS
Processor Unit

ARINC 629
System Bus (3)

155.8
+15C

From
AIMS
EICAS Display

155.8

62.7

62.7

30.4

-37C
+15C

75.4
10

Fuel Synoptic Display


Fuel Maintenance Pages (2)

Controls and Indications


June 2003

10-5

OVERFILL

DEFUEL VALVE

RESET

TEST

POWER

LOAD SELECT QTY


BATT

OPEN
TEST

IND

SYSTEM

OPEN
CLOSE

IND

TOTAL/BACKUP
FUEL QTY

NORMAL

QTY X1000

NORMAL
RIGHT MAIN

155.8

CENTER

62.7

LEFT MAIN

30.4

62.7

FUEL QTY
LOAD SEL

LOAD SEL
LB

TF
QTY X1000

LB

QTY X1000

LB

QTY X1000

QTY X1000

LOAD SELECT
SET
TOTAL LOAD SELECT
SET

OUTBD
OPEN

INBD

RIGHT

LEFT

INBD

OPEN

OPEN
TOTAL/BACKUP DISPLAY
TANK SELECT

OUTBD

Center Tank

OPEN

CLOSE

REFUEL VALVE CONTROL

CLOSE

Refuel/Jettison
Manifold

P28 Integrated Refuel Panel


Refuel
Station

Surge Tank (2)


Refuel
Valve (6)
Left Main Tank

Right Main Tank

Pressure Refuel System


Pressure Refuel System
The refuel station is on the leading
edge of the left wing. It has two refuel
adapters and an integrated refuel
panel (IRP). A refuel station on the
right wing is optional.
The integrated refuel panel has
these components:

Overfill test and reset switches


Overfill indication light
Indication and system test
switches
Load select quantity switches
Defuel valve control switch
Defuel valve position light
Battery power switch
LCD fuel quantity and load select
indicators
Load select set switches
Display transfer switch
Refuel valve position lights
Refuel valve control switches.

10-6

There are six refuel valves, two for


each main tank and two for the
center tank. The fuel/jettison
manifold supplies fuel from the refuel
station to the valves. You can fill the
tanks individually or all at the same
time.

Power for the refuel system comes


from the ground handling bus or the
main battery. If electrical power is not
available, you can not operate the
valves manually.
Fuel measuring sticks permit manual
fuel quantity measurement.

The control switches on the


integrated refuel panel open and
close the refuel valves. The valves
also close automatically when one of
these occur:

Tank weight gets to a level set on


the refuel control panel
Tank gets to the volumetric shut
off (VSO)
Fuel flows into the surge tank
You push the system test switch.

When you push the system test


switch, the valves close and then
open again automatically.

June 2003

Fuel

Crossfeed Valves
APU
Isolation
Valve

Engine Feed Manifold

Bypass Valve
Fuel Spar
Valve
To Engine

To Engine

APU Shutoff
Valve
To APU
APU DC
Pump

Override/
Jettison
Pumps
Boost
Pumps

Boost
Pumps

Engine and APU Fuel Feed Systems


Engine Fuel Feed System
There are two boost pumps for each
main tank and two override/jettison
pumps in the center tank to supply
fuel to the engines. The fuel flows
through the crossfeed manifold to the
engines. Redundant crossfeed
valves isolate the left and right sides
of the manifold.

When the override/jettison pump


output pressure decreases because
of low fuel quantity in the center tank,
the boost pumps automatically
supply fuel to the two engines from
the main tanks. The pilot puts off the
override/jettison pumps. A scavenge
jet pump moves the remaining center
tank fuel to the main tanks.

APU Fuel Feed System


The APU can receive fuel from each
tank. A dc pump supplies fuel from
the left main tank if no ac power is
available. When ground service ac
power is available, the left forward
boost pump automatically operates
during an APU start.

At the start of a flight, when all the


tanks are full, the normal procedure
is to put on all the fuel pumps. The
override/jettison pumps supply
center tank fuel to the two engines.
This occurs because the
override/jettison pumps have a
higher output pressure than the main
tank boost pumps.

June 2003

10-7

FUEL JETTISON
L NOZZLE R
ON

ON

VALVE

VALVE

FUEL TO
REMAIN
DECR

ARM

INCR

ARMED
FAULT

PULL ON

Fuel Panel (P5)

Crossfeed
Valve (2)

Refuel/Jettison
Manifold

Fuel Feed
Manifold

Defuel
Valve

Bypass
Valve (2)

Fuel Spar
Valve (2)

Override/Jettison
Pump (2)

Jettison Nozzle
Valve (2)
Jettison Nozzle (2)

Jettison
Pump (2)

Isolation
Valve (2)
Boost
Pump (4)

Refuel
Valve (6)

Jettison and Defuel System


Jettison System
The fuel jettison system moves fuel
overboard to decrease the landing
weight. The system only operates in
the air.
To operate the system, you set the
ARM switch to ARM and the nozzle
switches to ON. This opens the
isolation valves, puts on the jettison
pumps, and opens the jettison
nozzles.

10-8

The jettison pumps put main tank fuel


into the refuel/jettison manifold. The
override/jettison pumps put center
tank fuel into the fuel feed manifolds,
through the isolation valve, and into
the refuel/jettison manifold. The fuel
goes overboard through the jettison
nozzles.
Fuel quantity and jettison time show
on EICAS and the fuel synoptic. The
jettison system automatically goes
off at the maximum landing weight
(MLW). You can set the MLW up or
down with the FUEL TO REMAIN
switch.

Defuel System
The override/jettison and boost
pumps put fuel into the engine feed
manifold. You open the defuel valve
from the refuel panel. Fuel goes
through the defuel valve, the
refuel/jettison manifold, and the
refuel panel adapters into a ground
container.
FUEL TRANSFER
You use the boost pumps and the
defuel, crossfeed, and refuel valves
for a tank-to-tank transfer on the
ground.

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


Features

CONTROL

Engine Specifications

ENGINE

The PW4000 uses a dual channel,


full authority digital electronic control
(FADEC) system. The main
component of the FADEC system is
the EEC. The EEC controls these
functions:

Engine Cowling

Engine Indication

Engine Control System

Engine Fuel System

Engine Air System

Engine Start and Ignition

The EEC also supplies fault monitor


data to the central maintenance
computing system (CMCS).

Engine Oil System

Engine Exhaust System

FUEL

Maintenance Pages

THE PW4000 engine for the 777 is a


growth version of the PW4000
engines that came before. The
engine core is the same as these
engines. It has a new 112-inch (2.84meter) diameter fan and wide-cord
shroudless fan blades.
POWERED DOOR OPENING
SYSTEM (PDOS)
The thrust reverser assemblies and
the fan cowls have a powered door
opening system.
INDICATION

Engine systems
Starts and autostarts
Thrust reverser operation.

The servo fuel heater makes cold


temperature starting better.

Most engine parameters go to the


AIMS from the electronic engine
control (EEC). Primary display
system pages show engine
parameters and dispatch data. Four
maintenance pages show engine
maintenance data.

June 2003

11A-1

2.5
(4)
Note:
Station Number
(Compressor Stage)

2.0

4.95
2.9
(9)

HPC

Fan

3.0
(15)

HPT

LPT

LPC

Engine Specifications
Pratt & Whitney 4000
The Pratt & Whitney 4000 engine is a
high bypass ratio, two-spool turbofan
engine. The low pressure shaft (N1)
includes a:

112-inch fan
Six-stage low pressure
compressor (LPC)
Seven-stage low pressure
turbine (LPT).

The high pressure shaft (N2) and


combustion sections are common to
previous PW4000 engines. The high
pressure shaft includes an elevenstage high pressure compressor
(HPC) and a two-stage high pressure
turbine (HPT).

11A-2

The PW4000 engines have different


takeoff thrust ratings. An external
program plug selects different
software in the EEC to set the
ratings. The last two digits of the
engine series number give the thrust
rating.
Most of the engine line replaceable
units (LRUs) attach to the core of the
engine or the gearbox. You open the
thrust reverser assembly to get
access to these components. Some
LRUs attach to the fan case and you
open the fan cowls to get access to
them.

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


Engine Relay Unit (ERU)
Precooler
Exhaust Gas Temperature
(EGT) Probes (4)

2.9 Bleed Valve

TVBC Air
Valves (2)
Fuel/Oil Cooler
Oil Filter
Mount

Fuel Pump and


Fuel Metering
Unit (FMU)

Oil Tank
Servo Fuel Heater

De-Oiler

Electronic Engine
Control (EEC)

Backup
Generator
Permanent Magnet
Alternator (PMA)

N2 Crank Pad

Engine Left Side and Forward Gearbox Components


2.9 Bleed Valve

TCC Air
Valves (2)

TCC Valve
Actuator

Starter Air
Valve
Gearbox
FMU
TVBC and TVC
Air Valves

Hydraulic Pump
Fuel Filter
IDG

Starter
Lube and
Scavenge Pump

Engine Right Side and Aft Gearbox Components


June 2003

11A-3

PDOS Pump/Power Pack

Thrust Reverser
PDOS Switches
Fan Cowl
PDOS Switches
Plug
Nozzle

Inlet Cowl

Thrust Reverser
Assembly

Fan Cowl

Engine Cowling
Engine Cowling
Fixed and hinged cowls make up the
engine nacelle. The cowls permit
smooth airflow through and around
the engine. They also protect the
components on the engine.

You open hinged cowls to get access


to engine components. The fan and
thrust reverser assemblies open
hydraulically with the powered door
opening system (PDOS). The PDOS
has these components:

The fixed cowls include these:

Inlet cowl
Nozzle
Plug.

The fixed cowls attach to engine


flanges.
Hinged cowls include the fan cowl
and thrust reverser assembly. They
hinge on the strut and latch on the
bottom. Unlike earlier PW4000
engines, there is no core cowl on this
engine.

11A-4

Fan cowl opening actuators (2)


Thrust reverser assembly
opening actuators (2)
Strut-mounted pump/power pack
Control switches (one set per
side).

The PDOS is a self-contained


system. If there is no electrical
power, you can override the PDOS
and open the hinged cowls
mechanically.

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


ARINC 629
System Buses

EDIU
EEC

N1
EICAS &
Maintenance
Pages

AIMS
N2

AVM
SCU

Primary Display
System

N2
RCC

Vibration

P2/T2
(EPR)

MAT
P4.95

Accelerometers (3)
(EPR)
EGT

N1 Speed
Transducer

N1

T4.95
PMA

N2 and Power

Engine Indication
Engine Indication System

TACHOMETER

AVM

The engine indication system


supplies engine performance data to
the AIMS. The system has these
sub-systems:

The engine tachometer system


supplies N1 and N2 speed signals to
the EEC, AIMS, EDIU, and AVM
signal conditioning unit (SCU). The
N1 speed transducer supplies the N1
signal. The permanent magnet
alternator (PMA) frequency gives the
N2 signal. The EICAS display shows
N1, and the secondary engine
display shows N2.

The AVM system monitors engine


vibration. Three accelerometers on
each engine supply vibration signals
to the remote charge converter
(RCC) in the strut. The RCC does an
amplification of the signals and
sends them to the AVM SCU. The
SCU uses the signals and N1 and N2
speed signals to calculate vibration
levels. The secondary engine display
shows the vibration.

Engine pressure ratio (EPR)


Tachometer (N1 & N2)
Exhaust gas temperature (EGT)
Airborne vibration monitoring
(AVM).

The EEC uses ARINC 429. An


engine data interface unit (EDIU)
changes ARINC 429 to ARINC 629
for the airplane ARINC 629 system.
EPR
EPR is the main thrust indication. It is
the ratio of turbine exhaust pressure
(P4.95) and fan inlet pressure (P2).
The EEC calculates EPR. The
EICAS display shows EPR.

June 2003

EGT
MAINTENANCE
The EGT sub-system senses low
pressure turbine exhaust
temperature (T4.95). Four
temperature probes supply a signal
to the EEC. The EEC uses the signal
and sends it to the AIMS. The EICAS
display shows EGT.

The maintenance page formats show


many engine parameters sent to the
AIMS from the EEC. You use a
control display unit (CDU) to see
maintenance pages.
The CMCS stores fault data sent
from the EEC. You use the MAT to
see the fault data.

11A-5

Prog Plug

FMU

TLA Resolvers

T/R Isln Valve

Fuel Ctrl Switch

T/R Interlock Act

Start Valve

Fire Switch

Eng Relay Unit

Exciters

EEC Mode Sw

FOC Bypass Vlv

Probe Heat

Start/Ignition Sel

Eng AOC Valve

Autostart Switch

IDG AOC Valve

Maintenance Sw

BUG AOC Valve

Ch A

VSV

Engine Sensors
Ch B
PMA

Nacelle Zone
Vent Valve
2.5 Bleed Valve
TVBC Valves

AIMS

2.9 Bleed Valves

EDIU

TCC Valves

OPAS
ARINC 629
System Buses

EEC

Engine Control System


Engine Control System
The full authority digital electronic
control (FADEC) system controls
these engine functions:

Thrust management
Engine systems control
Engine fault detection, storage,
and recall
Engine communication with other
airplane systems.

The heart of the system is the


electronic engine control (EEC). The
EEC is a two-channel digital
electronic control. Each channel
receives the necessary control
inputs. Each channel also divides
functionally so that if it is not able to
do a specified control function. It
uses that part of the other channel to
do it. This is active-active control.

11A-6

Most engine control inputs come


from airplane sources. Engine
sensors supply engine status data to
the EEC.
The EEC controls these engine
systems:

The engine-driven permanent


magnet alternator (PMA) supplies
power to the EEC. The flight deck
maintenance switch lets airplane
power go to the EEC for
maintenance.

Fuel
Thrust reverser
Starting
Ignition
Probe heat
Fuel and oil cooling
Compressor airflow
Nacelle ventilation
Turbine cooling.

The EEC has two modes of


operation, normal and alternate. If
the normal mode does not operate,
the EEC changes to the alternate
mode. You can also select the
alternate mode with the EEC mode
switches.

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


EICAS
Displays

Thrust Levers

Airplane Fuel
Supply

AIMS

EDIU

Fuel Control
Switch
Off

EEC

ELMS

ARINC 629
Systems Buses

Fire Switch
Fuel
Filter

Differential Pressure Switch


Fuel
Manifolds

Main Fuel
Bypass Fuel
Fuel Flow
Transmitter

Distribution
Valve

Fuel
Nozzles

FMU

Fuel Pump

Servo Functions

Servo Supply
Fuel/Oil
Cooler

Servo
Fuel Heater

Engine Fuel System


Engine Fuel System
The engine fuel system supplies
fuel to the engine for combustion. It
cools the engine and IDG oil. It also
supplies servo fuel to fuel metering
unit and the engine air system
actuators and valves.
The main gearbox drives a two-stage
fuel pump. The fuel pump supplies
high pressure fuel to the FMU. The
fuel filter is part of the fuel pump
housing.
The fuel/oil cooler and servo fuel
heater heat the fuel to prevent icing.
Both have temperature bypass
valves to prevent overheating the
fuel.

The EEC controls the FMU and


supplies fuel on/off commands. The
fuel control switch and fire switch can
supply a direct fuel off command to
the FMU through the ELMS.
The fuel flow transmitter sends a
signal to the EEC for primary display
system indication. The fuel filter
differential pressure switch (attached
to the fuel pump housing) also
supplies an input to the EEC for
indication.
Fuel flows from the fuel flow
transmitter to the distribution valve.
The valve distributes the fuel into
eight fuel manifolds that connect to
24 identical fuel nozzles.

The FMU supplies metered fuel to


the engine for combustion based
upon thrust lever position and the
engines operating condition.
Unused fuel (bypass fuel) goes back
to the fuel pump.
June 2003

11A-7

Compressor Control
VSV
Actuator

2.9 Bleed
Valves (2)

2.5 Bleed
Valve Actuator

2.9 Bleed
Valve Solenoid

Servo
Fuel

Servo Air
(PS3)

EEC

TCC Air Valve


Actuator
12th Stage
Air

TVC Air
Valve

TVC Air Valve


Actuator

TVBC
Air Valves
(3)

Fan Air

TVBC Air
Valve Solenoid

No. 3 Bearing
Buffer Air
Cooler

Nacelle Zone
Ventilation
Valve

Exhaust

TCC Air
Valves (2)

Engine
Accessories

Engine Core
Compartment

Turbine Case
Cooling

Turbine Vane
and Blade
Cooling

No. 3 Bearing
Compartment

Engine Air System


Engine Air System

ENGINE COOLING

The engine air system controls


airflow through the compressors. It
also supplies cooling air to engine
systems and components. The EEC
controls the air system components.

The engine air cooling system


increases engine efficiency and
extends engine life. Engine air cools
these:

COMPRESSOR CONTROL
Airflow control increases compressor
stability during start, transient, and
reverse thrust operations. The
airflow control components include
these components:

Variable stator vanes (VSV)


2.5 bleed valve
2.9 bleed valves.

11A-8

Engine accessories
Engine core compartment
Turbine cases
HPT vanes and blades
No. 3 bearing compartment.

The nacelle zone ventilation valve


supplies fan air to cool the engine
core compartment. It operates
pneumatically.

Three turbine vane and blade cooling


(TVBC) air valves and one turbine
vane cooling (TVC) air valve supply
12th stage compressor air to cool the
HPT blades and vanes. The TVBC
valves are either full open or full
closed. They operate pneumatically.
The TVC valve modulates and
operates hydraulically.
The No. 3 bearing compartment is
continuously cooled with 12th stage
air. The 12th stage air is first cooled
with fan air in the buffer air cooler.

The turbine case cooling (TCC) air


valves supply fan air to cool the HPT
and LPT cases. The hydraulically
operated TCC air valve actuator
moves each valve separately.

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


Airplane Power
Fuel Control Switch

Power

ELMS
ARINC 629
Systems Buses

Start/Ignition Selector

Control

AIMS

ERU

EDIU
Autostart
Switch

OPAS

EEC

Starter Air
Valve
Solenoid

Isolation Valves

APU
Air Valve

ENGINE
EEC MODE

NORM

ALTN

START

Starter Air
Valve

NORM

Precooler

ALTN

START/IGNITION

L
NORM

START

CON

R
NORM
CON

APU
Speed
Sensor

AUTOSTART
ON

Ignition
Exciters (2)

OFF

Engine Control Panel (P5)

Starter

Igniter Plugs (2)

Engine Start and Ignition


Engine Start and Ignition Systems
START
The engine start system supplies the
initial engine movement (N2) to
permit fuel combustion. These are
the components in the system:

Starter air valve


Starter air valve solenoid
Starter
Flight deck controls.

Pneumatic sources for engine starts


include:

APU
Ground air
Engine crossbleed.

The isolation valves operate


automatically to permit different
pneumatic configurations.
The flight deck controls permit
automatic or manual starts. During
June 2003

an autostart, the autostart switch is


ON, and the fuel control switch is in
the RUN position at the start of the
start. The EEC controls fuel and
ignition. The EEC also monitors the
start sequence and makes
corrections for fault conditions.
During a manual start, the autostart
switch is OFF, and the fuel control
switch is put to the RUN position at
maximum motor. The EEC controls
fuel and ignition, but the pilot must
monitor the start and make
corrections for fault conditions.
The EEC controls the starter
operation with the start air valve
solenoid and the starter speed
signal. The starter air valve does a
modulation to control the starter
speed by pulse-width modulation of
the starter air valve solenoid. EEC
control of the starter speed prevents
crash engagements of the starter.

IGNITION
Each engine has two ignition
systems that operate independently.
They supply the spark to start or
keep combustion in operation. These
are the main components in the
ignition system:

Ignition exciters
Igniter plugs
Flight deck controls.

The flight deck controls permit


continuous or automatic selection of
ignition. The EEC controls ignition.
Relays in the engine relay unit (ERU)
connect power to one or the two
exciters.

11A-9

Fuel/Oil Cooler

Oil Quantity
Sensor

Oil Pressure
Transmitters

Magnetic
Chip Detectors
Oil Tank

Oil Temperature
Sensor

Lube & Scavenge


Pump

Deoiler

EEC
Air/Oil
Cooler

Main
Gearbox
209

OIL
PRESS

210

109

OIL
TEMP

109

15

OIL QTY

Oil Filter

15

Secondary Engine Display

Servo Fuel Heater


Legend:
Supply Oil
Pressure Oil
Scavenge Oil
Breather

Engine Oil System


Engine Oil System
The engine oil system supplies oil to
lubricate, remove heat, and clean
engine bearings and gearboxes. The
system also adds heat to engine fuel
to prevent ice in the fuel. The oil
system has no regulation, so oil
pressure changes with engine
speed. The oil system has these subsystems:

Pressure
Scavenge
Breather
Indication.

PRESSURE
The pressure sub-system supplies
oil to the engine bearings and
gearboxes. Oil flows from the oil tank
to the pressure stage of the lube and
scavenge pump. Pressurized oil then
goes through a filter. The filter does a
bypass of the oil if it has a blockage.

11A-10

Oil then flows through the servo fuel


heater, engine air/oil heat
exchanger, and fuel/oil cooler. The
oil adds heat to the fuel as it
decreases temperature. The fuel/oil
cooler is the primary source of oil
cooling. The air/oil cooler operates
when necessary. The EEC controls
the fuel and oil temperatures in the
air/oil heat exchanger and fuel/oil
cooler.

BREATHER

SCAVENGE

The indication sub-system supplies


oil system data through the EEC to
the AIMS. The secondary engine
display shows oil pressure,
temperature, and quantity. The
EICAS display and status display
show fault messages. Oil data also
shows on the maintenance pages.

The scavenge sub-system removes


oil and contaminants from the
bearing compartments and
gearboxes. The lube and scavenge
pump assembly has five scavenge
pumps. Each pump removes oil from
its related bearing compartment or
gearbox and sends it to the oil tank.
Magnetic chip detectors remove
magnetic particles from the
scavenge oil.

The breather sub-system gives a


vent for bearing seal pressurization
air from the bearing compartments.
The deoiler removes air from the oil.
The air goes overboard from the
main gearbox while oil stays in the
system.
INDICATION

June 2003

Power Plant - P & W


Cascade
Segments

ELMS

SLV
DCV
IV

Interlock

Directional
Control
Valve

ELMS

TLA

T/R Sleeve

Isolation
Valve

Drag Links

Blocker Doors

Sync Lock Valve

Thrust Lever
Assembly

Hydraulic Supply
T/R Test
Enable Switch

RVDT
EEC

EDIU

AIMS

Proximity
Sensor
System
EICAS

Non-Locking
Actuator
Sync Shaft

ARINC 629
Systems Buses

Locking
Actuators
Sync Lock

Engine Exhaust System


Engine Exhaust System
The engine exhaust system controls
the direction of exhaust gases to
supply forward and reverse thrust.
The thrust reverser (T/R) system
supplies reverse thrust to decrease
the speed of the airplane on the
ground. Fan exhaust is blocked and
turned forward during reverse thrust.

Hydraulic actuators
Synchronizing (sync) shaft and
lock
Sleeve position sensors.

Other T/R components are in the


strut and include these:

Isolation valve (IV)


Directional control valve (DCV)
Sync lock valve (SLV).

The T/R system is electrically


controlled and hydraulically
operated. You can operate it
manually for maintenance.

System components in the flight


deck include reverse thrust levers
and interlock actuators below the
control stand.

COMPONENTS

OPERATION

There are two T/R halves on each


engine. Each half includes these
components:

When you lift the reverse thrust lever,


this happens:

T/R sleeve
Blocker doors
Drag links
Cascade segments

June 2003

The SLV releases the sync lock


The DCV moves to the deploy
position
The EEC commands reverse
thrust.

The EEC controls the operation of


the T/R. The IV supplies hydraulic
pressure to the T/R system. The
hydraulic actuators deploy the T/R.
When the reverser is deployed, the
EEC energizes the interlock
actuator. This permits continued
movement of the reverse thrust lever
to increase reverse power.
When you put the reverse thrust
lever to the down position, the T/R
stows. The locking actuators and the
sync lock both lock to keep the
reverser stowed.
A maintenance switch on the fan
case permits a bypass of the EEC
engine run logic to permit T/R
deployment during maintenance.
RVDTs and proximity sensors
monitor the T/R system for fault
conditions. The RVDTs also supply
signals for T/R control and flight deck
indications.
11A-11

EPCS AUTO PG 1/2


LEFT ENGINE

RIGHT ENGINE

TACH

82.9
85.9
403
50.0
0.0
0.0
2.8
150
4.9
5.7
19
0.0
109
120
209
80
70

82.9
85.9
403
50.0
0.0
0.0
2.8
150
4.9
5.7
19
0.0
109
120
209
80
70

-85.9

TACH

83.5
85.6
400
50.0
0.0
0.0
2.8
150
4.9
5.7
19
0.0
100
110
209
80
70

-85.6

T2.95 SR

83.5
85.6
400
50.0
0.0
0.0
2.8
150
4.9
5.7
19
0.0
100
110
209
80
70

DATE

02 NOV 94

N
N

1
2

EGT
TRA
T/R
T/R

L
R

P
AMB
P
P
P
T

B
2
5
2

2.5 BLD
SVA
OIL T
OIL P
T2.95 SB

ENG L OIL TEMP

UTC

18:54:04

EPCS AUTO PG 2/2


LEFT ENGINE

50
45
50
50
84
3
3
48

50
45
50
50
84
3
3
48

0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000

0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000

ENG L OIL TEMP

RIGHT ENGINE

50
45
50
50
84
3
3
48

50
45
50
50
84
3
3
48

STATUS 8

0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000

0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000

DATE

02 NOV 94

FMV
TCA
LPT TCC
HPT TCC
FUEL T
ENG AOC
IDG AOC
VSCF AOC
STARTER SPD
STATUS 1
STATUS 2
STATUS 3
STATUS 4
STATUS 5
STATUS 6
STATUS 7

UTC

18:54:04

Maintenance Pages
11A-12

June 2003

Power Plant - GE
Features

EGT PYROMETER

Engine Specifications

ENGINE

An EGT pyrometer uses an infrared


sensor to measure turbine blade
metal temperature.

Engine Cowling

Engine Indication

DUAL SPRAY DUPLEX FUEL


NOZZLES

Engine Control System

Engine Fuel System

Engine Air System

Engine Start and Ignition

Engine Oil System

DEBRIS MONITORING SYSTEM

Engine Exhaust System

An electronic chip detector monitors


the engine oil system for ferrous
contamination.

Maintenance Pages

The GE90 is a high bypass turbofan


engine with a 123-inch (3.12-meter)
fan diameter.
POWERED DOOR OPENING
SYSTEM
The fan cowls and thrust reverser
assemblies have a powered door
opening system.

June 2003

Each fuel nozzle assembly has two


spray nozzles on it for different spray
patterns and changes in fuel
scheduling necessary for the dual
annular combustor.

11B-1

Station Numbers

12

13

25

HPC

Fan

49

HPT

LPT

LPC

Engine Specifications
GE90
The GE90 engine is a high bypass
ratio, two-spool turbofan engine. The
low pressure shaft (N1) has these
components:

123-inch (3.12m) fan


Three-stage low pressure
compressor (LPC or booster)
Six-stage low pressure turbine
(LPT).

The GE90 engines have different


takeoff thrust ratings. Software pin
programming in the electronic engine
control (EEC) changes the ratings.
Most of the engine line replaceable
units (LRUs) attach to the core of the
engine or the gearbox. You open the
thrust reverser assembly to get
access to these components. Some
LRUs attach to the fan case and you
open the fan cowls to get to them.

The high pressure shaft (N2) has


these components:

Ten-stage high pressure


compressor (HPC)
Two-stage high pressure turbine
(HPT).

11B-2

June 2003

Power Plant - GE

Hydraulic Pump
IDG/VSCF Air/Oil
Heat Exchanger

Oil Tank

IDG F/O
Heat Exchanger

Drain Mast

Backup
Generator
Drive Shaft
Control Alternator

Oil Pump

Engine Left Side and Forward Gearbox Components

EEC
VSV Actuator
ICC Ducts

Hydraulic Pump

Pyrometer
Starter Valve

Main F/O
Heat Exchanger
Drain Mast
Fuel Pump
IDG
Starter

HMU

Engine Right Side and Aft Gearbox Components


June 2003

11B-3

PDOS Pump/Power Pack

Plug

Inlet Cowl

Thrust Reverser
Assembly

Fan Cowl
PDOS Switches
Thrust Reverser
PDOS Switches

Fan Cowl

Engine Cowling
Engine Cowling
Fixed and hinged cowls make up the
engine nacelle. The cowls permit
smooth airflow through and around
the engine. They also protect engine
components.
The fixed cowls include the inlet cowl
and plug. The fixed cowls attach to
engine flanges.
Hinged cowls include the fan cowl
and thrust reverser assembly. They
hinge on the strut and latch on the
bottom. Unlike earlier GE engines,
there is no core cowl on this engine.

11B-4

You open hinged cowls to get access


to engine components. The fan
cowls and thrust reverser assemblies
open hydraulically with the powered
door opening system (PDOS). The
PDOS includes these components:

Fan cowl opening actuators (2)


Thrust reverser assembly
opening actuators (2)
Strut-mounted pump/power pack
Control switches (one set per
side).

The PDOS is a self-contained


system. If there is no electrical
power, you can override the PDOS
and open the hinged cowls
mechanically.

June 2003

Power Plant - GE
EDIU

EEC

EICAS &
Maintenance
Pages

AIMS

RCC

Vibration

AVM
SCU
Primary Display
System

ARINC 629
System Buses
N1

N2

Accelerometer

EGT
N1

MAT

Accelerometer
Thermocouples

N1 Speed
Sensor

Pyrometer
N2 Speed
Sensor

N2

Engine Indication
Engine Indication System
The engine indication system
supplies engine performance data to
the AIMS. The system has these
subsystems:

Tachometer (N1 & N2)


Exhaust gas temperature (EGT)
Airborne vibration monitoring
(AVM).

The EEC uses ARINC 429. To


communicate with the airplane
ARINC 629 system, an engine data
interface unit (EDIU) changes
ARINC 429 to ARINC 629.
TACHOMETER
The engine tachometer system
supplies N1 and N2 signals to the
EEC, the AIMS, the EDIU, and the
AVM signal conditioning unit (SCU).
The N1 speed sensor is on the fan
hub frame and measures fan shaft
speed. N1 is the main thrust
June 2003

indication. The N2 speed sensor is


on the gearbox. The EICAS display
shows N1 and the secondary engine
display shows N2.
EGT
The EGT subsystem measures
temperatures at the low pressure
turbine (T49). It uses two different
measurement techniques. At low
temperatures, two thermocouple
probes supply temperature signals to
the EEC. During normal operation, a
pyrometer (infrared sensor)
measures the LPT first stage turbine
blade temperature and supplies the
signal to the EEC. The EEC
processes the signals and sends
them to the AIMS. EGT shows on the
EICAS display.

AVM
The AVM system monitors engine
vibration. Two accelerometers on
each engine send vibration signals to
the remote charge converter (RCC)
in the strut. The RCC amplifies the
signals and sends them to the AVM
signal conditioning unit (SCU). The
SCU uses the accelerometer signals
and N1 and N2 speed signals to
calculate vibration levels. The
secondary engine display shows
the vibration data.
MAINTENANCE
The maintenance pages show many
engine parameters that go to the
AIMS from the EEC.
The AIMS central maintenance
function stores fault data that comes
from the EEC. You use a
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
to see the fault data.

11B-5

Prog Plug

HMU

TLA Resolvers
T/R Isln Valve

Fuel Ctrl Switch


Ch A
Fire Switch

Start Valve
EEC Mode Sw
Start/Ignition Sel

Exciters

Autostart Switch
T/R Interlock Act

Maintenance Sw
Ch B

Engine Sensors

CCC Valve
Control Alt
EDIU

AIMS

LPT ACC Valve

OPAS
ARINC 629
System Buses

EEC

Engine Control System


Engine Control System
The full authority digital electronic
control (FADEC) system controls
these engine functions:

Thrust management
Engine systems control
Engine fault detection, storage,
and recall
Engine communication with other
airplane systems.

The heart of the system is the


electronic engine control (EEC).
The EEC is a two-channel digital
electronic control. Each channel
receives the necessary control
inputs. Also, each channel is
functionally divided so that if it is not
able to maintain a specific control
function, it uses that part of the other
channel to do so.

11B-6

Most engine control inputs come


from airplane sources. Engine
sensors supply engine status
information to the EEC.

The engine-driven control alternator


supplies power to the EEC. The flight
deck maintenance switch lets
airplane power go to the EEC for
maintenance.

The EEC controls these engine


systems:

Fuel
Thrust reverser
Starting
Ignition
Fuel and oil cooling
Compressor airflow
Nacelle ventilation
Turbine cooling.

The EEC has two modes of


operation, normal and alternate. If
the normal mode does not work, the
EEC automatically changes to the
alternate mode. You can also select
the alternate mode with the EEC
mode switches.

June 2003

Power Plant - GE
EICAS
Displays

Thrust Levers

Fuel Control
Switch

EDIU

Airplane Fuel
Supply

ELMS

AIMS
ARINC 629
System Buses

Off
EEC
Fire Switch
Fuel Flow
Transmitter

Fuel
Pump

Fuel
Filter

HMU

Servo
F/O HX

Main
F/O HX

Servo
Functions
IDG
F/O HX

Fuel
Nozzles
(30)

Legend:
Main Fuel
Servo Fuel
Bypass Fuel

Engine Fuel System


Engine Fuel System
The engine fuel system does these
functions:

Supplies fuel to the engine for


combustion
Removes heat from the engine
and IDG oil
Supplies servo fuel to the
hydromechanical unit (HMU) and
engine system actuators and
valves.

The main gearbox turns a two-stage


fuel pump. The fuel pump supplies
high pressure fuel to the HMU. The
fuel filter is part of the fuel pump
housing.

June 2003

The main and servo fuel/oil heat


exchangers are in a single unit. They
add heat to the fuel to prevent icing.
The HMU supplies metered fuel to
the engine for combustion in relation
to thrust lever position and the
engine operation condition. Fuel not
used (bypass fuel) goes back to the
fuel pump.

The fuel flow transmitter sends a


signal to the EEC for indication on
the engine primary format. The fuel
filter differential pressure switch on
the fuel pump housing also supplies
an input to the EEC for indication.
Fuel flows from the fuel flow
transmitter to two fuel manifolds. The
fuel manifolds connect to 30 dual
spray fuel nozzles.

The EEC controls the HMU fuel


metering valve. The fuel control
switch and fire switch supply a direct
command to the fuel shutoff valve in
the HMU through the ELMS.

11B-7

VSV
Actuators

t/m

EEC
7th Stage Air

Core
Compartment
Cooling

LPT Active
Clearance
Control

CCC
Valve

LPT ACC
Valve

HPT Active
Clearance
Control

HPT ACC
Valve

t/m t/m
HMU

Fan
Air

VBV
Actuators

Engine Air System


Engine Air System

ENGINE COOLING

The engine air system controls


airflow through the compressors. It
also supplies cooling air to engine
systems and components. The EEC
controls the air system components.

The engine air cooling system


increases engine efficiency and
extends engine life. Engine air cools
these parts of the engine:

AIRFLOW CONTROL
Airflow control increases compressor
stability during start, transient, and
reverse thrust operations. The
airflow control components include
the:

Variable stator vanes (VSV)


Variable bypass valves (VBV).

The stator vanes and bypass valves


operate with servo fuel by torque
motors in the HMU. The EEC
controls the torque motors.

11B-8

Engine core compartment


Turbine cases.

The core compartment cooling


(CCC) supplies fan air to cool the
components on the core of the
engine.
The HPT and LPT active clearance
control (ACC) systems supply fan air
to cool the HPT and LPT cases. The
hydraulically operated ACC air valve
actuators move the valves.

June 2003

Power Plant - GE
OPAS

EDIU

Ground Air Connections


AIMS

Autostart
Switch

Airplane Power
Start/Ignition Switch
Fuel Control Switch

ELMS

ARINC 629
System Buses
EEC
Isolation Valves
Precooler

APU
Air Valve

PRSOV

Starter Control
Valve

ENGINE
L

EEC MODE

NORM

NORM

ALTN

ALTN

L
START

START/IGNITION

NORM

START

CON

Ignition
Exciters (2)

APU

NORM
CON

AUTOSTART
ON
OFF

Engine Control Panel (P5)

Igniters (2)

Starter

Engine Start and Ignition


Engine Start and Ignition Systems
START
The engine start system supplies the
initial engine rotation (N2) to permit
fuel combustion. These are the
components in the system:

Starter control valve and solenoid


Starter
Flight deck controls.

Pneumatic sources for engine starts


include:

APU
Ground air
Engine crossbleed.

The isolation valves operate


automatically to permit different
pneumatic configurations.

June 2003

The flight deck controls permit


automatic or manual starts. During
an autostart, the autostart switch is
ON, and the fuel control switch is put
to the RUN position at the beginning
of the start. The EEC controls fuel
and ignition. The EEC also monitors
the start sequence and takes
corrective action for fault conditions.
During a manual start, the autostart
switch is OFF, and the fuel control
switch is put to the RUN position at
maximum motoring. The EEC
controls fuel and ignition, but the pilot
must monitor the start sequence and
take corrective action for fault
conditions.

IGNITION
Each engine has two ignition
systems that operate independently.
They supply the spark to start or
keep combustion going. These are
the main components in the system:

Ignition exciters
Igniters
Flight deck controls.

The flight deck controls permit


continuous or automatic selection of
ignition. The EEC controls ignition.

The EEC controls the starter


operation with the starter control
valve.

11B-9

BU Generator O/O
Heat Exchanger

Oil Temperature
Sensor

AIMS

DMS
SCM

EEC
ARINC 629
System Buses

Oil Quantity
Sensor

DMS

72

OIL
PRESS

73

60

OIL
TEMP

61

23

OIL QTY

Oil Pressure
Sensor

Magnetic
Chip Detectors
Lube & Scavenge
Pump

Oil Tank

Boost Supply
23

Accessory
Gearbox

Secondary Engine Display

Oil Filter

Legend:
Supply Oil
Pressure Oil
Scavenge Oil

Main F/O
Heat Exchanger

Engine Oil System


Engine Oil System
The engine oil system supplies oil to
lubricate, cool, and clean engine
bearings and gearboxes. The system
also heats engine fuel to prevent ice
formation in the fuel.
The oil system is not regulated. This
means that oil pressure changes with
engine speed. The oil system has
these subsystems:

Pressure
Scavenge
Indication.

PRESSURE
The pressure subsystem supplies oil
to engine bearings and gearboxes.
Oil flows from the oil tank to the
pressure stage of the lube and
scavenge pump. Pressurized oil is
then filtered. The filter bypasses oil if
it is blocked.

11B-10

Next, oil flows through the main


fuel/oil heat exchanger. The oil heats
the fuel as it cools. A small amount of
boost supply oil returns to the lube
and scavenge pump before it goes to
two of the engine main bearings. Oil
flows through the backup generator
oil/oil heat exchanger before it goes
to the bearings and gearboxes.

INDICATION
The indication subsystem supplies
oil system data through the EEC to
the AIMS. The secondary engine
display shows oil pressure,
temperature, and quantity. The
EICAS display and status display
show fault messages. Oil data also
shows on the maintenance pages.

SCAVENGE
The scavenge subsystem removes
oil and contaminants from the
bearing compartments and
gearboxes. The lube and scavenge
pump assembly has five scavenge
pumps. Each pump removes oil from
its bearing compartment or gearbox
and sends it to the oil tank. A debris
monitoring sensor (DMS) is on the oil
tank. It captures metal particles in the
return oil and counts their landing on
the probe.

June 2003

Power Plant - GE
Cascade
Segments
Drag Links
SLV
DCV
IV

ELMS

Interlock Actuator

Directional
Control
Isolation
Valve
Valve

ELMS

TLA

Blocker Doors

T/R Sleeve

Sync Lock
Valve

Thrust Lever
Assembly

Hydraulic Supply
T/R Test
Enable Switch

RVDT
EEC

EDIU

AIMS

Proximity
Sensor
System
Non-Locking
Actuator

EICAS

Sync Shaft
Locking
Actuators

ARINC 629
Systems Buses
Sync Lock

Engine Exhaust System


Engine Exhaust System

The engine exhaust system controls


the direction of exhaust gases to
supply forward and reverse thrust.

The thrust reverser (T/R) system


supplies reverse thrust to decrease
the speed of the airplane on the
ground. Fan exhaust is blocked and
turned forward during reverse thrust.
The T/R system is electrically
controlled and hydraulically
operated. You can operate it
manually for maintenance.

Synchronizing (sync) shaft and


lock
Proximity sensors.

These other T/R components are in


the strut:

Isolation valve (IV)


Directional control valve (DCV)
Sync lock valve (SLV).

System components include reverse


thrust levers in the flight deck and
interlock actuators below the control
stand.
OPERATION

COMPONENTS
There are two T/R halves on each
engine. Each half includes:

T/R sleeve
Blocker doors
Drag links
Cascade segments
Hydraulic actuators

June 2003

When you lift the reverse thrust lever,


these three things happen to deploy
the translating cowl:

SLV releases the sync lock


DCV moves to the deploy
position
EEC energizes the IV.

The EEC controls the operation of


the T/R. The IV supplies hydraulic
pressure to the T/R system. The
hydraulic actuators deploy the T/R.
Once the reverser is deployed, the
EEC energizes the interlock
actuators. This permits more
movement of the reverse thrust
levers to increase reverse power.
When you put the reverse thrust
lever to the down position, the T/R
stows. The locking actuators and
sync shaft lock to keep the reverser
stowed.
RVDTs and proximity sensors
monitor the T/R system for fault
conditions. The RVDTs also supply
signals for T/R control and flight deck
indications.
A maintenance switch on the fan
case permits a bypass of the EEC
engine run logic to let the T/R deploy
during maintenance.
11B-11

EPCS PG 1/2
LEFT ENGINE

RIGHT ENGINE

TACH

97.2
103.7

97.2 97.2
103.7 103.7
72.0 72.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.7
4.7
276
276
-17
-17
39
39
528
528
0
0
81
81
0
0

TACH

STB

97.2 97.2
103.7 103.7
72.0 72.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.7
4.7
276
276
-17
-17
39
39
528
528
0
0
81
81
0
0

DATE02

SEP 94

N1
N2
TRA
T/R L
T/R R
PAMB
PS3
T12
T25
T3
VBV
VSV

97.2
103.7

UTC18:54:04

EPCS PG 2/2
RIGHT ENGINE

LEFT ENGINE

52
52
0
0
100
100
30
30
OPEN OPEN
CLOSED CLOSED
60
60
73
73
4
4
3
3
0000
0000
0000
0000

0000
0000
0000
0000

A
FMV
BSV
MSV
HPT ACC
LPT ACC
CCC
OIL T
OIL P
OIL FLT
FUEL FLT
STATUS 1
STATUS 2
STATUS 3
STATUS 4

DATE02

52
52
0
0
100
100
30
30
OPEN OPEN
CLOSED CLOSED
61
61
72
72
4
4
3
3
0000
0000
0000
0000

SEP 94

0000
0000
0000
0000

UTC18:54:04

Maintenance Pages
11B-12

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
Features

CONTROL

Engine Specifications

ENGINE

The Trent engine uses a dual


channel, full authority digital
electronic control (FADEC) system.
The main component of the FADEC
system is the electronic engine
controller (EEC). The EEC controls:

Engine Cowling

Engine Indication

Engine Control System

Engine Fuel System

Engine Air System

Engine Start and Ignition

Engine Oil System

Engine Exhaust System

Maintenance Pages

The Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engine is


a growth version of earlier RB211
engines. It has advanced wide-chord
fan blades.
POWERED DOOR OPENING
SYSTEM (PDOS)
Both the thrust reverser assemblies
and fan cowls have a powered door
opening system.
INDICATION
Most engine parameters go to the
AIMS from the electronic engine
controller (EEC). EICAS pages show
engine parameters and dispatch
information. Four primary display
system maintenance pages show
engine maintenance data.

June 2003

Engine systems
Starts and autostarts
Thrust reverser operation.

The EEC also supplies fault


monitoring information to the central
maintenance computing system
(CMCS).

11C-1

160
Station Number 20

30

44

50

LPT

HPC
IPT
HPT

FAN

IPC

Engine Specifications
RB211 Trent 800
The Rolls-Royce RB211 Trent 800
engine is a high bypass ratio, threespool turbofan engine. The low
pressure shaft (N1) has these
components:

110 inch (2.8 m) fan


Five-stage low pressure turbine
(LPT).

The intermediate pressure shaft (N2)


has these components:

Eight-stage intermediate
pressure compressor (IPC)
Single stage intermediate
pressure turbine (IPT).

11C-2

The high pressure shaft (N3) turns


the external gearbox and has these
components:

Six-stage high pressure


compressor (HPC)
Single stage high pressure
turbine (HPT).

The Trent 800 engines have different


takeoff thrust ratings. An external
data entry plug selects different
software in the EEC to set the
ratings.
Most of the engine line replaceable
units (LRUs) are on the fan case of
the engine or the gearbox. You open
the fan cowl to get access to these
components. Some LRUs are on the
core of the engine and you open the
thrust reverser assembly to get to
them.

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
Electronic Engine
Controller (EEC)

Electrical
Power Controller
Unit (PCU)

Overspeed Protection
Unit (OPU)
Precooler

Data Entry
Plug

Ignition Units

EGT Probe
Starter
Control
Valve

HP Bleed Valve

P50 Manifold
Tube

IDG Air/Oil Heat Exchanger

Starter
IDG

Engine Left Side


Fuel Cooled
Oil Cooler
HP Bleed Valve (2)

LP Fuel
Filter

Oil Tank

Scavenge Oil
Filter
Igniter Plug (2)

Engine Air/Oil Heat Exchanger

BU Generator
Drain Mast

Engine Right Side


June 2003

11C-3

PDOS Pump/Power Pack

Inlet Cowl

Turbine Exhaust
Plug
Turbine Exhaust
Nozzle
Fan Cowl
PDOS Switches

Fan Cowl

Thrust Reverser
Assembly

Thrust Reverser
PDOS Switches

Engine Cowling
Engine Cowling
Fixed and hinged cowls make up the
engine nacelle. The cowls permit
smooth airflow through and around
the engine. They also protect the
components installed on the engine.
These are the fixed cowls:

Inlet cowl
Turbine exhaust nozzle
Turbine exhaust plug.

The fixed cowls attach to engine


flanges.
Hinged cowls include the fan cowl
and thrust reverser assembly. They
hinge to the fan cowl support beam
and the strut. The cowl latches are on
the bottom. There is no core cowl on
the engine.

11C-4

You open hinged cowls to get access


to engine components. The fan
cowls and thrust reverser assemblies
open hydraulically with the powered
door opening system (PDOS).
The PDOS has these components:

Fan cowl actuators (2)


Thrust reverser assembly
actuators (2)
Strut-mounted pump/power pack
Control switches (one set per
side).

The PDOS is a self-contained


system. You can override it and open
the hinged cowls mechanically.

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
ARINC 629
System Buses

EEC
EDIU

EICAS &
Maintenance
Pages

AIMS
N2

AVM
SCU

N3

OPU

Primary Display
System

N1

PCU

RCC

Vibration
N3

EPR
P20/T20

MAT
Accelerometer (3)

P50

EPR
EGT
OPR Probe
N1
N2

T44

N1 Probe (3)
N2 Probe (3)

N3 and Power

Dedicated
Alternator

Engine Indication
Engine Indication System

SHAFT SPEED

AVM

The engine indication system


supplies engine performance data to
the AIMS. The system has these
subsystems:

The engine shaft speed system


supplies N1, N2, and N3 speed
signals to the EEC, AIMS, the EDIU,
and the AVM signal conditioning unit
(SCU). Speed probes supply the N1
and N2 signals through the
overspeed protection unit (OPU).
The dedicated alternator gives the
N3 signal through the electrical
power controller unit (PCU). The
EICAS display shows N1 and the
secondary engine display shows N2
and N3.

The AVM system monitors engine


vibration. Three accelerometers on
each engine supply vibration signals
to the remote charge converter
(RCC) in the strut. The RCC
amplifies the signals and sends them
to the AVM SCU. The SCU uses the
signals and rotor speed signals to
calculate vibration levels.The
secondary engine display shows the
vibration.
A once-per-rev (OPR) speed probe
supplies a signal for fan balancing.

EGT

MAINTENANCE

The EGT subsystem measures


intermediate pressure turbine
exhaust temperature (T44). Eleven
temperature probes supply a signal
to the EEC. The EEC processes the
signal and sends it to the AIMS. The
EICAS display shows the EGT.

The maintenance pages show many


engine parameters. You use a CDU
to see the maintenance pages. The
CMCS stores fault data that comes
from the EEC. You use a
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
to get the fault data.

Engine pressure ratio (EPR)


Shaft speed (N1, N2, and N3)
Exhaust gas temperature (EGT)
Airborne vibration monitoring
(AVM).

The EEC uses ARINC 429. To


communicate with the airplane
ARINC 629, an engine data interface
unit (EDIU) changes ARINC 429 to
ARINC 629.
EPR
EPR is the main thrust indication.
It is the ratio of low pressure turbine
exhaust pressure (P50) over fan
inlet pressure (P20). The EEC
calculates EPR. EPR shows on
the EICAS display.
June 2003

11C-5

Data Entry Plug

FMU

TLA Resolvers
T/R Isln Valve
Fuel Ctrl Switch
T/R Interlock Act
Fire Switch

Ch A
PCU

Ignition Units

Start Selector

Eng AOHE Valve

Probe Heat

Autostart Switch

VIGV/VSV

Maintenance Sw

HP/IP Bleed Vlvs

EEC Mode Sw

Engine Sensors
IP/LP TIC
Ded Alternator

N1,N2

PCU

Ch B
Start Valve

A
B
OPU
AIMS

EDIU
EEC

OPAS

Engine Control System


Engine Control System
The full authority digital electronic
control (FADEC) system controls
these engine functions:

Thrust management
Engine systems control
Engine fault detection, storage,
and recall
Engine communication with other
airplane systems.

The heart of the system is the


electronic engine controller (EEC).
The EEC is a two-channel digital
electronic control. Each channel
receives the necessary control inputs
and can control the engine.

The EEC controls these engine


systems:

Fuel
Thrust reverser
Starting
Ignition
Probe heat
Oil cooling
Compressor airflow
Turbine impingement cooling.

The EEC has two modes of


operation, normal and alternate. If
the normal mode does not work, the
EEC automatically switches to the
alternate mode. You can also select
the alternate mode with the EEC
mode switches.

The engine-driven dedicated


alternator supplies power to the
power controller unit (PCU) and the
overspeed protection unit (OPU).
The PCU supplies power to the EEC,
ignition units, and probe heat.
The OPU receives N1 and N2 signals
to independently protect the engine
from overspeeds.
The flight deck maintenance switch
lets airplane power go to the EEC for
maintenance.

Most engine control inputs come


from airplane sources. Engine
sensors supply engine status
information to the EEC.

11C-6

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
EICAS
Displays

Thrust Levers
EDIU
Airplane Fuel
Supply

Fuel Control
Switch

Off

ELMS

EEC

AIMS
ARINC 629
System Buses

Fire Switch
Main Fuel

Fuel
Manifolds

Bypass Fuel
HP Fuel
Filter
Fuel Pump

FMU
Servo Fuel

Fuel Spray
Nozzles

Fuel Flow
Transmitter

Fuel Cooled
Oil Cooler
Drains Tank
Legend:

LP Fuel
Filter

Main Fuel
Servo Fuel

Ejector Pump

Engine Fuel System


Engine Fuel System
The engine fuel system supplies fuel
to the engine for combustion and
cools the engine oil. It also supplies
servo fuel to engine system control
actuators.
The airplane fuel system supplies
fuel to the engine fuel pump. The
external gearbox turns the two-stage
fuel pump. Low pressure fuel flows
from the fuel pump, through the fuel
cooled oil cooler and LP fuel filter,
and back to the fuel pump.The pump
then supplies high pressure fuel to
the fuel metering unit (FMU) and
servo fuel to the engine system
control actuators.

June 2003

The FMU supplies metered fuel to


the engine for combustion based
upon thrust lever position and the
engines operating condition. Fuel
not used for combustion (bypass
fuel) goes back to the fuel pump.
The EEC controls the FMU and
supplies fuel on/off commands. The
fuel control switch and fire switch can
supply a direct fuel off command to
the FMU through the ELMS.
Metered fuel flows from the FMU to
the fuel flow transmitter. The fuel flow
transmitter sends a signal to the EEC
for flight deck indication.
Fuel flows from the fuel flow
transmitter through the high pressure
fuel filter to the fuel spray nozzles.

11C-7

Air Flow Control

Servo
Fuel

VIGV/VSV
Actuators (2)

IP 8 Bleed
Valves (3)

HP 3 Bleed
Valves (3)

VSV Actuator
Control Valve

IP Bleed
Valve
Solenoid

HP Bleed
Valve
Solenoid

Fuel
Pump

Servo Air
(HP3)

Cooling Air
(IP8)

TIC Solenoid
Valve

EEC

Fan Air
TIC
Valve

TIC

Internal Gearbox
Bearing
Compartment

Engine Air System


Engine Air System
The engine air system controls air
flow through the compressors. It also
supplies cooling air to engine
systems and components. The EEC
controls the air system components.
AIR FLOW CONTROL
Air flow control increases
compressor stability during start,
transient, and reverse thrust
operations. The EEC controls these
air flow control components:

Variable stator vanes (VSV)


Variable inlet guide vanes (VIGV)
IP 8 bleed valves
HP 3 bleed valves.

The EEC controls the pneumaticallyoperated bleed valves with solenoids


to ensure engine operating stability.

IP compressor air (IP8) cools the


internal gearbox bearing
compartment.

ENGINE COOLING
The engine air cooling system
increases engine efficiency and
extends engine life. Engine air cools
the turbine cases and the internal
gearbox bearing compartment.
The turbine impingement cooling
(TIC) valve supplies fan air to cool
the IPT and LPT cases. The TIC
solenoid valve pneumatically opens
the TIC valve. The EEC controls the
TIC valve.

The VSVs mechanically lock to the


VIGVs under normal conditions.
When the VSV actuator control valve
moves the VSVs with the VSV
actuators, it also moves the VIGVs.

11C-8

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
AIMS

EDIU
Autostart Switch

Start Selector

Ground Air Connections

Fuel Control Switch


Airplane Power

ARINC 629
System Buses

ELMS

Isolation Valves
EEC

PCU

Starter
Control
Valve
APU
Air Valve
Precooler
PRSOV
L

START

ENGINE
CONTROL

NORM

NORM

ALTN

ALTN

L
NORM

START
START

Ignition
Units

R
NORM

AUTOSTART

APU

ON
OFF

Engine Control Panel (P5)

Igniter Plugs (2)

Starter

Engine Start and Ignition


Engine Start and Ignition Systems
START
The engine start system supplies the
initial engine rotation (N3) to permit
fuel combustion. The system has
these components:

Starter control valve


Starter
Flight deck controls.

Pneumatic sources for engine starts


include these:

APU
Ground air
Engine crossbleed.

The isolation valves operate


automatically to permit different
pneumatic configurations.

June 2003

The flight deck controls permit


automatic or manual starts. During
an autostart, the autostart switch is
ON and the fuel control switch is put
to the RUN position at the beginning
of the start. The EEC controls fuel
and ignition. The EEC also monitors
the start sequence and takes
corrective action for fault conditions.
During a manual start, the autostart
switch is OFF, and the fuel control
switch is put to the RUN position at
maximum motoring. The EEC
controls fuel and ignition, but the pilot
must monitor the start sequence and
take corrective action for fault
conditions.

IGNITION
Each engine has two ignition
systems that operate independently.
They supply the spark to start or
keep combustion going. The main
components in the system are the
ignition units and igniter plugs.
The EEC completely controls
ignition. There is no continuous
ignition selection in the flight deck.
Relays in the power controller unit
(PCU) connect power to one or both
exciters.

The EEC controls the starter


operation with the starter control
valve.

11C-9

Master Chip Detector


Fuel Cooled
Oil cooler
Oil Tank
Oil Quantity
Transmitter
Servo Fuel

Fan Air
Oil Temperature
Thermocouples
Air/Oil Heat
Exchanger

Scavenge
Oil Filter

EEC
Oil Pressure
Transmitters
Oil Pump
90

260
15

OIL
PRESS

OIL
TEMP

OIL QTY

90

External
Gearbox

Pressure Oil
Filter

260
15

Legend:
Supply Oil
Pressure Oil
Scavenge Oil
Breather

Magnetic
Chip Detectors
(Provisions)

Secondary Engine Display

Engine Oil System


Engine Oil System
The engine oil system supplies oil to
lubricate, cool, and clean engine
bearings and gearboxes. The system
also heats engine fuel to prevent ice
formation in the fuel. The oil system
is unregulated so that oil pressure
changes with engine speed. The oil
system has these subsystems:

Pressure
Scavenge
Breather
Indication.

PRESSURE
The pressure subsystem supplies oil
to the engine bearings and
gearboxes. Oil flows from the oil tank
to the pressure stage of the oil pump.
Pressurized oil then goes through a
filter. Next, oil flows through the
engine air/oil heat exchanger and
the fuel cooled oil cooler.

11C-10

The fuel cooled oil cooler is the


primary source of cooling for engine
oil. When additional cooling is
necessary, the EEC sends a signal to
open the air/oil heat exchanger
valve. This lets fan air cool the oil.
The valve is a modulating valve.
SCAVENGE
The scavenge subsystem removes
oil and contaminants from the
bearing compartments and
gearboxes. The oil pump has a row
of scavenge pumps. Each pump
removes oil from its related bearing
compartment or gearbox and sends
it to the oil tank through the scavenge
filter. Magnetic chip detectors
remove ferrous particles from the
scavenge oil.

BREATHER
The breather subsystem vents
bearing seal pressurization air from
the bearing compartments and oil
tank. The engine breather in the
external gearbox separates air from
the oil. The air vents overboard while
oil remains in the system.
INDICATION
The indication subsystem supplies
oil pressure and temperature data
through the EEC to the AIMS. The oil
quantity transmitter has a direct
analog connection to the AIMS. The
secondary engine display shows oil
pressure, temperature, and quantity.
The EICAS display and the status
display show fault messages. Oil
data also shows on the maintenance
pages.

June 2003

Power Plant - RR
Cascade Vanes
Drag Links
ELMS

SLV
DCV
IV

Interlock Actuator

Directional
Control
Valve

ELMS

TLA

Isolation
Valve

Blocker Doors
Sync Lock
Valve

Thrust Lever
Assembly

T/R Sleeve

S S

Hydraulic Supply
T/R Test Enable
Switch

RVDT
EEC
EDIU

AIMS

Proximity
Sensor
System

Non-Locking
Actuator
Sync Shaft
Locking
Actuators

EICAS
ARINC 629
System Buses

Sync Lock

Engine Exhaust System


Engine Exhaust System

The engine exhaust system controls


the direction of exhaust gases to
supply forward and reverse thrust.

The thrust reverser (T/R) system


supplies reverse thrust to decrease
the speed of the airplane on the
ground. Fan exhaust is blocked and
turned forward during reverse thrust.
The T/R system is electrically
controlled and hydraulically
operated. You can operate it
manually for maintenance.

Synchronizing (sync) shaft and


lock
Proximity sensors.

These T/R system components are


in the strut:

Isolation valve (IV)


Directional control valve (DCV)
Sync lock valve (SLV).

System components in the flight


deck include reverse thrust levers
and interlock actuators below the
control stand.
OPERATION

COMPONENTS
There are two T/R halves on each
engine. Each half includes:

T/R sleeve
Blocker doors
Drag links
Cascade segments
Hydraulic actuators

June 2003

When you lift the reverse thrust lever,


these three things happen:

SLV releases the synch shaft lock


DCV moves to the deploy
position
EEC commands reverse thrust.

The EEC controls the operation of


the T/R. The IV supplies hydraulic
pressure to the T/R system. The
hydraulic actuators deploy the T/R.
Once the reverser is deployed, the
EEC energizes the interlock
actuator. This permits more
movement of the reverse thrust lever
to increase reverse power.
When you put the reverse thrust
lever in the down position, the T/R
stows. The locking actuators and
synch shaft lock to keep the reverser
stowed.
A maintenance switch on the fan
case permits a bypass of the EEC
engine run logic to let the T/R deploy
during maintenance.
RVDTs and proximity sensors
monitor the T/R system for fault
conditions. The RVDTs also supply
signals for T/R control and flight deck
indications.
11C-11

SHOW
PG MENU

EPCS
LEFT ENGINE

19.5
46.3
60.3
33.9
0.0
0.0
14.7
52
14.7
10
37.1
11
101
59
32.7

19.5
46.3
60.3
33.9
0.0
0.0
14.7
52
14.7
10
36.9
11
101
61
32.7

RIGHT ENGINE

TACH

19.5
0.0
60.3

N1
N2
N3
TRA
T/R L
T/R R
PAMB
P30
P20
T 20
VSV
T24
OIL T
OIL P
FMV

ENG OIL TEMP L

SHOW
PG MENU

PG 1/2

DATE

EPCS
LEFT ENGINE

347
15
15

347
15
15

3060
0E00
0008
4200
00A0
0010
0020
BA28

3040
0E00
0008
4200
00A0
0010
0020
BA28

ENG OIL TEMP L

19.4
46.1
60.4
34.0
0.0
0.0
14.7
52
14.7
12
37.0
12
101
62
32.2

TACH

19.4
46.1
60.4
34.0
0.0
0.0
14.7
52
14.7
12
36.2
12
100
61
32.2

16 SEP 980

19.4
0.0
60.4

UTC

18:54:04

PG 2/2
RIGHT ENGINE

344
15
15

344
15
15

3060
0E00
0008
4400
00A0
0010
0020
BA28

3040
0E00
0008
4400
00A0
0010
0020
BA28

EGT
EEC TEMP
P50

STATUS 1
STATUS 2
STATUS 3
STATUS 4
STATUS 5
STATUS 6
STATUS 7
STATUS 8

DATE

16 SEP 98

UTC

18:54:04

Maintenance Pages
11C-12

June 2003

Auxiliary Power Unit


Features

DUAL OPERATING MODES

Auxiliary Power System

OPERATES ON THE GROUND OR


IN FLIGHT

Control and Indication

Fuel System

The auxiliary power unit (APU) is an


electrical and pneumatic power
source for aircraft systems on the
ground or in flight.

The APU may operate in either the


attended or unattended mode. In the
attended mode, only safety related
faults cause automatic protective
shutdowns. In the unattended mode,
all faults that may damage the APU
cause protective shutdowns.

Pneumatic System

Ignition and Starting System

PNEUMATIC POWER SOURCE

OPERABLE DURING REFUELING

Lubrication System

The APU load compressor supplies


pneumatic power up to an altitude of
22,000 feet (6700 m).

The APU operates normally during


refueling operations.
CLUSTER COMPONENT DESIGN

ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCE


A 120 kVA APU generator supplies
electrical power up to the service
ceiling of the airplane.
DUAL STARTING SYSTEM
The APU has an electric and an air
turbine starter. The air turbine starter
starts the APU when there is
pressure in the pneumatic system.
EDUCTOR COOLING SYSTEM
The APU eductor air/oil cooling
system replaces the more usual
mechanical fan.

For easier line maintenance, these


subsystem components are in
functional clusters:

Fuel
Lubrication
Ignition
Pneumatic.

The clusters are line replaceable


units.
OPERATIONAL HISTORY
RECORDING
A data memory module records
APU operation data.

AUTOSTART

OPTIONAL EXHAUST MUFFLER

The APU automatically starts if the


airplane is in the air and both the left
and right transfer buses lose power.

An optional exhaust muffler in the


exhaust duct decreases exhaust
noise.

FULL AUTHORITY DIGITAL


ELECTRONIC CONTROL
The APU control system uses
microprocessor electronics to supply
automatic, full-authority digital
electronic control for all APU
operating conditions.

June 2003

12-1

Air Inlet

Exhaust

APUC
APU Access
Doors

Auxiliary Power System


Auxiliary Power System
The auxiliary power system supplies
electrical and pneumatic power to
the airplane. This permits
independent ground operation. The
auxiliary power system is also
available for use in flight.
The auxiliary power unit (APU) is an
AlliedSignal Engines 331-500. The
APU is in the tail cone of the aircraft.

The APU can start at all altitudes up


to the service ceiling of the airplane
(43,100 feet / 13,100m). Electrical
power is available up to the service
ceiling and pneumatic power is
available up to 22,000 feet (6700m).
To make maintenance easier, some
subsystem components are in
removable clusters.

A data memory module (DMM)


attaches to the left side of the APU
inlet plenum. The DMM makes a
record of this APU operation data:

Number of starts
Type of start (electric or
pneumatic)
Operating hours
Time in the different operating
modes
Average generator load.

The APU controller (APUC) controls


and monitors the APU starting
sequence, normal operation, and
shutdown. The APUC does
protective shutdowns, if necessary,
to prevent damage to the APU.

12-2

June 2003

Auxiliary Power Unit


Air Turbine Starter
Control Valve

Air Inlet Plenum

Bleed Air
Check Valve

Air Turbine
Starter

Oil Cooler

Fuel Manifolds
APU Generator
Data Memory Module
Electric Starter

Fuel Cluster

Lube Cluster

APU Components - Left Side


Exhaust Eductor

Air Turbine Starter

Electric Starter Motor

Fuel Cluster
Surge Control Valve
Bleed Air Check Valve

APU
Generator
Oil Filler Port

APU Components - Right Side


June 2003

12-3

ELECTRICAL

ON

APU BTL
DISCH a

APU
ON

BATTERY
OFF

APU FIRE
WARNING
HORN

START

OFF a
DISCH

APU GEN
ON

OFF

FAULT

r
APU FIRE

FIRE BOTTLE
ARMED

APU Selector (P5)

APU Fire Switch (P5)


BOTTLE
DISCHARGE

APU Fire Shutdown Switch


APU FIRE
SHUTDOWN

APU BOTTLE
DISCHARGE

Starting and Ignition


Fuel Control

APU MAINT

Surge Control

FLIGHT DECK
CALL

FLIGHT
INPH

NLG DOORS
CLOSE
OFF

IGV Control

APU
POWER
NORM

Data Storage
ARM

OFF

Protective Shutdown
Normal Shutdown

COCKPIT
VOICE

SERVICE
INPH

EMER EXIT
LT TEST

WHEELWELL
LIGHTS

BITE

TEST

ON

APU Indications

NORM

OFF

APUC

TEST

APU Maintenance
Switch (P61)

P40 Service and APU Shutdown Panel

APU Control and Indication


Control and Indication
CONTROL
The APUC controls these APU
functions:

Starting and ignition


Fuel control
Surge control
Inlet guide vane (IGV) control
Data storage
Protective shutdowns
Normal shutdowns
Bite/Fault reporting
APU indications.

The APU selector is on the electrical


panel on the P5 overhead panel. You
use this selector for normal APU start
and shutdown.

12-4

The APU fire switch on the P5


overhead panel or the APU fire
shutdown switch on the P40 service
and APU shutdown panel are for
emergency shutdown.
The APU maintenance switch on the
P61 overhead maintenance panel
lets you supply power to the APUC
when the APU selector is OFF.

The APU maintenance page shows


the output of the APU sensors and
other APU data.
A fault light below the APU selector
comes on when the APU does a
protective shutdown. The fault light
also flashes during APU start and
shutdown to show the APUC self-test
BITE.

INDICATION
The EICAS display shows an APU
RUNNING memo message when the
APU is on.
The status display normally shows
this APU data:

Exhaust gas temperature


Speed
Lubrication system status.

June 2003

Auxiliary Power Unit

HYDRAULIC
L

QTY

0.91

0.98

0.90

PRESS

3000

3050

3010

APU
RPM
OIL PRESS

100.6

70 PSI

EGT
OIL TEMP

520

98 C

OIL QTY

7.9

OXYGEN
CREW PRESS

1850

Status Display

Primary Display System Indications

APU

DUCTPRESS
ONSPEED
SPEED SENSOR 1
100.6
SPEED SENSOR 2
100.8
EGT CORRECTED
388
EGT THERMOCOUPLE 1
387
EGT THERMOCOUPLE 2
388
OIL PRESS
70
OIL TEMP
98
OIL QTY
7.90
INLET STATIC PRESS
14.5
LOAD COMP TOTAL PRESS
30.3
LOAD COMP DIFF PRESS
15.3
COMP INLET TEMP
105
OIL SUMP TEMP
49
SURGE CONTROL VLV POSN 63.7
IGV ACTUATOR POS
60.0
FMU FUEL TEMP
80
FUEL CLUSTER FMV POS
100.0
INLET DOOR CMD
OPEN
INLET DOOR POS
OPEN

240
240
28.0
DIS 120
0
0
0.00

PNEU MODE

BLD CORRECTED FLOW

APUC MODE

BLD CORRECTED FLOW SET


APU BAT DC-V
APU BAT DC-A
APU GEN AC-V
APU GEN FREQ
APU GEN LOAD

APU FUEL FEED


COMMAND STATUS

S/O VLV
DC PUMP
AC PUMP

OPEN CLOSED
ON
PRESS
OFF

STATUS CODE
STATUS 1
STATUS 2
STATUS 3

0000
0000
0000

APU OPER HOURS


APU STARTS

DATE

23 JUN 97

00 -0
000 0000
250517
29891

UTC18:51:04

APU Maintenance Page

Primary Display System Indications


June 2003

12-5

APU

Fuel Feed

APUC
Fuel Cluster

Fuel Manifolds

APU Fuel System


Fuel System
The APU fuel system gets fuel from
the left main tank and supplies it to
the APU for combustion. These are
the main components of the fuel
system:

Fuel cluster
Fuel manifolds.

To make maintenance easier, many


of the fuel system components are in
a cluster. The fuel cluster has these
components:

Boost and pressure pumps


Fuel filter
Pressure regulator
Pressure relief valve
Fuel metering section
Flow divider
Fuel shutoff valve
Fuel temperature sensor.

12-6

The APUC sends fuel control signals


to the fuel cluster for normal
operation. The APUC also controls
fuel flow during start and shutdown
(both normal and protective), and
adjusts APU generator speed for nobreak electrical power transfers.
The APU fuel cluster pressurizes,
filters, and meters the fuel flow. The
fuel flow divider separates the
metered fuel into the primary and
secondary fuel manifolds for supply
to the combustion chamber. The
secondary fuel manifold operates
after the APU speed increases to
more than 50 percent RPM to supply
more fuel flow.

Regulated (servo) fuel pressure


operates the inlet guide vane
actuator and the surge control valve
actuator.
Overspeed causes fuel system
protective shutdowns. No light-off
and no acceleration cause protective
shutdowns in the unattended mode
only.

June 2003

Auxiliary Power Unit


Pneumatic
Cluster

Air Inlet Door


Air Inlet
Door Actuator

Surge Control
Valve

FWD
ELMS
Inlet Plenum
Surge Control
Valve

Bleed Air
Check Valve
IGVs

IGV Actuator

FWD

To Exhaust
Duct

Load
Compressor

Surge Control
Valve Actuator

IGV Actuator

APUC

APU Pneumatic System


Pneumatic System
The APU supplies pressurized air for
these pneumatic system functions:

Environmental control system


(ECS)
Air driven hydraulic pumps
(ADPs)
Main engine start (MES)
Wing anti-ice.

The electrical load management


system (ELMS) controls the
operation of the air inlet door. Air
comes into the APU inlet air plenum
from the air inlet door. The load
compressor gets air from the plenum
through variable inlet guide vanes
(IGVs). The IGVs control the volume
of air available to the load
compressor. The load compressor
sends pressurized air into the
pneumatic ducts.

June 2003

The APUC controls the IGVs as a


function of how the airplane systems
use pressurized air. High pressure
fuel supplies the force that operates
the IGVs.

To make maintenance easier, some


pneumatic components are in a
cluster. The cluster includes three
pneumatic pressure sensors and the
surge control valve that mounts on a
section of the bleed air duct.

A surge control valve sends any


unneeded pressurized air into the
APU exhaust. The APUC controls
the surge control valve. High
pressure fuel supplies the force that
operates the surge control valve. A
bleed air check valve prevents
reverse pressurized air flow from
the airplane system.

12-7

ELECTRICAL
APU
ON

BATTERY
ON

OFF

START

OFF a
APU GEN

ATS Control Valve


ON

OFF

FAULT

APU Selector (P5)

Air Turbine Starter

Ignition
Unit

APUC

Ignitors

Electric Starter
Ignition Cluster

APU Ignition and Starting System


Ignition and Starting System
The ignition and starting system
supplies the combustion spark and
starts the APU acceleration. These
are the components of the ignition
and starting system:

Air turbine starter (ATS) control


valve
Air turbine starter
Electric starter
Ignition unit
Dual ignitors.

The ignition components are in a


cluster.
The ignition unit supplies energy to
the two ignitors. The APUC controls
the power to the ignition unit. The
ignitors supply the spark to the
combustion chamber.
Automatic starting of the APU occurs
when transfer bus power is lost in the
air.

One of the two starters starts the


APU. The pneumatic starter
operates when pressurized air is
available. If pressurized air is not
available, the electric starter starts
the APU.

12-8

June 2003

Auxiliary Power Unit

ATS

APU
Gen

Gearbox Load
Comp

Midframe
Bearing
Compt

Gas
Gen

Turbine
Bearing
Compt

Exhaust

Lube
Cluster

Oil Cooler
Magnetic Chip
Collectors
Legend:
Pressure
Scavenge

Oil Fill Port and Sight Gage

Lube Cluster

Supply

APU Lubrication System


Lubrication System
The APU lubrication system cools
and lubricates these components:

APU generator
Air turbine starter
APU gearbox
APU bearings.

Some lubrication system


components are in the lube cluster.
These components are in the lube
cluster:

Pressure and scavenge pumps


Oil filters
Pressure and temperature
sensors.

These are the other lubrication


system components:

Oil cooler
Magnetic chip collectors
Oil heater assembly.

June 2003

The APU oil supply is in the gearbox


sump. Oil servicing is through a pourtype fill port. A sight glass shows oil
quantity. A transmitter sends oil
quantity data to the APUC.
Cooled and filtered pressure oil goes
to the bearings, the generator, and
the accessory section gearbox.
Scavenge pumps send oil back to the
reservoir from the turbine and load
compressor bearings. Scavenge
pumps also return filtered oil from the
generator to the reservoir.
The APU exhaust gas operates an
eductor which pulls APU
compartment air through the oil
cooler for cooling.
Five magnetic chip collectors collect
metallic particles in the APU
lubrication system.

12-9

Hydraulics
Features
TRIPLE REDUNDANCY
There are three independent
hydraulic systems. Each system has
two or more pumps that operate from
different pneumatic, mechanical, or
electrical power sources.
Each hydraulic system can
independently operate the flight
controls for safe flight and landing.
PUMP OPERATION ON DEMAND
Normally, one or two pumps in each
hydraulic system operate
continuously. The other pumps
operate only when there is a
hydraulic demand. This increases
pump life, system efficiency, and
reliability.
AUTOMATIC SYSTEM CONTROLS
The flight crew sets the pump
switches for flight before engine
start. Normally no further action is
necessary. The demand pumps
operate automatically.
Each hydraulic system uses
hydraulic interface module electronic
cards for automatic control, fault
detection, and indications.

Left and right system tubes are on


opposite sides of the body. In the
wheel wells, there is maximum
separation of tubes. In the wings, one
system is forward of the rear spar
and two systems are aft of the rear
spar.
CENTER HYDRAULIC ISOLATION
SYSTEM

Hydraulic Systems

Controls and Indications

Automatic Control

Reservoir Servicing Station

Maintenance Panel

A center hydraulic isolation system


(CHIS) supplies a reserve brake and
steering function if there is a loss of
center hydraulic system fluid.
HYDRAULIC FUSES
Hydraulic fuses in some of the
hydraulic lines to these systems
protect against fluid loss:

Main Gear Steering


Brakes
Main Gear Actuation
Flight Controls.

COMPONENTS GROUPING
Hydraulic reservoirs are near the
pumps they supply. Pump filter
modules are close to each pump.
Return filter modules are close to
each reservoir.
COMMONALITY OF
COMPONENTS

RAM AIR TURBINE


If all usual pressure sources become
unavailable during flight, the ram air
turbine is an emergency source of
hydraulic power for the primary flight
controls.
TUBE SEPARATION
The location of the hydraulic system
tubes decreases the risk of multiple
system losses from a single failure
source. Only one hydraulic system
has tubes in an engine strut and
nacelle. Only two systems go to the
end of the wings.

June 2003

All electric pumps are


interchangeable. The air-driven
pumps and engine-driven pumps are
also interchangeable. The pressure
and case drain filter modules are the
same for the engine-driven pumps
and the air-driven pumps. The
pressure and case drain filter
modules are the same for all electric
pumps.
SINGLE-POINT RESERVOIR
SERVICING
A hydraulic reservoir servicing
station in the right aft body fairing
makes it possible to fill all three
reservoirs from one location.

13-1

Center System

Left System

APU
Engine Bleed

AC
Motor
Pump
(ACMP)

Right System

APU
Air

Engine Bleed

Left
Engine

AirDriven
Pump
(ADP)

AirDriven
Pump
(ADP)

Right
Engine

EngineDriven
Pump
(EDP)

AC
Motor
Pump
(ACMP)

AC
Motor
Pump
(ACMP)

EngineDriven
Pump
(EDP)

AC
Motor
Pump
(ACMP)

Ram
Air
Turbine
(RAT)
Spoilers

2, 4, 11, 13

1, 5, 7, 8,10,14

Ailerons

LOB and ROB

LIB and RIB

Flaperons

LOB

ROB

LIB and RIB

Elevators

LOB and ROB

LIB

RIB

Middle PCU

Upper PCU

Lower PCU

Center

Right

Rudder
Pitch Trim
Thrust
Reverser

Right

Left

Main Gear
Brakes

Alternate
Reserve

Nose Gear
Steering

Normal
Reserve

Landing Gear
Actuation

3, 6, 9, 12

Nose Gear
Main Gear

Normal

Legend:
Main Hydraulic Connection

Main Gear
Steering

Normal

Connections for Alternate


and Emergency Supply

Trailing
Edge Flaps

Primary

Leading
Edge Slats

Primary

LOB
ROB
LIB
RIB

- Left Outboard PCU


- Right Outboard PCU
- Left Inboard PCU
- Right Inboard PCU

Hydraulic System Block Diagram


13-2

June 2003

Hydraulics

Right System
Color Code: Green
One EDP
One ACMP
Main Components in
the Right Engine Strut

Center System
Color Code: Blue
Two ACMPs
Two ADPs, One RAT
Main Components in/near
the Wheel Wells

Left System
Color Code: Red
One EDP
One ACMP
Main Components in
the Left Engine Strut

Hydraulic Systems Component Locations


Hydraulic Systems
The three hydraulic systems operate
independently at 3,000 psi nominal
pressure. The three systems are
named left (L), center (C) and right
(R) for the location of their main
components. Each system has its
own reservoir, pumps, and filters.
LEFT SYSTEM
The left system has an engine-driven
pump (EDP) and an alternatingcurrent motor pump (ACMP). The
right AC bus supplies power to the
ACMP. The left system supplies
power to the flight controls and the
left thrust reverser.
RIGHT SYSTEM
The right system also has an EDP
and an ACMP. The left AC bus
supplies power to the ACMP. The
right system supplies power to the

June 2003

flight controls, the normal main gear


brakes, and the right thrust reverser.

The RAT deploys automatically


during flight when any of these
conditions occur:

CENTER SYSTEM
The center system has two ACMPs,
two air-driven pumps (ADPs) and a
ram air turbine (RAT) pump. The left
and right AC buses supply power to
the ACMPs. Pneumatic power from
the two engines or the auxiliary
power unit (APU) operates the
ADPs.
The center system supplies power
for these functions:

Flight controls
Leading edge slats
Trailing edge flaps
Alternate and reserve main gear
brakes
Normal and reserve nose gear
steering and nose gear
extension-retraction
Main gear extension-retraction
Main gear steering.

Both engines are shut down


Both AC buses are not powered
All three hydraulic system
pressures are low.

Ram air then turns the turbine. Only


the flight controls use hydraulic
power from the RAT. The RAT can
be retracted only on the ground.
PRIMARY AND DEMAND PUMPS
The primary pumps are the EDPs in
the left and right systems and the
ACMPs in the center system. These
pumps operate continuously.
The demand pumps are the ACMPs
for the left and right systems and the
ADPs for the center system. These
pumps normally operate only during
heavy system demands.

13-3

RAT Deploy
Switch

RAM AIR
TURBINE
PRESS
UNLKD

ACMP Primary
Pump Switch

HYDRAULIC
P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

C1
L ENG
ON

ELEC

C2

ON

ON

FAULT

FAULT

R ENG
ON

FAULT

FAULT
C1
AUTO

L ELEC
AUTO
OFF
D
E
M
A
N
D

OFF

AIR

C2
AUTO

ON OFF

ON

ON

R ELEC
AUTO
ON

OFF

FAULT

FAULT

FAULT

P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

D
E
M
A
N
D

EDP Primary
Pump Switch
ADP Demand
Pump Selector

ACMP Demand
Pump Selector

FAULT

Fault Light
Hydraulic/RAT Panel (P5)
ENG BTL
1 DISCH

ENG BTL
2 DISCH

DISCH
1

DISCH
2

L
E
F
T

R
I
G
H
T

Engine Fire Switches (P8)

Controls and Indications


Controls and Indications

INDICATING LIGHTS

The hydraulic pump controls and


indication lights are on the P5
overhead panel.

Each pump has an amber fault light


which shows a pump overheat or low
pressure condition. The RAT switch
has a green light which shows high
RAT output pressure and an amber
light which shows the RAT is
unlocked.

PUMP MANUAL CONTROLS


Pump controls on the Hydraulic/RAT
panel permit manual control of the
hydraulic systems.
The primary pump switches have ON
and OFF positions. Primary pumps
are normally ON.
Demand pump selectors may be set
to OFF, AUTO, or ON. To permit
automatic pump control, demand
pumps are normally set to AUTO.
RAT MANUAL CONTROL
The RAT deploy switch, on the upper
part of the hydraulic /RAT panel,
permits the flight crew to manually
deploy the ram air turbine.
13-4

ENGINE FIRE SWITCHES


The engine fire switches shut off
hydraulic fluid supply to the EDPs.
The engine fire switches are on the
P8 aft control stand.

PRIMARY DISPLAY SYSTEM


INDICATIONS
These conditions cause alert level
EICAS indications:

RAT unlocked
Low system pressure
Low pump pressure
Pump overheat
Reservoir low quantity
Reserve brake and steering
failure
HYDIM card failure.

The status display shows reservoir


quantity and system pressure for
each system.
The hydraulic synoptic display is a
real-time diagram of the operational
status of the hydraulic system.
The hydraulic maintenance page
shows hydraulic data for
maintenance personnel.

June 2003

Hydraulics

HYDRAULIC

QTY
PRESS

1.20
2990

0.72
3010

0.39
3010

RF

LO

APU
RPM
OIL PRESS

EGT
PSI

OIL TEMP

C
C

OIL QTY

OXYGEN
CREW PRESS

1850

Status Display

Hydraulic Status Page

HYDRAULIC
NORM BRKS

FLAPS

L REV

NOSE GEAR ALTN/RSV MAIN GEAR


BRAKES & STEERING FLT CTRL
FLT CTRL & STEERING

R REV

SYSTEM PRESS:

2990

PRIMARY PUMP: PRESS


TEMP
SEL
RUN
S/O VLV
DEMAND PUMP: PRESS
TEMP
SEL
RUN
PRESS
RAT PUMP:
RPM
POS
RESERVOIR:
QTY
PRESS
TEMP
F/C S/O VLV:
TAIL
WING
RESERVE ISLN: VALVE POS
NOSE GR ISLN: VALVE POS

3050
103
ON
-OPEN
50
20
AUTO
NO
---1.20 OF
NORM
90
NORM
NORM
---

L
ENG

ISLN

ELEC
C1

P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

ELEC
C2

AIR
C1

L
ELEC

AIR
C2

RAT
D
E
M
A
N
D

D
E
M
A
N
D

SOV

1.20

P
R
I
M
A
R
Y

0.72

OF

2990

PRESS

Hydraulic Synoptic Display

3010

R
ENG

R
ELEC

SOV

0.39 LO

RF
PRESS

3010

FLT CTRL
1

ISLN

C
3010

2980
75
ON
YES
-50
20
AUTO
NO

2
2980
75
ON
YES
-40
20
AUTO
NO

2950
4550
NOT STOWED
0.72 RF
NORM
55
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM

50
55
ON
-CLOSED
3020
45
AUTO
YES
---0.39 LO
LOW
30
CLOSED
NORM
---

3010

Hydraulic Maintenance Page

Hydraulic Synoptic and Maintenance Pages


June 2003

13-5

Hydraulic
System
Sensors
Hydraulic/
RAT Panel
Switches
Other
Airplane
Systems

HYDIM L

Demand Pump
AUTO Operation

HYDIM CL

RAT
Deployment

HYDIM CR

Landing Gear
Auto-Off

HYDIM R

Center System
Isolation

Systems Card Files


EICAS

MFD
AIMS

MAT

Hydraulic Control Interfaces


Automatic Control

HYDIM FUNCTIONS

HYDIM CARDS

The HYDIM cards control these


functions:

Hydraulic interface module (HYDIM)


cards control the hydraulic system
operation and indication. These
cards are in the systems card files in
the main equipment center. There is
one card for the left system (HYDIM
L), two for the center system (HYDIM
CL and CR) and one for the right
system (HYDIM R).
The HYDIM cards send data to the
airplane information management
system (AIMS) through ARINC 629
buses.

13-6

Demand pump AUTO operation


Rat deployment
Landing gear Auto-Off operation
Center hydraulic system
isolation.

MAINTENANCE ACCESS
TERMINAL
Maintenance personnel can use the
maintenance access terminal (MAT)
to do tests on the hydraulic systems.

The ON position of the demand


pump switches cancels the HYDIM
demand pump control.
The HYDIM cards also control these
hydraulic system indications:

System pressure
Pump pressure
Pump temperature
Reservoir quantity
Reservoir temperature
Reservoir pressure.

June 2003

Hydraulics

Instruction Placard
Suction Hose

FLT CONTROL HYD VALVE POWER


L

C
TAIL

Selector Handle
NORM

Remote Quantity
Indicator
Inlet
Filter

NORM

SHUT
OFF

Pressure Fill
Connection
Manual Pump

VALVE
CLOSED

SHUT
OFF
VALVE
CLOSED

VALVE
CLOSED

WING

NORM

NORM

SHUT
OFF

FWD

VALVE
CLOSED

SHUT
OFF
VALVE
CLOSED

VALVE
CLOSED

Flight Control Hydraulic Power


Panel (P61)

Reservoir Servicing and Maintenance Power


Reservoir Servicing Station

Maintenance Panel

A reservoir servicing station in the


right aft body fairing lets
maintenance personnel fill the three
hydraulic system reservoirs.

The flight control hydraulic power


panel is on the P61 overhead
maintenance panel. Guarded
switches control six hydraulic shutoff
valves to the wing and tail flight
controls. An amber light, below each
switch, shows that its shutoff valve is
not fully open. An EICAS message
also shows.

A selector handle selects the


reservoir to fill. The remote quantity
indicator shows the fluid quantity in
the reservoir selected.
To fill the selected hydraulic
reservoir, maintenance personnel
use either a ground cart that
connects to the pressure fill
connection, or the manual pump and
suction hose.

Maintenance personnel use these


switches to isolate hydraulic
pressure for system checks.

Replacement hydraulic fluid goes


through an inlet filter in the service
station.

June 2003

13-7

Landing Gear
Features

MAIN GEAR STEERING

Main Landing Gear

TRICYCLE LANDING GEAR

The aft axles of the main gear trucks


pivot to help the nose gear steer the
airplane. This helps to decrease the
turn radius and tire scrub.

Nose Landing Gear

Landing Gear Controls and


Indications

CARBON BRAKES

Proximity Sensor System

All wheels of the main landing gear


trucks have carbon brakes for
reduced weight and longer life.

Air/Ground System

Airplane Ground Steering

BRAKE SYSTEM CONTROL UNIT

Brakes

A brake system control unit (BSCU)


controls antiskid and autobrake
operation and other brake system
functions.

Antiskid and Autobrake

Brake Temperature Monitor


System

Tire Pressure Indication


System

The tricycle landing gear has two


main landing gear under the wings
and one nose landing gear.
HYDRAULIC ACTUATION
The landing gear operates with
center hydraulic system pressure.
During normal operation, valves
control the sequence of operation.
An alternate gear extension system
extends the landing gear without
center hydraulic system pressure.
When the landing gear is fully
retracted in flight, valves
automatically remove hydraulic
pressure from the landing gear.
ELECTRICAL CONTROL OF
LANDING GEAR
The landing gear control lever has
two positions and electrically controls
the landing gear selector valves for
landing gear operation.
PROXIMITY SENSOR SYSTEM

TAXI BRAKE RELEASE


During low taxi speed, the BSCU
releases two brakes on each truck.
This decreases brake and tire wear.
BRAKE INDICATIONS
Lights on the nose gear show if the
brakes and the parking brake are
applied.
TAIL STRIKE INDICATION

The proximity sensor system


monitors the position of the proximity
sensors and supplies signals to show
the position of the landing gear and
other aircraft systems.

A tail strike assembly (TSA) on the


bottom of the aft part of the fuselage
sends signals to the PSEUs if a tail
strike occurs.

AIR/GROUND SYSTEM

OTHER FEATURES

Load sensors monitor the weight of


the aircraft on the landing gear and
supply signals for air/ground
detection. Many aircraft systems use
these air/ground signals. Nose gear
and main truck proximity sensors
also supply air/ground signals for
some limited functions.

Other features include a brake


temperature monitor system, a tire
pressure indicating system, and an
optional brake cooling system.

SIX WHEELS ON THE MAIN


TRUCKS
Each main landing gear truck has
six wheels.

June 2003

14-1

Uplock Hook
Retract Actuator

Door Actuator
Side Brace

Main Gear Trunnion

Door
Uplock
Lock
Link

Downlock
Actuator
Drag Brace

Landing Gear Door

Tail Skid
(777-300)
Main Gear Strut

Torsion Links
Main Gear Steering
Components

Wheel-Tire
Assembly

FWD
Truck

Truck Tilt Actuator

Main Landing Gear and Tail Skid


Main Landing Gear

NORMAL OPERATION

ALTERNATE EXTENSION

The main landing gear strut includes


an air-oil shock absorber. A drag
brace and a side brace transmit
loads from the strut to the airplane
structure. Over-center mechanisms
lock both braces when the landing
gear is fully extended.

The main landing gear uses


hydraulic pressure from the center
system to retract and extend.
Sequence valves control the door
and gear movement.

The alternate extension system


permits landing gear extension if the
center hydraulic system has no
pressure. An alternate extend power
pack supplies hydraulic pressure to
unlock the landing gear doors and
the landing gear.The doors open and
the gear extends by their own weight.
The gear doors stay open after an
alternate extension.

A landing gear door on each main


gear wheel well opens and closes
during gear retraction and extension.

Drag brace and side brace downlock


actuators lock the gear in the
extended position. Uplock hooks lock
the landing gear in the retracted
position.

GROUND DOOR OPERATION


Each truck has three axles. A brake
and a wheel-tire assembly are at the
end of each axle for a total of six
wheels on each main landing gear.
The aft axle pivots for main gear
steering.

14-2

The main landing gear trucks tilt


approximately 13 degrees forward
wheels up with the gear extended in
flight. The gear trucks tilt about 5
degrees forward wheels down when
the gear is up and locked, or in
transit.

The alternate extension system lets


you open the doors when the
airplane is on the ground. The doors
open by their own weight. Center
system hydraulic pressure closes the
doors.

June 2003

Landing Gear

Retract Actuator
Nose Gear Operated
Sequence Valve
Drag Brace
Lock Link

Nose Gear Trunnion


Door Actuator
Nose Gear Strut

Aft Door

Torsion LInks

Steering
Mechanism

Forward Door

Wheel-Tire
Assembly
FWD
Note:
Left doors not shown for clarity.

Nose Landing Gear


Nose Landing Gear

NORMAL OPERATION

GROUND DOOR OPERATION

The nose landing gear strut includes


an air-oil shock absorber. A folding
drag brace transmits loads from the
strut to the airplane structure. At full
extension or retraction of the nose
gear, the over-center mechanism of
the lock link locks the drag brace.

The nose landing gear uses center


system hydraulic pressure to retract
and extend. Sequence valves control
forward door and landing gear
movement.

The alternate extension system


permits you to open the forward
doors when the airplane is on the
ground. The forward doors open by
their own weight. The doors close
with hydraulic pressure from the
center system.

The forward doors of the nose gear


wheel well operate hydraulically
during gear retraction and extension.
The aft doors operate by mechanical
linkages that connect to the nose
gear. The aft doors close only when
the gear retracts.

Nose gear alternate extension uses


hydraulic pressure from the alternate
extend power pack. The forward
doors open and the landing gear
extends by its own weight. The
forward doors remain open after an
alternate extension.

June 2003

ALTERNATE EXTENSION

14-3

BRAKE
SOURCE

Parking Brake
Set Light
a

G/S

BRAKE
ACCUM

GND PROX
GEAR
FLAP

Brake-On
Light

GND
PROX

PSI X 1000

Brake Accumulator
Pressure Indicator (P1)

OVRD

RETRACT
270K-.82M
UP

OVRD

ALTN
GEAR
NORM
LOCK
OVRD

Brake-Off
Light

Lever Lock
Override Switch
Alternate Gear
Switch

Landing Gear
Lever
DOWN

DN

Parking Brake
Lever

Autobrake
Selector

EXTEND
270K-.82M
AUTOBRAKE
DISARM
OFF

MAX
AUTO

RTO

P10 Control Stand

Landing Gear Panel (P2)

Nose Gear

Landing Gear Controls and Indications


Landing Gear Controls and
Indications

alternate extend power pack. This


permits the gear to extend by gravity.

FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS

The autobrake selector is below the


landing gear lever. This selector
arms the autobrake system for
landing autobrakes or for rejected
takeoff (RTO).

These landing gear controls are on


the flight deck:

Landing gear lever


Alternate gear switch
Autobrake selector
Parking brake lever.

You set the parking brakes with the


parking brake lever on the P10
control stand.

There are warning, caution, and


advisory messages for the landing
gear. The status, maintenance, and
synoptic displays show additional
landing gear information.
A brake accumulator gage shows
brake accumulator pressure.
Brake status lights on the nose gear
show the condition of the brakes.
DOOR GROUND CONTROL

The landing gear lever has two


positions, down (DN) and UP.The
lever electrically controls the landing
gear selector valves to control the
hydraulic operation of the landing
gear. An automatic lever lock
prevents the lever from being moved
up on the ground. A lever lock
override switch permits the lever to
be unlocked manually.
A guarded switch next to the lever
lock override switch turns on the

14-4

LANDING GEAR INDICATION


The EICAS display shows the
position of the landing gear. The
DOWN indication shows
continuously when the landing gear
is down and locked. The UP
indication goes out of view 10
seconds after the landing gear is up
and locked. During an alternate
landing gear extension or a nonnormal condition, an expanded
indication shows the position of each
gear.

Two switches on the main wheel well


electrical service panel open all the
landing gear doors. These switches
also close the main landing gear
doors. Two switches on the service
and APU shutdown panel close the
nose gear doors.

June 2003

Landing Gear

TAT +13c

1.83

LANDING GEAR ACTN/INDN

D-TO 1 +15c

1.83

1.624

PSEU 1

1.624

TAILSTRIKE
ALTN EXT CMD
UP

NOSE GEAR:

75.6

DOWN

MAIN GEAR:

NOT DN

DOWN GND

NOT DN

NOT DN

FAR

FAR

NEAR

NEAR

GEAR DOWN

FAR

FAR

DOOR

FAR

NOT COMP

FAR

GEAR

F
L
A
P
S

777-300

20

182.6
TEMP+15c

NEAR

NEAR

FAR

FAR

SIDE BRACE

FAR

NEAR

NEAR

NEAR

DRAG BRACE

NEAR

NEAR

NEAR

NEAR

DOOR

FAR

FAR

NEAR

NEAR

TRUCK TILT

NEAR

NEAR

NEAR

NEAR

AUTO-OFF
HYDIM L

FLAP PRIORITY CMD

HYDIM R

EICAS Display

FSEU 1

FSEU 2

CMD

ENGAGED NOT ENGA

LBS X
1000

FAR
R

HYD PRESS

TOTAL FUEL

FAR

L
UP LOCK

EGT

UP

NOT DN

GEAR UP

587

NORM

UP

DOWN PWR
LOCK

N1
587

GND/OPEN

NORM

GEAR LEVER:
EPR

75.6

PSEU 2

28V

NOT CMD
AIR/GND
L WOW

TAIL SKID

C SYS

3000

L TILT

3000

UP

FAR

L MLG

GND

R TILT

3000

DOWN

NEAR

R MLG

GND

PSEU 2

DATE 02 SEPT 95

R WOW
AIR SIM
AIR SIM

UTC 19:23:09

Landing Gear Actuation/Indication Maintenance Page

APU FIRE
WARNING
HORN

OFF
S3

MLG DOORS
CLOSE

05

OFF
S32018
APU FIRE

FIRE BOTTLE
ARMED
RESET FIRE/OVHT
TEST SW (P5)

ARM
DOORS

ALL DOORS
OPEN

D23009
SERVICE
INTERPHONE

D23024
P.M.A.T.

BOTTLE
DISCHARGE

APU FIRE
SHUTDOWN

FLIGHT DECK
CALL

APU BOTTLE
DISCHARGE

NLG DOORS
UNSAFE LIGHT
PRESS TO TEST

FLIGHT
INPH

NLG DOORS
CLOSE
OFF

ARM
COCKPIT
VOICE

SERVICE
INPH

EMER EXIT
LT TEST

MAIN WHEEL
WELL INSP
LIGHT SW
ON

MLG DOOR
UNSAFE LT
PRESS TO TEST

OFF

WHEELWELL
LIGHTS

TEST

ON

NORM

OFF

P40 Service and APU Shutdown Panel

S32017
OPEN

MAIN WHEEL WELL


ELECTRICAL
SERVICE PANEL

OFF
S33002

P56 Main Wheel Well Electrical Service Panel

Landing Gear Controls and Indications


June 2003

14-5

Landing Gear
Prox Sensors

Doors
Prox Sensors

Left and Right


Main Gear Load
Sensors

Left Weight
on Wheels
Card

PSEU 1
Left Card File
ARINC 629
System Buses (3)

Right System
Air/Ground
Relays

Thrust Reverser
Prox Sensors

Tail Strike
Assembly

Left System
Air/Ground
Relays

Left and Right


Main Gear Load
Sensors

PSEU 2

Other
Inputs

Right Weight
on Wheels
Card

Standby System
Air/Ground Relays

Right Card File

ELMS

AIMS

ARINC 629
Flight Controls
Buses (3)

Proximity Sensor and Air/Ground System Block Diagram


Proximity Sensor System
The proximity sensor system (PSS)
monitors the position of some
airplane components.
The proximity sensor system has two
proximity sensor electronic units
(PSEUs) which get input from
proximity sensors on these systems:

Landing gear
Landing gear doors
Passenger entry, cargo and
access doors
Thrust reversers.

The tail strike assembly is on the


bottom of the airplane in the tail strike
area. The TSA has two electrical
wires that go to the PSEUs. If a tail
strike occurs, the wires will open or
short. This tells the PSEUs that there
has been a tail strike.
The PSEUs supply data to the AIMS
through the ARINC 629 system
buses. The PSEUs also supply
signals for other airplane systems
through hard wires.

Air/Ground System (AGS)


Two load sensors on each main
landing gear support beam send
airplane weight on wheels data to
two weight on wheels (WOW) cards.
The WOW cards supply signals to
airplane systems and control
air/ground relays in the ELMS. These
air/ground relays control electrical
circuits for many of the systems.
The WOW cards supply data to the
AIMS for indication on EICAS and to
the ARINC 629 flight control buses.

The PSEUs also get signals from the


tail strike assembly (TSA) and other
airplane systems.

14-6

June 2003

Landing Gear
Tiller

Rudder Pedal
Interconnect
Mechanism
Upper
Cable Loop

Tiller

Lower
Cable
Loop
Steering Metering
Valve Module

Position
Transducers

MGSCU

Torsion
Links

Towing Lever

Steering/
Locking
Actuator

Steering Actuators
FWD

Nose Wheel Steering

FWD
Aft Axle
Left Truck
(Looking Forward)

Nose Wheel and Main Gear Steering


Airplane Ground Steering

MAIN GEAR STEERING

NOSE GEAR STEERING

Main gear steering operates when


nose wheel steering commands are
more than 13 degrees. The main
gear steering control unit (MGSCU)
receives tiller position and controls
the aft axles to steer up to 8 degrees
left or right. Main gear steering also
uses center hydraulic system
pressure.

Two tillers control the nose wheel


movement to a maximum of 70
degrees in each direction. The
rudder pedals control the nose wheel
movement to a maximum of 7
degrees in each direction.
An upper cable loop gets inputs from
the tillers or from the rudder pedals
through the rudder pedal
interconnect mechanism. The upper
cable loop drives a lower cable loop.
The lower cable loop supplies inputs
to the steering metering valve
module to supply center hydraulic
pressure to the two actuators. The
steering metering valve module has
a dynamic load damper for shimmy
protection. It also has a towing lever
to depressurize the nose wheel
steering during towing. A pin holds
the towing lever in the tow position.
June 2003

When not steered, the


steering/locking actuators align the
aft wheels with the forward wheels of
the main landing gear and lock the aft
axles.
The MGSCU monitors the aft axle
steering system for faults. Faults
stop the operation of the main gear
steering system and an EICAS
message shows.

14-7

Main Gear
Retract
Actuator
Pressure

Center
Hydraulic
System

Right
Hydraulic
System

ASSV

Brake
Accumulator
AIV

Altn
BMV

Norm
BMV

Norm
BMV

A/B
Valve

Hydraulic Fuse

Shuttle Valve

Altn
BMV
AIV

Normal Antiskid

Normal Antiskid

ASSV
Altn Antiskid

Shuttle Valve
Module

Altn Antiskid

Shuttle Valve
Module

Accumulator
Isolation Valve
Alternate Source
Selection Valve

BMV

Brake Metering
Valve

A/B

Autobrake

ALTN

Alternate

Normal Brake
Pressure

Alternate Brake
Pressure

10

11

12

Brake System Diagram


Brakes
A multiple disc carbon brake is on
each main landing gear wheel. There
are no brakes on the nose wheels.
BRAKE SYSTEM
Two sets of brake pedals control the
brakes. The pedals connect by
cables to the left and right brake
metering valves. The metering
valves supply hydraulic pressure to
the brakes in proportion to the pedal
movement.
Normal braking uses right system
hydraulic pressure and alternate
braking uses center system hydraulic
pressure. The accumulator isolation
valve (AIV) and alternate source
selection valve (ASSV) make an
automatic selection of normal or
alternate braking based on the
hydraulic pressure source available.
When there is no available hydraulic
pressure for normal or alternate
14-8

braking, a BRAKE SOURCE light


and an EICAS message alert the
flight crew. The brake accumulator
then supplies brake pressure for
about six full brake applications.
Separate brake metering valves,
antiskid valves, and hydraulic fuses
control the normal and alternate
hydraulic pressure to the brakes. The
normal and alternate brake lines
connect at the shuttle valve modules.

GEAR RETRACT BRAKING


During landing gear retraction,
center system hydraulic pressure
operates actuators on the alternate
brake metering valves. The metered
pressure stops wheel spin before the
wheels enter the wheel wells.
The nose gear tires rub against spin
brakes in the nose gear wheel well to
stop wheel spin as they enter the
nose wheel well.

PARKING BRAKE
The brake accumulator in the right
hydraulic system supplies brake
pressure to the brakes when there is
no hydraulic power on the airplane.

June 2003

Landing Gear
Center
Hyd Sys

Right Hyd Sys/


Accumulator

AUTOBRAKE
1 2 3
DISARM
4
MAX
AUTO

OFF

Altn Brake
Metering
Valve

Autobrake
Valve
Module

Norm Brake
Metering
Valve

RTO

Thrust Levers
Speedbrake Lever
Position

Autobrake
Shuttle
Valve

Altn
Antiskid
Valve Mod

Brake Pedal Pressure

Norm
Antiskid
Valve Mod

Return

Antiskid Surge
Accumulator
(Left Only)

Other Airplane
Systems Inputs

BSCU

Antiskid
Shuttle
Valve
Module

Transducers (6)

Left Main Landing Gear


(Right Similar)

Antiskid and Autobrake Diagram


Antiskid and Autobrake
The brake system control unit
(BSCU) in the aft cargo compartment
controls the antiskid and the
autobrake systems.

These are the BSCU secondary


functions:

ANTISKID
The primary function of the antiskid
system is to control brake pressure to
prevent tire skid.
The normal antiskid valve modules
contain six antiskid valves. In normal
braking, each valve controls
hydraulic pressure to one brake. The
alternate antiskid valve modules
contain four valves. In alternate
braking, each valve controls
pressure to one or two brakes.

Control brake pressure for locked


wheel and
hydroplane/touchdown protection
Release, in sequence, one third
of the brakes during low speed
and low effort braking to reduce
brake wear
Make sure the antiskid system
does not operate during gear
retract braking.

AUTOBRAKE
Before landing, the pilot arms the
autobrake and selects one of five
deceleration rates with the autobrake
selector. At touchdown with the
thrust levers at idle, the BSCU
controls the autobrake valve module
to meter brake pressure for the
selected deceleration rate. On the
ground, the autobrake disarms with
these pilot inputs.

Thrust lever movement forward


Speedbrake lever movement
forward
Brake pedal application.

The RTO function applies full


hydraulic system pressure to the
brakes if a takeoff is rejected.

Each wheel has a wheel speed


transducer which supplies signals to
the BSCU. When a tire skids, the
BSCU decreases the brake pressure
to keep wheel skid to a minimum.
June 2003

14-9

LANDING GEAR BRKS/STRNG

200

200

NOSE GEAR
TIRE PRESS

DOOR

200

CLOSED

STEERED ANGLE

L TILLER
R TILLER

70 L
70 L

200

MAIN GEAR
LEFT

200

200

7.1

200
6.2

200

200

3.3

200

3.1

0.0

200
3.1

BRAKE

200

3.3

3.1

Brake
Symbol

BRAKE TEMP

RIGHT

7.1

6.2

3.1

0.0

200

200

200

200

3.3

3.1

3.3

3.1

200

200

200

200

3.1

3.3

3.1

3.4

200

200

200

200

FANS ON

TIRE PRESS
AFT AXLE

200

200

3.1

200
3.3

8.0

200
3.4

3.1

AFT AXLE

8.0

UNLOCKED

UNLOCKED

BRAKE METERED PRESS

CLOSED

CLOSED

DOOR

NORM 3000
ALTN
0

AUTOBRAKE 50

DATE 02 SEP 93

Landing Gear Synoptic Display

NORM 3000
ALTN
0
UTC 18:54:04

Brake and Steering Maintenance Page

Brake Temperature and Tire Pressure Indications


Brake Temperature Monitor
System
A thermocouple in each wheel brake
measures the brake temperature and
sends signals to the brake
temperature monitor unit (BTMU).
The BTMU shows the temperature
for each brake on the landing gear
synoptic display and the brake and
steering maintenance page. A two
digit number that goes from 0.0 (cold)
to 9.9 (hot) shows temperature. A
brake symbol next to the tire outline
on the landing gear synoptic display
changes color to show brake
temperature conditions.
When a brake temperature is more
than the value of 5.0, EICAS shows a
BRAKE TEMP advisory message.
The color of the number and the
brake symbol on the synoptic display
changes from white to amber to show
this condition.

14-10

The BTMU contains BITE


capabilities to find and show faults.
Tire Pressure Indication System
A tire pressure transducer, on each
nose and main wheel, measures the
tire pressure and sends signals to the
tire pressure monitor unit (TPMU).
The TPMU processes the signals
and shows the tire pressure for each
wheel on the landing gear synoptic
display and the brake and steering
maintenance page. Each tire
pressure is in psi.
EICAS shows a TIRE PRESSURE
advisory message when a tire
pressure is not normal. The color of
the number on the synoptic page
changes to amber to show which tire
pressure is non-normal.

Brake Cooling System


An optional brake cooling system
operates automatically when the
temperature of any of the brakes gets
warm.
The system includes a brake cooling
fan motor in each of the axles of the
main landing gear wheels. The motor
turns a fan impeller which causes air
to flow around the main gear brake
assemblies. The BTMU supplies a
signal to start and stop the fan
motors.
The brake and steering maintenance
page shows a FANS ON indication
when the system operates.

The TPMU contains BITE to find and


show faults.

June 2003

Flight Controls
Features

ADDITIONAL PFCS FUNCTIONS

Flight Control Systems

FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS

Other functions of the PFCS are:

PFCS Operational Overview

Two separate systems control the


flight of the airplane, the primary
flight control system (PFCS) and the
high lift control system (HLCS).

PFCS Operational Modes

Roll Control

Yaw Control

Pitch Control - Elevator

Pitch Control - Stabilizer

PFCS Mechanical Control

PFCS Indications

High Lift Surfaces

HLCS Operational Overview

Flap and Slat Indications

HLCS Functions

HLCS Maintenance Page

PRIMARY FLIGHT CONTROL


SYSTEM (PFCS)
The PFCS is an electronic fly-by-wire
system. The PFCS supplies roll,
pitch, and yaw control with these
control surfaces:

Ailerons
Flaperons
Spoilers
Elevators
Rudder
Horizontal stabilizer.

HIGH LIFT CONTROL SYSTEM


(HLCS)

Aileron lockout
Aileron and flaperon droop
Yaw damping
Gust suppression
Modal suppression
Rudder ratio control
Elevator off-load
Flare compensation
Backdrive actuator control
Thrust asymmetry
compensation.

HLCS PROTECTION FUNCTIONS


The HLCS has these protection
functions:

Flap and slat load relief


Autoslat extension
Flap/slat sequencing
Skew or asymmetry shutdown.

SHIELDING
The HLCS is an electronic fly-by-wire
system. It has these control surfaces:

Inboard and outboard trailing


edge flaps
Leading edge slats
Krueger flaps.

ARINC 629 DIGITAL DATA BUSES


The PFCS and the HLCS use ARINC
629 digital data buses to
communicate with other systems.

Provisions, such as shielding, have


been made to protect PFCS wiring
from the effects of lightning and high
intensity radiated fields (HIRF).
MECHANICAL CONTROL
Two spoilers and the horizontal
stabilizer receive mechanical control
signals from the pilots.

FLIGHT ENVELOPE PROTECTION


The PFCS has these flight envelope
protection modes:

Bank angle protection (BAP)


Overyaw protection
Overspeed protection
Stall protection.

The pilots can always override the


protection modes if necessary.

June 2003

15-1

Single Tabbed Rudder


Spoilers
(7 Per Wing)

Leading Edge Slats


(7 Per Wing)

Elevator
Flaperon
(1 Per Wing)

Horizontal
Stabilizer
Inboard Flap
(1 Per Wing)
Outboard Flap
(1 Per Wing)
Aileron
(1 Per Wing)

Krueger Flap
(1 Under
Each Wing)

Flight Control Systems


Flight Control Systems
PRIMARY FLIGHT CONTROL
SYSTEM

The PFCS calculates commands to


move the control surfaces with
sensor inputs from these
components:

The primary flight control system


(PFCS) is a modern, three-axis, flyby-wire system. The fly-by-wire
design permits a more efficient
structural design. Some benefits of
this design are increased fuel
economy, and smaller vertical fin and
horizontal stabilizer. This technology
lets the airplane meet strict safety
requirements with decreased weight
and supplies improved control and
protection.

The PFCS supplies manual and


automatic airplane control and
envelope protection in all three axes.
There is stability augmentation in the
roll, pitch. and yaw axes.

For pitch control, there are two


elevators and a moveable horizontal
stabilizer.

15-2

Control wheels
Control column
Rudder pedals
Speedbrake lever
Pitch trim switches.

HIGH LIFT CONTROL SYSTEM


The high lift control system (HLCS)
supplies increased lift at lower
speeds for takeoff and landing.
High lift surfaces include one inboard
and one outboard trailing edge flap
on each wing. There are seven
leading edge slats and one Krueger
flap on each wing.

These are the control surfaces for roll


control:

Two ailerons
Two flaperons
Fourteen spoilers.

There is a tabbed rudder for yaw


control.

June 2003

Flight Controls
Pitch Rate
Sensors (4)
(777-300)
Speedbrake
Lever

Analog
Analog
PCU
(Typical)
Position
Transducers

Control
Surfaces

ACE (4)

Backdrive
Actuators
PFC (3)
Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)

Analog
Legend:
Mechanical
Connection

AIMS

ADIRU

SAARU

AFDC (3)

PFCS Operational Overview


PFCS Operational Overview
MANUAL OPERATION
Position transducers change the
flight crew commands of the control
wheels, the control columns, the
rudder pedals, and the speedbrake
lever to analog electrical signals.
These signals go to the actuator
control electronics (ACEs). The
ACEs change the signals to digital
format and send them to the primary
flight computers (PFCs).
The PFCs communicate with the
airplane systems through the three
flight controls ARINC 629 buses. The
PFCs use mid-value selection on the
input command signals. In addition to
command signals from the ACEs, the
PFCs also receive data from the
AIMS, ADIRU and SAARU. These
signals are airspeed, attitude and
inertial reference data. The PFCs
calculate the flight control commands
based on control laws, augmentation
June 2003

and envelope protections. The digital


command signals from the PFCs go
to the ACEs.
The ACEs change these command
signals to analog format and send
them to the power control units
(PCUs). One, two or three PCUs
operate each control surface. The
PCUs contain a hydraulic actuator,
an electro-hydraulic servo-valve, and
position feedback transducers.
The servo-valve causes the
hydraulic actuator to move the
control surface. The actuator position
transducer sends a position
feedback signal to the ACEs. After
conversion to digital format, the
ACEs send the signal to the PFCs.
The ACEs stop the PCU command
when the position feedback signal
equals the commanded position.

Some of the PCUs have differential


pressure transducers to measure the
force from the PCU. The PFC uses
this pressure data to equalize the
force of all PCUs of a control surface.
AUTOPILOT OPERATION
The PFCs receive autopilot
commands from the three autopilot
flight director computers (AFDCs).
The PFCs calculate the flight control
commands in the same manner as
for manual operation. In addition, the
PFCs supply the backdrive signals to
the backdrive actuators through the
AFDCs. The backdrive actuators
move the control wheels, control
columns and rudder pedals in
synchronization with the autopilot
commands. The movement of the
flight deck controls supplies visual
feedback of autopilot control to the
flight crews.

15-3

PRIMARY FLIGHT
COMPUTERS
DISC
DISC

AUTO

Normal
Automatic or Manual Switching
to the Highest Mode Available

PFC Disconnect
Switch (P5)

Automatic
or Manual
Switching

PFC

ACE

Secondary
Automatic
Selection

Automatic
or Manual
Switching
PFC

Direct

ACE

Automatic or Manual Switching


ACE

PFCS Operational Modes


PFCS Operational Modes

SECONDARY MODE

The PFCS has three modes of


operation:

The PFCS changes to the secondary


mode if the PFCS finds a loss of
important sensor data.

Normal
Secondary
Direct.

NORMAL MODE

The secondary mode operates the


same as the normal mode except
that the protection functions and the
autopilot are not available.

All control laws and protection


functions are active in the normal
mode.The control laws calculate
commands for roll, yaw, and pitch
control. The protection functions
include stall warning, overspeed,
overyaw, and bank angle.

DIRECT MODE

The autopilot operates only in the


normal mode. It cannot be engaged
in the secondary or direct mode.

In the direct mode, position


transducer signals (pilot commands)
go directly to the ACEs and to the
PCUs. The PFCs do not operate in
this mode.

15-4

The PFCS changes to the direct


mode if sensor data degrades further
or if there are failures that make the
normal and secondary modes
unreliable.

The PFCS protection functions and


the autopilot are not available in the
direct mode.
FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS
The PFC disconnect switch, on the
P5 overhead panel, has two
positions: AUTO and DISC. In the
AUTO position, the PFCS mode
selection is automatic. When the
switch is in the DISC position, the
PFCS changes to the direct mode.
The PFC disconnect switch permits
the pilots to select the direct mode of
operation. If the switch is cycled or
moved again to AUTO, the PFCS
goes from the direct mode to the
highest mode available.
An amber light adjacent to the switch
shows when the PFCS is in the direct
mode.

June 2003

Flight Controls
AILERON

PCU (2)

LEFT
WING
DOWN

Spoilers 4
and 11

RIGHT
WING
DOWN

Aileron
Trim
Switches
(P8)

PCU (2)

R Flaperon

PCU (2)

L Flaperon

Aileron Trim
Actuator

Control Wheel
Breakout
Mechanism

PCU (2)

Feel and
Centering
Mechanism

R Aileron

Position
Transducers (6)

PCU (2)

Force
Transducer

L Aileron
ACE (4)

Speedbrake
Lever
Transducers (4)

Speedbrake
Lever

Flight Controls
ARINC 629
Bus (3)

PCU (12)

Spoilers

Typical of All Spoilers


Except 4 and 11
Legend:
Mechanical
Connection

Backdrive
Actuator (2)

AFDC (3)

PFC (3)

PFCS Roll Control


Roll Control
The ailerons, the flaperons, and the
spoilers control the roll attitude of the
airplane. The spoilers also function
as speedbrakes.
FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS
A cable system connects the two
control wheels through a breakout
mechanism. A mechanical feel and
centering mechanism supplies feel
forces to the control wheels.
Each control wheel moves three
independent position transducers.
The position transducer signals go to
the ACEs and then to the PFCs.
There is a force transducer to detect
a pilot override of the bank angle
protection.
Two trim switches supply power to
the aileron trim actuator to move the
control wheels. A decal, on the top of

June 2003

the control wheel, shows the position


of the aileron trim.
CONTROL SURFACES
The ailerons move a maximum of 33
degrees up and 19 degrees down.
Counterweights balance the
ailerons. The flaperons move a
maximum of 11 degrees up and 34
degrees down. Two PCUs operate
each aileron and flaperon.
The inboard and outboard spoilers
move a maximum of 60 degrees up
except for spoilers 4 and 11, which
move a maximum of 45 degrees.
One PCU operates each spoiler.
AILERON AND FLAPERON
DROOP
When the flaps extend, the ailerons
and flaperons move down (droop) to
increase lift. When drooped, the
ailerons and flaperons continue to
supply roll control.

AILERON LOCKOUT
During high speed flight, the PFCs
fair the ailerons to the wing and lock
out their operation. At low speed, the
PFCs unlock the ailerons and
command their operation.
SPEEDBRAKE
The speedbrake lever, on the control
stand, moves a multiple channel
speedbrake transducer. The
speedbrake transducer signals go to
the ACEs and then to the PFCs. In
flight, the PFCs command the
speedbrakes to extend as a function
of the speedbrake lever movement.
At high speed, the PFCs prevent the
operation of some spoilers. When
the airplane lands, the auto
speedbrake actuator automatically
moves the speedbrake lever to
cause the spoilers to deploy. Some
spoilers are delayed until the pitch
attitude is less than 2 degrees.
15-5

Manual Trim
Cancel Switch

THRUST
ASYM COMP

Rudder Trim
Selector

AUTOw
OFF a

P8 Aft
Aisle
Stand

P5 Overhead Panel

Modal
Accelerometers
(2)

Rudder Trim
Actuator

Gust Suppression
Pressure
Transducers (2)

Feel and
Centering
Mechanism
Rudder

Pedal Position
Transducers (4)

PCU (3)
ACE (4)

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)

AIMS
Cabinet (2)

Legend:
Mechanical
Connection

Backdrive
Actuator (2)

AFDC (3)

PFC (3)
Rudder Trim
Indicator (P8)

PFCS Yaw Control


Yaw Control
The rudder controls the yaw attitude
of the airplane.
FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS
Linkages connect the two pairs of
rudder pedals. A feel and centering
mechanism supplies feel forces to
the rudder pedals. The pedals move
two independent position
transducers that send their signals to
the ACEs and the PFCs.
A crank, in front of each pilot, permits
the adjustment of the pedals.
A rudder trim selector, on the aisle
stand, supplies trim signals to the
ACEs. The rudder trim actuator
moves the rudder pedals when
commanded by the ACEs. Two
rudder trim rates are available. A
rudder trim indicator, also on the
aisle stand, shows the rudder trim
position.
15-6

A manual trim cancel switch, on the


aisle stand, sends a signal to the
ACEs to command the trim to zero.

gradually reduces the maximum


movement of the rudder as the
airspeed increases.

A switch on the P5 overhead panel


permits the pilots to disable the thrust
asymmetry compensation function.

YAW DAMPING

CONTROL SURFACE
The rudder moves a maximum of 27
degrees in either direction. Three
PCUs, which get power from
different hydraulic power sources,
operate the rudder. The rudder
PCUs have a pressure valve to
increase the PCU pressure when
another PCU is not operating.
A rudder tab hinges on the rudder.
The tab moves mechanically with the
rudder to increase its effect.
RUDDER RATIO
The PFCs calculate the rudder ratio
based on airspeed. The rudder ratio

In flight, the PFCs send commands


to move the rudder for Dutch roll
damping and turn coordination.
GUST AND MODAL
SUPPRESSION
The gust and modal suppression
functions increase passenger
comfort. The PFCs adjust the rudder
position to dampen the effects of side
gusts and other causes of lateral
motion of the vertical fin.
THRUST ASYMMETRY
COMPENSATION (TAC)
The TAC function helps the pilots
during asymmetrical engine thrust.
The PFCs send commands to the
ACEs to move the rudder.
June 2003

Flight Controls

Elevator Feel
Actuators (2)

Control
Columns

PCU (2)

R Elevator

PCU (2)

L Elevator

Elevator
Feel
Units (2)
Force
Transducers (2)
Position
Transducers (6)
Column
Breakout
Mechanism

Legend:

ACE (4)

Backdrive
Actuator (2)

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Buses (3)

AIMS Cabinet (2)


AFDC (3)

PFC (3)
ADIRU

Mechanical
Connection

PFCS Pitch Control - Elevator


Pitch Control - Elevator
The elevators supply short-term
correction of the pitch attitude of the
airplane.
FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS
The torque tubes of the two control
columns connect with a breakout
mechanism. Each control column
moves three independent position
transducers. The position transducer
signals go to the ACEs and then to
the PFCs.
The force transducers measure the
force that the pilot applies to the
columns. When the force transducer
signal is zero, the PFC uses a zero
input position command.

June 2003

Two elevator feel units, one forward


of each torque tube, supply limited
feel and center the columns. Two
electric actuators, commanded by
the PFCs through the ACEs,
increase the feel forces supplied by
each feel unit. The PFCs command
the feel forces as a function of
airspeed.
CONTROL SURFACES
The elevators hinge on the rear spar
of the horizontal stabilizer. The
elevators move a maximum of 33
degrees up and 27 degrees down.
Two PCUs, which get power from
different hydraulic power sources,
operate each elevator.
The elevator PCUs have a pressure
reducing valve operated by a
solenoid and controlled by an ACE.
When a PCU is not operating, the
ACEs increase the pressure on the
other PCU to maintain elevator
movement.

STALL PROTECTION
When the airplane approaches a
stall condition, the PFC causes the
elevator to move for airplane pitch
down.
OVERSPEED PROTECTION
During an overspeed condition, the
PFC causes the elevator to move for
airplane pitch up.
SPEED STABILITY AND FLARE
COMPENSATION
The PFC commands the elevator in
pitch up or pitch down based on
airspeed changes for speed stability.
During flare, the PFC commands a
pitch down to simulate the natural
attitude of the airplane in ground
effect.

15-7

Hydraulic
Brakes (2)

ALTN

Alternate
Pitch Trim
Levers (P10)

Stabilizer
Position
Modules (3)

STCM (2)

C STAB R

Control Wheel Pitch


Trim Switches (4)

NORM

CUTOUT

ACE (4)

Stabilizer
Cutout
Switches
(P10)

Flight Controls
ARINC 629 Bus (3)

Hydraulic
Motors (2)

Stabilizer

Ballscrew
Actuator

AIMS

Legend:
Mechanical
Connection
Hydraulic
Connection

PFC (3)
Stabilizer
Position
Indicator (2)
(P10)

PFCS Pitch Control - Stabilizer


Pitch Control - Stabilizer

CONTROL SURFACE

The horizontal stabilizer supplies


long-term correction of the pitch
attitude of the airplane.

The horizontal stabilizer is a one


piece airfoil. It pivots at its rear spar.
A ballscrew actuator, attached to the
front spar, moves the stabilizer
leading edge to a maximum of 4
degrees up and 11 degrees down.

FLIGHT DECK CONTROLS


The pilots use two pitch trim switches
for manual pitch trim control. The
switches, on the outboard of each
control wheel, send electrical pitch
trim signals to the ACEs. The pilots
also use two alternate pitch trim
levers on the left of the control stand.
Two guarded cut-out switches, on
the control stand, control hydraulic
shutoff valves to stop hydraulic
pressure to the stabilizer.
Two stabilizer position indicators, on
the control stand, show the position
of the stabilizer. A green band on the
indicator shows the range of correct
stabilizer position for takeoff.

15-8

Two hydraulic motors, which get


power from different hydraulic power
sources, cause the ballscrew
actuator to rotate. Two hydraulic
brakes prevent the ballscrew
actuator from moving. Two stabilizer
trim control modules (STCMs)
receive commands from the ACEs to
control the hydraulic pressure to the
motors and brakes. A shutoff valve,
on each STCM, stops hydraulic
power when the applicable cutout
switch is in the CUTOUT position.
Cables transmit the stabilizer
movement to three stabilizer position
modules (SPMs) in the stabilizer

compartment. The SPMs supply


stabilizer position data to the ACEs.
ELEVATOR OFFLOAD
In the normal mode of operation, the
PFCs command pitch trim when the
elevator is not faired to the stabilizer
for more than a set time.
COLUMN CUTOUT
When the pilot moves the control
column in the opposite direction of
the pitch trim direction, the PFCs cut
out the pitch command to the
STCMs. This stops the stabilizer
ballscrew.
STABILIZER AUTO SHUTDOWN
If there is an uncommanded pitch
trim, the PFCs command the STCM
hydraulic shutoff valves to close.

June 2003

Flight Controls

PCU

Spoiler 11

PCU

Spoiler 4

Mechanical Cables

Stabilizer

Mechanical Cables

Right
STCM
R Hyd Sys

Alternate Pitch
Trim Levers

M/B Ballscrew
Actuator
M/B

Left
STCM

Legend:

C Hyd Sys

Mechanical Connection
Hydraulic Connection

PFCS Mechanical Control


PFCS Mechanical Control

HORIZONTAL STABILIZER

A cable-driven system controls two


spoilers and the stabilizer.

The pilots use two alternate pitch trim


levers and a set of cables to send
mechanical control signals to the
horizontal stabilizer. Two alternate
pitch trim levers on the control stand
connect to valves on each stabilizer
trim control module (STCM).If the
pilots move both levers in the same
direction, this moves the valves in the
STCMs. This sends hydraulic fluid to
the hydraulic motors and brakes to
move the horizontal stabilizer.

SPOILERS
The pilots use the control wheels and
cables to mechanically control
signals to spoilers 4 and 11. The
captains or first officers control
wheel controls the position of a
hydraulic control valve on the spoiler
PCUs. This causes the hydraulic
PCUs to move the spoilers.
In normal mode only, the PFCs
calculate commands to electrically
control spoilers 4 and 11 as speed
brakes.
Spoilers 4 and 11 deploy to a
maximum of 45 degrees.

June 2003

15-9

SPOILERS

L AIL

L FLPRN

R FLPRN

R AIL

STAB

RUDDER TRIM

6.50

L ELEV

10.5

R ELEV
RUDDER
FLT CTRL MODE

SECONDARY

PFCS Synoptic Display

PFCS Indications
PFCS Indications

Trim position of the stabilizer and


rudder shows in degrees.

SYSTEM MONITORING
The PFCs do a self-test and a test of
the ACEs each time the system gets
power. A failure of a test may cause
an EICAS status message.
SYNOPTIC DISPLAY

The synoptic display helps the flight


crew understand the impact of flight
control system failures.
It is not necessary to use the synoptic
display to do any normal or nonnormal crew procedures.

MAINTENANCE PAGES
There are three maintenance pages.
Maintenance personnel use the
maintenance pages to do
maintenance functions, such as
rigging, and to do checks of the
discrete outputs from the PFCS
components.

The flight controls synoptic display


gives the flight crew a graphical
overview of the flight control system.
The display has this information:

Primary flight control surface


positions
Failures
Current flight control mode.

15-10

June 2003

Flight Controls

FLIGHT CONTROL
ROLL RATE
ROLL ANGLE

-0.70
-0.18

+2.39

ALT

ANGLE OF ATTACK +5.23

CAS

YAW RATE

PITCH RATE:
ADIRU +0.15

L1
ACE INT XDCR +0.15
EXT XDCR

COLUMN

+5.36
2 +5.36
3 +5.36
FORCE 1 +0.05
2 +0.05
FDR +0.062
POS 1

SPD BRK
HANDLE

CAPT
WHEEL

+0.15
PEDAL

+3.57
+3.57
+3.57
+0.05

-0.42
-0.42

+15.3

+18.7

RUD
TRIM

FLIGHT CONTROL

AUTO PG 1/3

L2

2000
257

+0.15
+0.15

+0.15
+0.15

+0.15
+0.15

F/O
WHEEL

COLUMN

+3.57
+3.57
+3.57
+0.05

+5.36
+5.36
+5.36
+0.05
+0.05
+0.062

PEDAL

-0.42
-0.42

+18.7

POS 1

+0.00

+0.05

+0.05

UPR

+1.2

+1.2

+0.00
+0.00

+0.05

+0.05

LWR

+1.2

+1.2

3
4

+0.00

HYD PRESS

3000
3000
R 3000
L

AUTOPILOT:

PROT MODE ACTIVITY:

NORMAL

ENGAGED

OVERSPEED PROT

FLAPERON
POSITION
PCU FORCE

+3.36
+10

+3.36
+10

+0.75

+0.75

AILERON
POSITION

+0.75 S

+0.75

RUDDER
POSITION
DELTA PRESS
UPR
MID
LWR

+2.20
+2.20 S
+2.20

+2.35
+2.35 S

+20
-20

STAB
POSITION
1
2
3

STABILIZER

DATE 17 JAN 91

1.20
1.20
10
1.20 S
1.23
12
1.20
1.23
14
1.20 S

+3.36 S
-10

ELEVATOR
POSITION
DELTA PRESS

PFC MODE:

+3.36
-10

SUPPRESS
GUST
MODAL

ELEVATOR
FEEL

SPOILER
POSITION

1.23 S
1.20
5 1.23 S
1.23
3 1.20
1.23
1 1.23 S
7

AUTO PG 2/3

UTC 18:44:33

STABILIZER

PFCS Maintenance Page Controls

+20
+20
-20
ELEVATOR
POSITION
DELTA PRESS

-2.06
+2.35
+10
SR
-2.06
+2.35 S
+10
SC
-2.06
DATE 17 JAN 91
UTC 18:44:33

PFCS Maintenance Page Surfaces

PFCS Indications

FLIGHT CONTROL

ACE ANALOG DISCRETES:


FSEU 1 TE & LE RETRACTED
FSEU 2 TE & LE RETRACTED
PFC DISCONNECT SWITCH
ACE MODE
RUD MTC SWITCH PUSHED
RUD TRIM ARMED
RUD TRIM RATE
RUD TRIM DIRECTION
RUD TRIM BRK RELEASED
CAPT PITCH TRIM ARM
CAPT PITCH TRIM/CTRL
F/O PITCH TRIM ARM
F/O PITCH TRIM CTRL
STCM BRK RELEASE PRESS
STCM HYD SO RLY POWER
ELEV FEEL ENGAGED
SPDBRK ACTR RETRACTED
TAC SWITCH POSITION

L1

AUTO PG 3/3

L2

YES
NO
AUTO
DIRECT
YES
--LEFT
-UP
------YES
--

YES
NO
AUTO
NORM
-------NO
---YES
---

L
AIMS ANALOG DISCRETES:
ALTN PITCH TRIM LEVER ARM
ALTN PITCH TRIM LEVER CTRL

STABILIZER

YES
NO
AUTO
NORM
------UP
--YES
YES
YES
-AUTO

YES
NO
AUTO
NORM
-YES
FAST
-YES
---NO
YES
YES
----

ACTIVE

DIRECTION

ACTIVE

DIRECTION

YES
YES

UP
UP

YES
YES

UP
UP

DATE

17 JAN 91

UTC

18:44:33

PFCS Maintenance Page Discretes

PFCS Indications
June 2003

15-11

FSEUs
Slats

Flap and Slat


Primary Control Valves

Krueger Flap

Flap and Slat


Position Sensors
Slat PDU

Flap Position
Sensors
Torque Tubes
Flap Transmission
Assembly
Slat Rotary
Actuators
Flap PDU

Inboard Flap

Outboard Flap
Slat Position
Sensors

High Lift Surfaces


High Lift Surfaces
TRAILING EDGE FLAPS
The trailing edge flaps have an
inboard double slotted flap and an
outboard single slotted flap on each
wing.
The flaps have six positions: up, 5,
15, 20, 25, and 30. The takeoff
setting is at 5, 15, or 20. The landing
setting is at 25 or 30. The flaps
retract at settings 1 and up.
Hydraulic or electric motors on the
flap PDU turn the flap torque tubes.
The torque tubes operate the flap
transmission assemblies. The
transmission assemblies use a
ballscrew and gimbal to extend and
retract the flaps.
LEADING EDGE SLATS
The leading edge slat system has
seven slats and one Krueger flap on
15-12

each wing. The Krueger flap seals


the gap between the engine strut and
the inboard slat.
The slats have these three positions:

Cruise (retracted)
Takeoff (sealed)
Landing (gapped).

The Krueger flap has only two


positions: retracted and deployed.
Hydraulic or electric motors on the
slat power drive unit (PDU) turn the
slat torque tubes. The torque tubes
drive the slat rotary actuators. The
rotary actuators extend and retract
the slats with a rack and pinion drive.
FLAP/SLAT ELECTRONIC UNITS
Two identical and interchangeable
flap/slat electronic units (FSEUs), in
the main equipment center, process
the high lift commands.

FLAP POSITION SENSING


There are two position sensors on
each side of the flap PDU. These
sensors supply the flap position to
the FSEUs for control and
monitoring. The FSEUs also receive
inputs from 16 flap skew sensors.
These sensors are on the flap
linkages and monitor for flap
misalignment.
SLAT POSITION SENSING
There are two position sensors at
each end of the slat torque tubes.
These sensors supply the slat
position to the FSEUs for closed
loop control and for monitoring. The
FSEUs also receive inputs from 12
slat skew/loss proximity sensors.
These sensors monitor for slat
misalignment and for a lost slat.

June 2003

Flight Controls
ALTN FLAPS
ARM
ALTN
w

Sec/Altn
Control
Relays

w
OFF
RET

EXT

Center Hydraulic
System

Limit
Switches

Autoslat
Priority
Valve

Alternate Flaps
Panel (P10)

PDU
(Typical)
Flap/Slat
Priority Valve

FLAP

Flap Lever
Position
Sensors

Hydraulic
Motor

15

FSEU (2)
20

Primary Control Valve


(Typical)
Electric
Motor

25

Flap and Slat


Position Sensors

30

Flap Lever (P10)


Legend:
Mechanical Connection
Hydraulic Connection

Systems
ARINC 629
Bus (4)

Flap and Slat


Skew Sensors

TE Flaps and
LE Slats

HLCS Operational Overview


HLCS Operational Overview
The high lift control system (HLCS)
extends and retracts the trailing edge
and leading edge devices.
The HLCS operates in three modes:

Primary
Secondary
Alternate.

PRIMARY MODE
The primary mode has a fly-by-wire
closed loop control and operates
hydraulically. The pilot controls the
HLCS with the flap lever on the
control stand. The lever has seven
detents with gates at detents 1 and
20. Four sensors transmit the flap
lever position to the two FSEUs.
The FSEUs receive and transmit
data on the systems ARINC 629
buses. Other airplane systems
supply airspeed and hydraulic data
June 2003

through these buses for the high lift


protection functions.
The FSEUs control solenoids in the
primary control valves. These valves
control the hydraulic power to the
hydraulic motors on the flap and slat
PDUs. These motors operate the flap
and slat mechanisms.
The FSEUs also operate the autoslat
priority valve for autoslat extension
when the airplane is near a stall
condition.
SECONDARY MODE
If the FSEUs find a fault in primary
mode, they switch to the secondary
mode. The secondary mode
operates electrically, but the pilot
control is the same as in the primary
mode.
The FSEUs control the
secondary/alternate control relays.
These relays engage clutches and

supply electrical power to electric


motors on the flap and slat PDUs.
The electric motors move the flap
and slat mechanisms.
ALTERNATE MODE
The alternate mode is independent
of the FSEUs and uses electrical
power to move the flaps and slats.
The pilot selects the alternate mode
with the alternate flaps arm switch.
The pilot then selects extend or
retract using the alternate flaps
selector. These switches are on the
control stand, outboard of the flap
lever. These switches control the
secondary/alternate control relays
for the flaps and slats in the same
way as the secondary mode.
The alternate mode uses flap and
slat limit switches to limit the flaps to
20 degrees and the slats to the
sealed position.

15-13

Flap/Slat Indication

EICAS

Tape

Left Wing
Slats
Left Wing
Flaps

F
L
A
P
S

Command Bar
Command
Bar

20

Detent
Number

Primary Mode Display

F
L
A
P
S

15

Detent
Number

Secondary Mode Display

5
20

F
L
A
P
S

5
20

Alternate Mode Display

Flap and Slat Indications


Flap and Slat Indications

SECONDARY MODE DISPLAY

ALTERNATE MODE DISPLAY

The EICAS display shows all HLCS


indications. The FSEUs supply
surface positions to the primary
display system which shows the
indications in the three modes of
operation.

When the system changes to the


secondary mode, the flap/slat
indication expands to show position
tapes for both the slats and flaps on
each wing. A magenta command bar
and detent number shows the flap
setting. The command bar and
detent number change to green
when the surface position agrees
with the flap lever command. The
tape, command bar, and detent
number change to amber to show
faults in the secondary mode.

The alternate mode display shows


when the alternate system is armed.
This display is similar to the
secondary mode display, except the
command bars do not show and tick
marks show flap lever detent
positions. The alternate mode uses
Xs on the tapes to show faults.

PRIMARY MODE DISPLAY


The primary mode display is a single
white tape that moves down as the
flaps and slats extend. A magenta
command bar and detent number
shows the flap setting. The
command bar and detent number
change to green when the surface
position agrees with the flap lever
command.

The secondary mode display goes


out of view 10 seconds after the flaps
and slats fully retract and the flap
lever is in the UP position.

The primary mode display goes out


of view 10 seconds after the flaps
and slats fully retract and the flap
lever is in the UP position.

15-14

June 2003

Flight Controls

Slats

Flaps

Cruise

Sealed Position

Takeoff

Gapped Position

Landing

HLCS Functions
HLCS Functions
The FSEUs control the sequence of
the flaps and slats extension and
retraction. The FSEUs also supply
protection functions such as autoslat
extension, load relief and skew or
asymmetry.
FLAP AND SLAT SEQUENCE
The flaps and slats extend and
retract in sequence. This sequence
is different in the three modes of
operation.
In the primary mode, the slats extend
to the sealed position before the flaps
extend. When the flap lever is at 25
or 30, the slats extend to the gapped
position before the flaps extend from
the 20 position.
In the secondary mode, the slats
extend to the gapped position before
the flaps extend.

June 2003

In the alternate mode, the slats and


flaps extend at the same time.
In all three modes, the flaps retract
before the slats retract.
AUTOSLAT
The autoslat function improves the
airplane stall performance near stall
conditions. The autoslat function is
available only in the primary
(hydraulic) mode.
When the airplane is near a stall
condition, the FSEUs send a
command to extend the slats from
the takeoff (sealed) position to the
landing (gapped) position. The slats
return to the takeoff position when
the airplane is no longer near a stall
condition.
LOAD RELIEF
The flap and slat load relief functions
protect the flaps and slats from

airload damage. The flap load relief


function is available only in the
primary (hydraulic) mode. The slat
load relief function is available only in
the secondary (electric) mode.
When the airspeed is more than set
levels, the flaps retract to a new
position. This new position depends
on airspeed. The slats retract from
the gapped to the sealed position.
When the airspeed is less than the
reset value, the flaps extend to the
commanded position. The slats
extend to the gapped position.
When load relief is active, the EICAS
display shows a LOAD RELIEF
message adjacent to the flap/slat
indication.
SKEW OR ASYMMETRY
When the FSEUs detect a skew or
asymmetry, they shut down the flap
or slat drive.

15-15

FLAP/SLAT

STATUS
FLAP LEVER

AIRSPEED

1A
1B
2A
2B

C SYS PRESS

9.00
8.47
8.91
9.05

AUTOSLAT
LOAD RELIEF
PRIORITY VLV
AIR/GND

FSEU 1

FSEU 2

STANDBY
200
3000
CMD
NOT CMD
OPEN
AIR

IN CONTROL
200
3000
NOT CMD
CMD
CLOSED
AIR

SLATS

DRIVE CMD
MODE
S/O VLV CMD
SLAT 2

SLAT POS

PRI EXT
LO SPD
CLOSED

SLAT 7

A FAR
B NEAR

L
1 200.40
2 198.80
SLAT 8

INBD
OUTBD
FAR
A FAR
B NEAR NEAR

OUTBD FLAP

L1
A 3.50
B 3.49

L2
3.50
3.49

FLAP POS

PRI EXT
LO SPD
CLOSED

INBD FLAP

L3
A 3.50
B 3.49

SLATS DRIVE

SLAT 13

A FAIL
B NEAR

OUTBD
INBD
FAR
A FAIL
B NEAR NEAR

FLAPS

DRIVE CMD
MODE
S/O VLV CMD

R
200.40
198.80

L4
3.50
3.49

L
1 200.40
2 198.80
INBD FLAP

R5
A 3.50
B 3.49

R6
3.50
3.49

DATE 23 JUN 90

R
200.40
198.80
OUTBD FLAP

R7
A 3.50
B 3.49

R8
3.50
3.49

UTC 18:54:04

HLCS Maintenance Page

HLCS Maintenance Page


HLCS Maintenance Page
There is one maintenance page for
the HLCS. Maintenance personnel
use the maintenance page to do
maintenance functions, such as
rigging, and to do checks of the
discrete outputs from the HLCS
components.

15-16

June 2003

Environmental Systems
Features
PNEUMATIC
Two controllers supply these
functions:

Pneumatic system control


Pressurization system control
Air conditioning pack flow
schedule control
Air conditioning pack backup
control.

The only crew action is to select auto


operations or off.
The system automatically removes
pneumatic loads if the airplane stalls.
The controller BITE monitors and
tests components to the LRU level.
AIR CONDITIONING
The airplane has seven temperature
control zones. The system can have
as many as sixteen zones to permit
options, without adding more
controllers.
Two controllers control the air
conditioning system. They both do
zone and pack control. Each
controller has two control channels.
The controller BITE monitors and
tests components to the LRU level.
Air bearings in the air cycle machine,
and a mechanical water collector
reduce service needs.
An optional gasper system gives
additional air circulation at each
passenger seat.

CREW REST AREA AIR


DISTRIBUTION (-200 IGW AND 300)

Pneumatic

Air Conditioning Pack

Air is provided to an optional lower


lobe attendants rest (LLAR) from the
air conditioning packs. Electric
heaters in the LLAR give additional
heat to the module.

Air Distribution

Temperature Control and


Recirculation

Gasper

Flight Deck, Door, and Galley


Heating

Equipment Cooling, and


Lavatory and Galley Ventilation

Cargo Compartment Heating


and Bulk Cargo Compartment
Ventilation

Cabin Pressure Control

Synoptic Displays

Maintenance Pages

EQUIPMENT COOLING
There are forward and aft equipment
cooling systems.
The forward system uses supply and
exhaust fans to cool equipment in the
MEC, forward equipment center, and
flight deck.
The aft system uses the lavatory and
galley ventilation system. It pulls air
through aft electrical equipment.
CARGO COMPARTMENT HEATING
AND VENTILATION
Waste heat from the exhaust part of
the forward equipment cooling
system heats the forward cargo
compartment.
Hot air from the pneumatic system
heats the aft and bulk cargo
compartments.
Ventilation permits the transport of
animals in the bulk cargo
compartment.
CABIN PRESSURE CONTROL
Two controllers control the
pressurization system. They also
control the pneumatic system.
The system has two outflow valves.

Electric heaters give additional heat


in the flight deck, galleys, and door
areas for crew and passenger
comfort.

June 2003

System operation is automatic. The


flight management computing
function (FMCF) of AIMS supplies
the necessary flight plan data. A
backup mode controls cabin
pressurization if the flight crew does
not use the FMCF for the flight.
Manual outflow valve control is also
available.

16-1

Pneumatic

Air from the pneumatic system does


these functions:

The engine bleed part of the system


has these three control levels:

Starts the APU


Starts the engines
Ventilates the cabin
Pressurizes the cabin
Prevents ice formation on the
wing slats
Causes air flow across the total
air temperature probes
Pressurizes hydraulic reservoirs
and potable water tanks
Supplies power to the air driven
hydraulic pumps
Supplies aft, and bulk cargo heat.

These are the sources of air for the


pneumatic system:

Ground air compressors


APU load compressor
Engine bleed air system.

There are two air supply cabin


pressure controllers (ASCPCs) in the
main equipment center. They use
data about the air sources and air
users to select the valve positions.
The data for automatic operation
comes from these:

Airfoil and cowl ice protection


system (ACIPS)
Autopilot flight director system
(AFDS)
Airplane information
management system (AIMS)
Air supply cabin pressure
controllers (ASCPC)
Auxiliary power unit controller
(APUC)
Cabin temperature controller
(CTC)
Duct leak and overheat detection
(DLODS)
ECS miscellaneous card
(ECSMC)
Electronic engine control (EEC)
Electrical load management
system (ELMS)
Flap slat electronics unit (FSEU)
Hydraulic interface module
(HYDIM) cards

16-2

Overhead panel ARINC 629


system (OPAS)
Warning electronic unit (WEU)
Weight on wheels (WOW) cards.

Digital
Analog
Pneumatic.

Air from the engine fan section cools


engine bleed air in the precooler. If
the bleed air does not cool
sufficiently, the PRSOV reduces the
air flow to keep the temperature to a
limit.
Over-pressure and over-temperature
bleed air and duct leak conditions
causes a system protective
shutdown.

Digital is the primary mode. Analog


and pneumatic are backup modes.
The ASCPCs give digital and analog
control. Valves give pneumatic
control.
The ASCPCs monitor system
operation to the level of the line
replaceable unit (LRU). The central
maintenance computing system
(CMCS) gives fault information.
The ASCPCs control the:

Engine bleed air supply


Isolation valves
APU shutoff valves.

Sensors (not shown) in the system


give the controllers pressure,
temperature, valve position, and flow
data.
Engine bleed air comes from either
an intermediate stage or the high
stage of the engine high pressure
compressor. The controllers use
engine pressure and airplane altitude
to make the stage selection.
The high pressure shutoff valve
(HPSOV) controls system pressure
when the high stage supplies the
bleed air. A check valve prevents
reverse flow through the
intermediate pressure port. The
pressure regulating and shutoff valve
(PRSOV) controls system pressure
when the intermediate stage
supplies the bleed air.

June 2003

Environmental Systems
BLEED AIR
L

ISLN

ISLN

AFDS

ACIPS

AUTO w

AUTO w

AUTO w

CLOSEDa

CLOSED
a

CLOSEDa

WAI

WAI

CTC
(2)

APUC
L ENG
ON

FSEU

DLODS

R ENG

APU

OFF

AIMS

AUTO w

ON

OFF

OFF

w
a

ECSMC
(2)

Bleed Air/Pressurization
Panel (P5)

EEC
(2)

ELMS

OPAS
(2)

ARINC 629
System Buses (3)

HYDIM
(4)

WEU

WOW

Left
ASCPC

Right
ASCPC

AC
Pack

Manifold
Flow
Sensor

AC
Pack

To Hydraulic
Reservoir

Air-Driven
Pump (C2)

To Wing Anti-Ice

Ground Air
Supply

Manifold Dual
Temperature Sensor

Ground Air Connection


To TAT Probe

Right
Engine
Bleed
Air
Supply

Isolation Valve
(3)

To Hydraulic Reservoir

To Engine Starter
Fan Air
Modulating Valve

Aft
Cargo
Heat

Precooler

High Pressure and


Fan Air Controller
Intermediate
Pressure Check Valve

Bulk
Cargo
Heat

To Potable Water
Air-Driven
Pump (C1)
APU Shutoff
Valve

Pressure Regulating
and Shutoff Valve
Duct
Vent
Valve
Engine
Anti-Ice
Valve

Controller
Air Cooler

High Pressure
Shutoff Valve

Pressure Regulating
and Shutoff Valve
Controller
Intermediate
Pressure
Sensor

APU Starter
Control Valve

To APU
Start

Supply
From
APU Air

Pneumatic System
June 2003

16-3

Ram Air
Inlet

To Trim
Air System

From
Pneumatic
System

Reheater

Temperature
Sensors
(Typical)

Economy Cooling
Check Valve

Water
Spray

Low Limit
Valve

Condenser Inlet
Temperature Sensors
Condenser
Economy
Cooling
Valve

Sec Hx

Water
Collector

Pri Hx

Flow
Sensor

Ozone
Converter

Flow Control
Shutoff Valves

To Flight Deck
(Left Pack Only)
C

T1

To Mix
Manifold

T2

Ram Air
Exhaust
Turbine
Bypass
Valve

ACM:
Fan

ACM:
Compressor
Turbines

To LLAR
(200 IGW -300)
(Left Pack Only)

Gnd Air
Connection

Pack Airflow
Pack Air Flow
Two flow control and shutoff valves
control air flow from the pneumatic
system to each pack. One valve is
open at a time.The upper valve is
open at altitudes up to 26,000 feet
(7930m). Above 26,000 feet the
lower valve opens to let air go
through the ozone converter. When
the airplane goes below 24,000 feet
(7315m), the upper valve opens and
the lower valve closes.
Heat exchangers use ambient ram
air to remove heat from the
pneumatic system and the air cycle
machine (ACM) compressor. The air
cools more in the condenser. The
water collector removes water that
has condensed and sends it to the
ram air for evaporative cooling. Air
from the collector warms in the
reheater to remove any ice
particles.Air expands in the turbines
of the ACM to give cooling.
16-4

The cabin temperature controller


(CTC) controls the turbine bypass
valve, low limit valve, and ram air
doors to adjust the air temperature
from the packs. The controllers use
data from sensors for control and
indication.

valve. It does not go through the


ACM. The CTC modulates only the
ram air doors to control cooling air
flow through the heat exchangers.

When less cooling is necessary, the


pack goes to the economy cooling
mode. The economy cooling valve
opens to decrease the air flow
through the compressor and turbine.
This decreases the pneumatic
pressure needed for pack air
flow.The CTCs modulate the turbine
bypass valve and ram air doors to
control pack outlet temperature.

Connections for ground conditioned


air are in the ECS bays in the ducts
that come from the packs. Normally
air from the left side goes to the flight
deck and the mix manifold and air
from the right side goes only to the
mix manifold.

If there is a failure of the ACM, or the


condenser inlet temperature
sensors, or if the economy cooling
valve fails open, the pack can
operate in the standby cooling mode.
Air goes through the economy
cooling check valve, the economy
cooling valve, and the turbine bypass

Distribution Air Flow

Air from the left pack also goes to the


optional LLAR (-200ER and -300).
The mix manifold is in the aft end of
the forward cargo compartment.
Ducts and risers for each zone
connect the mix manifold to
conditioned air distribution ducts
above both passenger compartment
aisles. The ducts have outlets that let
air go into the passenger
compartment.
June 2003

Environmental Systems
Conditioned Air
Overhead
Distribution
Duct
(Typical)

Aft
Upper
Recirculation
Fan

Mix Manifold
Fwd
Upper
Recirculation
Fan

Risers (8)
(Typical)

Conditioned Air
Outlet Ducts

Pack Locations
(In Underwing
Fuselage Area)

Lower
Recirculation
Fans
Flight Deck Conditioned Air
Distribution Duct

Ram Air
Exhaust

Ground Conditioned
Air Connector (2)

FWD

ECS Bay Doors


(Access to Packs)

Ram Air
Inlet Doors

Underwing Fuselage Area

Distribution Airflow
June 2003

16-5

Air Conditioning Control


There are two cabin temperature
controllers (CTCs) that give normal
air conditioning control. Each CTC
has two channels for redundancy.
There are two air supply cabin
pressure controllers (ASCPCs) that
give backup control.
The left controllers control these left
components:

Flow control and shutoff valves


Air conditioning pack
Trim air system.

The right controllers control the right


side.
There are two control panels. The
flight crew uses the air conditioning
panel on the P5 to do these
functions:

Operate the air conditioning


packs
Operate the recirculation fans
Set the flight deck temperature
Set the cabin temperature.

Sensors in the flight deck and


passenger zones give temperature
information to the controllers. The
controllers control the pack to get air
temperature for the zone that is set
the lowest. The controllers use
information from the temperature
sensors in the mix manifold to adjust
the pack temperature because of the
temperature of recirculation air.
The controllers control the trim air
system to warm the air that goes to
zones that are set higher than the
lowest set temperature. There are
temperature sensors in the ducts that
carry air to the zones. The controllers
use their information to control the
packs and trim air systems.

Recirculation
Air from the passenger cabin goes
through return air grilles to the area
between the fuselage skin and
sealed cargo compartments. Some
of this air goes out of the airplane
through the pressurization outflow
valves.
The lower recirculation fans get air
from the area between the fuselage
skin and sealed cargo
compartments. The upper
recirculation fans get air from above
the passenger compartment ceiling
near passenger doors two and three.
They move the air through filters into
the distribution system.
About one-half of the air in the
distribution system comes from the
recirculation fans. This decreases
the quantity of bleed air from the
engines.
The CTCs control the operation of
the fans.The environmental control
system miscellaneous control cards
(ECSMC) monitor their operation.

The cabin crew can use the cabin


temperature screen on cabin
services system (CSS) control
panels to adjust the temperature of
each cabin zone 10F (6C) above or
below the set temperature.

16-6

June 2003

Environmental Systems

EQUIP
COOLING

AIR CONDITIONING
GASPER

AUTO

MAIN
MENU

Optional

CABIN TEMPERATURE

ON
RECIRC FANS
UPPER LOWER

OVRD

ON

FLT DECK
TEMP
AUTO

AREA DESCRIPTION

ON

CABIN
TEMP
ACTUAL

AIR COND
RESET

TARGET

21
C

MAN W

L PACK

R PACK

AUTO
OFF

70

L TRIM AIR R

AUTO

ON

OFF

ON

70

AREA
RESET

FAULT FAULT

Cabin Services
System Panel
AIMS

Air Conditioning Panel (P5)

ELMS

ARINC 629 System Buses (2)

APUC

Right
ASCPC

Left
ASCPC

Left Cabin
Temperature
Controller

Passenger Cabin Zones

Flight Deck
Zone

Forward
Upper
Recirculation
Fan (Ref)

Right Cabin
Temperature
Controller

ECSMC (2)

Zone Air Temp


Sensor (9)

Aft Upper
Recirculation
Fan (Ref)

Filter
(Typical)

Trim Air Pressure


Regulating and
Shutoff Valve (2)

Zone Duct
Temp Sensor (14)
Gasper Fan (Optional)

Trim Air
Pressure
Sensor (2)

Pneumatic
System

Zone Trim Air


Modulating Valves (7)
Flow Control
and Shutoff
Valves

Mix Manifold

Left
A/C
Pack

Right
A/C
Pack

Pneumatic
System

Lower
Recirculation
Fans

Ozone
Converter
To LLAR

Temperature Control and Recirculation


June 2003

16-7

AIR CONDITIONING
EQUIP
COOLING

GASPER

AUTO

ON

Gasper Fan Switch

RECIRC FANS
UPPER LOWER

OVRD

ON

FLT DECK
TEMP
AUTO

ON

Gasper Fan
Conditioned
Air Overhead
Distribution Ducts

CABIN
TEMP

AIR COND
RESET
C

MAN

L PACK
AUTO
OFF

W
R PACK

L TRIM AIR R
ON

ON

FAULT

FAULT

AUTO
OFF

Gasper Air
Distribution Ducts

Air Conditioning Panel (P5)

Adjustable
Outlets

Air Flow

Air Flow
Passenger Service
Units (PSUs)

Gasper
Gasper (Optional)
The gasper system increases air flow
in the passenger cabin through
outlets in the passenger service units
(PSUs). The system has these
components:

Gasper fan above the ceiling in


the passenger cabin
Switch on the air conditioning
control panel in the flight deck
Air outlets on the passenger
service units
Ducts that connect the gasper
fan to the air supply and the air
outlets.

16-8

A switch on the control panel and the


two environmental control system
miscellaneous card (ECSMC) control
the fan. The left card gives backup
control.
The fan takes air from the distribution
system. It sends it to individual
outlets on the PSUs. Passengers
can adjust the outlets.

June 2003

Environmental Systems

Warm Air
Flow

Warm Air
Flow

Warm Air
Flow
Warm Air
Flow

Foot Heaters

Air Flow Heater

Warm Air
Flow

Heaters
Flight Deck, Door, and Galley
Heaters
Electric heaters give additional heat
to these areas:

Flight deck
Galleys
Passenger entry doors.

The ELMS and the ECSMCs control


the heaters.
There are two different types of
heaters in the flight deck. One type
heats the air going to the left
shoulder of the captain and right
shoulder of the first officer. The other
type heats the foot area for the
captain and first officer. Each of the
crew has individual heater controls.
The heaters can operate only in the
air.

June 2003

The galley heaters heat the air that


goes to the floor area. There is a
control switch in each galley. The
heater will operate only if a pack is
on.
The door heaters heat the air that
goes to the bottom of each
passenger entry door opening. There
are no control switches. Operation is
automatic during these conditions:

Airplane is in the air


Outside air temperature is less
than 35F (2C)
Pack or recirculation fan is on.

16-9

O/H
Panel

Inst

Equipment
Cooling Switch

Aisle
Stand

E2

E1
MAT

E3

MEC
Supply
Duct

Fwd Cargo
Heat Duct

Vent
Valve

E4-1 E4-4
-2
-3

Smoke
Det

AIR CONDITIONING
EQUIP
COOLING

Fwd Cargo
Heat Valve

Vent Fan

Main Equipment Center

Flight Deck

GASPER

AUTO

ON
RECIRC FANS
UPPER LOWER

OVRD

ON

FLT DECK
TEMP
AUTO

ON

Pressure
Sensor (4)

CABIN
TEMP

Conv Supp
Cooling Fan

WXR

Supply
Fans
Air
Filter

AIR COND
RESET
C

MAN

L PACK
AUTO
OFF

W
R PACK

L TRIM AIR R
ON

ON

FAULT

FAULT

Fwd Equipment
Center

AUTO
OFF

F/D Supply Duct

Fwd
Outflow
Valve
(Ref)

E16

E5

Override
Valve

Flow Detector (2)


Forward Equipment Cooling System

Air Conditioning Panel (P5)


Pass Cabin
Temp Sensors

E11 Equip
Rack

Airplane Skin
Fwd Cargo
Compartment

Lav and
Galleys
Lavatory and Galley
Ventilation Fans

Bulk Cargo
Temp Sensors

Aft Electrical
Equipment

Aft Cargo
Temp Sensors

Aft Equipment Cooling System

Equipment Cooling and Lavatory and Galley Ventilation Systems


Equipment Cooling and Lavatory
and Galley Ventilation
The forward equipment cooling
system has two supply fans. The
lower fan operates. The upper gives
automatic backup. They send air
from around the cargo compartment
to the override valve. When one disc
of this valve is open, the other is
closed. Normally the upper disc is
open. When the lower disc is open,
the valve is in the override position.In
the normal position supply fan air
goes to this equipment:

Main equipment center


E5 and E16 racks near the
forward cargo compartment door
Forward equipment center
Flight deck.

The vent fan pulls the air from these


areas except the E5 and E16 racks.
It sends the air to the vent valve and
the forward cargo heat valve. When
one of these valves is open, the other
16-10

is closed. The cargo heat valve is


part of the cargo heat system. It is
open when the outside temperature
is less than 45F (7C). At a
temperature more than 45F (7C), the
vent valve is open. The outlet from
the vent valve is near the forward
pressurization outflow valve. When
the vent valve is open, air goes
overboard through the outflow valve.
There is a smoke detector. The
supply fans and vent fan push air
through the smoke detector. The
detector uses LED photoelectric cells
to find if there is smoke in the air.
There are also flow detectors.
Smoke or low flow will cause the
system to go to the override mode.
Also, the flight crew can use the
equipment cooling switch for the
override mode. In this mode, the:

Supply fans stop


Vent fan stops
Override valve goes to the
override position

Pressurization pushes air


through the equipment and
overboard.

The converter supplemental cooling


fan operates when the supply fans
are off, to supply cooling air to the
backup electrical power system.
There are two lavatory and galley
ventilation fans. The right fan
operates. The left fan gives
automatic backup.The fans pull air:

Through temperature sensors


Through equipment on racks
From lavatories
From galleys.

The air goes overboard through the


aft pressurization outflow valve.
The two ECSMCs control the forward
system, and the lavatory and galley
vent fans. They use controllers to
control the forward system supply
fans and the override valve.
June 2003

Environmental Systems
Temperature
Sensor (777-300)

Door
Floor
Forward Cargo
Heat Valve

Equipment Cooling
Ventilation Fan

Forward Cargo Compartment Heating System


Forward Cargo
Heater (777-300)
Aft
Cargo
Compt

Vent Valve

Door

Bulk Cargo
Bulk Ventilation Fan
Cargo
Compt
Door

Cabin
Air

Floor

CARGO TEMP SELECT


AFT
LOW
OFF

BULK
LOW
HIGH

OFF

Temperature
Sensors

HIGH

Pneumatic System
Distribution Duct
Cargo Heat Panel (P61)

Temperature
Control Valves
Shutoff Valves

Aft and Bulk Cargo Compartment Heating System

Cargo Compartment Heating and Bulk Cargo Compartment Ventilation


Cargo Compartment Heating and
Bulk Cargo Compartment
Ventilation
The forward, aft, and bulk cargo
compartments each have heating
systems. The bulk cargo
compartment also has a ventilation
system.
The forward cargo compartment
heating system uses vent air from the
forward equipment cooling system.
The two ECSMCs give control. There
is no control switch.
The AIMS tells the ECSMC when the
total air temperature (TAT) is less
than 50F (10C). The card tells ELMS
to close the vent valve and open the
forward cargo heat valve. The warm
air flows into the forward cargo
compartment.

June 2003

The aft and bulk cargo compartment


heating systems are independent of
each other. The ECSMCs control the
systems. Air from the pneumatic
system is the heat source. Each
compartment has these
components:

Shutoff valve
Temperature control valve
Temperature sensor
Control switch on P61.

The valve operation for both


compartments is the same.The crew
sets HIGH or LOW on the control
switch. The ECSMC tells the ELMS
to open the shutoff valve.

The ELMS also opens and closes the


temperature control valve. When the
switch is set to LOW, the control
valve opens at a compartment
temperature of 40F (4C) and closes
at 50F (10C). When the switch is set
to HIGH, the valve opens at a
compartment temperature of 65F
(18C) and closes at 75F (24C).
The crew uses HIGH for the bulk
cargo compartment when animals
are in the cargo.This turns on the
bulk cargo ventilation fan. The fan
takes cabin air from around the
compartment and blows it into the
compartment.
Smoke in the compartments causes
the heating and ventilation systems
to stop operation.

16-11

Negative Pressure
Relief Vent (4)

Positive Pressure
Relief Valve (2)

PRESSURIZATION
FWD

OUTFLOW
VALVE

AFT

AUTOw

AUTOw

MAN a

MAN a

OPEN

OPEN

MAX
P .11 PSI
TAKEOFF & LDG

LDG ALT
DECR

INCR

PULL ON

MANUAL

Manual Control

Manual Control
Bleed Air/Pressurization Panel (P5)
CLOSE

CLOSE

Remote
Sensor
28v dc
ELMS

Right ASCPC

Controllers
Outflow Valves:
Forward
Aft

AIMS

Left ASCPC
Card
Files
ARINC 629
Systems Buses (3)

Cabin Pressure Control


Pressurization
The pressurization system controls
the air pressure inside the airplane
for the comfort and safety of the
passengers and crew.
The pressurization system has these
components:

Control panel on the P5


overhead panel
Two air supply cabin pressure
controllers (ASCPC), in the main
equipment center
Two outflow valve assemblies,
one each below the left forward
and left aft passenger doors
Remote cabin pressure sensor in
the main equipment center
Two positive pressure relief
valves in the forward cargo
compartment, opposite the cargo
door
Four negative pressure relief
vents in the forward cargo
compartment, two on each side.

16-12

The left ASCPC controls cabin


pressure automatically. The right
ASCPC gives automatic backup
control. Control data comes from the:

AIMS
Landing altitude select switch on
the control panel
Cabin pressure sensors on the
controllers
Remote cabin pressure sensor
Weight on wheels card.

The air conditioning packs put air into


the airplane. The outflow valves
control the rate at which the air goes
out of the airplane.
There are two motors on each
outflow valve assembly. Each
ASCPC uses one motor on each
valve assembly to control the valve
position. A controller on each valve
controls motor operation.
For manual control of the outflow
valves, the crew uses the switches

on the panel. They use the pushbutton switch to turn off the auto
control for a valve. They use the
toggle switch to open or close the
valve.
These indications show on the
primary display system:

Cabin altitude
Cabin altitude rate of change
Differential pressure
Selected landing altitude
Outflow valve positions
System problems.

Differential pressure is the difference


in pressure between the inside and
outside of the airplane. The
maximum pressure is 8.6 psi. The
positive pressure relief valves open if
the pressure inside the airplane is too
high.
If the pressure outside the airplane is
higher than the pressure inside, the
negative pressure vents open.
June 2003

Environmental Systems

F/D

74

75

MASTER

72 F

76

73 72

71 72

72 72

FWD

F/D TRIM

28

TRIM
AIR

65

R PACK
STBY COOLING

ISLN

ISLN

AIR 1
HYD

WAI

74

L PACK

DUCT PRESS

44 70

45

74 72

BULK

AFT

44
C

74 72

DUCT PRESS

44

AIR 2
HYD

WAI

APU
EAI

EAI
GND
AIR
START

L ENG

START

APU

R ENG

START

This information shows only


if the forward cargo A/C
option is installed.

Air Synoptic Display


Synoptic Display
For the pneumatics system, the air
synoptic display shows this
information:

Ground air in use


Duct pressures
Engine bleed air pressure
regulating and shutoff valve
position
Isolation valve position
APU shutoff valve position.

An X on an isolation valve symbol or


the APU shutoff valve symbol shows
the valve has failed or the switch on
the bleed air/pressurization panel for
the valve is in the non-normal
position.

June 2003

For the air conditioning system, the


air synoptic display shows this
information:

Normal air conditioning pack


operation
Standby air conditioning pack
operation
Trim air pressure regulating and
shutoff valve position
Master air conditioning
temperature for the whole
airplane
Target and actual temperature for
each air conditioning zone
Flight deck trim air modulating
valve position
Target and actual temperature in
the cargo compartments.

The air synoptic display shows


position data for these valves:

APU start valve


Engine start valves
Engine thermal anti-ice valves
Wing thermal anti-ice valves.

16-13

AIR SUPPLY

AIR CONDITIONING

L
HIGH PRESS S/O VLV
PRESS REG S/O VLV
FAN AIR VLV
STARTER VLV
ENG HIGH STAGE PRESS
INTERIM DUCT PRESS
MANIFOLD DUCT PRESS
PRECOOLER OUT TEMP
BLEED FLOW RATE
ENG N1 FAN SPEED

MASTER TEMP
F/D

OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
120
38
38
400
120
90
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
CRUISE

OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
120
38
38
400
120
90

LEFT ISO VLV


CENTER ISO VLV
RIGHT ISO VLV
APU ISO VLV
FLIGHT PHASE

ZONE TEMP
TRGT TEMP
DUCT TEMP
TRIM VLV
CTRL CH

CAB ALT
LDG ALT

5000
3000

RIGHT LOWER RECIR FAN

ASCPC IN CONTROL

AC TEMP ZONE

AUTO

+125
P 7.0

0.45

L
PACK FLOW-VOLUME
PACK FLOW-MASS
PACK OUT TEMP
PRI HX IN TEMP

SEC HX OUT TEMP


CONDENSER IN TEMP

0.45

STG 2 TURB IN TEMP

MAN
DATE

17 JAN 91

TRIM AIR PRESS


UTC

Air Supply Maintenance Page

18:44:33

2700
200.0
40
385
350
400
300
9
77
5.0

426

SEATS
D

FWD

AFT

77
77
77

50
50
----

FWD UPPER RECIR FAN


AFT UPPER RECIR FAN

77

MIX MANIFOLD TEMP

OUTFLOW VALVES
FWD
AFT

72
C

ON
ON

LEFT LOWER RECIR FAN

CPRSR OUT TEMP

RATE

70
75
72
72
70
71
70
70
76
72
72
70
71
70
80
87
87
97
97
57
50
0.35 0.25 0.31 0.35 0.35 0.02 0.00
1
1
2
1
2
1
2

PRI HX OUT TEMP


CABIN PRESSURE SYSTEM:

FLOW SCHEDULE

A/C TEMP ZONE

70
70
----

ON
ON
1
L

2700
200.0
40
385
350
400
300
59
77
5.0

BULK

PACK CTRL CH
PACK IN PRESS
LOW LIM VLV POS
TURB BYP VLV
RAM AIR INLET
RAM AIR EXIT
ECON COOL VLV
LOWER FLOW CTRL VLV
UPPER FLOW CTRL VLV

DATE 23 JUN 90

1
55.0
0.00
0.15
0.35
0.35
CLSD
OPEN
CLSD

2
55.0
0.00
0.15
0.35
0.35
CLSD
OPEN
CLSD

UTC 18:54:04

Air Conditioning Maintenance Page

This information shows only if the forward cargo A/C option is installed.

Air Supply and Air Conditioning Maintenance Pages


Maintenance Pages
Environmental control system data is
on two maintenance pages. The air
supply maintenance page shows this
information:

Pneumatic system valve


positions
Pneumatic system pressures
Pneumatic system temperatures
Flight phase
Cabin pressure system data
Outflow valve position.

16-14

The air conditioning maintenance


page shows this information:

Zone temperatures
Trim valve positions
Recirculation fan conditions
Pack data
Pack flow schedule
Pack flow
Temperatures at points
throughout the pack
Pack valve positions.

June 2003

Ice and Rain Protection


Features

Anti-Ice

ICE DETECTION

Ice Detection

Ice detectors are on the side of the


forward fuselage. When the airplane
is in the air and the detectors sense
ice, they operate the engine and wing
anti-ice systems.

Wing Anti-Ice

Engine Anti-Ice

Air Data Probe Heat

WING ANTI-ICE

Window Heat

When the airplane is in the air, bleed


air prevents ice on three of the five
outboard leading-edge slats.

Windshield Rain Removal

Water and Waste Heat

ENGINE ANTI-ICE
Bleed air from the engine prevents
ice on the forward edge of the engine
inlet cowl.
AIR DATA PROBE HEAT
Electric heaters heat these air data
sensors:

Three pitot probes


Two angle-of-attack sensors
One total air temperature probe
Two engine inlet probes (P&W
and R-R).

WINDOW HEAT
Electric heaters in the flight deck
windows prevent fog and ice on the
windows.
WINDSHIELD RAIN REMOVAL
A permanent coating on the forward
flight deck windows repels water.
Windshield wipers remove water.
WATER AND WASTE HEAT
Electric heaters prevent freezing in
the water and waste systems.

June 2003

17-1

Portable Water Tank


(Typical)

Waste Tank
(Typical)
Water and Waste Heat

Windshield Rain
Removal
Window Heat

Wing Anti-Ice

Ice Detection
Engine Anti-Ice
Air Data Probe Heat

Anti-Ice Systems
Anti-Ice
The wings and engine inlet cowls
have anti-ice systems that use bleed
air. The ice detection system
automatically operates these
systems during icing conditions.
The flight deck windows, air data
sensors, drain masts, and potable
water lines have electric anti-icing
systems.

17-2

June 2003

Ice and Rain Protection


ANTI-ICE
WING

AUTO
OFF

ENGINE

AUTO
ON OFF

R
AUTO

ON OFF

ON

AIMS

Anti-Ice/Lighting Panel (P5)

Systems
ARINC 629
Buses
Right Fuselage
Ice Detector

ACIPS Control
Card WNG
ACIPS Control
Card ENG
R Card File
ACIPS Control
Card ENG
L Card File

Ice Detector
Left Fuselage

Ice Detection System


Ice Detection
The ice detection system has an ice
detector on each side of the forward
fuselage. When ice collects on either
detector, a signal goes to the engine
airfoil and cowl ice protection system
(ACIPS) card.

Also, an EICAS message shows for


these conditions:

A switch is in the OFF position


and ice is detected
A switch is in the ON position and
no ice is detected.

The engine ACIPS cards share the


information with the wing ACIPS
card. The cards operates the wing
and engine anti-ice systems
automatically when the engine and
wing switches are in auto and the
airplane is in the air.

June 2003

17-3

ANTI-ICE
WING

AUTO
OFF

ENGINE

AUTO
ON OFF

ON OFF

ON

OPAS

ADIRU

WOW

AIMS

Anti-Ice/Lighting Panel (P5)

Ice
Detector
(Left)

ACIPS Control
Card - EAI
Engine
Bleed Air

(Left)

ASCPC
ECSMC
WES

R
AUTO

Systems
ARINC 629
Buses

ACIPS Control
Card - WAI

Ice
Detector

ACIPS Control
Card - EAI
Engine
Bleed Air

(Right)

(Right)

WAI Valve
WAI Valve
WAI Pressure Sensor

WAI Pressure Sensor


Perforated Duct

Perforated Duct

Heated Slats

Heated Slats
APU
Bleed Air

Wing Anti-Ice System


Wing Anti-Ice
The wing anti-ice (WAI) system
prevents ice on slats three, four, five,
ten, eleven, and twelve. It uses air
from the pneumatic system.
The ice detection system turns on the
WAI system when all of these
conditions occur:

The airplane is in the air


The selector is in auto
Ice is detected.

The flight crew can also use the


selector to turn the system on in the
air.

17-4

The system has a wing anti-ice (WAI)


valve and a pressure sensor inside
the leading edge of each wing. The
valve regulates pressure. A spray
tube takes the hot air into the slats.
The air goes through perforations in
the tube to heat the slats. Then it
goes overboard through vents in the
bottom of the slats.
There are no test switches for the
WAI system. The central
maintenance computing system
(CMCS) can do a test of the system
with the airplane on the ground.

June 2003

Ice and Rain Protection


ANTI-ICE
WING

AUTO

AUTO

OFF

ON OFF

ENGINE

R
AUTO

ON OFF

ON

AIMS

Anti-Ice/Lighting Panel (P5)


Systems
ARINC 629
Buses

Fan Case
Duct Leak
Detector
(Ref)

Nozzle

Ice
Detector
(Left)

ACIPS Control
Card - EAI
(Left)

Duct Leak
and
Overheat
Detection
System

ACIPS Control
Card - EAI
(Right)

Ice
Detector
(Right)

Nozzle
Fan Case
Duct Leak
Detector
(Ref)
Pressure Sensors

Pressure Sensors
High Stage
Bleed Port

High Stage
Bleed Port

EAI Valve

EAI Valve

EAI Valve Controller

EAI Valve Controller

Engine Anti-Ice System


Engine Anti-Ice
The engine anti-ice (EAI) system
uses air from a dedicated bleed port
on the engine to prevent engine inlet
cowl ice.
The ice detection system turns on the
EAI system when all of these
conditions occur:

The airplane is in the air


The selector is in auto
Ice is detected.

The flight crew can also use the


selector to turn on the system on the
ground or in the air.

June 2003

Hot bleed air flows from the EAI


valve, through a duct, and into the
inside of the engine inlet cowl. The
bleed air leaves the cowl through an
overboard vent on the bottom of the
cowl.
Two pressure sensors are in the EAI
duct for each engine. The sensors
give pressure information to the EAI
ACIPS card to control the valve
position.
There is an overheat detector
adjacent to the EAI duct. When the
detector senses a leak, the duct leak
and overheat detection system
(DLODS) sends a signal to the
applicable ACIPS card. It closes the
EAI valve.

17-5

Center Pitot Probe

Left Pitot Probe

Right Pitot Probe

Left AOA Sensor

Right AOA Sensor

TAT Probe

Engine Inlet Probe


(P&W and R-R only)

ELMS

ELMS

Left
Pitot
ADM

Right
Pitot
ADM

TAT Probe
(Optional)
Engine Inlet Probe
(P&W and R-R only)
Systems
ARINC 629
Buses

Left Engine
ELMS
Electronics
Unit

WOW

ERU

ELMS

Right Engine

Flight Controls
ARINC 629
Buses

ERU

EEC

EEC
PFC

ADIRU

SAARU

ELMS

AIMS
EDIU

EDIU

Air Data Probe Heat System


Air Data Probe Heat
The air data probes have electric
heaters. The air data modules and
the electrical load management
system (ELMS) control the heaters.

These are the conditions on the


ground with an engine on:

Pitot probes are on low heat


AOA sensors are heated
The engine inlet probes on each
operating engine is heated.

The pitot probes have two levels of


heat. The angle of attack (AOA), total
air temperature (TAT), and engine
inlet probes have one level.

These are the conditions during


flight:

On the ground with both engines off,


the heaters do not operate.

17-6

Pitot probes are on high heat


AOA sensors are heated
TAT probes are heated
The engine inlet probes are
heated.

June 2003

Ice and Rain Protection


Left

Number 3
Window

Right

Number 1
Window

Number 1
Window

Number 2
Window

Number 2
Window

Number 3
Window

BACKUP
WINDOW HEAT
LEFT
RIGHT
ON

AIMS
Systems
ARINC 629
Buses

OFF

Backup Window Heat Panel


(P61)

Window Heat
Control Unit (2)

WINDOW HEAT
SIDE

SIDE

FWD

FWD

ON

ON

ON

ON

INOP

INOP

INOP

INOP

Window Heat/Emergency Lights Panel (P5)

Window Heat System


Window Heat
The window heat system prevents
ice and fog on the flight deck
windows.
Electrically resistive material in the
window lamination heats the
windows. The heat layer for the
number two and three windows is
near the inside surface. It is for antifog. The number one window has two
heat layers. The one near the inside
surface is for anti-fog. The one near
the outside surface is for anti-ice.
Two window heat control units
(WHCUs) in the main equipment
center control the system. One
controls the power for the left number
one window and the right number two
and three windows. The other
controls the power for the right
number one window and the left
number two and three windows. A
backup heat circuit in the controllers
June 2003

gives power to the number one


window anti-fog circuit.
The window heat switches are on the
P5 overhead panel. The switches for
the backup window heat system are
on the P61 overhead maintenance
panel. When the window heat
switches are on, the controllers send
power to the number one window
anti-ice layer and the number two
and three window anti-fog layer.

The WHCUs reduce their power


output to the number one windows
during the first four minutes of
operation. This reduces the thermal
stress on the number one windows.
The WHCUs contain an automatic
shutoff circuit to protect the windows
from overheat conditions.

A controller sends power to the


number one window anti-fog layer if
the anti-ice heat fails or if the window
heat switch is off. The backup
window heat switch on the P61 lets
maintenance personnel remove
backup heat power.

17-7

L WIPER

R WIPER

OFF

OFF

INT
LOW
HIGH

OBS
AUDIO
ENT

INT

OFF

LOW
HIGH

Coating

ON

Coating

Right No. 1 Window

Left No. 1 Window

Wiper Assembly

Wiper Assembly

Windowshield Rain Removal System


Windshield Rain Removal
A coating on both number one
windows repels rain. The window
manufacturer applies the coating.
The airplane operator can renew it.
Electrically powered windshield
wipers remove water from the left
and right number one windows.
There is a selector on the P5
overhead panel for each wiper.

17-8

June 2003

Ice and Rain Protection

Water Supply
Line Heat
(Typical)
Gray Water
Drain Mast Heat

Waste Drain Heat


(Typical)

Water Supply Line, Gray Water Drain Mast, and Waste Drain Heat
Water and Waste Heat
Electrical heat sources prevent ice in
the water and waste systems.
These components heat the water
supply lines:

Heater tape
Inline heaters
Heated hoses.

Heaters in the gray water drain masts


give high heat in flight and low heat
on the ground.
Heated gaskets protect the waste
drains. Heater blankets heat the
waste tank drain lines.

June 2003

17-9

Fire Protection
Features

FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS

Engine Fire and Overheat


Detection

FIRE AND OVERHEAT


DETECTION SYSTEMS

An APU fire on the ground when both


engines are off automatically
discharges the APU fire extinguisher.

Engine Turbine Overheat


Detection - Rolls-Royce

The cargo fire extinguishing system


uses flow valves to send the fire
extinguishing agent to the forward or
aft compartment. There are no
multiple-bottle discharge outlets.

Engine Fire Extinguishing

APU Fire Detection

APU Fire Extinguishing

The fire extinguishing system in the


LLAR sends the fire extinguishing
agent to the common area inside the
module (-200ER and -300).

Cargo Compartment Smoke


Detection

Cargo Compartment Fire


Extinguishing

Wheel Well Fire Detection

Duct Leak and Overheat


Detection

Lavatory Smoke Detection and


Fire Extinguishing

LLAR Smoke Detection (-200


ER and -300)

LLAR Fire Extinguishing (-200


ER and -300)

Dual loop systems protect these


areas:

Engines
APU
Pneumatic ducts
Wheel wells.

Detection circuits monitor these


areas and cause flight deck
indications.
Detectors on the engines monitor
both fire and overheat conditions,
they also supply temperature data to
the airplane conditioning monitoring
system.
Detection systems are automatically
tested. They can also be manually
tested.
Pneumatic and anti-ice system
valves close automatically to isolate
a leaking duct segment.

The ELMS does an automatic squib


test during each flight leg.

SMOKE DETECTION SYSTEMS


Cargo smoke detectors use light
emitting diodes for high reliability.
The smoke detectors can tell the
difference between smoke and other
aerosols.
A smoke detector in the optional
lower lobe attendants rest (LLAR)
operates similar to the cargo smoke
detectors to monitor for smoke in the
module (-200ER and -300).

June 2003

18-1

AIMS

CAUTION
Master Caution
Light (2)

Engine Fire
Detectors

Speaker
(2)

L&R
Systems
ARINC 629
Buses

Loop 1
Loop 2
Fire
Detection
Card Eng

WARNING
Master Warning
Light (2)

WEU (2)
FUEL CONTROL
R
L
RUN

CUTOFF

P10 Control Stand


FIRE/
OVHT
TEST

ENG BTL ENG BTL


1 DISCH 2 DISCH

DISCH
2

L
E
F
T

P5 Cargo Fire/
Engine Control
Panel

DISCH
2

R
I
G
H
T

P8 Engine Fire Panel

Engine Fire and Overheat Protection


Engine Fire And Overheat
Detection

These are the engine overheat


indications:

Each engine has three fire detectors


in a dual loop system. The detectors
monitor the engine for fire and
overheat conditions. They also
supply nacelle temperature data to
the airplane condition monitoring
system. Detector signals go to a fire
detection card. The card sends
signals for flight deck indications.

These are the engine fire indications:

There are also periodic automatic


tests. There are no indications from
these tests unless there are faults.

EICAS warning message


Fire warning aural
Master warning lights
Fuel control switch fire warning
light
Engine fire warning light.

18-2

EICAS caution message


Master caution lights
Caution aural.

You use the fire/overheat test switch


on the P5 to manually test the
system. The test includes the engine
fire indications. Test results show on
the primary display system.

June 2003

Fire Protection

IP Turbine

Fire
Detection
Card
Engine

Engine Turbine Ovht


Thermocouple Front

To Engine Fire
Warning Circuits

AIMS
Engine Turbine Ovht
Thermocouple Rear

EDIU

Electronic Engine Controller

L & R Systems
ARINC 629 Buses

Engine Turbine Overheat Protection Rolls-Royce


Engine Turbine Overheat
Detection - Rolls-Royce
The engine turbine overheat
detection system monitors the
temperature of the cooling air at the
front and rear of the intermediate
pressure (IP) turbine. Engine fire
warnings occur in the flight deck if the
front or rear temperature is more
than limits.
Two thermocouples give IP cooling
air temperature information to the
electronic engine controller (EEC).
The EEC makes an analysis of the
temperature information. If the EEC
finds an overheat condition, it sends
a signal to the engine fire detection
card. The fire detection card turns on
the engine fire warning indications in
the flight deck.

June 2003

BITE does a check of the condition of


the system. Status and maintenance
messages give information about
system failures. The fire detection
card monitors its interface with the
EEC for failures and sends
information about the failure to the
AIMS. The EEC monitors the
thermocouple circuits for failures.
The EEC sends information about
the failure through the engine data
interface unit (EDIU) to the AIMS.
The FIRE/OVHT TEST switch in the
flight deck does not do a test of this
system.

18-3

Engine Bottle
Discharge Lights

Engine Fire
Switches

Engine Fire
Extinguishing
Bottles

Bottle 1

Engine Fire Switches (P8)


Squibs

Left Engine

Right Engine

To Discharge
Nozzles
Bottle 2

Check Valve
Pressure
Switch

Discharge
Manifold

Engine Fire Extinguishing


Engine Fire Extinguishing
The two engine fire extinguishing
bottles are in the forward cargo
compartment. They are aft of the
cargo compartment door and
outboard of the liner. They contain
Halon. Each bottle has two discharge
squibs. The squib is an electrically
operated explosive device which
breaks the seal on the discharge
port. Pipes connect both bottles to
discharge nozzles in each engine
compartment.

18-4

These things happen when you pull a


fire switch:

The squib arms


Fuel supply to the engine stops
Engine generators electrically
disconnect
Hydraulic fluid supply to the
engine-driven pump stops
Engine bleed air valves close
Engine thrust reverser is
deactivated.

When you turn a fire switch, the squib


on one bottle fires and breaks the
bottle seal. Halon discharges and
flows to the selected engine. When
you turn the switch in the other
direction, the other bottle discharges
to the same engine.
Discharge lights and the primary
display system give indications of fire
bottle discharge.
The ELMS does an automatic squib
test during each flight leg. You can
also use the MAT to do a squib test.
Status messages show inoperative
squib circuits.

June 2003

Fire Protection

Fire Detectors
Fire Extinguishing
Bottle
APU Compartment
P40 Service and APU
Shutdown Panel
APU BTL
DISCH

CARGO FIRE
FWD ARM

ARMED

FWD

AFT

DISCH

A
P
U

AFT

ARMED

FIRE/
OVHT
TEST

DISCH

DISCH

Cargo Fire/Engine Control Panel (P5)

APU Fire Detection and Extinguishing System


APU Fire Detection
Three dual loop fire detectors in the
APU compartment tell the APU fire
detection card when there is a fire.

There are also periodic automatic


tests. There are no indications from
these tests unless there are faults.
APU Fire Extinguishing

These are the flight deck indications:

APU shut down


Master warning lights
Fire warning aural
EICAS warning message
APU fire warning light.

These are the P40 service and APU


shutdown panel indications:

Red APU fire warning light


Fire warning horn.

You use the fire/overheat test switch


on the P5 to do a manua test of the
system. The test includes the APU
fire indications. Test results show on
the primary display system.

June 2003

The bottle squib arms


The APU generator electrically
disconnects
The APU fuel shutoff valve closes
The APU air shutoff valve closes
The fire warning horn stops.

The APU fire extinguishing bottle is


on the forward side of the APU
compartment firewall. It contains
Halon. The bottle has a discharge
squib that breaks the seal on the
discharge port. A pipe connects the
bottles to the APU compartment.

When you turn the APU fire switch on


the P5 or push the bottle discharge
switch on the P40 panel, the squib
fires. Halon flows into the APU
compartment.

The system has automatic and


manual bottle discharge. Automatic
discharge occurs when:

The airplane is on the ground


The engines are off
An APU fire is detected.

The switches on the P5 or P40 panel


give manual operation. When you
pull the APU fire switch (P5) or push
the APU shutdown switch (P40):

These are the discharge indications:

Discharge light on the cargo


fire/engine control panel
Primary display system
messages
Discharge light on the P40.

The ELMS does an automatic squib


test during each flight leg. You can
also use the MAT to do a squib test.
Status messages show inoperative
squib circuits.

18-5

AIMS

Speaker

LLAR Smoke Detector


(Optional)

WARNING

Master Warning
Lights

Warning Electronic Unit


Aft Cargo Smoke Detector

CARGO FIRE
OPAS

FWD

ARINC 629
Systems Buses

ARM

AFT

ARMED

ARMED

FWD

AFT

DISCH
FIRE/
OVHT
TEST

Fwd Cargo Smoke Detector


Equipment
Cooling
System

Systems Card File


(P84/P85)

DISCH

Cargo Fire/Engine Control Panel (P5)

MEC Cooling Smoke Detector

Cargo Compartment Smoke Detection


Cargo Compartment Smoke
Detection

These components make up the


cargo smoke detection system:

The cargo smoke detection system


(CSDS) monitors air in these areas
for smoke:

Forward cargo compartment


Aft cargo compartment
Bulk cargo compartment.

The forward cargo compartment


smoke detector processes signals
from the main equipment center
(MEC) cooling smoke detector.
The aft cargo compartment smoke
detector processes signals from the
smoke detector in the optional LLAR
(-200ER and -300).

18-6

Light emitting diode smoke


detectors
Smoke detector fans
Air sampling ducts.

The smoke detector fans bring air


from the cargo compartments
through the sampling ducts and into
the smoke detectors. The smoke
detectors analyze the air for smoke.
Cargo compartment smoke detection
signals go to the ASG cards in the
system card files. It sends signals to:

OPAS
WES
AIMS.

These are the indications:

EICAS warning message


Fire warning aural
Master warning lights
Fwd or aft cargo fire warning
light.

You use the fire/overheat test switch


on the P5 to manually test the
system. The test includes the cargo
compartment fire indications. Test
results show on the primary display
system.
There are also periodic automatic
tests. There are no indications from
these tests unless there are system
faults.

June 2003

Fire Protection
CARGO FIRE

APU BTL
DISCH

FWD

ARM

AFT

ARMED

ARMED

FWD

AFT

DISCH

FIRE/
OVHT
TEST

A
P
U

Pressure
Switches

DISCH

DISCH

Cargo Fire/Engine Control Panel (P5)

Fwd Cargo
Compartment

Fwd Flow
Valve

Aft Flow
Valve

Aft and Bulk Cargo


Compartments

Dump Bottles (2)


(Larger capacity
on 777-300)

Metered Bottles (3)

Discharge
Squib (5)

Filter/
Regulator

Cargo Compartment Fire Extinguishing System


Cargo Compartment Fire
Extinguishing System
The cargo compartment fire
extinguishing bottles are in the
forward cargo compartment. They
are aft of the cargo compartment
door and outboard of the liner. The
bottles are filled with Halon and
pressurized with nitrogen. Tubes and
flow valves connect the bottles to the
forward, aft and bulk cargo
compartments.
Each bottle has one discharge squib.
Each flow valve has two squibs. The
squib is an electrically-operated
explosive device which breaks a seal
in the bottle and in the flow valve.
Halon flows from the bottle through
the flow valve to the selected cargo
compartment.

Push the forward or aft cargo fire arm


switch to arm the system. Push the
discharge switch to:

The filter/regulator causes the


metered bottles to discharge slowly
for long-term fire suppression.

It takes 180 minutes for all three


bottles to completely discharge (240
minutes is an option).

This is how the metered bottles


discharge:

The cargo fire/engine control panel


has forward and aft cargo fire arm
switches and a discharge switch.
June 2003

Open the flow valve


Release halon from the dump
bottles
Start a timer in ELMS for the
discharge of the metered bottles.

If the airplane is on the ground


when the discharge switch is set,
one metered bottle will discharge
20 minutes after the dump
bottles.
If the airplane is in the air but
lands less than 20 minutes after
the switch is set, one metered
bottle will discharge at landing.
If the airplane is in the air 20
minutes after the switch is set, all
of the metered bottles will
discharge.

A pressure switch in the discharge


line turns on the light in the discharge
switch. A pressure switch in each
bottle shows bottle discharge on the
primary display system. The primary
display system also shows the
condition of the squibs.
The ELMS does an automatic squib
test during each flight leg. You can
also use the MAT to do a squib test.
Status messages show inoperative
squib circuits.

18-7

CSS
EVAC
r

OFF
a
AIR FLOW
OFF

ELMS

TEST
a
FIRE
TEST

FIRE
r

EXTING FIRE HORN


BOTTLE INTERRUPT

Call Reset
Switch
(Above Door)

Attendant Switch Panel


(Entrance Enclosure)

Fan
Installed/
Not Installed
Switch

O2 HORN
CANCEL

BACK-UP
LIGHTS

LLAR Air Supply


Shutoff Valve

AIR
FLOW

EVAC
FIRE BTL
MODULE PRESS

LLAR Attendant Switch Panel


AIMS

WES

L/R ASG
Aft Cargo
Smoke Detector

LLAR Smoke Detector

P84 R Systems
Card File

Lower Lobe Attendant


Rest Module

L and R
Systems
ARINC
629 Bus

Lower Lobe Attendants Rest Smoke Detection (Optional)


Lower Lobe Attendants Rest
Smoke Detection (Optional on
(-200ER and -300)
The lower lobe attendants rest
(LLAR) smoke detection system
monitors the air in the LLAR module
for smoke.
These are the components of the
LLAR smoke detection system:

Light emitting diode smoke


detector
Smoke detector fan
Air sampling ducts.

LLAR smoke detection signals go to:

These are the indications:

The smoke detector fans bring air


from the LLAR module through the
sampling ducts and into the smoke
detector.

18-8

AIMS
WES
Attendant switch panels in the
entrance enclosure and the
LLAR
CSS.

EICAS caution message


Chimes and master call lights in
the cabin
FIRE warning light in the
entrance enclosure
EVAC light and fire HORN in the
LLAR.

June 2003

Fire Protection
LLAR Smoke
Detection
System

AIMS

ELMS
L and R Systems
ARINC 629 Bus
EVAC
r

OFF
a
AIR FLOW
OFF

TEST
a
FIRE
TEST

FIRE
r

EXTING FIRE HORN


BOTTLE INTERRUPT

ARM
a

DISCH
a

ARM

DISCH

Attendant Switch Panel


(Entrance Enclosure)
CSS
Common Area

Switch

Fire Bottle
FIRE
EVAC
MODULE BOTTLE

Discharge
Nozzle (2)

LIGHTING

TENDANT ENTRY
REST ENCLOSURE

Attendant Switch Panel


Lower Lobe Attendants Rest

Lower Lobe Attendants Rest Fire Extinguishing (Optional)


Lower Lobe Attendants Rest Fire
Extinguishing System (Optional
on -200ER and -300)
The lower lobe attendants rest
(LLAR) fire extinguishing system
discharges Halon into the LLAR to
extinguish fires. The fire
extinguishing bottle is behind an
access panel on the forward side of
the LLAR.

Push the arm switch to arm the fire


extinguishing circuit. Push the
discharge switch to fire the squib and
discharge the halon.
A pressure switch on the bottle
shows low bottle pressure on the
attendant switch panels in the
entrance enclosure and the LLAR.

The bottle has one discharge squib.


When the squib is fired, it breaks a
seal in the bottle and the Halon
discharges into the LLAR. There are
two discharge nozzles which
discharge the halon into the common
area of the module.
The attendant switch panel in the
entrance enclosure has the fire bottle
arm and discharge switches.

June 2003

18-9

Duct Leak and


Overheat Detectors

Wheel Well
Fire Detector

Wheel Well, Duct Leak, and Overheat Detection Systems


Wheel Well Fire Detection

Duct Leak and Overheat Detection

Dual loop fire detectors monitor the


main wheel wells for brake and tire
fires. There is a detector in each
wheel well. These are the fire
indications:

The duct leak and overheat detection


system (DLODS) is a dual loop
system. The detectors parallel the
high pressure ducts. These are the
detectors:

EICAS warning message


Master warning lights
Fire warning aural.

You use the fire/overheat test switch


on the P5 to do a manual test of the
system. The test includes the wheel
well fire indications. Test results
show on the primary display system.
There are also periodic automatic
tests. There are no indications from
these tests unless there are system
faults.

18-10

Two detectors in each engine


strut
Five detectors on the wing ducts
Twelve detectors on the body
ducts.

Lavatory Smoke Detection and


Fire Extinguishing
Each lavatory has a smoke detector.
Visual and aural indications occur in
the lavatory and at attendant
stations.
A Halon fire extinguisher is in the sink
cabinet of each lavatory. Heat from a
waste compartment fire causes the
extinguisher to discharge.

Some duct leaks are automatically


isolated. A fan case overheat causes
the engine anti-ice valve to close.
Strut, wing, or body duct leaks cause
pneumatic system valves to close.
There is continuous monitoring of the
system. The fire/overheat test switch
on the P5 does not test the system.

June 2003

Cabin Systems
Features

LAVATORIES

PASSENGER COMPARTMENT
EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

The ability to change the


configuration of the vacuum waste
system gives more cabin interior
flexibility. The vacuum toilets reduce
odors and improve resistance to
structural corrosion.

The passenger compartment


equipment and furnishings give
comfort, convenience, and safety to
the passengers and crew.

DOORS
Interior design and flexibility let the
airline select and rearrange the
configuration to meet their needs.
LOWER LOBE ATTENDANTS
REST
An optional lower lobe attendants
rest (LLAR) is in the forward end of
the aft cargo compartment. The
LLAR contains equipment and
furnishings for attendants. There is
an entrance enclosure in the
passenger compartment for access
to the LLAR (-200ER and -300).

Passenger entry door openings are


wide enough for two people.
A large cargo door is standard on the
forward cargo compartment and
optional on the aft.
The large door permits the loading of
pallet size cargo.

Passenger Compartment
Equipment and Furnishings

Lower Lobe Attendants Rest

Overhead Flight Crew and


Attendant Rest

Overhead Stowage Bins

Flight Crew Oxygen

Passenger Oxygen

Potable and Gray Water

Lavatory Waste System

Doors

Windows

OVERHEAD FLIGHT CREW AND


ATTENDANT REST
An optional overhead flight crew and
attendants rest are in the overhead of
the main cabin. The crew rests
contain equipment and furnishings
for the flight crews and attendants.
OXYGEN SYSTEMS
The flight deck crew gets oxygen
from cylinder(s).
All passenger seats, attendant seats,
and lavatories get oxygen from
chemical generators.
Passenger oxygen from cylinders is
an option.
POTABLE WATER
There are two potable water storage
tanks on the 777-200. There are
three tanks on the 777-200ER and
the 777-300. Each tank has a
capacity of 109 gallons.

June 2003

19-1

Galley Flexibility Zone (-300)

Galley Flexibility Zone (-200)

Lavatory Flexibility Zone (-300)

Lavatory Flexibility Zone (-200)

Interior Flexibility
Passenger Compartment
Equipment and Furnishings

These functions also have flexibility


zones:

INTERIOR CONFIGURATION

The airline specifies the airplane


interior configuration.
INTERIOR FLEXIBILITY
Interior flexibility zones are the areas
in the airplane for the location of
movable lavatories and galleys. The
airline can move the lavatories and
galleys to any position within these
areas. Additional connections for
plumbing, wiring, and air ducts are
already installed.

Stowage bins
Closet
Class dividers/partitions
LCD monitors
Projection screens
Video projectors
Passenger service units
Passenger entertainment
Purser stations.

The flexibility allows for changes in


passenger loads and route
structures.

19-2

June 2003

Cabin Systems

Entrance
Enclosure

Hatch

Module

Stairs

Bunk
(Typical)

Base

Umbilical
Panel
Access
FWD

Lower Lobe Attendants Rest (Optional on -200ER and -300)

ENTRANCE ENCLOSURE

The entrance enclosure gives


access to the LLAR from the
passenger compartment. It contains
an attendant switch panel to give
control for the lights and fire
extinguishing in the LLAR.

The LLAR is a two piece module,


similar in size and shape to a unit
load device (ULD). You can load it in
two pieces through a small aft cargo
door. It can be loaded through the
large aft cargo door in one piece.

LLAR

All service connections from the


airplane systems to the LLAR are at
the umbilical disconnect panel.

Lower Lobe Attendants Rest

The LLAR gives an area for flight


attendant rest while the airplane is in
the air. It contains sleeping bunks
and storage compartments for
personal belongings. The module
has these systems and equipment:

Lighting
Passenger address
Cabin interphone
Ventilation
Temperature control
Smoke detection

June 2003

Fire extinguishing
Supplemental oxygen
Emergency equipment.

There are two hatches that give


access to the LLAR. The hatch in
floor of the entrance enclosure gives
usual access to the module. There is
a second hatch in the ceiling of the
LLAR for emergency exit.

19-3

yqmm-33-29-0017

yqmm-26-14-0009

FWD
FWD

YQMM-21-29-0021

yqmm-26-14-0011
yqmm-26-14-0010

FWD

FWD

777-200 Overhead Flight Crew and Attendant Rest


777-200 Overhead Flight Crew
and Attendant Rest

and climb the stairs to the seat area.


The bunks are aft of the seats.

OVERHEAD FLIGHT CREW REST

OVERHEAD FLIGHT ATTENDANT


REST

The overhead flight crew rest


(OFCR) contains two seats and two
bunks for two crew members and a
storage compartment for their
belongings. The OFCR module has
these functions:

Ventilation and heating


Fire detection
Aural and visual fire/smoke
indication
Cabin interphone
Passenger address
Lighting
Attendant call
Supplemental oxygen.

Access to the overhead flight crew


rest (OFCR) module is in the main
cabin area by door 1 left. You must
open the entrance enclosure door

19-4

common area. The bunks are


forward and aft of the common area.

The overhead flight attendant rest


(OFAR) contains a common area
and two modules with three bunks in
each module and storage area for
the attendants belonging. The 0FAR
module has these functions:

Ventilation and heating


Fire detection
Aural and visual fire/smoke
indication
Cabin interphone
Passenger address
Lighting
Attendant call
Supplemental oxygen.

Access to the OFAR is in the main


cabin area by door 3 right side. You
must open the entrance enclosure
door and go up the stairs into the
March 1998

Cabin Systems

yqmm-26-14-0009
yqmm-21-41-0034

FWD

FWD

yqmm-21-29-0042

yqmm-26-14-0010

wqmt-25-29-0015

FWD

777-300 Overhead Flight Crew and Attendant Rest


777-300 Overhead Flight Crew
and Attendant Rest

and climb the stairs to the seat area.


The bunks are aft of the seats.

OVERHEAD FLIGHT CREW REST

OVERHEAD FLIGHT ATTENDANT


REST

The overhead flight crew rest


(OFCR) contains two seats and two
bunks for two crew members and a
storage compartment for their
belongings. The OFCR module has
these functions:

Ventilation and heating


Fire detection
Aural and visual fire/smoke
indication
Cabin interphone
Passenger address
Lighting
Attendant call
Supplemental oxygen.

Access to the overhead flight crew


rest (OFCR) module is in the main
cabin area by door 1 left. You must
open the entrance enclosure door

March 1998

the stairs into the common area. The


bunks are forward of the common
area.

The overhead flight attendant rest


(OFAR) contains a common area
and four modules with two bunks in
each module and two storage areas
for attendant belongings. The OFAR
module has these functions:

Ventilation and heating


Fire detection
Aural and visual fire/smoke
indication
Cabin interphone
Passenger address
Lighting
Attendant call
Supplemental oxygen.

Access to the flight attendant rest


module is in the main cabin area by
door 5 left side. You must open the
entrance enclosure door and go up
19-5

First Class Seats

Economy Class Seats

Overhead Stowage Bins


Overhead Stowage Bins
There are overhead stowage bins for
carry-on items. They are above the
outboard and center seats.
The center stowage bins move
downward for easier use by the
passengers. In higher density
seating areas, they also move
outboard toward the aisle.

19-6

June 2003

Cabin Systems
AIMS
Transducer
Fill Panel
(Optional)

Pressure
Regulators

Indicator
Relief
Valve

Oxygen Cylinder
Crew Masks
Shutoff
Valve
Thermal Relief
(Overboard Discharge)

Mask

Pressure
Regulator
Bleed
Valve

Regulator

ELMS

Mask in Storage

Flight Crew Oxygen System


Flight Crew Oxygen System
A high pressure oxygen cylinder
supplies oxygen to the fight crew.
The cylinder is on the left side of the
main equipment center.
A pressure regulator on the oxygen
cylinder decreases the pressure to
the flight deck to 60 to 85 psig. A
second pressure regulator on the
crew mask also makes sure the
pressure is not more than 60 to 85
psig.
CONTROL AND INDICATIONS
There is a pressure gage on the
cylinder. There is a pressure
transducer on the supply line that
goes to the flight deck. The pressure
transducer sends a signal to the
optional fill panel and to the AIMS for
the primary display system.

June 2003

The bleed valve opens for 15


seconds when the first engine starts.
If the cylinder shutoff valve is not
open, oxygen does not pressurize
the supply line. The flight crew will
see the low pressure on the status
display.

The user holds the control and puts


on the mask with the harness
inflated. The user releases the lever
and the harness deflates. Elastic in
the harness holds the mask to the
users face.
REGULATOR CONTROLS

CREW OXYGEN MASK STOWAGE


The oxygen mask and regulator are
in a stowage box at each crew
position. A valve in the box controls
the oxygen flow to the mask. The box
door opens the valve when the door
is opened. You use a reset control on
the box to close the valve after you
close the door.

Oxygen flows into the mask when the


user breathes. Controls on the mask
lets the user set the oxygen to normal
(diluted oxygen on demand), 100
percent (100 percent oxygen on
demand), or emergency flow
(continuous oxygen). The flow
indicator on the stowage box shows
the flow to the mask.

PNEUMATIC HARNESS
A pneumatic harness holds the mask
to the users face. A lever on the
mask controls the inflation of the
mask harness.

19-7

Remote
Pressure
Sensor

ASCPC

AIMS

Systems
ARINC 629
Buses (3)
EMER
LIGHTS

P5 Overhead Panel
OFF

SERV
INTPH

PASS
OXYGEN

Cabin Altitude > 13,500 ft


P5 Control Switch to ON

OFF

ARMED
ON

ELMS

ON

ON

Oxygen Mask

Window Heat/Emergency Lights Panel (P5)

Chemical Oxygen
Generator

Activation Pin

EXIT

EXIT

Mask (4)
Mask Lanyard (4)
Passenger Compartment

Oxygen Module

Chemical Oxygen Generation System (Basic)


Passenger Oxygen System Chemical (Basic)
Chemical oxygen generators supply
the passengers and attendants with
emergency oxygen. The generators
and masks are:

A lanyard connects each mask to the


generator firing pin. The passenger
pulls the mask. This pulls the pin and
starts the chemical generator. A
flexible tube transmits the oxygen
from the generator to the mask.
INDICATIONS

In each passenger service unit


(PSU)
In each lavatory
At each flight attendant station
In the optional LLAR (-200ER
and -300).

A light on the switch and an EICAS


message show when the masks are
released.

The masks are released by a switch


on the P5 panel or when the cabin
altitude is above 13,500 feet by the
cabin pressure sensor. Cabin
altitude information comes from the
ASCPCs and a remote pressure
sensor.

19-8

June 2003

Cabin Systems
THERAPEUTIC
OXYGEN
RESET NORM ON

Therapeutic Oxygen Panel (P5)


Cylinders
Thermal
Compensator

Pressure Transducer
Pressure Regulator

From
Additional
Cylinders

EMER
LIGHTS
OFF

SERV
INTPH

PASS
OXYGEN

OFF

ARMED
ON

From
Additional
Cylinders

ON

ON

Window Heat/Emergency Lights Panel (P5)

Pressure
Gage

Overboard
Discharge
Port

From Service
Panel (Optional)

Shutoff
Valve

Check
Valve

Medium
Pressure
Manifold

PSU Oxygen
Module (Typical)

Bleed Valve
(Typical)

Flow
Control
Unit

Flow
Control
Unit

Therapeutic Oxygen
Connection

Vent Valve
To Other
Oxygen Modules

Gaseous Oxygen System (Optional)


Gaseous Oxygen System
(Optional)
Gas cylinders supply oxygen in the
optional system. The cylinders are
on the right side of the aft cargo
compartment.
There can be as many as 23
cylinders. The airline selects the
number of cylinders (-200).
There can be as many as 25
cylinders. The airline selects the
number of cylinders (-200ER and 300).
Cylinder pressure and gage
transducers measure the cylinder
pressures. The transducer sends a
signal to the voltage averaging unit
(VAU). The VAU sends a signal to
the fill panel gage (optional) and to
the primary display system.

June 2003

A pressure regulator on the oxygen


cylinders keep the pressure to the
flow control unit at 600 - 700 psi.
These things happen by a switch on
the P5 overhead panel or if the cabin
altitude is 13,500 feet or more:

INDICATIONS
A light on the switch and on an
EICAS message show when the
masks are released.

Starts flow through both flow


control units to the PSUs
Releases the masks from the
PSU.

Each mask has a shutoff valve (not


shown) in the PSU. When a
passenger or attendant pulls on a
mask, it opens the valve for that
mask.
There is an option for therapeutic
oxygen mask fittings on the outboard
PSUs. The therapeutic oxygen
switch on the P5 starts flow through
one flow control unit to the PSUs but
does not cause the masks to drop.
An attendant connects a mask to the
fitting for a passengers use.
19-9

Isolation
Valve

Isolation/
Drain Valve

Lavatory
Water
Supply
Shutoff
Valve
LAV
(TYP)

GALLEY
(TYP)

LAV
(TYP)

DOOR
2

GALLEY
(TYP)

DOOR
3

LAV
(TYP)

LAV
(TYP)

DOOR
4

LAV
(TYP)

GALLEY
(TYP)

Fill
Overflow
Valve

Water Tank
Pressurization
(Ref)

Distribution
Drain
Shutoff
Valve
Gray Water Drain
Restrictor Valve
(2) (Ref)

Overhead
Distribution
Line

P
M

P
M

Forward
System
Drain
Valve

Left
Water
Tank
1

Aft
System
Drain
Valve

Water
Quantity
Transmitter
(3) (Ref)

Right
Water
Tank

Center
Water Tank
Q

Additional Water Tank


on -200ER & -300
Forward System
Drain Panel

Drain Mast
(Ref)

Aft Potable
Water Service Panel

Tank Fill
Valve Handle

Tank Drain Valve

Potable and Gray Water Systems


Potable Water System
There are two potable water tanks aft
of the bulk cargo compartment. The
usable quantity of each tank is 109
gallons (413 liters).
There is an additional water tank aft
of the bulk cargo compartment. It can
also contain 109 gallons (-200ER
and -300).
Air pressure inside the tanks pushes
the potable water through the
distribution system to the lavatories
and galleys. The pressure comes
from the pneumatic system or a
compressor. A pressure switch on
the tank starts the compressor when
tank pressure is low. The
compressor does not operate when
you open the fill overflow valve.

19-10

The tank quantity sensors and


transmitters give information to:

The cabin services system


Service panel gages
Optional quantity preselect
systems (not shown).

The standard system configuration


has an aft potable water service
panel and a forward potable water
system drain panel. The aft service
panel is below the aft end of the aft
cargo compartment. The drain panel
is forward of and below the right
wing.
You use the aft panel to fill. You can
use the gage to monitor the quantity,
or fill the tanks until water comes out
of the tank overflow and drain.You
use both the forward and aft panels
to drain the system.

There is a quantity preselect option


(not shown). The controls and fill
connections can be on a dedicated
forward potable water service panel
below the number one left passenger
door, or on the aft potable water
service panel. You use a switch to
select the quantity. The fill valves
open. They close when the selected
quantity is in the tanks.
Gray Water System
The gray water system drains water
from the galley and lavatory sinks
through two drain masts on the
bottom of the fuselage. There are
restrictor valves in the system to
reduce air noise. Water pressure in
the lines opens the valves. They are
fail safe to the open position and are
open on the ground.

June 2003

Cabin Systems
Flush Control Unit

Flush Switch
Toilet

CSS

Potable
Water

Bypass Check Valve

Vacuum Blower

Logic Control
Module

Barometric Switch
Water Separator

Point Level Sensors


Waste Tank
Continuous Level Sensor
Legend:
Electrical

Tank Drain Valve

Flush Valve

Tank Drain
Connection

Tank Flush
Connection

Rinse Valve

Lavatory Waste System


Lavatory Waste System
Each lavatory has a vacuum toilet.
Three waste tanks outboard of the
left wall of the bulk cargo
compartment hold the waste. The
total waste capacity is 189 gallons for
the 777-200 and -200ER. The total
waste capacity is 229 gallons for the
777-300. The waste tank service
panel is on the bottom aft fuselage.
Waste lines connect the lavatories to
the waste tanks. Each tank gets
waste from a specified group of
lavatories.
A vacuum in the tank pulls the waste
from the toilet into the tank. Below
16,000 feet, a vacuum blower
causes the vacuum. Above 16,000
feet, the ambient atmosphere causes
the vacuum.

Each toilet has a flush switch that


connects to a flush control unit
(FCU). When a person pushes the
flush switch, the FCU starts the flush
cycle. During the flush cycle:

The waste moves from the toilet


into the waste tank
Potable water flushes the toilet.

There are two tank full sensors and a


logic control module (LCM) for each
tank. If a tank is full, the LCM:

Prevents operation of the


lavatories that connect to that
tank
Shows a tank full message on
the CSS.

There is a continuous level sensor


and two point level sensors on each
tank. Sensor information goes to an
LCM on each tank. Continuous level
sensor information shows on the
CSS. The point level sensor
information is used to stop toilet
operation when a tank is full.
The waste tank service panel has
one drain connection. It has a drain
handle and a rinse connection for
each of the three tanks. This lets the
ground crew do servicing of each
tank independently from the other
tanks.

There are two vacuum blowers. One


is for the forward tank, and the other
is for the mid and aft tanks.
June 2003

19-11

MAIN
MENU

PREVIOUS
MENU

LAVATORY/WASTE TANK STATUS

LAVATORIES
FWD DR 1L VACANT
AFT DR 1R OCCUPIED
FWD DR 2L VACANT
FWD DR 3R INOP

WASTE TANK 1
E 1/8

1/4

E 1/8

1/4

E 1/8

1/4

LAVATORIES

CSS Control
Panel

FWD DR 1R OCCUPIED
AFT DR 2R VACANT
DR 3 CTR L VACANT
FWD DR 4R VACANT

MAIN
MENU

PREVIOUS
MENU

1/8

1/2

5/8

3/4

7/8

7/8

7/8

WASTE TANK 2

LAVATORIES
DR 3 CTR R INOP
FWD DR 4L INOP
AFT DR 4L INOP
DR 4 CTR INOP

3/8

3/8

1/2

5/8

3/4

WASTE TANK 3
3/8

1/2

5/8

3/4

POTABLE WATER STATUS


1/4

3/8

1/2

5/8

3/4

7/8

82

GALLONS REMAINING

65

GALLONS REQUIRED FOR TAKEOFF

CSS Waste System Page

CSS Potable Water System Page

Water and Waste Systems Display


Water and Waste Systems
Displays
The potable water system and the
lavatory waste system each have a
CSS page. The potable water
system page shows the quantity of
potable water in both tanks.
The lavatory waste system page
shows the waste level in each waste
tank. It also shows which lavatories:

Are in use
Are not in use
Have been locked by an
attendant because they are
inoperative.

19-12

June 2003

Cabin Systems
Equipment Center
Access Doors

Cargo Door (3)


Fueling Control
Panel (Optional)

Passenger
Entry Door
1

Nose Landing
Gear Door
Environmental Control
System (ECS) Low Pressure
Connection Access Door (2)

External Ground
Power Supply Door
Forward Potable Water
System Drain Panel Door

ECS High Pressure


Connection Access Door

ECS Access Door (2)


Hydraulic
Service
Door
Auxiliary Power
Unit (APU)
Access Doors

Potable Water
Service Panel
Door

Main Landing
Gear Door (2)

Fueling Control
Panel

Forward Potable
Water Service
Panel (Optional)
ADP Filter
Access Door
ADP Pressure
Relief Door
1

Air-Driven Pump (ADP)


Exhaust Access Door

8 on -200, 10 on -300

Control Bay
Access Door
Service
Access Door
Waste Tank Service
Access Door

Doors
Doors
Doors give access to these areas:

Passenger and flight


compartments
Cargo compartments
Equipment centers
Service areas.

June 2003

19-13

Mode Select Lever

Mode Select
Mechanism

Window
Vent Door
Mechanism
Door Hinge

Programming
Chain Mechanism
Hold-Open
Mechanism

EPAS Reservoir
EPAS Battery
Hold Open
Release Handle

Slide Pack (With


Stored Gas Bottle
and Pressure Gauge)

Interior Door
Handle

FWD

Girt Bar
Mechanism (2)

Internal View of
Door Mechanisms

Passenger and Service Entry Doors


Entry Doors
There are four passenger entry
doors on each side of the airplane
(-200).
There are five passenger entry doors
on each side of the airplane (-300).
The overwing doors are for
emergency use only.
The door openings have sufficient
width to let two people go through the
door at the same time.
The doors are plug type that open
outward. There are stops on the door
and on the door frame. The door
stops put the pressurization load on
the frame stops.

19-14

All of the doors operate manually


from inside and outside of the
airplane. A single hinge arm attaches
the middle of the door to the door
frame. The mechanism that connects
the door to the hinge permits this
door movement:

Move up and down


Turn in relation to the hinge arm.

As the door opens, it first moves up


so the door stops can move over the
frame stops. The door then moves
outward and forward. The
programming mechanism chain
keeps the inboard side of the door
toward the airplane. The door does
not turn in relation to the airplane.
The inboard side of the door always
faces inboard.

A hold-open mechanism holds the


door in the open position.
The mode select lever lets the cabin
attendants arm the emergency
power assist system (EPAS) and the
escape slides. The EPAS uses
compressed gas from a reservoir to
help open the doors in an
emergency. The gas goes from the
reservoir to an actuator (not shown).
The actuator connects to the
programming chain. It uses the chain
to open the door.
Each door has a flight lock assembly
that locks the door when airspeed is
more than 80 knots.

June 2003

Cabin Systems

Emergency Escape System (-200)


Emergency Escape System
There is an escape slide/raft at each
passenger entry door. A bustle
covers each slide/raft.
Each slide/raft has two passenger
lanes. Lights on the end of the slides
come on when the slides are inflated.
They are safe for use in winds up to
25 knots, and with the collapse of
one or more of the landing gear.

As the door opens, the slide/raft


releases from the door. This starts
the slide/raft inflation sequence.
When you use the external door
handle, the EPAS and escape slide
automatically disarm.

The mode select lever on the door


lets the cabin attendants arm the
emergency power assist system
(EPAS) and the escape slides. The
EPAS opens the door when it is
armed and you move the interior
door handle to the open position.

June 2003

19-15

Over-Wing Door

Slide Compartment

Off-Wing Slide

Off-Wing Escape System (777-300)


Off-Wing Escape System
The off-wing escape system lets
passengers and crew get off the wing
after they go out of the airplane
through the number three passenger
entry (over-wing) door.
There is an off-wing slide for each
wing. The slide is stowed in a
compartment aft of the wing in the
wing-to-body fairing. The inflation
bottle is in a compartment in the
wing-to-body fairing below the wing.
Operation of the over-wing door is
the same as the other passenger
entry doors. The off-wing slide
inflates when you open the door in
the armed mode.

19-16

June 2003

Cabin Systems and Lighting


Door
28V DC
L BUS

Chime
Module
Deadbolt
Handles And
Door Lock
Handle

(RED)
(AMBER)

Pressure Sensor

(GREEN)

Strike Assembly

Strike Assembly
(In Door Post)

Chime Module Operational Mode


- Controls Strike Assembly
- Controls Indications

Keypad

FWD
Flight Compartment
(Looking Aft)

FLT DECK DOOR


AUTO
UNLKD
LOCK
FAIL
AUTO
UNLK

Door

Keypad

Chime
Module

Control Panel (P8)

Lock Pin

Deadbolt
Key Lock
And Door
Handle
FWD

Chime Module Program Mode


- Programs Access Code For Keypad
- Programs Time Delays

DENY

Strike
(Catch Position)

Decompression
Panel (2)

Door Post

Door Lock Bolt


(Connects To Forward
Door Lock Handle Only)

Door
FWD
Door Post Area
(Top View)

Passenger Compartment
(Looking Forward)

Flight Compartment Door


Flight Compartment door
The flight compartment door divides
the flight compartment from the
passenger cabin. The door and the
structure around the door gives
ballistic and intruder protection to the
flight compartment. The door opens
forward into the flight compartment.
The mechanical part of the door has
these main components:

Decompression panel (2)


Door lock assembly
Deadbolt assembly.

The decompression panels open aft


if the passenger cabin has a loss of
pressurization.
The door lock assembly has one
handle on the flight compartment
side of the door that operates the
door lock bolt. The handle on the
passenger side of the door lets you

June 2003

move the door but does not connect


to the door lock bolt.
The deadbolt assembly has handles
on the forward side of the door and a
key lock on the aft side of the door.
The handles let you extend or retract
a deadbolt and let you enable or
disable key operation.
The electrical part of the flight
compartment door lock system has
these components:

Chime module
Door Strike assembly
Pressure sensor
Control Panel
Keypad.

The chime module is a computer that


controls the system. It controls the
strike assembly and it controls
system indications. It also lets you
program the access code and
system time delays.

The strike assembly has a solenoid


that extends or retacts a pin to lock or
release the strike.
The pressure sensor detects a loss
of pressurization in the flight
compartment. If there is a loss of
pressurization, the sensor opens the
circuit to the solenoid in the strike
assembly. This releases the strike
and lets the door open to equalize
pressure.
The pilots can control the strike
assembly with a switch on the control
panel. Lights on the control panel
indicate system status.
A keypad lets authorized people go
into the flight compartment after they
enter the correct access code.
Power to lock the strike comes from
28 VDC left bus. If power is lost, the
door strike release. This is a safety
feature that release the door strike in
an emergency.
17-17

Bulk Cargo Door

Small Cargo Door

Large Cargo Door

Cargo Doors
Cargo Doors

SMALL CARGO DOOR

LARGE CARGO DOOR

BULK CARGO DOOR

The small cargo door is standard on


the aft cargo compartment. The door
opening lets you load cargo in
containers and one-half size pallets.

The large cargo door is standard on


the forward cargo compartment, and
optional on the aft. The size of the
door opening is sufficient for cargo
on pallets.

The bulk cargo door opening lets you


load items that are not in containers
or on pallets.
The door is a plug type that opens
inward and upward. Two hinge arms
attach the top of the door to the
airplane. There are exterior and
interior handles. The door operates
manually. A counterbalance helps
you open the door.

The door opens outward. Two hinge


arms attach the top of the door to the
airplane. Electric actuators open and
close the door.
The door is a plug type. There are
stops on the door and door frame. As
the door closes, it lowers to a position
where the door stops are inboard of
the frame stops. When the airplane is
pressurized, the door stops put the
pressurization load on the frame
stops. This holds the door closed.

A continuous hinge along the top of


the door attaches it to the airplane.
The door opens outward.
The door is not a plug type door.
Latches and locks hold the door
closed. Electric actuators lock and
unlock, and open and close the door.
There are control panels inside and
outside of the compartment.

There are control panels inside and


outside of the compartment.

19-18

June 2003

Cabin Systems

FWD ACCESS

FWD ACCESS
E/E ACCESS

ENTRY 1L

E/E ACCESS

ENTRY 1R

ENTRY 1L

FWD CARGO
ENTRY 2L

ENTRY 2R

ENTRY 2L

ENTRY 3L

ENTRY 3L

ENTRY 4L

ENTRY 3R
AFT CARGO

777-200

ENTRY 2R

ENTRY 3R

ENTRY 4R
AFT CARGO

BULK CARGO
ENTRY 4L

ENTRY 1R
FWD CARGO

BULK CARGO
ENTRY 5L

ENTRY 4R

ENTRY 5R

777-300

Door Synoptic Display


Door Synoptic Display
The door synoptic display shows the
doors. An amber box shows an open
door. The box goes away when the
door is closed.
There is an option to show if a door is
in the manual (disarmed) or
automatic (armed) mode. The
symbol M identifies a door in the
manual mode. The symbol A
identifies a door in the automatic
mode.

June 2003

19-19

Door-Mounted
Flight Deck Windows 1
Windows

Passenger
Compartment
Windows

Overwing Passenger Entry Door on -300 Not Shown.

Windows
Windows
The flight deck has three windows on
each side. Number one window is in
the front. Number three window is in
the back. The number two window
opens from inside the flight deck.
There is a window in each passenger
entry door.
Passenger compartment windows
are along both sides of the
passenger compartment.

19-20

June 2003

Lights
Features

SERVICE AND CARGO LIGHTS

Flight Deck Lights

FLIGHT DECK LIGHTING

Flight Deck Light Controls

Panel lights give light to the


instruments for the flight crew. Each
flight crew position has a map light,
chart light, and a work table light.
Dome lights are in the ceiling of the
flight deck.

There are lights in all of the service


and cargo compartments for the
ground crew. Cargo loading lights
give light during cargo loading.The
cargo loading lights are on the
outside of the fuselage and on the
inside of the forward, aft, and bulk
cargo doors.

Exterior Lights

Exterior Light Controls

Lighting Control Displays

Service and Cargo Lights

EXTERIOR LIGHTS

EMERGENCY LIGHTS

Emergency Lights

Landing lights on the wings and nose


landing gear show the runway to the
flight crew. Anti-collision lights and
position lights show the airplane to
the flight crews in other airplanes.
Logo lights on the horizontal
stabilizers give light to the airline logo
on the vertical stabilizer.

Emergency lights show the


emergency escape routing to the
passengers and crew.

CABIN LIGHTING
The cabin services system (CSS)
controls the passenger cabin
lighting.

June 2003

20-1

Observer Map Lights


Dome Light
Dome Light
First Officer Chart Light
Center Aisle
Stand Flood Light
Captain Chart Light

First Officer Work


Table Light

Flight Crew
Map Lights

Captain Work
Table Light

Glareshield and Forward


Instrument Panel Floodlights

Floor Lights

Glareshield and Forward


Instrument Panel Floodlights

Flight Deck Lights


Flight Deck Lights
The flight deck has these lights:

Integral panel lights for all of the


instrument and circuit breaker
panels
Flood lights for all of the panels
except the overhead panel
Dome lights
Map lights for the flight crew and
observers
Chart lights for the captain and
first officer
Work table lights for the captain
and first officer
Floor lights
Utility lights for the observers.

20-2

June 2003

Lights
PASS SIGNS
SEAT BELTS
AUTO
ON

NO SMOKING
AUTO
OFF
ON

OVHD/
CB

OFF

MASTER
BRIGHT

STORM

DOME

ON
OFF
MIN
GLARESHIELD
PNL/FLOOD

PUSH
ON/OFF

LANDING
LEFT
OFF

NOSE
OFF

RIGHT
OFF

ON

ON
ON

Lighting Panel (P5)


AISLE STAND
PNL/FLOOD

HEATERS
SHOULDER
OFF

OFF

OFF

HIGH

SHOULDER
HIGH

HIGH

OFF

INBD DSPL/
WXR

HIGH

FWD PANEL BRIGHTNESS

FWD PANEL BRIGHTNESS


OUTBD
DSPL

HEATERS
FOOT
LOW

FOOT
LOW

PNL/
FLOOD

PNL/
FLOOD

INBD DSPL/
WXR

OUTBD
DSPL

P8 Aft Aisle Stand

P13 Left Sidewall Panel

P14 Right Sidewall Panel

Flight Deck Light Controls


Flight Deck Light Controls
The P5 overhead panel has controls
for these lights:

Panel and flood lights for the


glareshield instrument panel
Panel lights for the overhead
circuit breaker panel
Dome lights
Storm lighting
Master brightness control.

The storm lighting control lets you


turn on these lights to the full bright
level:

A master bright control on the P5


overhead panel lets you control all
of the panel and instrument lights
together. You can also use individual
controls for the panel lights.
The individual panel and flood light
controls for the forward instrument
panels are on the left and right
sidewall panels.
The individual panel and flood light
control for the aisle stand instrument
panel is on the aft end of the aisle
stand.

Dome
Flood
Lighted switches
System annunciator lights that
are on.

June 2003

20-3

White Anti-Collision
Light
Green Position
Light

White Position
Light
White Anti-Collision Light

Red Anti-Collision Lights

Logo Lights

White Position
Light

Landing Lights,
Taxi Lights

Wing
Illumination
Light

Runway
Turnoff
Light

Wing Landing
Light

Red Position Light

White
Anti-Collision
Light

Exterior Lights
Exterior Lights

The empennage has these lights:

The wings have these lights:

One white anti-collision light on


each wing tip
One red and one white position
light on the left wing tip
One green and one white
position light on the right wing tip
One main landing gear (MLG)
ground maneuver camera light
on the outboard flap outboard
support fairing on each wing
(777-300).

One white anti-collision light on


the aft end
Two logo lights on the top of each
horizontal stabilizer.

The nose gear strut has these lights:

Two landing lights


Two taxi lights
One nose landing gear (NLG)
ground maneuver camera light
(777-300).

The fuselage has these lights:

One red anti-collision light on the


top and one on the bottom
One landing light at the inboard
forward edge of each wing
One runway turnoff light located
with the landing light
One wing illumination light on
each side, forward of the wing.

20-4

June 2003

Lights

ANTI-ICE
PASS SIGNS
NO SMOKING
AUTO
ON

OVHD/
CB

WING
AUTO

SEAT BELTS
AUTO
ON

OFF

OFF

OFF

DOME

NAV

ENGINE
ON

R
AUTO

OFF

LOGO

WING

ON w

ON w

ON w

ON w

MIN

BEACON

OFF

ON w

STORM

OFF
GLARESHIELD
PNL/FLOOD

MASTER
BRIGHT

L
AUTO
ON

ON

IND LTS
TEST
BRT

PUSH
ON/OFF
DIM

LANDING
LEFT
OFF

NOSE
OFF

ON

RIGHT
OFF

RUNWAY TURNOFF
L
OFF R

ON

ON

TAXI
OFF

STROBE
OFF

ON

ON

ON

Anti-Ice/ Lighting Panel (P5)


Red Anti-Collision Lights
Wing Position Lights

Wing Illumination
Lights
White Anti-Collision
Lights

Exterior Light Controls


Exterior Light Controls
The P5 overhead panel has controls
for these exterior lights:

Landing lights
Red anti-collision lights (beacon)
Wing position lights (nav)
Logo lights
Wing illumination lights
White anti-collision lights (strobe)
Taxi lights
Runway turnoff lights.

June 2003

20-5

Ceiling and
Night Lights

MAIN
MENU

Reading Lights

LIGHTING MENU

CABIN LIGHTING
ENTRY WAY LIGHTS
READING LIGHTS

Sidewall Lights

CSS Panel
(Typical)

Passenger Cabin Lights


Passenger Cabin Lights
Ceiling lights are fluorescent tubes
above the outboard stowage bins.
The light reflects off of the ceiling
panels to light the passenger
compartment.

The cabin attendants use the cabin


services system (CSS) to control the
lights. They select the:

Night lights are incandescent bulbs


that are with some ceiling lights in the
cabin. They give a dim light when the
ceiling lights are off.
Reading lights are incandescent
bulbs in the passenger service units
above the passenger seats. There is
a light for each passenger.

20-6

Cabin lighting screen to set the


intensity of the ceiling lights or
set the night lights on or off
Entry lights screen to set the
entry on or off
Reading light screen to give
control of the lights to the
passengers, or to set the reading
lights on or off.

When the passengers have control,


they use individual controls at their
seats to control the reading lights.

June 2003

Lights

Nose Wheel Well


Forward Cargo
Compartment
Forward Cargo
Loading Light

Equipment
Centers
ECS
Compartments

Aft Cargo
Loading Light

Refuel Station
APU
Compartment

Aft Cargo
Compartment

Main
Wheel Wells

Bulk Cargo
Loading Light

Stabilizer
Compartment

Service and Cargo Lights


Service and Cargo Lights
The ground crew uses lights in these
locations:

Nose and main gear wheel wells


Equipment centers
ECS compartments
Refuel station
Cargo compartments
Stabilizer compartment
APU compartment.

There are cargo loading lights on the


fuselage aft of the cargo doors and
on the inside of the door.

June 2003

20-7

Aisle
Illumination
Light

EMER
LIGHTS
Exit
Signs

OFF
ARMED

ON

Emergency Lights (P5)

EMER
LIGHTS

Slide
Illumination
Lights

EMER
LIGHTS TEST

Attendants
Switch Panel
Floor Proximity Lights

P40 Service and APU Shutdown Panel

Emergency Lights
An EICAS advisory message shows
when:

All of the emergency lights come on


if one of the these occurs:

The passenger compartment has


these emergency lights:

Emergency Lights

Floor proximity lights on the sides


of the aisle seats
Aisle illumination lights in the
ceiling with the air conditioning
outlets
Exit signs above and adjacent to
the doors.

There are emergency escape slide


lights on the outside of the fuselage,
aft of the doors.
The emergency power supplies for
the lights are above each door.

The P5 emergency lights switch


is not set to the armed position
The attendants emergency light
switch is set to the on position.

The emergency lights switch on


the P5 is set to armed and the
electrical power fails
The emergency lights switch on
the P5 is set to on
The emergency lights switch on
the attendants panel is set to on.

These are the locations for the three


emergency light test switches:

The emergency lights in the area


near a passenger entry door will
come on if the door is opened in the
armed mode.

P40 on the nose gear


Attendants switch panel at the
left number one or two passenger
door
Attendants switch panel at the
left or right number four
passenger door.

The emergency light switch for the


flight crew is on the P5 overhead
panel. There is one emergency light
switch on the attendants panel. The
panel can be at the left number one
or two passenger door.

20-8

June 2003

Cargo
Features

Overview

CARGO HANDLING

Cargo Handling System

Forward and aft cargo compartments


hold certified and uncertified
containers. Bulk cargo compartment
holds loose baggage. Forward and
aft cargo handing systems let a
single operator load or unload
containers and pallets.
Two cargo handling system
controllers control the operation of
the cargo handling system
components.
FIRE RESISTANCE
Compartment sidewalls, ceilings,
and walkways are made of fire
resistant materials.
The compartments meet these classC requirements:

Sidewalls and ceilings contain


fire
Smoke detection system gives
warning to the flight compartment
Fire extinguishing system lets the
operator put fires out.

June 2003

21-1

Fwd Cargo
Compartment

LD-3

Aft Cargo
Compartment

Bulk Cargo
Compartment

LD-2
LD-3 (14) (777-200)
LD-3 (18) (777-200)
(20) (777-300)
(24) (777-300)
All LD-3 Containers
LD-1

LD-6

LD-3 (14) (777-200)


(20) (777-300)

Size M
Pallets (6) (777-200)
(8) (777-300)

Pallets And Containers


LD-5
LD-10
LD-11
Size M
Pallets (6) (777-200)
(8) (777-300)

Pallets:
Size A 125 in x 88 in
Size M 125 in x 96 in
1/2 Size 60.4 in x 61.5 in
1/2 Size 60.4 in x 125 in
1/2 Size 96 in x 61.5 in

Size M
Pallets (4) (777-200)
(6) (777-300)
All Pallets*

Note:
* Requires Optional 104-Inch Wide Aft Cargo Door

Compartment Features and Capacities


Cargo Compartments
These are the three cargo
compartments in the lower deck:

Forward cargo compartment


Aft cargo compartment
Bulk cargo compartment.

The forward and aft cargo


compartments hold certified and
non-certified unit load devices (ULD).
The forward cargo compartment
holds these ULDs:

LD-1
LD-2
LD-3
LD-5
LD-6
LD-7
LD-9
LD-10
LD-11
Pallets (size A, M, and 1/2 size).

21-2

The aft cargo compartment holds


these ULDs:

LD-1
LD-2
LD-3
LD-5
LD-6
LD-10
LD-11
1/2 size pallets.

Optional equipment let both


compartments hold these ULDs:

LD-4
LD-8.

The aft cargo compartment holds the


larger ULDs if the airplane has the
optional aft large cargo door.
The forward and aft cargo
compartments have a cargo handling
system.

A divider net separates the bulk


cargo compartment from the aft
cargo compartment.
The cargo compartments have a
lining of fire resistant material.
Cargo Capacities
The capacity of the forward cargo
compartment of the 777-200 is 2,844
cubic feet (80.5 cubic meters). The
capacity of the forward cargo
compartment of the 777-300 is 3,792
cubic feet (107.4 cubic meters).
The capacity of the aft cargo
compartment of the 777-200 is 2,212
cubic feet (62.6 cubic meters). The
capacity of the aft cargo
compartment of the 777-300 is 3,160
cubic feet (89.5 cubic meters).
The capacity of the bulk cargo
compartment is 600 cubic feet (17
cubic meters).
June 2003

Cargo
Aft Cargo Handling
System

Forward Cargo Handling


System

Secondary Joystick

Cargo Handling
Accessory Panel
Cargo System
Controller

Center Stop/Lock
Cargo
Control
Joystick

Lateral Guide

*Auxiliary Stop/Lock
*Auxiliary Guide

Cargo Handling
Control Panel
Powered Drive Unit

Rollout Stop/Lock
Retractable Guide
Roller/Lock

Note:
* Option for LD-4 / LD-8 containers

Cargo Handling System


Cargo Handling System
A cargo handling system is in the
forward and the aft cargo
compartments. The operator uses an
external joystick and control panel to
set the configuration and operate the
system. The operator may also use a
secondary joystick in the ceiling of
the compartment to operate the
system.
The LD-4/LD-8 option adds these:

Auxiliary Guides
Auxiliary Lock/Stops.

Auxiliary guides and stop/locks give


lateral and longitudinal restraint for
LD-4/LD-8 containers.
Center lock/stops give separation
and vertical restraint for LD-3
containers.

The lateral guides give these


functions:

A joystick above the cargo handling


control panel operates the PDUs for
lateral and longitudinal movement of
cargo.

Powered drive units (PDUs) move


the ULDs laterally and longitudinally.
Rollout stop/locks give lateral and
vertical restraint.
The retractable guide roller/lock
guides containers through the
doorway and gives vertical restraint
for pallets and containers.
There are switches on the cargo
handling control panel and a switch
near the cargo handling accessory
panel. The switches let the operator
set the configuration of the system
for these functions:

June 2003

Lateral guidance for container


Longitudinal restraint for all ULDs
Vertical restraint for pallets.

Type of ULD
PDU operation.

The secondary joystick lets the


operator move ULDs longitudinally
from inside the cargo compartment.
The cargo handling system also has
these components:

Guides
Rollers
Stops/Locks
Restraints.

The operator moves the ULDs


manually if the PDUs do not operate.

System power on/off


Lock, load or unload
21-3

Abbreviations and Acronyms


A

AIV

accumulator isolation
valve

A/B

autobrake

AMI

airline modifiable
information

ac

alternating current
AMU

ACAC

air cooled air cooler

ACARS

aircraft communications
addressing and reporting
system

ACC

active clearance control

acclrm

accelerometer

ACE

actuator control
electronics

ACIPS

airfoil and cowl ice


protection system

ACM

air cycle machine

ACMF

airplane condition
monitoring function

ACMS

airplane condition
monitoring system

ACMP

alternating current motor


pump

ACP

audio control panel

ADC

air data computer

ADF

automatic direction
finder

ADIRS

air data inertial reference


system

BPCU

bus power control unit

BSCU

brake system control unit

BSU

beam steering unit

audio management unit

BSU

bypass switch unit

ANS

ambient noise sensor

BTB

bus tie breaker

AOA

angle of attack

BTMU

brake temperature
monitor unit

AOC

air/oil cooler

BU

back up

AOHE

air/oil heat exchanger

APB

auxiliary power breaker

APP

approach

APU

auxiliary power unit

CACP

cabin area control panel

APUC

auxiliary power unit


controller

CAH

cabin attendant handset

CAPT

captain

ARINC

Aeronautical Radio,
Incorporated

CCB

converter circuit breaker

CCD

cursor control device

ASCPC

air supply and cabin


pressure controllers

CCR

credit card reader

ASG

ARINC signal gateway

CDG

configuration database
generator

ASM

autothrottle servo motor


CDU

control display unit

ASSV

alternate source
selection valve

CFS

cabin file server

ATC

air traffic control

CHG

charge

ATS

air turbine starter

CHIS

center hydraulic isolation


system

ATT

attitude
CI

cabin interphone

A/T

autothrottle
CLB

climb

AVLAN

avionics local area


network

CMCF

central maintenance
computing function

airborne vibration
monitor

CMCS

central maintenance
computing system

CMD

command Comm
communication

COMP

compressor

CON

continuous

ADIRU

air data inertial reference


unit

ADM

air data module

ADP

air driven pump

AES

aircraft earth station

AWS

attendant work station

AFDC

autopilot flight director


computer

A/P

autopilot

AFDS

autopilot flight director


system

AGS

air/ground system

BAP

bank angle protection

CPC

cabin pressure controller

AIL

aileron

BITE

built-in test equipment

CPM

core processor module

AIMS

airplane information
management system

BMM

boarding music machine

cprsr

compressor

BMV

brake metering valve

CPS

cabin pressure sensor

June 2003

AVM

Abbreviations and Acronyms


CRT

cathode ray tube

DSF

display system function

ERU

engine relay unit

CSC

cargo system controller

DSP

display select panel

ETOPS

CSCP

cabin system control


panel

DU

display unit

extended range
operation with twoengine airplanes

CSDS

cargo smoke detection


system

CSS

cabin services system

EAI

engine anti-ice

FADEC

CSMU

cabin system
management unit

ECS

environmental control
system

full authority digital


electronic control

FBW

fly-by-wire

CTAI

cowl thermal anti-icing

ECSL

FCDC

flight controls dc

CTC

cabin temperature
controller

left environmental control


system card

ECSMC

ECS miscellaneous card

FDAF

flight data acquisition


function

ECSR

right environmental
control system card

FDH

flight deck handset

EDI

engine data interface

FDR

flight data recorder

EDIF

engine data interface


function

FDRS

flight data recorder


system

EDIU

engine data interface unit

FLCH

flight level change

EDP

engine driven pump

FLPRN

flaperon

electronic engine control


(PW, GE)

flt ctrl

flight control

flt inst

flight instrument

CTU

cabin
telecommunications unit

dc

direct current

DCGF

data conversion gateway


function

DCMF

data communication
management function

EEC

DCMS

data communication
management system

EEC

electronic engine
controller (RR)

FMCF

flight management
computing function

DCV

directional control valve

EEU

ELMS electronics unit

FMCS

ded

dedicated

EFIS

electronic flight
instrument system

flight management
computing system

FMU

fuel metering unit

DFDAF

digital flight data


acquisition function

EFIS CP

EFIS control panel

F/O

first officer

DFDR

digital flight data recorder

EGT

exhaust gas temperature

F/O

fuel/oil (cooler)

DH

decision height

EICAS

engine indication and


crew alerting system

FOC

fuel/oil cooler

disch

discharge

FPA

flight path angle

ELMS

DLGF

data load gateway


function

electrical load
management system

FPV

flight path vector

EMC

entertainment
multiplexer controller

FQIS

fuel quantity indicating


system

EP

external power

FQPU

fuel quantity processor


unit

EPC

external power contactor

FREQ

frequency

EPCS

electronic propulsion
control system

FSEU

flap slat electronics unit

EPR

engine pressure ratio

F/D

flight director

ERP

eye reference point

DLODS

duct leak and overheat


detection

DLS

data load system

DME

distance measuring
equipment

DMM

data memory module

DMS

debris monitoring sensor

June 2003

Abbreviations and Acronyms


G

IDG

integrated drive
generator

GBST

IDS

ice detection system

IFE

in-flight entertainment

IGV

inlet guide vane

IGW

increased gross weight

ILS

instrument landing
system

ground based software


tool

GCB

generator circuit breaker

GCU

generator control unit

GES

ground earth station

GG

graphics generator

ground handling

ind

indicator

GND

ground

INPH

interphone

GPS

global positioning system

IOM

input/output module

GPSSU

global positioning system


sensor unit

IP
IPC

GPWC

ground proximity warning


computer

GPWS

ground proximity warning


system

LRM

line replaceable module

LRU

line replaceable unit

main equipment center

MES

main engine start

IPT

intermediate pressure
turbine

MFD

multi-function display

MGSCU
IRP

integrated refuel panel

main gear steering


control unit

IRS

inertial reference system

MLW

maximum landing weight

IRU

inertial reference unit

MMR

multi-mode receiver

isolation

HLCS

high lift control system

ISO

HF

high frequency

isolation IV isolation
valve

HP

high pressure

HPA

high power amplifier

HPC

high pressure
compressor

HPSOV

high pressure shutoff


valve

IVD

interactive video
downloader

J
K
KB

keyboard

kVA

kilovolt-ampere

heat exchanger

L
I

June 2003

low pressure turbine

MEC

ISLN

intercabinet

LPT

intermediate pressure
compressor

high intensity radiated


field

IC

low pressure compressor

mode control panel

HIRF

HX

LPC

MCP

Integrated standby flight


display

hydraulic interface
module

localizer

intermediate pressure

ISFD

HYDIM

LOC

maintenance access
terminal

heading

high pressure turbine

left outboard

MAT

HDG

HPT

LOB

LCD

liquid crystal display

LIB

left inboard

LNA

low noise amplifier

N
NAVAID

navigational aid

ND

navigation display

O
OAT

outside air temperature

OEU

overhead electronics
units

OPAS

overhead panel ARINC


629 system

OPBC

overhead panel bus


controller

OVRD

override

OPR

once per revolution

OPU

overspeed protection
unit

oxy

oxygen

Abbreviations and Acronyms


P
PA

passenger address

PA/CI

passenger address/cabin
interphone

PC

personal computer

PCU

passenger control unit

PCU

power control unit

U
ULD

unit load device

UTC

universal time
(coordinated)

WEU

warning electronic unit

WHCU

window heat control unit

WOW

weight on wheels

WPT

waypoint

WTAI

wing thermal anti-icing

WXR

weather radar

X
xdcr

transducer xfrtransfer
xmttransmit

xmtr

transmitter

V
Z
VAU

voltage averaging unit

VBV

variable bypass valve

VEP

video entertainment
player

VHF

very high frequency

VIGV

variable integral guide


vane

VLV

valve

VOR

VHF omnidirectional
ranging

VOR/MB

VOR/ marker beacon

VOS

velocity of sound

V/S

vertical speed

VSCF

variable speed constant


frequency

VSV

variable stator vane

VTO

volumetric top-off

ZMU

zone management unit

W
WAI

wing anti-ice

WES

warning electronic
system

June 2003