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HOW WE DO IT:

A prison teams
aeration solution
PAGE 40

tpomag.com
OCTOBER 2016

HEARTS AND MINDS:

A spooky time in Louisville


PAGE 16

TECH TALK:

The power of microscopy


PAGE 36
Joe Creaghe
Operations/Maintenance Superintendent
Estes Park, Colo.

Performance

in Paradise

PAGE 20

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contents

October 2016

top performers:
WASTEWATER: PLANT Page 42

Pulling Together

A major plant upgrade didnt keep the team at a Tulsa clean-water plant from
meeting permit limits and earning a Platinum Peak Performance Award.
By Trude Witham
OPERATOR Page 30

30

42
on the cover

Joe Creaghe and his team at the


Upper Thompson Sanitation
District in Colorado deal with
wastewater flows that increase
significantly in tourist season.
Staff members routinely solve
problems, save money and
improve operations with ingenuity
and teamwork and won a 2015 Plant Performance
Award. (Photography by Carl Scofield)

20

12

In the Loop

Rob Scott and his team make sure the UConn Reclaimed Water Facility
lives up to its role in sustainable water use on a fast-growing campus.
By Ted J. Rulseh
WATER: OPERATOR Page 12

Crisis-Tested

Justin Maughan led a team effort to meet a water-contamination challenge,


earning praise from local officials and citizens and winning a water
operations award.
By Jack Powell
WASTEWATER: PLANT Page 20

Performance in Paradise

The staff at a Colorado sanitation district delivers award-winning


excellence with ingenious problem-solving and dedicated teamwork.
By Steve Frank
C

LETS BE CLEAR Page 8

Full Circle?

Clean-water professionals have long looked


at stormwater as an entirely separate issue.
Important signs indicate that is changing.
By Ted J. Rulseh, Editor
@TPOMAG.COM Page 10

Visit daily for exclusive news, features and blogs.


HEARTS AND MINDS Page 16

A Haunting Experience

Zombies, ghosts and ghouls take over Louisvilles


Crescent Hill Water Treatment Plant, and learn
about treatment in the process.
By Craig Mandli
SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS Page 28

Lofty Goals

The Twin Cities Metro Council looks everywhere for opportunities to save energy and
deploy renewable energy sources.

IN MY WORDS Page 52

PRODUCT NEWS Page 80

Over nearly two decades, Ned Beecher and


NEBRA have helped elevate public debate about
biosolids and bring recycling into the mainstream of farming practice.

Product Spotlight Water: Hach portable parallel


analyzer tests multiple parameters at once
Product Spotlight Wastewater: Hayward
injection valves and quills keep process
chemicals away from inner pipe walls

By Ted J. Rulseh

By Ed Wodalski

TECHNOLOGY DEEP DIVE Page 56

WORTH NOTING Page 84

True Believers

An Aid to Digestion

PONDUS process from CNP helps anaerobic


digesters produce more biogas while also
improving dewatering efficiency and reducing
polymer consumption.
By Ted J. Rulseh
PRODUCT FOCUS Page 62

Tanks, Structures and Components


By Craig Mandli
CASE STUDIES Page 68

Tanks, Structures and Components

By Doug Day

By Craig Mandli

TECH TALK Page 36

WWETT SPOTLIGHT Page 74

Revisiting an Old Friend


Regular microscopic examination of MLSS
can give operators valuable information to help
prevent or correct process upsets.

Wide Range of Uses

Durable, portable trash pump from Global Pump


can be used for a variety of wastewater
applications.

By Ron Trygar, CET

By Craig Mandli

HOW WE DO IT: WASTEWATER Page 40

INDUSTRY NEWS Page 78

Inmate Ingenuity

Operators of the water reclaim plant in a


California prison devise a creative solution to
provide denitrification and meet effluent
standards for off-grounds discharge.
By Ted J. Rulseh

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

People/Awards; Events

coming next month: November 2016


FOCUS: Treatment and Filtration
Lets Be Clear: The austerity trap
Top Performers:
Wastewater Biosolids: Class A success in
Sumner, Washington
Water Plant: Source water protection in
Kankakee, Illinois
Water Plant: Dual directors awards in
Marshalltown, Iowa
Wastewater Plant: Net-positive energy in
Hayward, California
Sustainable Operations: Smart aeration in
Wetumpka, Alabama
In My Words: New approaches to nutrient removal
Tech Talk: Composting insights in Albany, Oregon
PlantScapes: Living fence in Havre de Grace, Maryland
Technology Deep Dive: DNA sequencing for microbial

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tpomag.com October 2016

lets be clear

Full Circle?
CLEAN-WATER PROFESSIONALS HAVE LONG LOOKED
AT STORMWATER AS AN ENTIRELY SEPARATE ISSUE.
IMPORTANT SIGNS INDICATE THAT IS CHANGING.
By Ted J. Rulseh, Editor

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

DEDICATED TO WASTEWATER & WATER TREATMENT PROFESSIONALS

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TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

nce upon a time, sewage and stormwater in cities


flowed through the same pipes to treatment plants.
The inevitable result was overloading of those plants
during heavy storms, leading to severe water pollution.
Communities then spent years and
billions of dollars creating mostly
separate stormwater and wastewater
conveyances.
Now, clean-water agencies are
looking again at stormwater. No less
an authority than the Water Environment Federation has released a report,
Rainfall to Results: The Future of Stormwater. There are good reasons for this.
The WEF report notes that stormwater is the only growing source of
water pollution in many watersheds
throughout North America. This is
because industries and municipalities alike now operate sophisticated
treatment plants the cleanup of
plant effluent is reaching the point of
diminishing returns.
Much of the pollution now entering our waters is carried
in runoff from farmscapes and city lawns and streets. If were
serious about taking clean water to the next level, we have to
address stormwater. Phosphorus in runoff is a major concern.

WHOS RESPONSIBLE?
That being the case, just who should take care of stormwater? A separate utility? A utility somehow connected with
the wastewater side? The latter idea makes a certain amount
of sense, given that treatment plants increasingly look
toward nutrient trading and adaptive management upstream
as alternatives to costly new processes (see In My Words,
August 2016 TPO).
The thing about stormwater is that it doesnt observe
municipal boundaries. The waters flowing through or bordering Any City, USA, arent affected just by the rain that
falls on the cities. Watershed approaches to the problem are
essential that isnt news.
As the WEF report observes, the common approach to
stormwater used to be carrying runoff away as fast as possible. Now the emphasis is shifting toward handling as much
runoff as possible right where the rain falls. How exactly to
do that is the subject of the report.

SETTING A VISION
The WEF report tacitly acknowledges that stormwater
has traditionally been treated as the poor stepchild of wastewater and drinking water. It hasnt received nearly the attention or the funding as those other two components of the
urban water system.
Suppose that were to change. Suppose that, as the WEF
report envisions, stormwater were managed at the watershed
scale. Suppose that stormwater governance were rigorous
and the programs and agencies responsible fully funded.
Suppose that best practices in managing stormwater were
aggressively researched, selected and deployed.

uch of the pollution now entering our


waters is carried in runoff from farmscapes
and city lawns and streets. If were serious about
taking clean water to the next level, we have to
address stormwater.

Finally, suppose that stormwater systems were overseen


by a workforce well qualified to install, inspect, operate,
maintain and repair the infrastructure. All that looks like a
recipe for progress. But what about looking beyond management and toward reuse? Theres the potential role for professionals on the water and wastewater treatment sides.

ANOTHER RESOURCE?
Can stormwater become a resource to be used, instead of
just something to be managed? That idea was planted in my
head by Melissa Meeker, CEO of the new Water Environment and Reuse Foundation (see In My Words, September
2016 TPO).
Imagine a community where water is scarce capturing
and reusing not only its wastewater but the rain that falls.
There are logistical issues involved, of course. We surely
dont want to go back to the days of combined sewers. There
would be challenges in getting the stormwater to a place
where it can be routed into treatment.
And of course, treatment itself poses issues. First-flush
stormwater is pretty nasty stuff, full of gasoline, oil, tire dust
and other pollutants from vehicles, plus traces of herbicides,
pesticides, pet waste and who knows what else. On the other
hand, todays treatment technologies can do remarkable
things (albeit at a price).
The point is that it behooves society, and people in the
water professions, to bring stormwater into the tent as something to be handled with the same caliber of concern and
investment as drinking water and wastewater. Stormwater is
not something thats off to the side. Today more than ever, it
is front and center in its impacts. It deserves our full attention. Were past the time when any water professional can
look at stormwater as just someone elses concern.

Its your magazine.


Tell your story.
TPO welcomes news about your wastewater or water treatment operation.

Send your ideas to editor@tpomag.com or call 877/953-3301


FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

@tpomag.com

Visit the site daily for new, exclusive content. Read our blogs, find resources and get the most out of TPO magazine.

OVERHEARD ONLINE

Clean water, or the lack


thereof is a real problem.
Practicing water efficiency
is an action we can all take to
prolong our local water supplies.

4 Evolved Pokemon That Could Protect Our Water


Tpomag.com/featured

OPERATOR HEROES

The Tale of Smoke, Fire and Saving a Plant


RUNOFF SOLUTIONS

Bring on the Mud Chasers


The fight against stormwater runoff is taking a new shape in
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. There, a brand-new group, dubbed the
Mud Chasers, will be out in rain events, helping the local treatment plant and watershed officials track down nonpoint source
runoff. Learn more about this unique program and see how the
fight against phosphorus runoff is becoming a community effort.
Tpomag.com/featured

Earlier this summer, a massive


fire that began southwest of Fort
McMurray, Alberta, ripped across
1.5 million acres, destroying
about 2,400 homes and buildings. In this online exclusive,
find out how the operators in
Fort McMurray worked 16- to
20-hour shifts to save their plant
from the wildfire now known
simply as The Beast.
Tpomag.com/featured

MOSQUITO CONTROL

How A Texas Utility is


Fighting the Zika Virus
In El Paso, Texas, stopping the spread of the
Zika virus means controlling prime mosquito
breeding areas in stormwater ponds. Find out
how the citys water utility is using a threepronged approach including public education
to eliminate standing water.
Tpomag.com/featured

10

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Join the Discussion


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and youll stay in the loop on topics
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tpomag.com October 2016

11

top performer
water: OPERATOR

CRISIS-TESTED
JUSTIN MAUGHAN LED A TEAM EFFORT TO MEET A WATER-CONTAMINATION CHALLENGE, EARNING
PRAISE FROM LOCAL OFFICIALS AND CITIZENS AND WINNING A WATER OPERATIONS AWARD
STORY: Jack Powell | PHOTOGRAPHY: Sallie Shatz

IMAGINE, YOURE NEW TO YOUR JOB


AND YOU GET HIT WITH A MISHAP

that knocks out your citys water supply for nearly


a week. Thats what happened to Justin Maughan,
P.E., Public Works director in Nibley, Utah.
A diesel oil spill into a spring in April 2015 contaminated the communitys water supply. Maughan
and colleagues worked day and night to diagnose
and correct the problem, restoring normal water
quality and service to customers.
Maughans cool head, nonstop work and analytical approach met the test and gained him recognition. For his handling of the crisis, Maughan received
the 2016 Water Operator of the Year award from the
Rural Water Association of Utah.

sewer operator certifications. We have two deep


wells and a spring source called Yeates Spring. We
get the water, chlorinate it and move it into our storage tanks and into the distribution system. Collectively, the wells put out 3,300 gpm, the spring puts
out about 350 gpm, and our three tanks collectively
hold 3.5 million gallons. We serve 1,600 connections, a population of about 6,000.

ENGINEERING SKILLS

Before Maughan became Public Works director


in September 2014, he spent nearly six years in the
Engineering Department of Logan, a city of 49,000
about 80 miles north of Salt Lake City. It was his
first job after graduating in 2009 from Utah State
University in Logan with a masters degree in civil
and environmental engineering and a bachelors in
QUICK ACTION
the same discipline.
Alan Luce, North Logan Public Works director,
He took the directors position because he thought
and Mike Grunig, Hyde Park Public Works direcit would be a good career choice to move into a city
tor, nominated Maughan for the award. They cited
thats growing so fast. Incorporated in 1935, the
his fast response and heads-up actions over six days,
community was named after Charles W. Nibley, a
from an April 22 do not use order to the all clear
bishop in the Mormon church. A quiet, rural submessage on April 28.
urb of Logan with six parks, three elementary schools
Grunig wrote that Maughans quick actions
and a few businesses, Nibley has doubled in popuand knowledge of the system contained and prelation over the last 10 years.
vented a catastrophic event. Luce saluted Maughan
Besides, water is a good field, says Maughan.
for organizing his own staff and coordinating
I
dont
think many people realize what an imporresources from other cities, counties, the state, the
Justin Maughan, P.E., Public Works director in
tant job water operators do. Of course, theyd have
Rural Water Association and the Utah Water &
Nibley, Utah.
a much better understanding if they went through
Wastewater Agency Response Network. Because
what we experienced here in Nibley, where we were without water for a week.
of his remarkable capability, the residents of the city were able to enjoy clean
drinking water again, Luce wrote. Several operators from other cities took
note of his abilities and focused effort.
ACCIDENTAL SPILL
Thats high praise for a guy who doesnt consider himself a true water
The diesel spill happened when a farmer was driving a truck on the access
operator. Nibley has no full-blown water treatment plant, says Maughan,
road that goes past Yeates Spring and up to the water tanks. For some reason,
a Nibley native who has Grade IV (highest) water operator and Grade IV
his brakes locked and two tires slipped off the road, causing the truck to tilt

12

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

I dont think many


people realize what an
important job water operators
do. Of course, theyd have a
much better understanding if
they went through what we
experienced here in Nibley,
where we were without water
for a week.

JUSTIN MAUGHAN
Justin Maughans fast action and creative solutions to a diesel truck spill
won him the 2016 Water Operator of the Year award from the Rural Water
Association of Utah. Hes shown checking the oil on a well pump motor
(US Motors Nidec Motor Corporation).

Justin Maughan, Nibley (Utah)


Public Works Department
POSITION: |

Public Works director


Seven years (two years in Nibley)
DUTIES: | Oversee citys water, sewer, parks and road systems
EDUCATION: Bachelors and masters degrees, civil and environmental
engineering, Utah State University
CERTIFICATIONS: Grade IV Water Operator, Grade IV Sewer Operator,
Backflow Technician I
GOALS: | Stay in Nibley and continue to work with a fantastic team
ANNUAL BUDGET: | $4 million (operations)
GPS COORDINATES: | Latitude: 414030.53N; longitude: 1115051.72W
EXPERIENCE: |

tpomag.com October 2016

13

The Nibley City Hall houses


the communitys Public
Utilities Department.

The team in Nibley includes, from left, Justin


Pope, water supervisor; Josh Herschi, operator;
and Justin Maughan, director of Public Works.

TEAMWORK HELPS
When Justin Maughan won the Operator of the Year award,
he gave credit to everyone while downplaying his role in
responding to the April 2015 water contamination crisis. I truly
believe that the award belongs to the entire Cache Valley community, certainly not me alone, he says. Everybody did a fantastic
job during the water contamination crisis.
Indeed, the surrounding communities took the good-neighbor
concept to the next level. From the start of the emergency, teams
from other the Cache Valley communities in northern Utah
pitched in: Logan City, Hyrum City, Paradise, Providence City,
Richmond and Hyde Park.
They provided filling stations for Nibley residents to fill water
containers. They brought in tankers and moved them throughout
the city to dispense water. They helped flush contaminated
waterlines, offered advice to city engineers on the cleanup, and
took on tasks to relieve exhausted work crews. Moreover,
grocery stores and businesses donated bottled water, and some
neighboring residents even made their homes available for
people to take showers or wash their clothes.
We needed everybodys help for those six days, says
Maughan. The Nibley Public Works Department has only seven
employees. After so much work, we got pretty tired and needed
to rest. For example, we had to drive our water samples to Salt
Lake City, which is nearly an hour and a half away, and we sure
didnt want guys with an hour or so sleep going that far. So we
asked workers from other communities, and they were happy to
drive. Their support meant so much.

and ultimately leak up to 25 gallons of diesel oil from its fuel tank into the
spring. It happened on a Saturday, and it was late Monday night before Maughan
and his Sewer and Water Division team got their first funny water complaint.
They went to the home, tasted the water and noticed a film on it. At first,
they thought the problem was the homeowners water softening system, so
they took samples, sent them to the lab and did some precautionary hydrant
flushing. End of story, they believed.
But early Tuesday morning a second complaint came in. After taking a

14

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

sample, the team visited the collection-area box next to the spring, popped
the hatch and saw the bad news. It looked like a parking lot had spilled into
our drinking water system, says Maughan. Immediately, we notified the
state that we had a major contamination issue. Then the city issued a no-use
order to the public. We told everybody we could by any means possible: social
media, local radio and personal calls to schools and businesses.
Nibley residents were told not to drink the water, wash with it or use it
to clean their clothes. Other communities brought in trucks filled with water
and donated bottled water. Still, two local schools closed. Day care facilities
were hit hard because of all the water they use, and so was a convenience
store, which lost thousands of dollars in business when it couldnt sell coffee,
sodas or meals.

CLEANUP PLAN
Before moving to the cleanup phase, Maughan, like any good engineer,
sat down with city engineers and Sewer and Water Department personnel to
investigate options. Such thoroughness distinguished Maughan during the effort,
according to Justin Pope, department manager and 10-year Nibley veteran.
Justin is an awesome boss the best Ive ever had, says Pope, a Grade
IV water operator. He did a great job handling the contamination event.
Hes different than your typical public works type because of his background
as an engineer. Across the board, he knew where to get resources to help. It
was his broad spectrum and experience that was so effective. Were a small
city with very limited experience in this sort of thing. He knew who to call
to get us what we needed, from booms to soak up oil to folks who could drive
our samples the hour 20 minutes to Salt Lake City.
Rod Elwood, parks division manager and 15-year city employee, was

equally appreciative: Justin is a good guy who likes to be informed about


both sides of an issue before making a decision. He did very well resolving
the contamination issue. He wasnt too quick to make a decision. He
wanted to know how our actions would affect the system. His biggest concern was with our customers and making sure they were well taken care of
during the emergency.

TIMELY RESTORATION
With the help of the county fire department, Maughans crew turned on
the two wells, since there was no problem with them, and flushed 72 hydrants,
about half the number in the system. At the same time, the citys three connected water tanks had to be decontaminated.
Instead of deploying skimmer pumps, Maughan decided to overflow the
tanks, but that posed problems because the overflow elevations werent exactly
the same for all three tanks. Since the team couldnt get in enough water to
spill from the tanks, they had to use a core drill to
punch holes in the tank sides to skim off as much
oily water as possible.
While that was happening, Public Works crews
were cleaning the spill site, using oil-absorbent pads
to make sure the diesel fuel didnt go anywhere. Meanwhile, Maughan sent samples to the lab to make sure
the system was, in fact, cleaned up. It was pretty much
around-the-clock for the first three days, with maybe
a few off hours for naps. The first night brought no
sleep whatsoever. Finally, the water was declared safe
to use. Maughan and the rest of the Public Works
staff could relax, but only a little.
When the decontamination work was completed,
we asked Nibley residents to flush their homes, says
Maughan. While we didnt max out our sewer system, we put a lot of water into it, which was pretty
nerve-wracking.
All of our sewer water flows through one lift station that goes to Logan City, so I had guys at the lift
station during the flushing with tanker trucks standing by in case something went wrong. Our normal
sewer flows are normally about 350 gpm. When this
event was taking place we were pushing 1,500 gpm.
In the end, we gained a lot respect for our 10-yearold sewer system and the importance of maintaining
our lift station and pumps.

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community occupies his attention.
Theres such a broad spectrum
of activities here, Maughan says. One day Im driving a snow plow and the
next day Im in a meeting with engineers discussing drilling a new well for
the city and everything in between. Thats what makes this job so challenging and enjoyable.

LEADERSHIP QUALITIES
As for the normally low-key Maughan, he gained
the communitys respect and top marks from his boss,
David Zook, city manager. Zook calls Maughan,
whom he helped hire, a good leader, who leads by
example. Justin has done an amazing job in terms of
handling emergencies and in his everyday role as
Public Works director.
Zook says Maughan didnt know about the Water
Operator of the Year award until notified that he had
won. When we had a City Council meeting and formally presented Justin with the award, he invited all
of his team and recognized them for their efforts, as
well as all the office staff who worked throughout the
event, Zook says. And he has given credit to teams
from the other communities who pitched in, and to
our residents and local businesses who came together
to get the issue resolved.
Despite such accolades, Maughan, father of two
young sons and a daughter, remains laser-focused on
overseeing Nibleys water, sewer, roads and parks sysFREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

15

HEARTS
AND MINDS

A Haunting Experience
ZOMBIES, GHOSTS AND GHOULS TAKE OVER LOUISVILLES CRESCENT HILL
WATER TREATMENT PLANT, AND LEARN ABOUT TREATMENT IN THE PROCESS
By Craig Mandli

HISTORIC TREATMENT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LOUISVILLE WATER

umors have said for years that the Gatehouse at


the Crescent Hill Reservoir in Louisville is haunted.
Well, at least for one day in October, it was.
Louisville Water Company hosted its first-ever
Trick Or Treatment event at the historic Crescent Hill
Water Treatment Plant on Oct. 28, 2015. The Gatehouse
the plants Gothic-inspired centerpiece, with its
limestone walls, ornamental details and urns to denote
the flow of water made an ideal setting for a little
spooky entertainment.
The Gatehouse just looks like something out of a
horror film, says Kelley Dearing-Smith, strategic communications and government relations director. Its
already a popular stop for people in the area, so we
thought combining that ambiance with a Halloweenthemed event would give us a great platform to talk
about the importance of water.

The 110-million-gallon Crescent Hill Reservoir was


designed in 1879 to allow sediment to settle from drinking water drawn from the Ohio River water. The threestory Gatehouse was modeled after a similar building
along the Rhine River in Germany. When it opened, its
picturesque grounds quickly became a destination for
family picnics, wedding photographs and visitors travA mad-scientist laboratory was part of the fun. Other activities included
eling through Louisville by train.
Frankensteins laboratory, a Good Witch reading children stories, and a visit
Louisville Water employed gatekeepers who would open and close large
from Tapper, Louisville Waters mascot.
gates to allow visitors to stroll the grounds. Today, the reservoir and
Gatehouse remain part of Louisville
Water operations. The original valves
You need to look at it like a business. First identify your assets, then look
remain, and the area around the
reservoir is still a popular place for
at how you fit in the community. Then its about finding something you
walkers. The reservoir and Gatehouse were named Kentucky Hiscan become known for and really buying into it.
toric Marker Sites in 2010.
KELLEY DEARING-SMITH
The old look of the Gatehouse
ples of its award-winning Louisville Pure Tap drinking water, and healthy
gives it that air of haunting mystery, says Dearing-Smith. The fact that
Monster Mash fruit smoothies.
the building remains in operation, and much of the original infrastructure
More than 500 adults and costume-clad children attended. Frankly, we
is still in place, is a credit to the designers and the water department staff
would have been extremely happy with 100 people, so the event exceeded
over the years. Its definitely turned into a neat destination for many people.
our expectations by far, says Dearing-Smith. Any time we can engage peoTo get the Gatehouse in character, the Louisville Water staff transple in learning about water is a win in our book. Fortunately, the opportuformed the building into a family-friendly spooktacular setting, complete
nity to get inside the Gatehouse is a pretty big drawing card.
with a mad-scientist laboratory, a zombie-guided tour of the reservoir, sam(continued)

16

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

A TWIST ON TRICK-OR-TREAT

CONSTANT OUTREACH

Louisville Water engineers and scientists served as the tour guides for a
continuous flow of superheroes, witches and zombies. Plant employees
talked about the citys award-winning water and the plant that recently
received a Phase IV Excellence in Water Treatment award from the Partnership for Safe Water.
Tour guides escorted visitors on a behind-the-scenes tour of the plants
laboratory, control room and filter gallery. Other activities included Frankensteins laboratory, complete with slimy, squishy body parts to feel; a Wizard
of Oz-inspired Good Witch who read children stories; a visit from Tapper,
the Louisville Water mascot; and a bloody handprint-making station.
We didnt market this as a traditional trick-or-treat experience, but the
kids all got a nice snack and went home with a little bag of goodies, says
Dearing-Smith. That didnt seem to matter, though. The kids loved seeing
the mascot and getting the chance to play in the water.

Dearing-Smith says the Trick Or Treatment event, along with other


Louisville Water events, work because the residents are engaged. Regular
Walking Wednesday events during summer open the Gatehouse and other
areas around the Crescent Hill Reservoir to visits. Partnerships with elementary schools help spread water messages to students, while a large social
media footprint and multiple presentations to service groups get the word
out to adults.
We dont pass up any opportunity to talk about what we do at Louisville Water, says Dearing-Smith. The more you are out in the community
educating people, the more they will understand how vital what we do actually is. That way, if we need to allocate resources to a project, or make
upgrades, they are on board.
The key to successful outreach, says Dearing-Smith, is finding and capitalizing on something a water department can be known for. For Louisville, thats the Crescent Hill Reservoir and the high-quality tap water it
helps produce.
You need to look at it like a business, she says. First identify your
assets, then look at how you fit in the community. Then its about finding
something you can become known for and really buying into it. If you are
truly proud of your product, it shows.
The day after Trick Or Treatment, the plant was back to normal: the
zombies gone, the ghosts back in hiding, and the mad scientists back in the
laboratory, making sure every Louisville residents water is fresh and clean.
Theyll be back on Oct. 26 this year, haunting the Gatehouse halls, promoting clean water, and showing off
the dark side of water treatment.

Whats Your Story?

A mummified version of Tapper, Louisville Waters mascot, led participants on


a tour of the Crescent Hill Reservoir grounds.

The Gatehouse, Gothic-inspired centerpiece of Louisvilles Crescent Hill Water


Treatment Plant, made an ideal setting for a little spooky entertainment.

Marketing for the event proved to be a success as well. Local media outlets were happy to grab on to the feel-good story. TV stations and newspapers helped us promote it, which was a really great partnership, says
Dearing-Smith. The idea that it was a different twist on something that
happens every Halloween helped us a lot. I think combining kids in costume with a facility that everyone in this area recognizes is a pretty good
recipe for a fun story.

18

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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tpomag.com October 2016

19

top performer
wastewater:

PLANT

Performance
in Paradise

THE STAFF AT A COLORADO SANITATION DISTRICT DELIVERS


AWARD-WINNING EXCELLENCE WITH INGENIOUS
PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DEDICATED TEAMWORK
STORY: Steve Frank | PHOTOGRAPHY: Carl Scofield

The Upper Thompson Sanitation District


treatment plant lies in scenic surroundings.

WHATS IT LIKE TO HAVE A SIXPOINT BULL ELK STANDING

on the front steps of your treatment plant? Or


to see his harem out the window of the lab?
They wander through here all the time,
says Joe Creaghe, treatment plant operations
and maintenance superintendent with the
Upper Thompson Sanitation Districts 2 mgd
plant in Estes Park, Colorado. Where else
could you work in such surroundings?
The district sits at 7,800 feet above sea level
and serves about 4,000 people in the Estes Valley around the town of Estes Park. In summer,
more than 4 million visitors flood into nearby
Rocky Mountain National Park, and wastewater flows to the district increase significantly.
Despite widely varying flows and wandering elk, UTSD is doing things right. Staff members routinely solve problems, save money and
improve operations with ingenuity and teamwork. In 2015, the facility won the Plant Performance Award from the Rocky Mountain
Water Environment Association (RMWEA).
In addition, Chris Bieker, district manager,
received the Manager of the Year award from
the Colorado Special Districts Association.
The plant came online in 1976; the plant
and collections system were built with federal,
state and local funding at a cost of $5.3 milThe team at the Upper Thompson Sanitation
District includes, from left, Sandy Mourning,
Debbie Taylor, Jerry Schrag, Henry Newhouse,
Joe Creaghe, and Clinton Dunkelberger.

Upper Thompson Sanitation


District Treatment Facility,
Estes Park, Colorado
BUILT: |

1976

POPULATION SERVED: |

4,000
6
FLOWS: 2 mgd design, 1.5 mgd average,
3.75 mgd peak
TREATMENT LEVEL: | Tertiary
TREATMENT PROCESS: Activated sludge,
tri-media filtration
RECEIVING WATER: | Big Thompson River
BIOSOLIDS: | 164 dry tons a year, land-applied
ANNUAL BUDGET: | $3.3 million
WEBSITE: | www.utsd.org
GPS COORDINATES: Latitude: 402223.43N;
Longitude: 1052855.34W
EMPLOYEES: |

lion. The funding was largely EPA grants,


Creaghe says. We maintain and improve the
plant so it meets permit limits, both current and
future. Were pretty creative in how we do that.
We typically have all three clarifiers in
service in the summer, but we usually have one
out of service in the winter. By transferring
flows among the clarifiers, the staff can maintain the equipment during downtime. During
spring 2016, they used the out-of-service clarifiers capacity to help keep up with treatment
during rehabilitation of an old concrete clarifier where rebar was starting to show through.
tpomag.com October 2016

21

ALL HANDS ON DECK


A slow-moving cold front stalled over northern Colorado on
Sept. 9, 2013, creating drought-busting floods over the next several
days in 17 Colorado counties. Those floods caused loss of life and
almost $1 billion in property damage.
In Larimer County, home to Estes Park and the Upper Thompson
Sanitation District, the flooding severely damaged two major sewer
drainages. Two of the three lift stations that pump sewage to the
districts 2 mgd wastewater treatment plant saw major damage.
During flood recovery, the plant continued to run, and the district
had no violations. When I saw what was happening the night the
rain started, I called everyone and told them, All hands on deck!
says Joe Creaghe, treatment plant superintendent and former Marine.

22

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The operations staff worked around the clock for the first couple
of days and ran the plant in manual mode during the flood. This is
a lost art for most operators, Creaghe said. After two days,
Creaghe worked out a schedule providing continuous staff coverage
until normal operations could be restored.
The flood wiped out our rainy day fund that I had worked so
hard to build up, said Chris Bieker, district manager. But the district
has now replaced its emergency operations fund and is continuing
with its asset management program. Bieker says, A lot of the
upgrades youll see out in the plant are happening now because we
identified the needs and made plans to address them.

OPPOSITE PAGE: Joe Creaghe and team members Jerry Schrag, Clinton

Dunkelberger and Henry Newhouse replace the impeller on a return activated


sludge pump (Aurora Layne/Verti-Line).

MEET THE STAFF


An elected board of directors sets policies for the district, and 14 permanent employees staff it: four administrative personnel, four on the sewer
crew and six plant operators. Operations staff members all wear several
hats, including grounds and building maintenance, metal fabrication, heavy
equipment operation and janitorial duties. Colorado wastewater certification
is required for all sewer and plant personnel. Creaghe holds Level A Wastewater and Level 2 Collections certifications. His team includes:
Debbie Taylor, laboratory supervisor, Level A Wastewater and Rocky
Mountain Water Quality Analyst Certification
Sandy Mourning, senior operator, Level A
Wastewater, Level 4 Collections, Level A Industrial Waste and Level C Water
Clinton Dunkelberger, plant operator, Level C
Wastewater
Jerry Schrag, plant operator, Level A Wastewater, Level 1 Collections
Henry Newhouse, operator, Level C Wastewater

nation before discharge to the Big Thompson River, which serves as source
water for downstream users and provides recreation.
Waste activated sludge goes from the clarifiers to the aerobic digesters,
where it is treated to Class B biosolids standards for land application. A centrifuge (Centrisys) dewaters the biosolids to 16 to 22 percent solids. A contractor collects the material weekly for application to cropland or for hauling
to landfill. Production is 164 dry tons per year.

NO MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT
The treatment plant has no separate maintenance staff; the four operators work maintenance and operations on a rotating schedule. This way, we
dont get bored, says Schrag. They also spend a week each month in the lab
with Taylor, who has been with the district for 36 years. She manages the lab
and keeps up with ever-changing analytical and reporting requirements.

UNIQUE PROCESS
The plant has an unusual design, Creaghe notes.
There are no primary clarifiers; influent enters through
three lift stations that also collect and screen out the
non-treatable solids. Combined flow from the lift stations goes into a flow equalization (EQ) basin that
also provides grit settling and inf luent f low
metering.
Wastewater exiting the EQ basin goes to the four
aeration basins, where a single 250 hp ABS Turbocompressor HST 20 blower (Sulzer) supplies the oxygen. Because the bar rakes in the lift stations dont

Its just a trash can frame


with a basket in it. Its nothing
fancy, but it keeps stuff from
going into the aerobic digester.

JOE CREAGHE

remove all the small floatable surface scum and trash,


Creaghe designed a simple strainer to remove it so it
wont interfere with downstream processes. Its just
a trash can frame with a basket in it, he says. Its
nothing fancy, but it keeps stuff from going into the
aerobic digesters.
From the aeration basins, mixed liquor suspended
solids (MLSS) goes to the secondary clarifiers. In
winter, one clarifier is usually out of service because
flows are low. Nitrification pumps move the secondary clarifier effluent to nitrification towers for polishing. The tower converts ammonia nitrogen to
nitrate nitrogen.
From the nitrification towers, the water goes to
tri-media filters. From there the water moves to the
chlorine contact basin where sodium hypochlorite is
added. Sodium bisulfite is then added for dechloriFREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

23

Upper Thompson Sanitation District


Treatment Facility
PERMIT AND PERFORMANCE
EFFLUENT

PERMIT

BOD

5.4 mg/L

30 mg/L

TSS

3.0 mg/L

30 mg/L

NH3 -N

2.1 mg/L

7.7 to 38 mg/L
(varies by month)

Debbie Taylor, laboratory supervisor.

are determined and crosses tasks off as theyre completed.


The schedule starts with a week in the lab, then a week in maintenance,
The staff has come up with an impressive list of ingenious solutions.
then two weeks in operations. During their maintenance week, the operaTake, for example, dealing with excess air from the blower. Blower output
tors come to the plant on the weekends to maintain process control and make
cannot be reduced enough during low-flow periods, such as at night and dursure all is working properly. In the evenings and overnight, we can control
ing winter, to keep from over-oxygenating the microorganisms. So the staff
operations from our cellphones or from a laptop, Creaghe notes.
decided to reroute excess air to the aerobic digesters or bleed it off to the outMaintenance is scheduled using the Antero computerized maintenance
side. They designed, built and installed piping that does just that.
management system (AllMax Software). Mourning, who also serves as the
While bleeding excess air to the outside is helpful, its also noisy. So operstaff IT guru, purchasing specialist and webmaster, populated the software
ator Dunkelberger, a handy guy with a wrench and a
with maintenance tasks. Each week starts with a mainwelder, found a diesel engine muffler in an auto parts
tenance task list. The operator on maintenance duty
We spend a lot
store that had been special-ordered but never picked up.
works through the list as the week goes by. Thursdays
He got it cheap, installed it on the air exhaust pipe and
are landscape maintenance and janitorial days. Everyof time on PM
solved the noise problem.
thing gets done, and theres usually time for improvePlant staff members solve difficult challenges every
ment projects on Fridays.
because we only have
day the impossible tasks just take a little longer. They
One task high on the preventive maintenance list is
one centrifuge.
saved the district close to $57,000 (a contractors cost estithe centrifuge. We spend a lot of time on PM because
JOE CREAGHE
mate) by installing the ABS Turbocompressor blower
we only have one centrifuge, says Creaghe.
themselves. It took two days of staff time and about $300
Safety is another area where staff responsibilities
to rent a heavy-duty forklift. The blower also saved the district some $26,000
rotate. Staffers serve as safety officer for a year at a time. The plant staff holds
on electricity in its first year of operation.
safety meetings monthly and holds tailgate meetings for any special projects.
Another project saved money by allowing the district to buy natural gas
The district has received the RMWEA Gold Safety Award for the past two years.
for plant heat at a lower cost from a different supplier. To do so, they had to
dig a trench, bury the new gas line, and connect it to the new companys supINNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS
ply line. That saved the cost of hiring a contractor, and the district continThe plant staff does many of its own improvements. Creaghe keeps a
ues to save with the lower-cost fuel.
(continued)
project list on his desk on a yellow legal pad. He adds new projects as needs

24

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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tpomag.com October 2016


TPO_HalfPage_Ad_0716 WEFTEC.indd 1

25

7/27/2016 7:13:43 AM

Joe Creaghe clears the distribution


Phosphate limits are coming to
heads on the polishing basin.
small plants in Colorado in 2022 and
Creaghe has been experimenting
with a staff-installed curtain and mixers in the aeration basins to help him
get phosphorus discharge numbers to what he thinks the limit will be. He
hopes the modification can help with nitrates, too.
Taylor has done her share of innovating, too. With help from Hatch Mott
MacDonald engineers and GEI consultants (ecotoxicologists), she implemented a biotic ligand model to provide a comprehensive analysis of copper
toxicity. The model estimates the bioavailability and toxicity of copper in the
discharge stream better than the previously accepted hardness-based equation.
The states Water Quality Control Commission adopted a site-specific
stream standard in 2014, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and
Environment amended the districts copper limit in August 2015. While still
protecting the environment, the new limits make more sense and are easier
to achieve.
We work together and we play together, says Creaghe. This is a great
place to work.

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TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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Lofty Goals

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN COUNCIL

SUSTAINABLE
OPERATIONS

The Metropolitan Wastewater Treatment Plant is the largest of the eight


operated by the Environmental Services Division of the Metropolitan Council
of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Total average flow at all plants is about 250 mgd.

THE TWIN CITIES METRO COUNCIL LOOKS EVERYWHERE FOR OPPORTUNITIES


TO SAVE ENERGY AND DEPLOY RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES
By Doug Day

n 2007, the Environmental Services Division of the Metropolitan Council in Minneapolis/St. Paul set a goal to reduce its fossil fuel purchases
by 15 percent by 2010. After achieving that goal, the division aimed for
a 25 percent reduction from the 2006 baseline by 2015.
The division came up just short, according to Sara Smith, sustainability
in operations manager: We came to a reduction of 23.6 percent, so we didnt
meet the goal, but we were very close. It was a good goal.
It was close enough that the division has challenged itself with a new goal
of a 10 percent reduction from 2015 levels by 2020. The idea is that well
keep that goal rolling and reduce our purchases by at least 10 percent every
five years, Smith says.

AERATION OPPORTUNITIES
The Metropolitan Council is a regional body serving the seven counties
and 181 cities and towns in the Twin Cities area. The Environmental Services Division operates and maintains 600 miles of regional sewers and eight
wastewater treatment plants that process on average 250 mgd. The council
also coordinates mass transit, community development planning, water supply planning, lake and river monitoring, regional parks and trails, land use
planning and affordable housing.
A cross-functional Energy Team meets quarterly to work on projects
across Environmental Services. We initiated the team in 2007 to bring
together maintenance, operations, people looking at process efficiency, and
technical services where capital projects are designed
and implemented, Smith says.
Aeration accounts for 30 to 60 percent of the treatment plants energy costs. Weve done a lot with optimizing our aeration systems and saved about 30 million
kWh per year, Smith says. One of the biggest efficiencies was switching from coarse-bubble to fine-bubble
diffusers. All the efficiency work was on the diffuser and
setpoint side of the aeration process. We did look at our
blowers a few years ago and determined that they were
efficient and a good match for our system.

Aeration tanks at the Metropolitan Wastewater Treatment


Plant are much more efficient since being converted from
large-bubble to fine-bubble diffusers. By doing the same
across all plants, the Metropolitan Council saves some 30
million kWh per year.

28

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The division also switched to


more efficient motors throughout the
collections and treatment systems
and added variable-frequency drives,
saving 1.2 million kWh a year.

RECOVERING HEAT
The Metropolitan plant, the agencys largest wastewater facility, has
two large fluidized-bed biosolids
incinerators that create steam for
heating and to produce about 20 percent of the plants electrical needs from
240 dry tons of solids per day. In
2015, our steam turbine averaged
more than 2 MW of generation that
resulted in $1.2 million in savings
for ratepayers, Smith says.
Normally, the turbine generator
had been used more in summer, but
low natural gas prices changed that
strategy. There are times when
weve decided that it was better to

Generating 20 percent of the plants


electricity, two fluid optimization
bed incinerators at the Metropolitan
plant process 240 dry tons of
biosolids daily, saving more than
$1 million per year.

run the turbines for electricity and purchase natural


gas for heating, Smith says. Its not necessarily displacing energy usage, but its a financial savings.
The division has also made several lighting
upgrades, the largest being the replacement of old
fluorescent, high-intensity discharge and incandescent lights with T8 and T5 fluorescents in 5 miles of
tunnels at the Metropolitan plant. That was before
LED lights became cost-effective, but it still saved
significant energy. Systemwide, weve seen about 3
million kWh of annual savings, says Smith. LED
lighting is planned for the next tunnel relighting
project at the Seneca plant.
Buildings have also received updates to HVAC
and other systems. We save about 7 million kWh a
year with all the work that weve done, says Smith.
Those efforts are aided by Xcel Energy, the local
electric utility, which has funded studies that identify conservation and rebate opportunities, especially
in lighting and building systems. Xcel pays about
$25,000 to $30,000 for each study, and a number of
energy projects are identified, says Smith. It helps
them meet their energy conservation goals as we use
less energy, and were one of their top users.

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LARGE AND SMALL

tpomag.com October 2016

29

top performer
OPERATOR

IN THE

LOOP

ROB SCOTT AND HIS TEAM MAKE SURE THE UCONN RECLAIMED WATER FACILITY
LIVES UP TO ITS ROLE IN SUSTAINABLE WATER USE ON A FAST-GROWING CAMPUS
STORY: Ted J. Rulseh | PHOTOGRAPHY: Sean D. Elliot

THE RECLAIMED WATER

a campground. He moved to the United


States after high school graduation in 1984.
His first job was as a maintenance assisof Connecticut sits right between two other
tant for three Vermont state park campcritical utility plants on the campus.
grounds. In 1988, his role evolved into
It receives secondary effluent from the
operation of the parks water and wasteuniversitys Water Pollution Control Facilwater systems. He did that for three years
ity (WPCF) and it delivers reclaimed water
while attending technical college courses
to the Central Utilities Plant (CUP) for use
for licensing. He then moved on to operin the cooling towers and boilers. About 20
ate a lagoon wastewater treatment system
to 60 percent of water used there returns
serving the Vermont towns of Troy and Jay,
to the WPCF.
where the major customers included a
Rob Scott, project manager with Woodcheese plant and a ski resort.
ard & Curran, leads a staff of four in fulIn 1993, he moved to Connecticut as a
filling the Reclaimed Water Facilitys role
circuit rider in the wastewater technical
in the universitys semi-closed water loop.
assistance program for the Atlantic States
Close communication and cooperation
Rural Water & Wastewater Association.
among the three facilities is essential, says
Seven years later he hired on with a priScott. Any operational change or issue at
Rob Scott, project manager, University of Connecticut Reclaimed
vate developer who owned multiple propone facility has potential to affect water
Water Facility.
erties and a large resort in Westbrook,
quality and operations at the other two.
Connecticut. In that role, he handled project management and environmenThere is little question that Scott and his team have held up their end of
tal compliance for the companys water and wastewater operations.
the bargain since the reclaim plant went online in 2013. One testament to
their success is a 2015 Asset Management Achievement Award from the New
England Water Environment Association (NEWEA).
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS
Were a very close-knit team, Scott says. We hold joint meetings. We
When I saw that UConn was building the Reclaimed Water Facility, I
work very hard to promote the assignment of responsibility, with the expecfelt it was a great opportunity to make a change in what I was doing, Scott
tation of accountability. Theres a lot of mentoring and training. We have
recalls. I lived fairly close to the university and was following the project
standard operating procedures in place. We develop operating guidelines.
through the newspapers. When the project manager job was posted, I applied.
Were always looking to be as efficient as possible.
By that time, Scott held multiple certifications, including Level 3 Wastewater Treatment Operator, Level 1 Water Treatment Operator, and Small
Water System Operator in Connecticut; Grade 2 Collections Systems OperDIVERSE BACKGROUND
ator from NEWEA; Grade 5 Wastewater Treatment Operator and Class 2
Scott didnt land at the UConn reclaim plant by accident. He applied for
Public Water System Operator in Vermont; and Grade 6 Wastewater Treatthe job when Woodard & Curran advertised it three years ago and came on
ment Operator in Massachusetts.
board with ample experience and qualifications. Born and bred in Montreal,
When I came on, the project was in the construction and commissionQuebec, Scott spent summers in northern Vermont, where his parents owned

FACILITY AT THE UNIVERSITY

30

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The Reclaimed Water Facility uses


microfiltration units (Pall Corporation)
as part of a process that delivers
high-quality process water to the
campus Central Utilities Plant.

The University of Connecticut Reclaimed Water Facility supports sustainability


goals by helping the campus use less potable water and protect local supplies.

Robert Scott, Woodard & Curran

Project manager, University of Connecticut


Reclaimed Water Facility
EXPERIENCE: | 28 years in water industry
AWARDS: New England WEA 2015 Asset Management
Achievement Award
EDUCATION: | Extensive technical schooling and training in water operations
CERTIFICATION: Multiple water and wastewater certifications in
New England states
GOAL: | Continue to operate an efficient facility and produce quality water
POSITION:

Rob Scott and his team have built a sound and award-winning asset
management program in the Reclaimed Water Facility.

tpomag.com October 2016

31

SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY
The University of Connecticut consistently ranks with the
greenest schools in the country. Among its sustainability
initiatives, UConn works to limit water use on campus and
protect the flow in the Fenton and Willimantic rivers during
seasonal dry periods while still meeting its water needs. The
UConn Reclaimed Water Facility is a key part of that endeavor.
The university operates the only public water supply within a
five-mile radius, providing water for its campus and for more
than 100 other users, including a town hall, a high school and the
growing downtown Storrs Center. The two main water sources
are the Fenton and Willimantic River wellfields.
During a drought in 2005, part of the Fenton River ran dry, and
the cause was attributed partly to the universitys withdrawals
from the Fenton wellfield. New management protocols were put
in place requiring the university to reduce its potable water usage
by about one-third, or 1 mgd. Needing an alternative strategy to
meet its water needs and preserve local water resources, the
university built the Reclaimed Water Facility.
Now, instead of sending all of its effluent to Willimantic River,
the Water Pollution Control Facility can divert up to 1 mgd to the
Reclaimed Water Facility. Water reclamation expands and makes
better use of the water supply; it extends drinking water
resources by about 20 percent.
On top of that, the university follows sustainable practices in
construction and renovation projects to conserve water. That
includes installing low-flow showerheads and low-flush toilets.
The university has also moved aggressively to find and repair
water main leaks.

ing phase, Scott recalls. CDM was contracted to do the commissioning;


Woodard & Curran was the universitys representative during the commissioning process. After commissioning, we did the facility startup and
optimization.

FINE FILTRATION
The Reclaimed Water Facility is designed to treat an average of 1 mgd
and to handle peaks up to 1.5 mgd. Average flow at present is about 0.5 mgd.
We have three redundant treatment trains, each capable of treating 0.5
mgd, Scott says. Each treatment train includes a Goulds vertical turbine
pump with an ABB variable-frequency drive.
The water is pumped through a 500-micron Eliminator (Fluid Engineering) self-cleaning auto-strainer before delivery to Pall 0.1-micron microfiltration membranes. The membrane permeate goes through a two-pass
TrojanUVFit disinfection system before being stored in a 1-million-gallon
tank. Water from the storage tank is sent to the CUP, again using Goulds
vertical turbine pumps with ABB variable-frequency drives.
The treated water is dosed with chlorine or chloramines throughout the
process to prevent pathogen growth in the treatment, distribution and storage systems.
The CUP provides electricity, air conditioning and heat to campus buildings. It previously used 250,000 and 450,000 gallons of potable water daily;
reclaimed water has replaced most of that demand. The university is exploring use of the water for campus irrigation.

CONSISTENT QUALITY
Since startup, the reclaim plant
has produced extremely high-quality effluent. Weve recorded zero
fecal coliform colonies, says Scott.

Weve recorded
zero fecal coliform
colonies. BOD and
TSS average less than
1 mg/L. Turbidity is
less than 1 NTU. Its
really clean.

ROB SCOTT

Daily inspections, an electronic inventory system,


and operations and maintenance manuals for each
piece of equipment are among tools Scott and his
team use to keep the plant running at peak efficiency.

(continued)

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TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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BOD and TSS average less than 1 mg/L. Turbidity is


less than 1 NTU. Its really clean. The utility plant incorporates reverse osmosis treatment for water used to produce high-pressure boiler steam.
Scott shares credit for the plants success with Sean
Hetherington and Ray Mott, lead operations and maintenance technicians, and Landon Kendricks and Lawrence Woznicki, operations and maintenance technicians.
They take care of facility assets using a computerized
maintenance management system.
Everything is electronic, says Scott. There are
daily facility inspections that include performance confirmation of the online analyzers. We use an electronic
inventory system. There is an operations and maintenance manual for each piece of equipment. Weve pulled
numerous operational elements together to give the university staff exactly what they wanted.
Communication is critical. While the key point of contact is the universitys facility director, multiple parties
need to be kept informed. We work extremely hard to
provide anyone and everyone with the information they
request in a timely manner, says Scott. It was essential
to develop a strong client relationship, and I believe we
have done that. Our initial contract was for three years,
and theyve already extended us for two more years.

Were a very close-knit team. We hold joint meetings.


We work very hard to promote the assignment of
responsibility, with the expectation of accountability.
Theres a lot of mentoring and training.

ROB SCOTT

FACILITY COORDINATION
Communication among the three critical facilities
The facility team includes (from left) Scott, project manager, and Ray Mott and Sean Hetherington,
is especially important. To keep continuity and consislead operations and maintenance technicians.
tency in service, staff members from all three facilities
and the related university departments meet as needed
for coordination meetings, says Scott. We have viewing access to each othWINNING TRUST
ers SCADA systems. That provides instant feedback about actual operating
Scotts supervisor, Frank Cavaleri, senior area manager for operations
parameters and water use requirements.
and maintenance with Woodard & Curran, calls Scott a trusted adviser to
Furthermore, water-quality sample results from all three facilities are
the university staff. They come to Rob for myriad reasons, Cavaleri says.
placed in a Hach Water Information Management Solution (WIMS) dataWe do engineering work for UConn as well as operations. Rob is involved
base, where all parties can track and trend parameters. All facility operain many of those meetings and in discussions on how to get things accomtional information is placed on a shared university network, to which all
plished. He helps derive solutions by engaging many disciplines and services.
affected parties have access, Scott says. When operational issues or mainHes excellent in terms of involving his staff in decision-making. He
tenance tasks arise that might affect others, we discuss them clearly. We
takes excellent notes and documentation and communicates that back so that
schedule responses so that all parties can act appropriately without unnecI can see what is happening on the project. What really sets Rob apart, along
essary problems.
with his experience, is his ability to listen. He listens to the client, to his
The facilities make efforts not just to improve their own performance but
team and to company leaders, and he comes up with plans that work well.
to help the other facilities as well. For example, Scott and his team have taken
Thats why he has been able to implement Woodard & Currans manmeasures to reduce conductivity in the reclaimed water, enabling the central
agement tools and help the university implement its programs, as well. He
utilities plant to increase yield and reduce reject water in its RO process.
is a great asset to have on our side.

ENGAGING WITH STUDENTS


The reclaim plant team also engages with university students, faculty
members and surrounding communities. We do literally hundreds of tours,
from middle school all the way up to university engineering students, sustainability classes and instructors, Scott says. Its very eye-opening to the
people who come through. Its a state-of-the-art reclaim facility, and we maintain it as such. Everyone who visits is enlightened about how much goes into
the water cycle, how nice the plant is, and the career opportunities in the
water field.
Woodard & Curran also offers an intern program at the facility that
is part of the contract with the university. Weve already had one intern
become a full-time operator at a wastewater treatment facility we operate,
Scott says. Two have become full-time engineers with the company. Another
got a good job in the field back in her home state of Minnesota.
We also co-sponsor senior design projects with the university. Senior
engineering students pick a topic and assess how they think they can make
improvements in real-life scenarios.

34

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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35

TECH TALK

Revisiting an Old Friend


REGULAR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF MLSS CAN GIVE OPERATORS VALUABLE
INFORMATION TO HELP PREVENT OR CORRECT PROCESS UPSETS
By Ron Trygar, CET

have seen many changes during my wastewater career, now extending


beyond 30 years.
SCADA systems and associated instrumentation have really taken
hold in many public and private treatment works, enabling operators to monitor processes, open and close valves, adjust flow rates and chemical dosages,
and much more. Some SCADA systems are connected to cameras at key locations to give a real-time view of plant equipment in operation.
Still, SCADA has its limitations. In my opinion, nothing replaces a welltrained operators senses and intuition, especially when it comes to daily
wastewater or water treatment plant operation. Operators using their eyes
and ears and senses of smell and touch during rounds can tell when something doesnt seem right. Operators of activated sludge facilities run settleability tests, and water plant operators perform jar tests, both using their
sense of sight and their instincts in decision-making.
The microscope is one process control tool that doesnt fit well into the
SCADA world. Many utilities use a microscope for process control observation and record analysts results in an electronic database, like Excel spreadsheets and Hach Water Information Management Solution (WIMS)
software.
However, there seems to be an increasing disconnect between actual plant
operation and what the microscopic exam results are telling us. We have
become reliant on SCADA systems, yet there are times when that information comes too late the plant is already upset, and we missed the clues
along the way.
I have attended many courses on
activated sludge microbiology, and
I want to share some of the key points
of those sessions. I hope they help
you as much as they have helped me.

FOUR KEY OBSERVATIONS

FIGURE 1. Phase contrast microscope observation of floc, filaments


and surrounding liquid (100x
magnification).

When viewing a mixed liquor


suspended solids (MLSS) sample
from an activated sludge plant (Figure 1), there are four significant items
I have found very useful.

Floc structure
Pay attention to floc shape and density. Is it uniform in size? Is it small
or large? Is it round and granular-shaped, or large and irregularly shaped?
Does the floc look like a piece of fluffy cotton or like a BB? Does light pass
through the floc easily, or does it seem dark and dense?
Round, granular floc that resemble BBs most commonly point toward a
higher sludge age, where the MLSS has become overoxidized (that is, it has
been through the aeration process many times). These floc particles usually

36

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

FIGURE 2. Gram stain of MLSS smear showing Gram positive blue/purple


organisms and Gram negative pink/red organisms (200x bright-field
magnification).

settle rapidly in the secondary clarifier and settleometer. You might also find
the five-minute settleability reading to be very close to the 30-minute reading, and the sludge volume index (SVI) may be low.
Irregularly shaped, fluffy particles normally settle more slowly and compact less in the secondary clarifier and settleometer. The resulting SVI may
be higher than normal. Fluffy floc particles could mean a younger sludge
age (under-oxidized MLSS), or possibly a filament bulking sludge, discussed
further below.
Clarity of the liquid around the floc
When the floc settles in the clarifier or settleability test container, the
liquid that rises above the settled sludge blanket (supernate) becomes the
secondary effluent. Is the liquid around the floc particles full of tiny particles, or is it relatively clean and clear? Are there very small pieces of round
floc dispersed throughout the liquid?
If you have a phase contrast microscope, be sure to use the phase or darkfield settings to get a good look at the liquid surrounding the floc. You may
be surprised at what you see. Phase contrast microscopes have special objectives, along with a substage phase contrast condenser that looks like a round
turret mounted directly under the stage. Under this objective, the turbidity
is much easier to observe, and tiny motile bacteria suddenly appear where
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tpomag.com October 2016

37

they were unseen in bright-field light conditions. Tiny particles suspended


in the supernate usually correspond with increased secondary clarifier effluent turbidity.
Filament abundance and identity
This observation can be difficult if you dont have a quality phase contrast microscope. Filaments are usually colorless; they are found within the
floc or extending beyond the floc surface. The term filament is more a
description of the way the bacteria are growing.
Bacteria come in many shapes and sizes, and some grow in clumps that
we call floc. Filaments are chains of bacteria that grow in hair-like strands
instead of clumps. Some filaments are very thin and short, making them
hard to see with a bright-field microscope. Special stains will help expose
them, but this does require stain supplies and training in the proper use of
the stains.
The Gram stain (Figure 2) and Neisser stain are used on slides with dried
MLSS called smears. They can help an operator get a good visual image of
filaments present. Filament abundance is a little easier to determine than
the identity of all filament species in a sample.
Keeping track of the relative abundance and the trend of filament presence should be a part of the routine microscopic exam of the MLSS. More
than 20 types of filaments could exist in your mixed liquor, many showing
up in pairs. Training in filament identification is critical if you really want
to uncover the cause of their growth and ways of reducing or eliminating them.

Reference manuals used for this article:


D. Jenkins, M. Richard, G. Daigger: Manual on the

Causes and Control of Activated Sludge Bulking,


Foaming, and Other Solids Separation Problems,
Third Edition 2004; Lewis Publishers
T. Glymph: Wastewater Microbiology, A Handbook
For Operators, 2005; AWWA
G. Bitton: Wastewater Microbiology, 1994; Wiley-Liss

swimmers expend energy while moving about, gulping bacteria as they swim.
They are common due to the abundance of bacteria available as food. This
abundance of bacteria also contributes to elevated BOD results in the clarifier effluent or final plant effluent.
As the abundance of free-living bacteria declines with rising sludge age
and bacteria begin to form durable flocs, the population of bulk-liquid freeswimmers declines, giving rise to crawling free-swimming ciliates. These
creatures have specialized cilia (cirri) that they use as scrapers to dislodge
bacteria from the floc particle they are crawling on.
As they crawl on the floc, they graze on surface-level bacteria. The numbers of free-living bacteria in the bulk liquid decline or vanish, and bulkliquid free-swimmers slowly disappear.
During this process, the effluent
e have become reliant on SCADA systems, yet there are times when
quality is improving, and BOD and
turbidity are decreasing.
that information comes too late the plant is already upset, and we
Carnivorous free-swimmers are
missed the clues along the way.
just as the name implies: they capture and consume the innards of
other protozoa. Still other protozoa, like the large Spirostomum, are conRemember, filaments are essential to good, strong floc formation and
sidered by some to be omnivorous, consuming algae, bacteria, fungi and
structure. Mixed liquor that contains no filaments will usually settle very
small protozoa.
rapidly, leaving a turbid appearance in the supernate. Secondary effluent
As the numbers of free-living bacteria in the liquid around the floc conquality can be reduced as the small, suspended particles flow over the weirs.
tinue to decline and the floc continues to build, the available food value in
Floc is more durable when it contains some filaments, since sticky bacthe water also declines. Ciliates become more specialized in how they obtain
teria can attach to and grow along the filaments. Filaments are a nuisance
their nourishment and energy. Stalked ciliates attach themselves to floc parwhen they become excessive, causing inter-floc bridging or slowing the rate
ticles and use a stalk to extend themselves into the open liquid. Once there,
of settling and sludge compaction. This condition, known as bulking, can
they use their cilia to move the water about in a circular motion and toward
be detrimental, especially if solids wash out of the secondary clarifiers. If
their gullet, consuming bacteria caught in the current. They expend less
this occurs, the filaments should be identified and their root cause uncovenergy overall to get their food as compared to motile free-swimmers.
ered. This information can help operators eliminate or reduce the cause and
improve settling and effluent quality.

GETTING CLUES

Protozoa abundance, identity and activity


Most operators are familiar with the diverse population of protozoa and
metazoa that can be found in the MLSS; many have a favorite they enjoy
watching when using the microscope. Protozoa are single-celled organisms
with organelles like contractile vacuoles, a nucleus and hair-like projections
used for locomotion (cilia).
Protozoa observed in MLSS include amoeba, flagellates, free-swimming
and stalked ciliates. Rotifers, nematodes (roundworms), gasterotrichs and
waterbears (tardigrades) are multicelled organisms called metazoa.
When observing slides of MLSS, use several magnifications and illumination settings to get a complete picture of the protozoa and metazoa present. It is easy to overlook the almost transparent, blob-like amoebae if you
do not adjust the light, contrast and magnification. Some organisms are much
easier to see than others; dont get into the practice of only looking for your
favorite active protozoa (free-swimmers) and metazoa (rotifers) and overlook
the slower-moving organisms like flagellates and amoebae.
When sludge age is relatively young and there is a large population of
free-living, dispersed bacteria in the liquid around the flocs, bulk-liquid
free-swimming ciliates may be common. These can be quite large, move
quickly through the liquid and have large oral grooves. Bulk-liquid free-

38

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

With this information, operators can use population observations to get


an idea of what is occurring in the activated sludge process. Watching for
trends or shifts in populations of protozoa and metazoa can be a clue to
increases or decreases in plant effluent quality.
You dont have to be an academic microbiologist to make the observations listed above. There are many reference manuals available on activated
sludge microbiology, and quality training can be found almost everywhere.
The topics explored in this article are only a few of the valuable lessons Ive
learned during courses I have attended. I continue to take microbiology
courses when I can.
In summary, electronic monitoring instruments found in todays modern treatment plants are valuable tools. Coupling SCADA information with
timely, hands-on microscopic observation of the MLSS a few times per week
can greatly enhance any process control regimen and help operators prevent
or recover from plant upsets.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ron Trygar, CET, is a senior training specialist at the University of Florida


TREEO Center. He can be reached at rtrygar@treeo.ufl.edu.

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Corporation trademarks followed by the symbol are registered with the U.S.
Patent and Trademark Office.
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wastewater:
HOW WE DO IT

Inmate Ingenuity
OPERATORS OF THE WATER RECLAIM PLANT IN A CALIFORNIA PRISON DEVISE A CREATIVE SOLUTION
TO PROVIDE DENITRIFICATION AND MEET EFFLUENT STANDARDS FOR OFF-GROUNDS DISCHARGE
R.A.S.

By Ted J. Rulseh

DECLINE IN FLOW

W.A.S.

Influent

Four diffusers

Effluent

he four inmate operators of a water reclamation plant at the California Correctional Institution in Tehachapi faced a dilemma. Working
with plant flows and influent BOD well below the
original plant design levels, they could not denitrify
well enough to meet a 10 mg/L total nitrogen permit
limit for discharge to customers off the facility grounds.
Working together, and under the supervision of
three state-employed operators and a contract chief
plant operator, they developed a creative solution to
the problem that enabled the facility to resume delivering reuse water to customers during a severe drought
when demand for reclaimed water was high.

Blowers

We operate a 1.1 mgd Class IV activated sludge


converted to
water reclamation plant with extended aeration, terOxic Anoxic
Oxic
Anoxic Oxic
mixers
tiary treatment and UV disinfection, reports Keith
about 200 mg/L, just one-third of the average for which the plant was designed.
Fredrickson, lead inmate operator. Our plant was designed and constructed
The significant decrease in the organic load caused us to face a severe
in 2008, when the facility population was expected to increase over the years.
dilemma, says Fredrickson. Per Title 22 reuse permit requirements, our
However, the states initiatives to reduce prison overcrowding resulted
plant must produce total effluent nitrogen below 10 mg/L in order to disin a drastic decline in the inmate population at Tehachapi. As a result, the
charge off the grounds to customers. This became almost impossible last
influent flow dropped to 0.55 to 0.60 mgd, and the BOD loading averaged
winter, since our centrifugal blower system was drastically oversized.
Previous methods to create an anoxic zone for denitrification were no
longer effective. Any attempt to run the blowers at the lowest possible airflow resulted in a surge that shut down the blowers due to excessive back
pressure. Although shutting off the blowers would lower dissolved oxygen
Keith Fredrickson, the lead inmate operator at the Tehachapi
(DO), it would not allow for a sustainable anoxic period, and very little denicorrectional facility who provided most of the information for this
trification occurred.
story, has a Grade III Wastewater Operator license (second
Keeping the blowers off for too long placed our aerobic bacteria at risk
and also created short-circuiting problems by allowing our solids to settle to
highest) and has passed his Grade IV exam. He also holds T2
the bottom of the basin. Our plants Parkson Biolac system relies on diffused
Water Treatment and D2 Water Distribution licenses.
aeration for both mixing and oxygen transfer.
Charles Knepper III, senior inmate operator, is also a Grade III
Wastewater Operator license holder who has passed his Grade IV
SEEKING ANSWERS
exam. He owns a D2 Water Distribution license as well.
The team tried multiple blower operation schemes seeking to achieve the
Richard Martin, inmate operator, has a Grade I Wastewater
desired results. Making things worse, Tehachapis below-freezing winter
license and has passed his Grade II exam. Lemuel Talley, inmate
weather was in full swing, entraining air in the water and making it more
operator-in-training, has passed his Grade I Wastewater Operator
difficult to maintain microorganism activity. Reuse water customers were
license exam.
growing frustrated, as Californias drought-driven water restrictions had
raised the cost of potable water and the demand for reclaimed water was at
The inmate team is supervised by Luis Ching, contract chief
an all-time high.
plant operator; Angel Ribera, drinking water treatment chief plant
Still, says Fredrickson, Nobody gave up hope. We continued to work as
operator; Carlos Martinez, plant operator; and Trinidad Rodriguez,
a team to come up with a solution. After putting our minds together, we came
weekend operator in charge.
up with a plan. Our single aeration basin used 12 separate diffuser rows,

THE OPERATIONS TEAM

40

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

each with 12 arrays. On each array were five separate perforated tubes that
created the fine bubbles for oxygen transfer.
Our plan involved converting some of the 12 diffuser rows into mixers.
The theory was that if we removed the perforated tubes from each array of
an entire row, that section of the system would mix the basin contents without significantly increasing the DO level. Large bubbles would help mix the
contents but would dissipate to the atmosphere before being absorbed in the
system.
The team decided to test the theory with one diffuser row. They tested
the DO level in the first section, and then removed all the perforated tubes
in the first row. The first thing we noticed was the increase in mixing, says
Fredrickson. The row being tested was capable of mixing not only its section but also the section next to it on both sides.
The best news, however, was when we tested the DO and saw that it had
dropped significantly. It worked we had finally found something that
would allow us to control our DO levels despite the oversized blowers.

I
re

e
Wh

on
ati
ov

nn

ws
Flo

All You Need in

Chemical Feed

EXERTING CONTROL
Next they had to decide which rows to convert to mixers and how many
should be converted. They decided to convert four of the 12 diffuser rows to
mixers by removing the perforated tubes. We created one mixer in between
each two diffusers to allow for a uniform balance between mixing and diffused aeration throughout the system, says Fredrickson.
The Parkson Biolac system then allowed them to control the on/off
sequences for the mixers and air diffusers directly from the PLC. The sequence
that worked best involved running the eight remaining air diffusers for one
hour while the mixers were off, then running all four mixers for one hour
while the diffusers were off.
Running the mixers every hour kept all of our solids in suspension without transferring much additional oxygen to the basin, says Fredrickson.

As an inmate, this is the best job I ever had.


... The plant had a legitimate problem.
My co-workers and I were asked to think like
operators. We poured our heart and soul into
finding a solution, and then it finally came.
KEITH FREDRICKSON

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This allowed for a time period where the microorganisms could lower the
295 DeKalb Pike
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All the manuals say the operators of an activated sludge plant must have
control over three factors: the air rates, the waste activated sludge (WAS)
rates and the return activated sludge (RAS) rates, Fredrickson says. Although
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WAS and RAS control was never a problem, we finally found way of controlling the air rates in our basin.
had a job that allowed me to contrib16-NEPT-0441 Neptune - Treatment Plant Operator - October 2016.indd 1
Share Your Ideas 8/2/16
The new sequences allow us to make adjustments when necessary to
ute something significant to the instiTPO welcomes news about interesting
maintain continuous control. We are now able to create a complete anoxic
tution and its community. The plant
methods or uses of technology at
zone for total nitrogen removal. We also no longer experience short-circuithad a legitimate problem. My coyour facility for future articles in the
ing, as the mixers keep all solids in suspension during denitrification. This
workers and I were asked to think
How We Do It column.
prevents any plug of raw wastewater from passing through untreated.
like operators. We poured our heart
Send your ideas to editor@
and soul into finding a solution, and
tpomag.com or call 877/953-3301
then it finally came.
IN COMPLIANCE
Fredrickson notes that he and
Fredrickson reports that the teamwork paid off: As of last summer, the
his fellow inmate operators all expect to be paroled by the end of 2017 or
plant was meeting its requirements for discharge off the grounds and was
sooner. He says, We are all excited about the prospect of starting our own
meeting the needs of water customers. There is no greater feeling than knowcareers in the water and wastewater industry.
ing we were able to come up with a solution together, Fredrickson says.
As an inmate, this is the best job I ever had. Most prison jobs involve
performing menial tasks, such as preparing food or basic janitorial work. I
tpomag.com October 2016

41

3:58 PM

top performer
wastewater:

PLANT

The entrance of the City of Tulsas Lower Bird Creek Water Pollution
Control Facility.

Pulling

Together

A MAJOR PLANT UPGRADE DIDNT KEEP THE TEAM AT A TULSA CLEAN-WATER PLANT
FROM MEETING PERMIT LIMITS AND EARNING A PLATINUM PEAK PERFORMANCE AWARD
STORY: Trude Witham
PHOTOGRAPHY: Brett Rojo

A MAJOR UPGRADE WAS A LONG TIME COMING FOR

the Lower Bird Creek Water Pollution Control Facility.


The 20-year-old facility in Tulsa, Oklahoma, needed new headworks to
solve a debris removal issue, plus a circular clarifier and new SCADA system. Completed in June 2012, the upgrade also doubled plant capacity from
2 mgd to 4 mgd to meet city growth and take in additional wastewater from
the city of Catoosa.
Several years of plant construction presented challenges for the operators. These included taking the oxidation ditch out of service for 30 days and
diverting flow to equalization basins while keeping the biomass alive. Construction delays added more stress.
The delays were very long, but we just dealt with it and put up with the
construction mess and dirt piles, recalls Zane Briggs, operations supervisor.
Shawn Glen, plant superintendent, has high praise for the team: Zane
and his group did a great job. We were able to meet our permit throughout
the expansion project. They also won the 2015 Platinum Peak Performance
Award from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA),
recognizing 100 percent permit compliance for five consecutive years.
Says Glen, We work hard to achieve this goal every year, and so far we
are the only facility in the state to have won the Platinum Award. He credits teamwork for the plants success: Thats a recurring theme here. It got
us through the upgrade, helped us win the award, and is the reason for our
ongoing success. Effluent typically contains less than 2 mg/L CBOD5, less
than 3 mg/L TSS, and less than 0.2 mg/L ammonia.

42

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

DOUBLING CAPACITY
The Lower Bird Creek plant, in northeast Tulsa on a bluff overlooking
the Port of Catoosa, is one of four wastewater facilities owned by the Tulsa
Metropolitan Utility Authority (TMUA). It serves 13,000 people. The 2012
expansion included:
Bar screen and continuous self-cleaning in-channel screen (Parkson
Aqua Guard)

Lower Bird Creek Water Pollution


Control Facility, Tulsa, Oklahoma
BUILT: |

1996, expanded in 2012


13,000
EMPLOYEES: | 8
FLOWS: | 4 mgd design, 1.2 mgd average, 8 mgd peak
TREATMENT LEVEL: | Secondary
TREATMENT PROCESS: | Oxidation ditch
RECEIVING WATER: | Bird Creek
BIOSOLIDS: | Transferred to Northside plant for processing, then land-applied
ANNUAL BUDGET: | $230,000 (operations)
WEBSITE: | www.cityoftulsa.org
GPS COORDINATES: | Latitude: 361221.81N; longitude: 954431.84W
POPULATION SERVED: |

Plant operator Kenny Friend measures


a sludge blanket in a clarifier with a
Sludge Judge tool (Nasco).

We work hard to achieve this goal every year,


and so far we are the only facility in the state
to have won the Platinum Award.

SHAWN GLEN

tpomag.com October 2016

43

Lower Bird Creek Water Pollution Control Facility


PERMIT AND PERFORMANCE (monthly averages)
CBOD5

INFLUENT

EFFLUENT

15 mg/L

<2 mg/L

TSS

30 mg/L

<3 mg/L

Fecal coliform

200 c.f.u./100 mL

<1.0 c.f.u./100 mL

Ammonia

7 mg/L

<0.2 mg/L

pH

6.5-9.0

Compliant

Plant operator Tom Collins fills a tank truck with biosolids (rolling ladder
from SafeRack).

44

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Eric DeAlba, right, plant mechanic, checks the oil in a clarifier drive as Kenny
Friend, operator, assists.

Advanced grit system including HeadCell multi-tray grit removal,


SlurryCup grit washing and Grit Snail dewatering (Hydro International)
Seepex progressive cavity sludge pumps (Grainger)
Circular clarifier (Walker Process)
Two brush aerators with variable-frequency drives
Odor control (PureAir Filtration)
Effluent water pumps (Grundfos)
Lift station pumps (Fairbanks Nijhuis)
Wastewater enters the plant through a 24-inch force main from the South
Port Lift Station and a 16-inch force main from the Spunky Creek Lift Station. After preliminary treatment, the process includes oxidation ditch aeration, final clarification, UV disinfection and post-aeration. An average of
130 gpm of plant effluent is chlorinated and used for pump seal water and
other plant processes.
The new headworks has greatly improved the operators jobs. In the
past, the staff had to remove debris by hand using pool nets and catch baskets, says Briggs. We now have fewer sludge pump stoppages and less floating debris throughout the plant. The new SCADA system allows remote
monitoring and control of all plant and lift station equipment. It includes
trend screens that operators can monitor remotely at night. The circular clarifier has improved settling compared to the old rectangular basins.
Before startup, engineering firm Black & Veatch and equipment vendors
held on-site training sessions. The vendors trained us on all the individual
pieces, and we received operations training from the engineer, who explained
how it all worked together, says Briggs. The learning curve wasnt very long,
since most of the operators had worked at our larger plants before coming here.

GOING PLATINUM

Operators work a 12-hour shift, and the plant is remotely monitored at


night by the staff at the Northside facility. Primary duties include plant monDuring plant expansion, the operations team dealt with shutdowns and
itoring, sampling, tracking and logging data every two hours, and keeping
process challenges. We took the oxidation ditch out of service for a month
up the grounds. They also assist the mechanics if needed.
to make the tie-ins for the new headworks building, to install new brush
They take a lot of pride in how the plant looks, from hosing out the
rotors and to clean out 17 years of solids buildup, Glen recalls.
buildings to mowing the grass, and everyone lends a hand to do whatever
The team diverted flow to the equalization basins while trying to keep
needs to be done, says Briggs. Theyre highly experienced with a lot of pasthe bugs happy. We had the ability to aerate 0.8 million gallons in a smaller
sion, and they take their job seriously every day.
basin, but when it came time to fill our oxidation ditch, we ended up haulUntil 2008, the Lower Bird Creek plant had no regular staff. It was
ing in close to 0.5 million gallons of seed sludge from one of our larger plants,
remotely monitored and one of the Northside plant operators would come
15 miles away, using 6,000-gallon tank trucks, Glen says.
out and take the required samples, says Glen. Zane was the first to be hired
During that time, the staff managed to meet permit. We have standard
at the plant, and he handled all the day-to-day operations. He didnt have a
operating procedures that we follow and indicators that let us know how the
cookie cutter role, but was able to make the job whatever he needed it to be.
equipment is operating, says Briggs. And scheduled maintenance keeps
Operators
have6:10
gonePM
above
everything running smoothly.
PV8021DoMoreManAD_C_Layout
1 8/1/16
Pageand
1 beyond to solve problems. Before the
expansion, they had an issue with settling in the final clarifier, says Glen.
Glen adds, During the five years that the Platinum Award covered, two
were during the plant upgrade, and another included
coming up to speed on the new equipment. So, it was
VISIT US AT
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even more of an accomplishment to win that award.
Staff empowerment is key. We strive to empower
the operations team by letting them know that this
is their plant, Glen says. They can make decisions
on their own, within prescribed parameters, and they
feel a sense of pride in their work.

HIGHLY EXPERIENCED
The team has 143 years of collective wastewater
treatment experience. Glen and Briggs hold Class A
(highest) wastewater operator licenses. Their team includes:
Operators IV Kenny Friend and Manny Verges,
both Class B license holders
Operators III Tom Collins and John Hines,
also both Class B
Mechanics III Eric DeAlba (Class C) and Al
Parker (Class D)

STORMY WEATHER
Operators at the Lower Bird Creek Water
Pollution Control Facility deal with some
extreme weather, including hot summers
and bone-chilling winters. Were prone to
ice storms, and that causes problems,
says Shawn Glen, plant superintendent.
We have power outages almost every
other year. One year a small tornado just
missed a lift station.
Fortunately, the plant has a dual power
feed. That works well, says Zane Briggs,
operations supervisor. It would take something major to disrupt both those sources.
The staff was tested during a major ice
and snowstorm in 2011. It caused hazardous conditions around the plant, unpassable
roads and intermittent power outages,
recalls Glen. It was an opportunity for the
staff to step up and show their dedication.
The team worked after normal hours and
stayed around the clock to make sure the
plant operated successfully.

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tpomag.com October 2016

45

The team at the Lower Bird Creek facility includes, from left, back row, John Hines, operator; Falan Versaw, storekeeper; Tom Collins, Kenny Friend and Manny
Verges, operators; and Eric DeAlba, mechanic; front row, Shawn Glen, plant superintendent; and Zane Briggs, operations supervisor.

This was due to short circuiting, which caused a higher-than-desired effluent TSS. Operators and mechanics worked together to design and build a
polymer feed system with storage tank, mixing system and peristaltic pump
to help the solids settleability until the new clarifier was brought online.

FUTURE IMPROVEMENTS

Shawn Glen, plant


superintendent.

46

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

With the plant expansion in the rearview mirror, the teams biggest challenge is biosolids management. Operators haul the solids 10 to 15 miles by
tanker truck to the Northside plant for processing. We have to do this every
day, and its hazardous, says Glen. We had a tanker truck roll over, and the
driver was injured. It also takes an operator away from plant operation.
A 10-mile force main under construction as of last June is designed to
allow solids to be pumped to the Northside plant. We had talked about
doing this, but the accident forced the issue and reminded us how dangerous and time-consuming the hauling is, says Glen. The main was to be completed in summer 2016.
In May 2016, the plant installed a UV disinfection system (TrojanUV
3000) to satisfy the state Department of Environmental Quality requirement
for year-round disinfection. Says Glen, We were previously required to disinfect from May to December only. We used bleach and bisulfite, but we
decided that UV was the best technology for our facility. We visited another
plant that had that system, and the staff there was very excited about it.
A primary clarifier is on the wish list, along with an updated holding
basin for diverting flow during heavy rains. The plant is designed for 8 mgd
peak flow, but when it gets to 6 mgd, we need to divert the flow, says Glen.
When the water subsides, we slowly bring the flow back to the plant.
For now, the plant is in great shape. The expansion gave us a final clar(continued)

Booth 3911

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tpomag.com October 2016

47

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Kenny Friend (left) and Manny Verges check the dissolved oxygen level in the
oxidation ditch.

ifier, which we didnt have before, says Glen. And now we have the UV system and were working on the new force main. So we feel very fortunate.
He is also thankful for the operations and maintenance team: Their
greatest success is the ability to communicate. They talk in the morning and
make sure they help each other with projects. They all pull together to get
the job done.
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TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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IN MY WORDS

True Believers
OVER NEARLY TWO DECADES, NED BEECHER AND NEBRA HAVE HELPED ELEVATE PUBLIC DEBATE
ABOUT BIOSOLIDS AND BRING RECYCLING INTO THE MAINSTREAM OF FARMING PRACTICE
By Ted J. Rulseh

or almost 20 years, Ned Beecher has led the Northeast Biosolids and
Residuals Association (NEBRA) as executive director. The organization has seen turbulent times, dealing with public controversy, local
bans on biosolids application, and various regulatory initiatives.
Through it all, NEBRA has served its members with research, workshops,
technical advice and public outreach, all aimed at gaining acceptance for
recycling of biosolids and other residuals as a beneficial practice. For his
role, Beecher received the 2015 Biosolids Management Award from the New
England Water Environment Association.
Beecher, a native of Concord, Massachusetts, was always interested in
the outdoors and environmental affairs. He earned a bachelors degree in
geology from Amherst College and a masters in resource management from
Antioch University New England. He started work life as a teacher and naturalist with Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, New Hampshire,
and later worked for Resource Management, a company in the same state
that manages municipal biosolids programs.
NEBRA was formed in late 1997, when permitting of farm fields for land
application of biosolids often led to public uprisings. Beecher became its first
and only executive director in February 1998. NEBRAs roughly 90 members include clean-water facilities, biosolids management companies, engineering firms, and some septage haulers and paper mills. Its service area
includes the New England states and Canadas Maritime Provinces and Quebec. Beecher talked about NEBRA and its accomplishments in an interview
with Treatment Plant Operator.

: What would you say is


NEBR As greatest benef it to
members?
Beecher: No. 1, we keep close
track of regulations and legislation
and new developments in the field.
No. 2, we provide a quick response
if members are wrestling with an
issue or have a particular question.
We have quite a large library now,
and were in touch with experts all
around North America. So if somebody has a technical question, we
can easily put them in touch with a
person who can answer.

Ned Beecher

: What would you cite as an


example of a key NEBRA accomplishment?
Beecher: In the early 2000s, we were facing an upset public around
land application of biosolids. Wed go into a public meeting feeling as if land
application was well regulated and controlled with a lot of science behind it.
But when we tried to explain that, people got really upset. It was very emotional and challenging. The Water Environment Research Foundation

You have to listen to people, figure out where they are, talk to them
: What was the climate like for biosolids recycling when NEBRA was formed?
about their concerns, and learn from that. Its a two-way discussion.
Beecher: It was pretty rough. There
were a lot of public issues, especially in
Its not just about educating people.
New Hampshire where 30 or 40 towns
NED BEECHER
adopted bans or very severe restrictions on
biosolids use. Even in Maine, which has long recycled about 90 percent of
(WERF) put out a request for proposals for a social-science look at public
its solids, some towns were trying to ban biosolids from use on farms. There
perceptions of biosolids. We assembled a team and met with leaders in the
was quite a lot of local public upset, mostly generated by odors.
field of environmental conflict people who understood the social science
around the siting of environmental facilities.
: How did NEBRA make an impact?
Beecher: Our biggest contribution at first was getting people in the
: What was the outcome of that exercise?
industry to be on the same page, networking together and sharing consistent
Beecher: We learned a lot. We got a good sense of why biosolids were
information. We held conferences and workshops that helped everyone think
so concerning to some people. Then we worked with WERF to put on a
about how utilities could do a better job and avoid creating the upsets. We
research symposium with diverse stakeholders, including some dedicated
also did a lot of outreach. For example, every few years we held a set of open
opponents of biosolids as well as leading researchers from around the counhouses, tours and field days for the public over a week or two. Legislators,
try. Everyone debated what the research priorities should be. It was a fascimedia people and others came. It helped get the word out about biosolids
nating process, working toward consensus. It wasnt wholly successful, but
and what was really going on. We still do outreach in different states dependit did get us talking to people rather than at people doing a better job of
ing on the current need.
communicating.
(continued)
52

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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tpomag.com October 2016

53

: From the social-science perspective, what did you learn from all this?
Beecher: A good tagline would be: Not public relations, public relationships. You have to listen to people, figure out where they are, talk to them
about their concerns, and learn from that. Its a two-way discussion. Its not
just about educating people. Its about building relationships, developing
two-way communication and allowing public involvement in biosolids programs. I think many in this profession have learned to adapt to the needs of
stakeholders and continually improve our practices. There are public utilities and biosolids managers that really get this, and others that still dont.
: Can you give an example of where NEBRA has made an impact
on regulations?
Beecher: Massachusetts had an old standard from the 1980s on the
level of molybdenum in biosolids applied to soil. It was based on concern
about molybdenosis in cattle. It was 25 ppm, or 10 ppm if being applied to a
forage crop. The standard made it impossible for Bostons biosolids pellets
Bay State Fertilizer to be used in the state to any great extent. In 2015,
we organized a workshop involving state regulators and researchers who had
done risk assessments on molybdenum. The Massachusetts Water Resources
Authority also weighed in and had considerable impact. The state Department of Environmental Protection has now proposed a new standard of 40
ppm that we recommended, and we expect it to be adopted later this year.
: What would you say are the biggest issues facing biosolids recycling today?
Beecher: The two biggest technical issues are emerging contaminants
of concern, which are trace chemicals from household products, and phosphorus. On emerging contaminants, weve tracked the research and provided
updates, and I think weve helped our stakeholders see that the likelihood
of any significant risk from those chemicals in biosolids is very low. These
chemicals are in our daily lives at much higher concentrations than in
biosolids.
: What is the issue with phosphorus?
Beecher: The phosphorus issue is more challenging. Phosphorus occurs
in biosolids often at levels higher than the crop needs. If you apply biosolids
based on the nitrogen needs of the crop, which is the common practice, you
end up applying more phosphorus than needed. Some states in our region
have laws that dont allow any phosphorus fertilizer to be applied to lawns
or turf, and sometimes in agriculture, if a soil test does not show the need.
Thats fine for commercial fertilizers where you can keep the phosphorus
out, but with biosolids, or with compost made from food waste, phosphorus
is a part of it and you cant just delete it.
What this points to is that biosolids is unbalanced as a fertilizer, and if
we can get more phosphorus out in the form of struvite at wastewater treatment plants, then well end up making a more balanced product. NEBRA
recently worked with the University of Massachusetts Extension to create a
symposium on how best to manage phosphorus in organic residuals applied
to soils.

groups around the continent. Theres a lot more understanding of biosolids


among key stakeholders around the region and country, and biosolids have
become an accepted part of soil amendment and fertilizer markets.
: What evidence would you cite to support that belief?
Beecher: For one thing, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in
its new produce safety rules under an act that Congress passed in 2012,
includes biosolids right along with manures and other fertilizers as standard
farming practice, if applied in accordance with Part 503, the U.S. EPA regulation. And the U.S. Department of Agricultures Nutrient Management
Code 590 also mentions biosolids as a common source of nutrients. Another
indication of how biosolids use is becoming more mainstream is that when
there have been legal challenges,
when courts have looked hard at the
technical arguments on both sides,
Theres a lot more
they have found in favor of biosolids
application being an appropriate
understanding of biofarming activity. And, here in
solids among key
NEBRAs region, there are fewer
public upsets around biosolids land
stakeholders around
application programs.

the region and country,


and biosolids have
become an accepted
part of soil amendment
and fertilizer markets.

: How would you assess the


importance of NEBRA and organizations like it in the years ahead?
Beecher: Biosolids management is a major expense item for
public utilities, yet the attention paid
to it is still low in many cases. The
hassles and the costs that can come
NED BEECHER
when a program doesnt work right
are significant. In the past, the EPA
had a large team of people working on biosolids, but in the last 10 to 15 years,
that has diminished a lot. State regulatory agencies have gone the same way
in most cases.
To me, organizations like NEBRA, the National Biosolids Partnership,
the California association biosolids program, Northwest Biosolids and the
Mid-Atlantic Biosolids Association have become more important, as have
the Water Environment Federation and National Association of Clean Water
Agencies biosolids programs. Where else are people looking at policy and
making sure that biosolids recycling is defended when needed, that outreach
happens, and that information and expertise continue to be shared? As a
profession, we cant rely on regulatory agencies or others to speak for us.
NEBRA has been a great team effort. I give kudos to our board of directors and our past presidents who have led the organization well and helped
it grow. It is really critical for an organization like ours to have a strong volunteer board and an active, engaged membership. I enjoy working with them
every day these are dedicated, thoughtful professionals. Its an honor to
work in this field.

: How would you briefly sum up NEBRAs accomplishments on


behalf of members?
Beecher: I would boil it down to just being there. Were not a big organization. There are a lot of things I wish we could do. But just being here to
make our members and the public aware of issues that come up, and to speak
for biosolids, has been the most valuable thing. Our members have said they
appreciate our tracking and commenting on regulations and legislation for
them, because they dont always have the time.
: How would you say that attitudes toward biosolids have changed
in NEBRAs nearly 20 years of existence?
Beecher: My sense is that things are better now than in the 1990s. I think
more people know what biosolids are. I believe weve had success through
NEBRA and through the work of our members and other individuals and

54

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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TECHNOLOGY
DEEP DIVE

2
1

1. The Pondus process uses caustic soda for pH change along with hot water to hydrolyze
sludge efficiently and improve the digestion process.
2. The process uses a circular reactor built for 2- to 2 1/2-hour detention time depending on
the feed-material characteristics.

An Aid to Digestion
PONDUS PROCESS FROM CNP HELPS ANAEROBIC DIGESTERS PRODUCE MORE BIOGAS
WHILE ALSO IMPROVING DEWATERING EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING POLYMER CONSUMPTION
By Ted J. Rulseh

lean-water plants looking toward energy self-sufficiency often seek


more biogas output from their anaerobic digesters. Some get it by
adding food waste and fats, oils and grease to the primary and waste
activated sludges.
CNP - Technology Water and Biosolids Corp. has another approach to
gas boosting in its PONDUS thermochemical hydrolysis process. In a reactor upstream from the digesters, hot water and caustic soda are used to break
the cell membranes in waste activated sludge. The hydrolyzed material is
then fed to the digesters along with primary sludge. Being more readily
digestible, this material enables the digestion process to increase gas production substantially. In addition, the process makes the resulting biosolids
easier to dewater and with less polymer.
CNP recently commissioned its first PONDUS installation in the United
States at the wastewater treatment plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Gerhard
Forstner, company president, talked about the process in an interview with
Treatment Plant Operator.

: What was the market need behind development of this process?


Forstner: The main motivation was to increase biogas production,
and a very close second was to improve dewaterability. Later we discovered
the potential for reducing polymer consumption and improving digester
loading rates. The process came out of German technology that was developed in the mid-2000s.

56

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

: What drove the interest in greater biogas production?


Forstner: In the municipal marketplace in Europe, plants larger than
2 to 3 mgd typically use anaerobic digestion to produce biogas to fuel combined heat and power units. They could produce electricity probably for 12
cents per kWh, and they could buy utility power for about the same rate. So
it made economic sense to break even producing electricity while producing
free heat for the digesters, or to dry biosolids. Another possibility was to use
hot water to hydrolyze the solids. That drove the development of the PONDUS technology.
: Is this technology a thermal process?
Forstner: Not entirely. It combines caustic soda sodium hydroxide
for pH change along with hot water. That combination enables us to hydrolyze the sludge efficiently.
: Where in the solids process is this technology deployed?
Forstner: Upstream of the anaerobic digesters. In the digestion process, there are two main steps. The first is hydrolysis, where the cells in the
waste activated sludge are broken down. That typically takes seven to 10 days
in the digester. Then the next step is the production of methane. So what we
do is take the hydrolysis step out of the digester. We predigest the food in a
reactor before it goes into the digester. That makes the digester more efficient because all the bugs are immediately focused on producing methane.
(continued)

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tpomag.com October 2016

57

We predigest the food in a reactor before it goes into the


digester. That makes the digester more efficient because
all the bugs are immediately focused on producing methane.
GERHARD FORSTNER

: Does this process work on both primary and waste activated sludges?
Forstner: The process uses only waste activated sludge, because that is the
sludge that is much harder to digest. We then blend the hydrolyzed material with
primary sludge and feed the mixture into the digester at about 100 degrees F.
: How exactly does the hydrolysis process work?
Forstner: We first thicken the waste activated sludge to 7 to 10 percent
solids. We then dose that with about 1,500 parts per million of 50 percent
caustic soda. Next we mix one part of that fresh sludge with two parts of
hydrolyzed sludge recycled from the PONDUS reactor. That reduces the viscosity by 80 to 90 percent. This material passes through a heat exchanger
and enters the reactor.
: What happens inside the reactor?
Forstner: Its a circular reactor built for two- to 2 1/2-hour detention
time depending on the characteristics of the incoming material. About 10
inches inside the outer reactor shell is a smaller ring. We feed the sludge at
the lowest section of the reactor, about 5 inches from the bottom, between
the inner and outer rings.
The sludge rises toward the top of the reactor bed and is heated to 150 to
170 degrees F. After about 1 1/2 hours, it overflows from the outer ring into
the inner ring, where there is another half-hour of detention time. During
this process, the caustic soda disintegrates the cell membranes, releasing
organic acids and neutralizing the pH from 11 to 7. After another half-hour,

the hydrolyzed sludge is withdrawn from the bottom of


the reactor. Heat from the hydrolyzed sludge can be captured to heat the digesters.

: What is the impact of this process on the


anaerobic digestion phase?
Forstner: The material sent to the digester is totally
different from waste activated sludge. It is mixed with
primary sludge before feeding to the digester. Most of the food is predigested,
and methane production can start immediately. That means we can have
reduced detention time in the digesters, or we can load the digesters with
more solids. We get higher volatile solids reduction; lower organic content
means we get higher dewaterability and drier cake solids.
: What is the effect on biogas production?
Forstner: We typically increase biogas production by 20 to 25 percent.
We also reduce polymer consumption by 15 to 20 percent, and the solids cake
is drier by 3 to 5 percentage points. Energy consumption is 0.9 to 1 kWh per cubic
meter of sludge. The payback time for a system is typically three to five years.
: What experience does this technology have in full-scale commercial operation?
Forstner: There are seven installations in Europe; the first was installed
in 2007. The process is installed in plants as small as 5 mgd and as large as
150 mgd.
: Are there any other potential benefits to this hydrolysis process?
Forstner: It can be combined with phosphorus recovery. You can use a
filter or other device to separate the solid and liquid phases of the hydrolyzed
material. The liquid phase is rich in phosphorus that can be recovered as
struvite. The system can also be configured to achieve Class A biosolids.

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58

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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61

product focus

from the center feed well to the effluent weir located around the periphery of the tank. 630/837-5640; www.lakeside-equipment.com.

Tanks, Structures
and Components
By Craig Mandli

Baffles/Booms/Weirs
SMITH & LOVELESS
OPTIFLOW 270
The OPTIFLOW 270 baffle system
from Smith & Loveless addresses the
OPTIFLOW 270 baffle system
numerous 270-degree vortex grit chamfrom Smith & Loveless
bers that are installed throughout
North America and elsewhere. It is a simple retrofit baffle system that
allows 270-degree grit systems to achieve improved removal efficiencies. Vortex grit removal systems designed to meet previous standards
can be upgraded to remove 95 percent of grit down to 150 microns with
the retrofit. The baffle system achieves improved efficiencies by directing the flow toward the hopper for an additional pass along the chamber floor, reducing the weir effect at the outlet and ensuring ideal velocities
at all times. The retrofit system is available not only for flat-floor vortex
grit chambers, but also as a conversion system for sloped and coneshaped grit chambers. It can be installed for new systems requiring
270-degree layouts. 800/898-9122; www.smithandloveless.com.

Buildings/Structures
GLOBAL TREAT
FIBERGLASS SHELTERS
Fiberglass shelters from Global Treat can be
used to protect chlorination and dechlorination
equipment from environment elements, enhancing
equipment life. They are corrosion-resistant, weatherproof and low-maintenance. Prefabricated buildFiberglass shelters
ings are made of fiberglass-reinforced skins with 1
from Global Treat
inch of isocyanurate foam-insulating core and a
white, UV-protective gel coat both inside and out. Standard building
sizes range from 2 by 4 feet to 12 by 12 feet. Custom dimensions and
door sizes are available. 800/370-4410; www.globaltreat.com.

Clarifiers
LAKESIDE EQUIPMENT
CORPORATION SPIRAFLO
Influent enters the periphery of the
Spiraflo peripheral-feed, center takeoff
clarifier from Lakeside Equipment Corporation, with the flow moving to the center for removal by a centrally located effluent
trough. This flow pattern is the opposite
of a center feed clarifier, where the
Spiraflo clarifier from Lakeside
influent enters at the center of the
Equipment Corporation
tank and moves radially out ward

LEOPOLD - A XYLEM BRAND CLARI-VAC


The Clari-Vac floating biosolids collector from
Leopold - a Xylem Brand uses a siphon that provides
a simple and efficient means of removing biosolids
from rectangular clarification basins for both secondary wastewater and potable water applications. Minimized maintenance, energy consumption and
operational costs are achieved through providing a
reliable solution capable of handling varying system
biosolids production volumes. Stainless
Clari-Vac biosolids collector
steel collection headers siphon biosolfrom Leopold - a Xylem Brand
ids from the floor of the tank (up to 12
feet per minute), with no stirring action involved. A degassing system
prevents the loss of flow capacity, reducing system downtime. A fully
self-supporting rigid structural design allows for trouble-free maintenance during tank drain-down periods. There are no moving parts below
the waters surface and no downtime to drain the tank for part maintenance or replacement. 855/995-4261; www.xylem.com/treatment.

SCHREIBER PERIPHERAL
DRIVE CLARIFIER
Peripheral drive clarifiers from Schreiber
are designed for applications such as stormwater and primary and secondary clarification. The peripheral drive system uses
leverage rather than center-drive torque to
Peripheral drive
rotate
the scraper and skimming assembly,
clarifiers from Schreiber
resulting in a simplified mechanical system. All
the equipment necessary for the continuous removal of floatables and
settled solids is suspended from either a rotating bridge or, for smaller
units, a lightweight rotating beam arm. The rotating skimming equipment removes floatables regardless of wind direction, and the helical
scrapers transport settled solids to the center of the basin in a single revolution. The design allows for the lifting of equipment above the water
level for inspection or maintenance without having to dewater the basin.
205/655-7466; www.schreiberwater.com.

Coatings and Linings


CORTEC CORPORATION VPCI-371
VpCI-371 high-temperature aluminum solvent from Cortec Corporation is a silicone coating that provides corrosion resistance on metal
substrates. The coating will dry tack-free to 5B
hardness in about 20 minutes at room temperature, and will achieve 9H hardness after heatVpCI-371 solvent from
ing. The coating is heat stable to 1,200 degrees
Cortec Corporation
F and offers prolonged heat resistance from
400 to 1,200 degrees F. 800/426-7832; www.cortecvci.com.

Digesters
LYSTEK INTERNATIONAL THERMAL
HYDROLYSIS SYSTEM
The thermal hydrolysis system from Lystek International optimizes
digesters and biological nutrient removal systems, contributing to diver-

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62

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

sion and sustainability. Nonhazardous materials


are transformed into nutrient-rich, federally recognized biofertilizers and other multipurpose products. High-speed shearing, alkali and low-pressure
steam are applied simultaneously in a reactor to
convert organic materials into LysteGro, a commercial-grade, Class A EQ biofertilizer with
applications in horticulture, agriculture and soil
revitalization. The end product can also
Thermal hydrolysis system
be used as a safe, cost-effective alternafrom Lystek International
tive carbon source (LysteCarb) in BNR
systems. When used in conjunction with anaerobic digestion (LysteMize), the system can reduce volumes by 25 percent while boosting biogas production by 40 percent. The biogas can then be converted into
green energy to help power wastewater treatment plants. 888/501-6508;
www.lystek.com.

Grating/Handrails/Ladders
FIBERGRATE COMPOSITE
STRUCTURES DYNARAIL
Combining corrosion resistance, long life and a lowmaintenance design, Dynarail fiberglass reinforced plastic ladder systems from Fibergrate Composite Structures
are designed and manufactured to be easily installed
with no guesswork involved. Components are lightweight
and easy to fabricate. Combining its
Dynarail ladder systems from
low cost of installation with low mainFibergrate Composite Structures
tenance and long life, it offers a low life
cycle cost. The line includes ladders, standard walk-throughs and safety
cages. Ladder rungs with heavily serrated flutes ensure slip-resistant
footholds, increasing worker safety. The ladders are useful in applications such as manholes, pits, pump stations, wet wells and other access
points where covers are used. 800/527-4043; www.fibergrate.com.

Mixers
FLYGT - A XYLEM BRAND 4320
The 4320 low-speed, submersible wastewater mixer from Flygt - a Xylem brand has builtin speed regulation to optimize control over the
mixers thrust for continuous process results and lower energy consumption. Coupling an integrated drive
4320 wastewater mixer
with a synchronous motor, the mixer elimfrom Flygt - a Xylem brand
inates the need for an external variablefrequency drive. Once installed, the mixer thrust or speed can be altered
to that facilitys specific conditions, reducing energy consumption. Applications include activated sludge treatment, sludge holding tanks and
digesters, as well as biogas applications. Mixers have a variable speed
of up to 70 rpm and are available in two- or three-blade models with a
range of propellers from 4.6 to 8.2 feet in diameter. The backswept design
ensures clog-free operation. Speed controls can be adjusted using a small
operator panel mounted tank-side or in the control room for easy accessibility. Remote communication enables the mixer to be accessed from
a central control system. 855/995-4261; www.xylem.com/treatment.

KRUGER USA STAMO MIXERS


Stamo mixers from Kruger USA are available in typical round, solid
shafts or square, hollow shafts for deeper tank applications. These square

shafts are constructed of structural carbon steel


and cladded with stainless steel (304 or 316), providing increased fatigue life and tensile strength.
With less hanging weight per foot of length,
square hollow shafts require less power to operate, offer lower installation costs, and allow for
single-piece shafts to be used. 919/677Stamo mixers from
8310; www.veoliawatertech.com.
Kruger USA

KSB AMAPROP 1000


Midsized Amaprop 1000 hybrid mixers from KSB can serve as part of an optimized mixing procedure that can reduce
operational energy needs, increasing energy
output and revenues for the plant. They are
optimized for each mixing task to
ensure a specific flow volume and
Amaprop 1000 hybrid
mixers from KSB
deliver enough thrust to move the
medium through all sections of the
fermenting tank. Use of multiple, properly positioned mixing units,
each of which processes the reduced, diluted material created by
other units, can help prevent short-circuiting flow paths and support the best possible transformation process. They combine all the
benefits of an agitator with the turbulence generation of a traditional
mixer. If substrate viscosity increases, they can adjust the conveying action to offset the increase and maintain optimal flow. 804/2221818; www.ksbusa.com.

RWL WATER HURRICANE


The Hurricane submersible aspirating aerator/mixer from RWL Water is
designed for mixing and aerating deep
tanks that have a small surface area,
including aerobic digesters, biosolids
holding tanks, activated sludge basins,
Hurricane aerator/mixer
flow equalization basins, post-aeration
from RWL Water
basins and sequencing batch reactors. It
provides 360-degree submersed fine-bubble aeration at the base, up
to 26 feet deep. The mixer is freestanding, with adjustable diffuser
pipes to fit any basin shape. The high-speed rotating impeller propels water at high velocities through the extended diffuser pipes,
creating agitation and influencing a large mixing area. It grinds and
cuts solids for maximum contact between bacteria, oxygen and waste
material. The hardened 17-4 stainless steel impeller allows for operation in applications with up to 4 percent solids. It has a chemicalduty, explosion-proof, water-cooled motor, and is designed to withstand
cold temperatures. 763/746-8400; www.rwlwater.com.

SPX FLOW TECHNOLOGY


LIGHTNIN CLEAN EDGE
The Lightnin Clean Edge impeller-shaft
assembly from SPX Flow Technology is
for use where a non-ragging mixer impeller is indicated or needed. It sheds all
fibrous debris while delivering high hydrofoil impeller performance. It includes a shaft guard
design that eliminates buildup. No part
Lightnin Clean Edge
of the wetted parts is a rag collector.
impeller-shaft assembly
800/252-5200; www.spx.com.

from SPX Flow Technology

(continued)

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tpomag.com October 2016

63

product focus

Tanks, Structures and Components

Storage Tanks

TIDEFLEX MIXING
SYSTEM (TMS)

C&E PLASTICS MOBILE


LIQUID STORAGE TANKS

The Tideflex Mixing System (TMS)


eliminates short-circuiting and water stagnation and achieves complete mixing in
water storage tanks. It has a check valve
originally created to solve backflow probTideflex Mixing
lems in outfall pipes, but since developed
System (TMS)
into a variable-orifice inlet nozzle that
provides superior mixing characteristics. When used in the TMS, variable-orifice nozzles optimize jet velocity at all flow rates and discharge
an elliptically shaped jet, which produces rapid and complete mixing
that improves water quality. The TMS also separates the inlet and outlet with one manifold pipe so short-circuiting is eliminated. 800/7560044; www.tideflex.com.

Mobile liquid storage tanks from C&E


Plastics are made out of polypropylene, a
Mobile liquid storage
corrosion-resistant, extremely durable and
tanks from C&E Plastics
long-lasting plastic. They are inherently
well insulated and come standard with 23-inch manways for ease of use.
A smooth interior design and sloped floors for easy cleaning are incorporated. The encapsulated steel corrugation of the outside walls prevents
any weakness in structure. Custom designs are available to meet unique
specifications. 724/947-4949; www.ceplastics.com.

VAUGHAN COMPANY
TURBO MIXER
The Turbo Mixer propeller mixer from Vaughan
Company is mounted vertically inside an 18-inch elbow.
It can mix a pit with only 1 foot of liquid above the floor
and incorporates an upper cutter above the propeller to
stop wrapping and fibrous material binding and to protect the mechanical seal. It can be belt- or gearbox-driven
and can be used in anoxic zones, oxidation ditches and
mixed liquor applications. 360/249-4042;
Turbo Mixer propeller mixer
www.chopperpumps.com.
from Vaughan Company

WESTECH ENGINEERING
EXTREME DUTY
Extreme Duty sludge mixers from WesTech Engineering provide vigorous mixing of digester contents
to prevent stratification and improve the anaerobic
process. They reliably speed gas production while
reducing foaming and scum accumulation. They were
originally developed to reduce the high service costs
of egg-shaped digester mixers, but are now used for
maximum efficiency and durability in
Extreme Duty sludge mixers
all digester-mixing applications. 801/265from WesTech Engineering
1000; www.westech-inc.com.

Skimmers
PARK PROCESS SKIMPRO
The SkimPro floating skimmer from Park
Process is designed to be used in backwash
receiving tanks to skim clear water and recycle
it back to the clean-water flow. The unit is constructed of 316 stainless steel with a skimmer head
that is designed to handle whatever flow is
SkimPro floating skimmer
required for the particular application. 855/511from Park Process
7275; www.parkprocess.com.

HAWKINS DOUBLE-WALL
STORAGE TANKS
Double-wall storage tanks from Hawkins are
available in a variety of sizes ranging from 10 to
12,500 gallons, in a variety of shapes and styles.
Their tank-in-a-tank design provides total containment protection with the big space-saving
advantage of a double-wall tank. The units conStorage tanks
sist
of a primary tank with a secondary outer
from Hawkins
containment tank with the capacity of 115 to 120
percent of the inner tanks capacity, exceeding EPA standards. A variety
of tank accessories are available. 800/328-5460; www.hawkinsinc.com.

JDV EQUIPMENT CORPORATION


DOUBLE MEMBRANE
BIOGAS HOLDER
The Double Membrane Biogas
Holder from JDV Equipment Corporation allows variable biogas storage within the inner membrane at
Double Membrane Biogas Holder
constant pressure during gas profrom JDV Equipment Corporation
duction and usage, while the airinflated outer membrane provides gas pressure and protection. The outer
membrane is constructed of a high-tech cross-woven fabric, coated with
PVC and UV protection. Sensors monitor gas volume, allowing operators to optimize the use of biogas to feed generators or heating systems.
973/366-6556; www.jdvequipment.com.

MID-STATE TANK CO. / ARTHUR


CUSTOM TANK STORAGE TANKS
Mid-State Tank Co. / Arthur Custom Tank manufactures aluminum and stainless steel tanks for storage. Leg tanks and flat-bottom tanks are available.
Several options are available to satisfy particular
requirements. Tanks are built in an authorized ASME
vessel manufacturing facility, and are UL 142 authorized and ISO 9001-2008 QMS registered.
Storage tanks from Mid-State
800/722-8384; www.midstatetank.com.
Tank Co. / Arthur Custom Tank

PCI MANUFACTURING SOLUTIONS


WASTE CONTAINERS
Designed for transport by roll-off trucks, waste containers from PCI
Manufacturing Solutions are commonly used to transport industrial and

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

64

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

paint waste or other waste types, like construction or demolition,


that require removing large quantities of material. Watertight rolloffs and dewatering boxes have a steel screen covering the interior
of the box, leaving the gate end open for easy dumping. They work
for freeing water from things like
biosolids or slurry from a work site.
Rectangular and tub-style containers are constructed to withstand rough
treatment and environments and hold
even the bulkiest waste. The tub and
Waste containers from PCI
rectangular
styles tapered sides allow
Manufacturing Solutions
customers to stack them easily for
shipping or to save space. Any waste container can be customized.
800/256-5633; www.pcimfgsolutions.com.

Tank Inspection/Repair
HAWK MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS
CENTURION GUIDE RADAR
The Centurion Guide Radar from Hawk Measurement Systems uses time-domain reflectometry, passing concentrated radar pulses through a rod or cable
from the sensor to the material being measured. The
dielectric constant of the measured material causes a
change in impedance that
Centurion Guide Radar from Hawk
in turn develops a wave
Measurement Systems
reflection. That reflec-

tion is sent back up the probe to the sensor, where the transit time is
translated into distance using time of flight and time expansion. It is
able to measure extremely low dielectric (1.5) to provide precise and
continuous measurement. Since pulses are directed via a guide, factors
like surface turbulence, foams, pressure, dust, vacuum, vapors, temperature, dielectric constant or tank obstructions do not influence the measurement. It offers auto-calibration to any dielectric constant greater
than or equal to 1.5, adjustable sensitivity and simple setup. 978/3043000; www.hawkmeasure.com.

NASCO SLUDGE JUDGE


The Sludge Judge from Nasco can be
used to take accurate readings of settleable
solids, 5 percent or less, in a variety of liquids to any depth. It is ideal for sewage treatment pla nt s , chem ic a l pla nt s a nd
food-processing facilities where accurate
sample levels of settleable solids in noncaustic materials are needed. The unit holds
approximately 3 ounces per foot. It comes
in 5-foot sections of 3/4-inch plastic
pipe with screw-type connectors. The
Sludge Judge from Nasco
top section includes a nylon rope for
raising and lowering the sampler. Individual sections can be combined
as required to achieve the length needed. Do not use in liquids over 165
degrees F. 800/558-9595; www.enasco.com.
(continued)

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

tpomag.com October 2016

65

product focus

Tanks, Structures and Components

Tanks
AMERICAN FIBERGLASS
TANK REPAIR
LINING AND REPAIR
SERVICES
Fiberglass lining and repair services
from American Fiberglass Tank Repair
can help extend an FRP tanks useful
life. The lining systems use todays resin
Fiberglass lining and repair
and veil components to upgrade existing
services from American
tanks beyond their original factory stanFiberglass Tank Repair
dard coatings, as technicians work with
resin manufacturers to pinpoint the latest resin and veil formulations
compatible with existing tank substrates. Techs use custom-blended
isophthalic and terephthalic polyester, vinylester, and epoxy resins, as
well as over 45 fiberglass mat, chopped strand, Nexus, Harlar and carbon veil laminates. They offer tank linings, repair, inspection, insulation, and nozzle repair services at the facility, adapting to existing
schedules. 877/427-0090; www.americanfiberglasstank.com.

IMPERIAL INDUSTRIES ONE-PIECE


WELDED SILOS
One-piece welded silos from Imperial Industries are manufactured
up to 16 feet in diameter in steel, aluminum or stainless steel. They are
custom designed with options including skirted tanks, legged tanks,

fabrication of almost any hopper


or cone design, Polane urethane
protection process, turnkey processing systems for OEMs to minimize time and difficulty on field
installation and reducing OEMs
One-piece silos from
labor and shipping costs, and
Imperial Industries
OSHA-approved ladders, cages,
stairways, platforms and guardrails. They can be used in a variety of
applications, including storage of lime, soda ash and carbon, as well as
water treatment media vessels for processing biosolids. 800/558-2945;
www.imperialind.com.

SUPERIOR TANK BOLTED STEEL TANKS


Bolted steel tanks from Superior Tank are available with steel roofs
as well as open-top configurations, and can be used as storage tanks, clarifiers and anaerobic digesters. They are delivered directly to the job site
as complete kits. Steel panels and other main components are prefabricated, including factory-applied powder coat
or hot-dipped galvanized finish. Tanks range
in size from 4,000 to 3.5 million gallons,
and are designed with a variety of industry
standards, including AWWA, NFPA and
FM approvals. Several powder-coating formulas are available, including variations for
Bolted steel tanks
potable water and corrosive wastewater.
from Superior Tank
888/499-8109; www.superiortank.com.

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

For FREE information on these products, check the box(es) below:


Baffles/Booms/Weirs
Smith & Loveless OPTIFLOW 270 baffle system
Buildings/Structures
Global Treat fiberglass shelters
Clarifiers
Lakeside Equipment Corporation Spiraflo clarifier
Leopold - a Xylem Brand Clari-Vac biosolids collector
Schreiber peripheral drive clarifier
Coatings and Linings
Cortec Corporation VpCI-371 solvent
Digesters
Lystek International thermal hydrolysis system
Grating/Handrails/Ladders
Fibergrate Composite Structures Dynarail ladder systems
Mixers
Flygt - a Xylem brand 4320 wastewater mixer
Kruger USA Stamo mixers
KSB Amaprop 1000 hybrid mixers
RWL Water Hurricane aerator/mixer
SPX Flow Technology Lightnin Clean Edge
impeller-shaft assembly
Tideflex Mixing System (TMS)
Vaughan Company Turbo Mixer propeller mixer

Connect with us
66

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

WesTech Engineering Extreme Duty sludge mixers


Skimmers
Park Process SkimPro floating skimmer
Storage Tanks
C&E Plastics mobile liquid storage tanks
Hawkins storage tanks
JDV Equipment Corporation Double Membrane
Biogas Holder
Mid-State Tank Co. / Arthur Custom Tank storage tanks
PCI Manufacturing Solutions waste containers

PRINT NAME:

Tank Inspection/Repair
Hawk Measurement Systems Centurion Guide Radar
Nasco Sludge Judge
Tanks
American Fiberglass Tank Repair fiberglass lining and
repair services
Imperial Industries one-piece silos
Superior Tank bolted steel tanks

FREE subscription to TPO magazine

TITLE:

FACILITY NAME:
MAILING ADDRESS:
CITY:

STATE:

PHONE:

CELL PHONE:

FAX:

EMAIL:

ZIP:

Scan and email to: nicole.labeau@colepublishing.com / Fax to: 715-546-3786


Mail to: COLE Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 220, Three Lakes WI 54562

O1016

Facebook.com/TPOmag Twitter.com/TPOmag
Plus.google.com Youtube.com/TPOmagazine
Linkedin.com/company/treatment-plant-operator-magazine

The Triton Screw Centrifugal Pump combines the benefits of Vaughans UNMATCHED
RELIABILITY with the advantages of highly efficient, non-clog performance. Tritons screw
centrifugal impeller is ideal for handling thick sludges, large solids, shear sensitive fluids
and delicate or highly abrasive material.

Booth 1516

- Steep performance curves


- Heavy-duty power frames
- Expedite pumps and parts availability

See videos, drawings, and details at ChopperPumps.com or call 888.249.CHOP

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

67

case studies

TANKS, STRUCTURES AND COMPONENTS

Bolted tank helps city meet growing


potable water demand

Problem

The city of Dickinson, North Dakota, faced difficulty with its reservoir
water system. As the community grew, low water pressure threatened to
impair fire protection and became an issue in the developing areas.

Solution

The city needed more water storage.


Factors considered were the appearance of the tank, tank maintenance
and cost-effectiveness, the tanks ability to function with the existing reservoirs, and the tank location. A stainless
steel standpipe reservoir tank was
the solution. American Structures
erected a 520,000-gallon-capacity bolted
stainless steel tank that requires little
maintenance, handles fluctuating flows
and functions well with the existing infrastructure. The city added a solaroperated mixer to protect water quality and save energy.

RESULT:
The issues of reservoir capacity, low water pressure and fire protection capability were rectified. 715/235-4225; www.ameristruc.com.

By Craig Mandli

Company evaluates, repairs 40-year-old tank

Problem

The Lewisville (Texas) Water Treatment Plant needed to rehabilitate a


40-year-old, 1-million-gallon conventionally reinforced clearwell tank. An
underwater inspection confirmed leakage through cracks and joints in the
floor and wall, along with structural deficiencies at various column bases
and pipe penetrations. The concrete exterior was weathered, and the access
hatches were inoperable.

Solution

DN Tanks Concrete
Tank Services (CTS) evaluated the tank and failed previous repairs, and developed
a plan that included applying
an elastomeric waterproofing
material on the interior floor,
floor joints and column bases,
along with structural repair
to the inlet pipe. CTS also cleaned and restored the deteriorated concrete,
applied a high-performance decorative coating, designed new hatch curbs
and installed two new aluminum roof access hatches.

RESULT:
The city now enjoys a refurbished tank that will have an extended
life and comply with Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
requirements. 800/662-8486; www.dntankscts.com.

Fabric building provides efficient sludge bed cover

Problem

In the past 10 years, the village of Huntley, Illinois, has grown from
6,000 to more than 23,000 residents. The villages two activated sludge
wastewater treatment plants needed covered storage for biosolids. We get
charged by the cubic yard, says Steve Zonta, utilities superintendent.
When stored without cover, it would get rained on and grow in mass.

Solution

The team chose a Hercules Truss Arch Building. I saw a ClearSpan


catalog, spoke to a truss arch sales specialist, and realized that a fabric
structure would be a cost-effective way to solve our problem, says Adrian
Pino, chief wastewater operator. We already had a wood
structure with a metal roof at
the East Wastewater Treatment Plant, and the structure
we chose came in at less than a
third of what the other structure cost.

RESULT:
With a 77- by 96-foot building, the village can store up to 13,000
cubic yards of material under cover. The warranty and the fact that
the building could be engineered to specific snow and wind loads were
important, says Pino. It proved that this wasnt going to be just a temporary solution. 866/643-1010; www.clearspan.com.

68

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Turnkey solution eliminates downtime


and improves performance

Problem

The Grass Valley (California) Wastewater Treatment Plant serving


12,000 residents had chain and scraper systems approaching end of life,
burdening the operations and maintenance. When the collector system in
two of the tanks became inoperable due to a breakdown of the shaft drive
system, only one tank remained operational, threatening shutdown of the
entire system.

Solution

The city commissioned an


upgrade to Envirex Chain and
Scraper collections systems
from Evoqua Water Technologies. The system uses nonmetallic chain with a lightweight
design for easy installation and
maintenance. The existing tripleoutput drive system was replaced with three individual drives to provide
operational flexibility, simplify maintenance and reduce costs.

RESULT:
The turnkey solution was provided under a tight timeline. Downtime and maintenance issues were eliminated, and the systems
increased solids removal efficiency. 800/524-6324; www.evoqua.com.

Grit tanks covered to help address odor concerns

Problem

The Georgetown (Ontario) Wastewater Treatment Plant was built in


1960 in a remote area, but in the mid-1990s, houses were built less than 110
yards from the property line. Although plant management introduced several odor control technologies, including oxidizers, vaporizers, misters,
ozone and carbon systems, the neighbors still complained. The staff identified its grit tanks as a significant source of odors.

Solution

Geomembrane Technologies designed and fabricated two structurally supported covers for
the 8- by 33-foot grit tanks. The
retractable covers consist of a
high-strength,
UV-protected,
coated fabric tensioned over a
low-profile aluminum arched
frame. Foul air from below the
covers and inside the grit building is withdrawn and treated in
a carbon system.

Skimmer effective in removing


surface scum at chemical plant

Problem

A specialty chemical manufacturer in Deer Park, Texas, was having


issues with a circular clarifier. The unit uses a simplistic scum skimmer
that was inefficient and ineffective. The scum buildup created operations
and maintenance problems.

Solution

The manufacturer installed


a custom-designed surface
skimmer system from
Kusters Water/Hi-Tech.
The system was adapted to fit
the clarifiers and included two
full-radius collection arms
with pivoting skimmer heads.

RESULT:
The new design is much more efficient and effective. 800/264-7005;
www.kusterswater.com.

RESULT:
The covers have helped the plant make progress against odors and
improve relations with neighbors. The covers control odors and easily
retract, meeting access requirements. One person can open the covers
for routine inspections. Covering the grit tanks was one of the most
effective things we could do to further reduce the potential for odors,
says Wendy Derjugin, plant operations supervisor. 506/449-0993;
www.gticovers.com.

Covered digester system helps


eliminate odor problems

Problem

The city of Madison (South Dakota) Wastewater Treatment Plant operated an anaerobic digestion system. Odors from excessive ammonia accumulation and foaming were prevalent. The system also had operation and
maintenance issues dealing with methane, and gas vents froze during
winter.

Solution

The city hired Banner


& Associates to design a
new aerobic digestion system. The company retrofitted the two anaerobic
digestion tanks with an
Ovivo USA Airbeam
Cover Aerobic Digestion System to minimize odors and operating and capital costs.

RESULT:
Biosolids enter the digesters at 2.5 to 4 percent solids; material
exits at 1.5 to 2 percent solids. Solids reduction is achieved by maintaining temperature control, aeration and mixing. Solids reduction
ranges from 40 to 60 percent. Ammonia concentrations are consistently
below 2 mg/L in each digester. 512/834-6000; www.ovivowater.com.

Berm cracking issues at tank terminal site solved


using geosynthetic cementitious composite mats

Problem

Asphalt emulsion had been used for years as hard armor berm protection for a secondary containment system at a tank terminal site in the state
of Washington. However, frequent cracking of the berm led to high maintenance and repair costs and operation disturbances from recoating every five
to seven years.

Solution

In late 2014, the asset owner selected Milliken Infrastructure Solutions Concrete Cloth GCCM, a flexible, concrete-impregnated fabric
that hardens on hydration to form a durable, waterproof and fire-resistant
concrete layer. It helps reduce installation time and the maintenance associated with slope erosion, vegetation growth and animal burrowing. Sandbags were first used to elevate the berm height to meet requirements. Bulk
rolls of the cloth were then spooled down to cover the berm and fixed to the
concrete infrastructure. The
cloth was placed into an anchor
trench and backfilled with a
compacted asphalt road base on
the inside and outside of the
berm. Finally, the solution was
hydrated using a high-volume
hose attached to a water hydrant.

RESULT:
The new surface minimized daily operation disturbances and upgraded the secondary containment berm to allow for possible expansions. It was installed in
seven days using minimal personnel. It has drastically reduced maintenance costs and safety concerns while improving impermeability and
aesthetics. 864/503-2020; www.milliken.com.
(continued)

tpomag.com October 2016

69

case studies

TANKS, STRUCTURES AND COMPONENTS

Insulated cover makes oxidation


oval more efficient

Fiberglass buildings provide quick solution


to cover existing equipment

Problem

Problem

Solution

Solution

A municipality in northern Illinois relied on an oxidation oval for


wastewater treatment. However, cold weather created problems; the city
needed to improve system efficiency during winter.

The facility upgraded


with insulated covers from
Industrial & Environmental Concepts (IEC).
The plant team chose a
floating insulated cover on
the oxidation oval.

RESULT:
Insulating the water
surface reduced heat loss and improved anaerobic and aerobic processes, enabling reliable year-round treatment. The system performs
successfully all year. 952/829-0731; www.ieccovers.com.

The East Norriton-Plymouth-Whitpain (Pennsylvania) Joint Sewer


Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant had two large pieces of equipment
that needed to be covered.

The authority chose RM


Products to design, fabricate and deliver a 12-footwide by 44-foot-long by
12-foot-high
fiberglass
building and a 20-foot-wide
by 40-foot-long by 11-foothigh fiberglass building to
cover the equipment.

RESULT:
Using RMs modular design, the buildings were erected around the
equipment. RM provided a supervisor to oversee the job, which was
completed in less than 10 days. 800/363-0867; www.rmfiberglass.com.

Seamless, chemical-resistant lining


repairs city pools overflow basin

Piston pump increases biosolids loading capacity

Problem

Problem

The city of Houston, Texas, operates 37 outdoor public pools. After


years of contact with pool water and chemicals, one pools 20-foot-long by
15-foot-wide by 18-foot-deep concrete overflow basin was leaking and had to
be shut down to avoid further damage.

Solution

The city applied HiChem HP 11-70, a 100 percent solids, zero-VOC


polyurea-based lining, with high chemical and corrosion resistance, high
tensile strength and dense, impermeable chemical structure from Rhino
Linings. After the concrete surfaces were cleaned and prepped, the contractor applied Moisture Guard, a
penetrating primer that creates a moisture-resistant barrier. The next day,
workers roller-applied 5 mils of Primer
251, a flexible polyurethane primer and
sealer that resists acids, hydrolysis and
salt. After curing, 110 mils of HiChem
11-70 was sprayed in overlapping passes
to ensure a monolithic seal.

RESULT:
The entire application was completed in three days by a three-person
crew. The application created a seamless, chemical-resistant, permanent seal in the 40,000-gallon overflow
basin. The city plans for the same application at other pool locations.
800/422-2603; www.rhinoliningsindustrial.com.

70

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The Alberta city of Edmontons Gold Bar Wastewater Treatment Plant


saw cake storage and transfer to truck loading as a bottleneck. Operations
included storage of mechanically dewatered biosolids in a Schwing Bioset
push-floor bunker. From there it was pumped to a composting operation.
Area growth led to biosolids volumes exceeding composter capacity, and a
screw conveyor bypass was installed from the storage bunker to divert
excess biosolids to truck loading for land application. As biosolids production grew, the bypass was no longer a viable solution. Loading each truck
took 45 minutes.

Solution

Edmonton installed a piston pump in the Schwing


Bioset storage bunker to
transfer biosolids to two 250cubic-yard sliding-frame truck
loading silos, which can store
enough material to seamlessly
support plant process flow.
Each silo has three drop points
to load two styles of trailers. Hanging pendant controls allow drivers to load
without leaving the truck cab.

RESULT:
The plant can now easily handle its biosolids production and can
load trailers in less than 15 minutes without repositioning. 715/2473433; www.schwingbioset.com.

Tank manufacturer supplies units


for large expansion

Booth 3445

Problem

A large-scale expansion project of the Changi water facility in Singapore required a number of bolted and reverse osmosis flush tanks.

Solution

Thirteen Tank Connection bolted, rolled, tapered panel tanks


were used. These included five tanks with aluminum geodesic domes, each
measuring 135 feet in diameter and 46 feet tall with 4.75 million gallons
capacity. The project
also included four
reverse osmosis flush
tanks with 26,400 gallons capacity and four
reverse osmosis feed
tanks holding 58,000
gallons.

RESULT:
All 13 tanks were supplied in a timely manner in early 2016 with no
issues. The contractor and end users were satisfied with the project
execution. 620/423-3010; www.tankconnection.com.

Tank coating designed to withstand


temperature variation

Problem

In Cortland, Illinois, a limited budget prevented the owner of a 125-million-gallon elevated municipal water storage tank from abrasive blasting a
failing 20-year-old alkyd paint system on exterior steel before recoating.
The project called for minimal preparation consisting of power washing
steel at 6,000 psi and some mechanical hand- or power-tool cleaning to
remove loose rust, scale and deteriorated coatings.

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

NowYou Smell It,


NowYou Dont.

Solution

Workers applied a single-component, mastic waterborne acrylic coating


for use on minimally prepared sound, rusted steel and previously coated
surfaces as a rust-inhibitive spot-primer and tie-coat to the steel tank surface. In addition to strong adhesion, Series 118 Uni-Bond Mastic from
Tnemec Company offers 200
percent elasticity and impact resistance. The coating expands and
contracts with the substrate as the
temperature varies. Two finish coats
of a water-based, low volatile organic
compound, high-dispersion, pure
acrylic polymer were applied over
the primer.

RESULT:
After a severe winter of freeze-thaw conditions, the overcoating system
maintained its color and gloss stability. 800/863-6321; www.tnemec.com.

Airashell
for Odor Control

Recycled
Seashells Media

Modular biofilter with small footprint


No chemical or nutrient addition
Third party tested for field performance
>99% H2S removal

Call: 336-547-9338 or visit: anuainternational.com


For more information, please see us at weftec 2016 Booth 152
FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

71

BioGas

boldly go
where no aerator or mixer
has gone before.

Aqua-Jet aerator featuring


Fold-a-Float technology.

The Fold-a-Float self-deploying, segmented float


from Aqua-Aerobic is lowering capital costs while
removing THMs from enclosed water reservoirs through
openings as narrow as 30 inches.
This patent-pending float technology is engineered to
self-deploy when it meets the surface water in a tank
or basin. Once in-place, the Fold-a-Float may be fitted
with an Aqua-Jet aerator or AquaDDM mixer power
section to provide efficient aeration or mixing.
Fold-a-Float units are ideal for applications where
conventional equipment simply cant go.

www.foldafloat.com

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

72

815-654-2501

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

Robu

INTRODUCING THE ROBOX ENERGY

The Most Energy Efficient


Rotary Screw Blower Package in the World
The only rotary screw blower package with
Permanent Magnet Drive Technology

VISIT US AT

WEFTEC booth #3317

www.RobuschiUSA.com
2016 Gardner Denver. All rights reserved.
FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Robuschi_TPO_8-2_9x10.875_PRESS.indd 2

8/26/2016 9:12:36 AM

spotlight

PHOTO COURTESY OF GLOBAL PUMP

Attendees look at the 6GST


standard trash pump with SoundGuard enclosure, designed to
handle a wide range of liquids in
wastewater application.

Water & Wastewater Equipment,


Treatment & Transport Show
www.wwettshow.com

Wide Range of Uses


DURABLE, PORTABLE TRASH PUMP FROM GLOBAL PUMP
CAN BE USED FOR A VARIETY OF WASTEWATER APPLICATIONS

Education Day: Feb. 22, 2017


Exhibits: Feb. 23-25, 2017
Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis

By Craig Mandli

astewater treatment plants must move liquid in various states


quickly and efficiently. The 6GST standard trash pump with
SoundGuard enclosure from Global Pump drew ample attention
at the 2016 Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment & Transport Show
for its efficiency, durability and ease of use.
The pump is designed for liquids from water to sewage and biosolids.
The pump has been through a range of performance testing at various duty
points, says Mark Vogel, general manager. This pump design has been in
the market for about 10 years and has been a very successful model.
The unit achieves flows up to 3,000 gpm and total head up to 202 feet
while handling solids up to 3 inches in diameter. It is powered by a watercooled, four-cylinder diesel engine; alternative drives include natural gas
engines and electric motors.
The SoundGuard enclosure makes it a fit for urban areas or plants near
residential neighborhoods. The enclosure is made of 12-gauge galvannealed
or stainless steel with double-sided-galvanized sheet panels insulated with
a 1.25-inch-thick acoustical fire-retardant composite foam barrier. Noise levels are no more than 68 dBA at 30 feet.
The enclosure uses upward exhaust of combustion gases and cooling air.
The panels are easily removable for maintenance and repair. The panel doors
come with locks and allow easy access to the pump, engine, priming system
and controls for routine service.
The heavy-duty pump is portable for applications including emergencies and sewer bypass. A nonreturn valve uses only one moving part to allow
flow with minimal restriction. The engine control panel provides preset
emergency shutdown protection; an automatic level control can be added.

74

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

The unit includes a fully guarded coupling. Pump casings are hydrostatically tested to 50 psig above the peak casing design pressure. Systems arrive
mounted on a highway trailer with integral fuel cell, chassis, lights, fenders,
tie-downs, lifting bail and front and rear jacks. Trailer brakes are optional.
The pump is a robust design that provides a dependable and highly efficient solution for municipalities, says Vogel. Customers cant believe how
efficient the pump is and how low the cost of operating is. Options include:
Auto Prime automatic compressor-fed venturi priming or diaphragm
priming
Mechanical seal with biodegradable glycol quench that allows the
pump to start and run dry
Environmental Box that separates and silences air exhaust and returns
liquid to the pump suction for added efficiency
Fuel cubes for extended runtimes in remote locations
Skid-mounted formats with tie-downs, lifting bail and fork pockets
Hose racks and accessory containers
Range of suction and discharge fittings, including QD Quick Disconnect fittings and accessories
The WWETT Show was solid for Global, Vogel says. We met several
potential customers along with some established customers. Global engineers
are developing innovations to roll out for the 2017 show, including a new
compact model.
We will have our SAE-mounted centrifugal pump at next years show,
Vogel says. This will reduce the units footprint and will not require a traditional alignment. Were excited about it. 866/360-7867; www.globalpump.com.

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Get A New

XRipper
For Less Than
The Cost Of
A Repair.
Show us a competitors repair quote
and well sell you a brand new XRipper
twin shaft grinder for $1 less. You get
our leading two year 100% parts and
labor warranty which includes wear
parts along with the most powerful
wastewater grinder in the industry.

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Drop-in replacement for most


competitor models
100% repairable in the field
QuickService design
No cutter stack tightening
Inline & channel designs
Outperforms competitors
in power, size, output
& maximum pressures

Visit us at Booth 619

TWIN SHAFT GRINDERS


For more information

call us at 1-800-984-9400

www.vogelsangusa.com/twinshaft
FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

76

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

THE MARK OF EXCELLENCE.


WWW.KELLERAMERICA.COM

SALES@KELLERAMERICA.COM

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

877-253-5537

industry news
Duperon names Turpin president
Duperon Corporation named Mark Turpin president.
He replaces current president and CEO Tammy Bernier,
who remains as CEO. Duperon is a leader in preliminary
liquids/solids separation technologies and provides solutions for coarse screening, fine screening, low-flow screening, perforated screening, washing, compacting and
conveying.

STANDARD CIRCULAR CLARIFIER DRIVES


Available 4 Weeks From Order

Mark Turpin

FCI adds air/gas measurement


information to website
Fluid Components International (FCI) added applications information,
case studies, videos, technical articles and product data for air/gas flow measurement to its website, www.fluidcomponents.com.

Russelectric appoints president, CEO


Russelectric named Dorian Alexandrescu president
and CEO. He replaces George Whittaker, who retired
after 48 years. Alexandrescu has 20 years of management experience and most recently served as president
and CEO of RESA Power Solutions.

Grundfos names regional


managing director

Aurora, IL USA

www.mcnishcorp.com
FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

MS Style Screw Press


for Sludge Dewatering
ADVANTAGES

Dorian Alexandrescu

Grundfos Pumps Corporation appointed Dieter Sauer as regional managing director of the Americas region. He will oversee all aspects of the global
pump manufacturers North and South America business, including driving
regional growth and maintaining a motivated workforce.

Booth 8417

Reduction of energy consumption


Reduced maintenance cost
High capture rates
Reduced odors compared to belt presses
Reduced operator cost

Press Technology & Mfg., Inc.


1401 Fotler Street Springfield, OH 45504
p. 937-327-0755
e. dberner@presstechnology.com
w. www.presstechnology.com

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Hach breaks ground on research/development center

AdEdge Water Technologies receives


California nitrate removal project
AdEdge Water Technologies will design and manufacture a biottta treatment plant rated for a maximum flow of 1.5 mgd for the removal of nitrate,
perchlorate and trichloroethylene in the West Valley Water District in Riverside County, California. The biottta process, a biologically tailored twostage treatment approach, uses naturally occurring bacteria to eliminate
multiple contaminants from groundwater, rather than creating harmful waste
streams found in other treatment processes.

Hach broke ground in June on a multimillion-dollar research and development facility in Loveland, Colorado. The 86,000-square-foot building will
house multiple testing and development laboratories.

Tank Connection adds glass coating line to Kansas plant


Tank Connection added vitreous enamel (glass/porcelain) coating equipment to its expanded plant in Galesburg, Kansas. The facility will produce
bolted glass panels coated with AQUA AGT 2020, a high-performance, proprietary glass coating system.

JWC Environmental names


business development manager
JWC Environmental named Jesus Rodriguez business development manager for Monster Screening Systems products, including in-channel headworks screens,
rotary drum screens, drum sludge thickeners and Screenings Washer Monsters.

Jesus Rodriguez

Robroy acquires ATTABOX


Industrial Enclosures
Robroy Enclosures, a subsidiary of Robroy Industries, acquired the assets
of ATTABOX Industrial Enclosures. ATTABOX is a leader in the design,
manufacture and marketing of polycarbonate NEMA-rated enclosures. The
acquisition will complement Robroys Stahlin nonmetallic enclosures brand.

Johnson Matthey acquires MIOX


Johnson Matthey acquired MIOX. The acquisition of the electrochemical generation business broadens Johnson Mattheys Water Technologies
portfolio of water purification products and services. MIOX will be part of
Johnson Mattheys new business division, headquartered in Albuquerque,
New Mexico.

78

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

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FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

79

product news

3
5

4
6

2
1. BAYCO PRODUCTS AC-POWERED LED WORK LIGHTS
AC-powered magnetic LED work lights from Bayco Products deliver
1,200 lumens on high mode and 600 lumens on low mode. Models SL-2135
(25-foot 18/2 SJTW cord) and SL-866 (50-foot cord inside retractable
reel) have two integrated magnets one at the balance point in the
middle of the handles and the other at the tip of the light. Both models
include a detachable magnetic hook that can be attached to either magnet for added versatility. 800/233-2155; www.baycoproducts.com.

2. BLUE-WHITE MD-3 CHEMICAL METERING PUMP


The Proseries-M MD-3 chemical metering pump from Blue-White
Industries provides precision chemical metering for the treatment of
municipal water and wastewater. The hybrid MD-3 diaphragm metering pump has 2000-1 turndown ratio and provides smooth chemical
dosing with no pulsation dampener required. Delivering 380 strokes
per minute, the pump features PVDF wetted end fittings for over 14
inlet and outlet configurations and a zero-maintenance brushless DC
drive. 714/893-8529; www.blue-white.com.

3. SINGER VALVE DELUGE FIRE VALVES


Deluge fire valves from Singer Valve are UL-approved for use in
high-hazard areas where high velocity suppression is necessary to prevent the spread of fire. Available in three news models (electronic operated, pneumatic operated remote control and electric pneumatic
operated), the deluge valves are available in globe style (3 to 8 inches)
and are ANSI Class 150 with 300 flanges and grooved ends. 604/5945404; www.singervalve.com.

4. GREYLINE INSTRUMENTS INSERTION MAGMETER


The ISM 5.0 insertion magmeter from Greyline Instruments measures the flow of conductive liquids in full pipes. It installs through a
tap in the pipe wall and is designed for 3- to 72-inch-diameter lines.
Installation through a full port ball valve allows for easy retraction and
reinsertion without shutting down flow. The magmeter has no moving
parts. Features include a dual-electrode sensor and continuous autozero function, selectable 4-20mA, 0-5 volt or 0-10 volt output. Other fea-

tures include 0-500 Hz frequency output and scalable pulse output.


888/473-9546; www.greyline.com.

5. MELTRIC HAZARDOUS-RATED PLUGS


AND RECEPTACLES
Hazardous-rated metal 60-amp and 150-amp plugs and receptacles
from Meltric Corporation are designed for Division 2/Zone 2 environments. The plugs and receptacles are cCSAus rated and listed to 75 hp.
The amperage, voltage, horsepower and environmental ratings are indicated on the product labels. The receptacle has a dead front that isolates
the supply contacts and prevents exposure to live parts. A safety shutter
blocks access to the contacts and can only be opened by DSN/DS plugs
with compatible ratings and contact configurations. DS60 and DSN150
receptacles have a screw-type locking pawl, enabling the user to lock the
plug to the receptacle by tightening a screw on the pawl. A lockout hole
is included for added security. 800/433-7642; www.meltric.com.

6. MATROX MURA CAPTURE AND DECODER CARDS


Matrox Mura IPX 4K capture and IP capture cards from Matrox
Graphics are available with and without fans. The cards feature four HDMI
inputs for direct high-resolution 4Kp60 or 2,560 by 1,600 p60 capture
plus H.264 decoding up to two 4Kp60, four 4Kp30, eight 1,080 p60 or 16
1,080 p30 streams. Applications include control rooms, digital signage and
AV presentation systems. 514/822-6000; www.matrox.com/graphics.

7. XYLEM FLYGT WASTEWATER PUMP CONTROLLER


The Flygt FGC400 self-contained, intuitive controller from Xylem
features advanced monitoring and control capabilities to optimize wastewater pumping efficiency. The plug-and-play pump controller features
preprogrammed functionality, enabling the operator to install and configure the unit to match specific wastewater pumping needs. The controller can be connected to one or two pumps and includes energy measurement,
data loggers and level monitoring in one unit. The FGC400 controls pumps
up to 5.5 kW or larger using external contactors. It is equipped to readily
sync with external controls, including SCADA systems, and can be configured via PC, USB or the HMI. 855/995-4261; www.xylem.com/pumping.

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

80

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

analyzes operating data, simulates possible responses and selects the


most efficient option to optimally match air production to system
demand. Features include a 12-inch color touch screen for at-a-glance
operating status, pressure history, power consumption and error messages in real time. 877/596-7138; www.kaeser.com.

9. FLOMATIC SLIM LINE WELL CHECK VALVES

10

Model 80SL Slim Line well check valves from Flomatic Corporation
are designed to support the weight of up to 1,000 feet of pipe and well
pump. Sizes range from 2 through 8 inches. Fusion epoxy coating is
standard. The small outside diameter allows for tight fits in the well.
The valves have a stainless steel body with corrosion-resistant internal
parts. 800/833-2040; www.flomatic.com.

10. SPIRAX SARCO ROTOR INSERTION FLOWMETER

9
8. KAESER SIGMA AIR MANAGER BLOWER CONTROL

The Sigma Air Manager (SAM) 4.0 blower control from Kaeser
Compressors provides seamless integration into plant control/SCADA
systems, tying blowers together in a secure Sigma Network. The control

The RIM20 rotor insertion flowmeter from Spirax Sarco USA utilizes a common electronics platform available in all new 20 Series meters
and provides the same features and benefits as the RIM10, including
SMART multivariable electronics for the measurement of mass or volumetric flow, density, temperature and pressure. Applications include
measurement of steam and natural gas flows for fiscal or load control and
heat flow calculations for chilled, hot water and other liquids and gases
in 3- to 80-inch lines. 800/356-9362; www.spirax.com.
(continued)

water:

SL1000 portable
parallel analyzer
(PPA) from Hach

product spotlight
Hach portable parallel analyzer tests
multiple parameters at once
By Ed Wodalski
The SL1000 portable parallel analyzer (PPA) from Hach is designed
to quickly and consistently test multiple parameters in drinking water
systems. The analyzer can simultaneously test four colorimetric and two
probe-based parameters by inserting the appropriate Chemkeys into the
sample for one to two seconds. Status bars on the analyzer display time
remaining until test results are complete.
Instead of having to run separate tests for chlorine, monochloramine,
free ammonia and nitrite, you can run all of those at the same time,
taking the testing time in many instances down from about 20 minutes
to eight minutes, says Ursula Jessee, Hach global product manager
instruments.
EPA-approved for reporting free and total chlorine in drinking water
applications, the analyzer uses no powder pillows or glass vials. All chemicals and processes are contained in the Chemkeys.
As an operator, especially when there are multiple operators running
a test, there is some variability, Jessee says. The SL1000 greatly reduces
that variability because everyone performs the test the exact same way.
Chemkeys can test for free and total ammonia, free and total chlorine,
monochloramine, nitrite, copper, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluoride,
nitrate and pH, as well as newly released hardness, alkalinity, orthophosphate and dissolved iron.
As an operator going from site to site gathering samples and doing
the testing, you would have to run each of the tests one by one and wait
for them to finish before you could move on, Jessee says.
Probes can test for conductivity, dissolved oxygen, fluoride, nitrate
and pH.

If there were any problems, youd have to start over. With the SL1000,
youre able to get your sample, insert the Chemkeys into the instrument,
attach the probes for pH and conductivity, for example, dip the instrument in the sample cup and start the reading. Two minutes into the test
you can start driving to your next location. Instead of spending 20 or 30
minutes at each location, youre now spending five.
The analyzer also captures sample time, temperature, site and operator ID. Data is downloadable to an Excel or similar format and transferred
via USB cord to a laptop computer.
It takes away the need to write down data in the field or in the lab,
Jessee says.
The portable analyzer includes the SL1000 meter, carrying case, instrument sample cup, two probe sample cups, rechargeable lithium-ion battery pack (200 Chemkey tests per full battery charge), instrument manual
and USB cable. 800/227-4224; www.hach.com/ppa.

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

tpomag.com October 2016

81

product news

13
17

15

11
14

18

12
16

19
11. FLUID COMPONENTS INTERNATIONAL
ST100 FLOWMETER
The ST100 flowmeter from Fluid Components International (FCI)
is designed for measuring direct gas flow, including hydrogen, wet gas,
mixed gases and dirty gases. The basic insertion style air/gas meter
features a thermal flow sensing unit that measures flow from 0.25 to
1,000 SFPS. It can measure at high flow rates from 0 to 6,600 lb/hr at
29 to 87 psi. Communication options include 4-20mA analog, frequency/pulse or certified digital bus communications such as HART,
Foundation Fieldbus, Profibus PA or Modbus RS485. 800/854-1993;
www.fluidcomponents.com.

12. ACRISON DUAL FEEDER/WETTIN CONE ASSEMBLY


The PAC feed system from Acrison features a dual feeder/wetting
cone assembly with common hopper. Designed for powder-activated
carbon applications where duty/standby operation is required for redundancy or for applications that need two separate independent feed
points at differing feed rates, the system has two Model W105Z volumetric feeders sharing a common hopper with its own wetting cone
assembly. The operator supplies both feeder systems with product from
a single loading point. A Model DCBDS-400 dust collector with bag
dump station is mounted on the hopper cover for dust-free loading. A
manual filter shaker handle releases any accumulated dust back into the
hopper. 201/440-8300; www.acrison.com.

13. BBA PUMPS STAINLESS STEEL


SELF-PRIMING BA PUMPS
Dry, self-priming BA Series 316 stainless steel pumps from BBA Pumps
are designed for use in corrosive environments and available in four models:
BA80H (3-inch clear liquids), BA100K (4-inch solids), BA150E (6-inch
solids) BA180E (8-inch solids). 843/849-3676; www.bbapumps.com.

14. FRANKLIN MILLER SEPTAGE RECEIVING STATION


The SPIRALIFT SR septage receiving station from Franklin Miller
is designed to receive, screen and separate solids. Features include a

grinder, fine screening shaftless screw system, spray wash and S270-SR
automatic control system with optional S270-SRH hauler station control system that collects transaction data, authenticates haulers, racks
loads and supplies a receipt via a card swipe system. The units wash and
compact screenings by up to 40 percent. Processed solids are conveyed
for discharge into a bin, bag or conveyor. The SPIRALIFT has a stainless steel tank enclosure with quick-disconnect inlet flange. An automatic inlet valve automatically regulates internal fluid level. Options
include the Taskmaster TT automated rock removal system. 800/9320599; www.franklinmiller.com.

15. RUSSELECTRIC CIRCUIT-BREAKER-TYPE


AUTOMATIC TRANSFER SWITCHES
Redesigned medium-voltage (5-15 kV) circuit-breaker-type automatic transfer switches and bypass/isolation switches from Russelectric
have a 20 to 50 percent smaller footprint than previous designs. The
switches are UL tested, listed and labeled under UL 1008A and suitable
for use in legally required alternate power systems. Switches can be configured for open- or closed-transition transfer. Designed for unattended
operation, the switches include controls for manually initiated operation. Functions are controlled by the RPTCS programmable microprocessor-based control system. Switches meet or exceed IEEE, NEMA
and ANSI standards. 800/225-5250; www.russelectric.com.

16. TYCO OLDHAM MX 32 GAS DETECTION CONTROLLER


The Oldham MX 32 alarm and control system from Tyco Gas & Flame
Detection is designed to meet SIL1 requirements. The compact, lowprofile controller manages digital lines and analog channels for a variety
of gas monitoring applications. Digital technology enables up to eight
detectors to be distributed on two lines. 713/559-9200; www.tycogfd.com.

17. NEPTUNE ABAQUE PERISTALTIC PUMPS


The Abaque Series of peristaltic (hose) pumps from Neptune, part
of PSG, a Dover company, feature a new orange and black look, stronger
rotor design and innovative hose handling system. A seal-free design

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FOLLOWING FORM

82

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

eliminates leaks and product contamination. The self-priming pumps


can run in forward or reverse and offer suction-lift capabilities to 25.5
feet, as well as the ability to run dry without adversely affecting performance, pressure and accuracy (no slip). Pumps are available in ductile iron and stainless steel with discharge pressure up to 217 psi, and
nine sizes with flow rates ranging from 0.59 to 238 gpm. 215/699-8700;
www.neptune1.com.

wastewater:

product spotlight

18. BACTERIAL LOGISTICS WASTEWATER


TREATMENT BIOREACTOR
The modular BioGill Tower wastewater treatment bioreactor from
Bacterial Logistics is designed to fit into any-size system and achieve
aerobic and anaerobic processes at the same time in the same unit.
Nano-ceramic media known as gills supply billions of attachment sites
for the microbes. Arranged in suspended vertical loops, each gill is
folded over a support, creating two distinct sides one in contact with
the water and the other in contact with the air. Wastewater is gravity-fed
down and through the gills. Microbes populate the gills and colonize into
a biofilm, feeding off nutrients in the liquid stream on one side while
drawing oxygen from the other. 802/735-2557; www.biogill.com.

19. DUPONT INDUSTRIAL BIOSCIENCES BIOGAS ENZYME


The OPTIMASH AD-100 enzyme from DuPont Industrial Biosciences is designed to help biomethane producers improve biogas yields. The
enzyme has been shown to increase biogas by 13 percent in anaerobic
digesters. The enzyme breaks down organic matter, making sugars more
suitable for biogas-producing microorganisms. www.dupont.com.

For FREE information on these products, check the box(es) below:


1. Bayco Products AC-powered LED work lights
2. Blue-White Industries Proseries-M MD-3 chemical metering pump
3. Singer Valve deluge fire valves
4. Greyline Instruments ISM 5.0 insertion magmeter
5. Meltric Corporation hazardous-rated plugs and receptacles
6. Matrox Graphics Mura IPX 4K capture and IP capture cards
7. Xylem Flygt FGC400 wastewater pump controller
8. Kaeser Compressors Sigma Air Manager (SAM) 4.0 blower control
9. Flomatic Corporation Model 80SL Slim Line well check valves
10. Spirax Sarco USA RIM20 rotor insertion flowmeter
11. Fluid Components International ST100 flowmeter
12. Acrison PAC feed system
13. BBA Pumps BA Series 316 stainless steel pumps
14. Franklin Miller SPIRALIFT SR septage receiving station
15. Russelectric circuit-breaker-type automatic transfer switches
16. Tyco Gas & Flame Detection Oldham MX 32 gas detection controller
17. Neptune, part of PSG, a Dover company, Abaque Series of peristaltic pumps
18. Bacterial Logistics BioGill Tower wastewater treatment bioreactor
19. DuPont Industrial Biosciences OPTIMASH AD-100 enzyme
Hach SL1000 portable parallel analyzer (PPA)
Hayward Flow Control IV Series injection valves and IQ Series injection quills
FREE subscription to TPO magazine
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IV Series injection valves


and IQ Series injection quills
from Hayward Flow Control

Hayward injection valves and quills


keep process chemicals
away from inner pipe walls
By Ed Wodalski
IV Series injection valves and IQ Series injection quills from
Hayward Flow Control are designed to inject chemicals into a flowing pipeline away from the inner walls of the pipe or tank, ensuring
rapid mixture and corrosion prevention.
The injection quills are available in PVC (Cell Class 12454 per
ASTM D1784), CPVC (Cell Class 23447 per ASTM D1784) and PVDC
to match a range of chemicals. The quills and injection valves have a
built-in check valve with Hastelloy C spring to prevent the backflow of
process liquid into the chemical feed line with the IV check being
rebuildable.
The injection valve has a seat that you can unscrew and repair or
clean as needed, says Patrick Heath, product manager for Hayward
Flow Control. Thats really the only difference between the two.
Both the quills and injection valves have MNPT end connections
and are pressure rated to 150 psi at 70 degrees F.
Theres a double-threaded bushing at the dry end so you can thread
the quill into the pipeline and connect your chemical pipe to the backside, Heath says.
The injection quills are available in 1/2- and 3/4-inch sizes with
3-inch quills, and 1-inch diameter with a 4-inch quill. All sizes of the
IV offer a 4-inch quill. Features include FPM O-ring seals and 45-degree
bevel on the quill tip.
We feel that the tapered end is the better choice as opposed to a
flat end, Heath says. When its orientated correctly in the pipeline it
helps to disperse the chemical more evenly.
Options include flat bevel, BSPT or socket end connections and
EPDM O-rings. 888/429-4635; www.haywardflowcontrol.com.

FREE INFO ON THESE PRODUCTS RETURN FORM ON THIS PAGE

tpomag.com October 2016

83

worth noting

people/awards
The Richmond Lake Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment System
earned an Operation and Maintenance Wastewater Treatment Award from
the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources.
The Conservation Foundation presented the city of Elmhurst (Illinois)
Wastewater Treatment Plant with a Clean Water Award.
The village of Potsdams Robert Henninger was named the 2016 Wastewater Operation Specialist of the Year by the New York Rural Water
Association.
The city of Amarillo, Texas, announced the hiring of Robert Patrick as
Public Works director and Russell Grubbs as utilities director.
Kishia L. Powell was named the commissioner of the Atlanta (Georgia)
Department of Watershed Management.
The Georgia Association of Water Professionals named the Henry County
Water Authoritys Bear Creek Water Reclamation Facility the states best
wastewater plant in the category non-discharging plants with 1.1 to 10 mgd
capacity.
The Scarborough (Rhode Island) Sewer Treatment Plant received a
Gold Award from the Narragansett Water Pollution Control Association for
having zero permit violations in 2015.
Killis Sinkhorn, who has been supervisor of the Winchester (Kentucky)
Municipal Utilities Wastewater Treatment Plant for 16 years and is planning
to retire soon, was honored by the WMU Commission for his service and
received a commemorative plaque.
Ray Wolf, an Enterprise (Alabama) Water Works Department certified
water operator, received the citys Extra Mile Award, nominated by residents
who wrote to Alan Mahan, field superintendent, about Wolfs service above
and beyond the call of duty.
The town of Madison Water Filtration Plant received the Area-Wide
Optimization Award for 2015. Of the 150 surface water systems in the state
of North Carolina, only 56 received the award.
The city of Wallowa, Oregon, and Travis Goebel, Public Works director, won awards for the citys new $4 million, 100 percent federally funded
water system. The city won the 2015 Water Project of the Year from the Eastern Oregon Region of the AWWA/Pacific Northwest Clean Water Association. Goebel was named 2015 Water Operator of the Year.
The Lake County (Ohio) Department of Utilities received the Directors Award of Recognition from the Partnership for Safe Water for both of
its water treatment plants. Lake County East Water Treatment Plant is in
Painesville and the West Water Treatment Plant is in Willoughby.
The Prince William County (Virginia) Service Authoritys H.L. Mooney
Advanced Water Reclamation Facility won a third consecutive Platinum Peak
Performance Award from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies.
Several honors were distributed at the 2016 Delaware Water and Wastewater Professionals Annual Award Ceremony:
Ronald Foreman, Water Department director in the town of

84

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

events
Oct. 4-6

Iowa Section AWWA Annual Conference, Altoona. Visit www.


ia-awwa.org.

Oct. 4-7

Western Canada Section AWWA Annual Conference, Calgary,


Alberta. Visit www.wcsawwa.net.

Oct. 5-7

WaterSmart Innovations Conference, South Point Hotel and


Conference Center, Las Vegas. Visit www.watersmartinnovations.com.

Oct. 9-11

Alabama-Mississippi Section AWWA Annual Conference,


Montgomery, Alabama. Visit www.almsawwa.org.

Oct. 11-13

North Dakota Section AWWA Annual Conference, Minot. Visit


www.awwand.org.

Oct. 12-13

New England Water Environment Association Northeast Residuals and Biosolids Conference and Exhibit, Radisson Hotel, Cromwell,
Connecticut. Visit www.newea.org.

Oct. 23-25

Southwest Section AWWA Annual Conference, Rogers, Arkansas.


Visit www.swawwa.org.

Oct. 24-27

California-Nevada Section AWWA Annual Conference, San Diego.


Visit www.ca-nv-awwa.org.

Oct. 30-Nov. 2

2016 Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition, Arizona


Grand Resort & Spa, Phoenix. Visit www.awwa.org.

Bethany Beach, 2015 Water Professional of the Year


Aleksey Reznik, project manager with Veolia North America, 2015
Wastewater Professional of the Year
Ronald E. Graeber, program manager 1 with the Department of
Natural Resources and Environmental Control Groundwater
Discharge Section, Allen J. Williams Lifetime Achievement Award
John G. Hayes, environmental scientist with the state Department
of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, On-Site Professional of the Year
Tidewater Utilities team of Bryan Blake, Clarence Quillen, Dean
Serman, Scott Walls and Rob Wilkerson, Water/Wastewater
Professionals Team Award
Bloomington, Minnesota, was named Best of the Best in the Tap Water
Taste Test at the AWWA annual conference in Chicago. Second place went
to Iola, Kansas, and third went to Canajoharie, New York.
The Wastewater Replenishment District of Southern California netted a Gold Nugget Award of Merit at the PCBC builders conference in San
Francisco for its Groundwater Reliability Improvement Project (GRIP). The
GRIP will use state-of-the-art technology to recycle billions of gallons of
recycled water annually to replenish the local groundwater basin.
The Macon Water Authority and its personnel received multiple awards
from the Georgia Association of Water Professionals:
William Brown, Top Water Plant Operator award, District 5
Jarvis Fennelle, District 5 Top Op Award for wastewater treatment
plant operators

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Frank C. Amerson Jr. Water Treatment Plant, Plant of the Year, 50


mgd and up
MWAs tap water, Best Tasting in District 5
In addition, the Amerson plant received a Gold Award and the Rocky
Creek Water Reclamation Facility a Platinum Award from the National
Association of Clean Water Agencies.
Jim Hewitt, Akron city engineer, received the Collection System Award
from the Ohio Water Environment Association.
The Michigan Chapter of the American Public Works Association presented Grand Rapids with its 2016 Project of the Year award for a Water
Resource Recovery Facilitys energy efficiency program that is saving taxpayers $2.2 million in energy costs through 2031.
The East Valley Water District of Highland, California, received the
Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the
Government Finance Officers Association. It is the highest recognition in
government accounting and financial reporting.
TPO welcomes your contributions to this listing. To recognize members of your
team, please send notices of new hires, promotions, service milestones, certifications
or achievements to editor@tpomag.com.

4 New & Used Equipment


4 Free Subscription
4 Digital Editions

4 Online Exclusives
4 Editors Blog

tpomag.com

BARGE OFFERS SAFE WORK AREA


AND BOOSTS CONFIDENCE
For Work On Treatment Ponds and Lagoons.

> 8' x 12' platform


> Approximate weight 550lbs
> Approximate capacity 1400lbs
> 23" Diameter aluminum pontoons #5052 x .080 wall thickness
> Heavy duty outboard motor mount
for small gasoline or electric motors
OPTIONS:
> Battery box with solar charger
> Boarding ladder
> 1000-lb. capacity crane
> Galvanized trailer
> Life ring
> Pivot arms (Used to secure barge to
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> Vinyl Decking for easy clean up


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INFO@AQUACYCLEUSA.COM

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FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

tpomag.com October 2016

85

MARKETPLACE ADVERTISING

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING

Generator-Parts.com
Online parts breakdowns to help you
troubleshoot and identify repair parts.

OCTOBER

FULL LINE OF GENERATORS


AND OEM PARTS FROM:

COVERS

MANY PARTS IN STOCK:

Filters
Fuel System
Components
Starter Motors

Replacement
Gaskets
Solenoids
Much More!

Uniform Distribution of
Waste Water

Same day shipping on in-stock inventory


orders placed before 4 p.m. CST.
Our large midwest inventory reaches most places
in 2-3 business days via standard shipping.
Government and Military Quotations Welcome
Trained & Certified Repair and Installation Staff

877-409-1618 sales@generator-parts.com

Generator-Parts.com

www.kifco.com 800.452.7017

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX


udge Division
Operator (TPO)
POND & TANK COVERS
RS

Gas Collection
Odor Control
Algae/TSS Control
Clarifier Covers
Heat Retention/Improve Nitrification

Call IEC 952-829-0731

We are
the cover
experts

See Us At WEFTEC, Booth 3606

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

Go to

tpomag.com/alerts
and get started today!

FREE INFO SEE ADVERTISER INDEX

86

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

FOR

GET EMAIL
NEWS ALERTS

TPO1609

EDUCATION

PRESSURE WASHERS

RoyCEU.com: We provide continuing education courses for water, wastewater and water distribution system operators. Log onto
www.royceu.com and see our approved
states and courses. Call 386-574-4307 for
details.
(oBM)

Industrial Pressure Washer - New w/warranty $9,500. 2,000psi, 18gpm. 999cc Kohler &
AR pump. Will deliver. 321-800-5763 (MBM)

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Industrial & Environmental Concepts

POND & TANK COVERS: Industrial & Environmental Concepts makes gas-collection
covers, odor-control covers, heat-retention
covers and anaerobic digester covers. Call
952-829-0731 www.ieccovers.com (oBM)

process. A full benefit package is also provided. Please forward letters of interest, resumes and three professional references to:
Wastewater Superintendent Search, Town of
Montague, Town Administrator, 1 Avenue A,
Turners Falls, MA 01376, EOE. Applications
will be accepted until the job is filled. (o10)

Town of Montague, Massachusetts, Wastewater Superintendent: The Town on Montague is seeking applicants for the full-time
position of Wastewater Superintendent.
The Montague wastewater system has approximately 7,400 customers, and is a
secondary treatment facility designed to
treat 1.83 million gallons (4.65 mgd peak)
of waste per day.The WPCF is also an EPA
award-winning facility that prides itself on
the innovation and creativity of a staff that
has implemented an innovative treatment
process that has achieved impressive cost
savings and generated significant revenues.
The Town is committed to the continuation
of this new process and seeks an individual
who will commit to achieving this objective.
Other qualifications for the position include:
Grade 6 wastewater operator license; Associates Degree in engineering, environmental
science or related field (strong biological
focus a plus), and 10 years experience in
wastewater treatment systems with three
years (five preferred) in a responsible administrative and/or supervisory role or any
equivalent of education and experience. Familiarity with sewer billing systems and generation of sewer rates, the SCADA system,
and enterprise accounting systems required.
Excellent communications skills are a must
as is interaction with local, state and federal
officials and the general public. The Superintendent is responsible for the operation and
maintenance of the sewer treatment plant
and eight pumping stations, compliance with
wastewater regulations; preparation and
management of operating and capital budgets; grants administration; the implementation of an industrial pretreatment program;
setting of sewer rates; and supervision of up
to nine employees. Salary range $70,858
to $78,213 depending upon qualifications.
A higher salary may be negotiable if candidate can demonstrate unique educational
or experience related to the new treatment

Honda horizontal GX engines, new in-thebox w/warranty. GX200QX - $399; GX270QAG - $579; GX390QA - $599 delivered
price. 800-363-9855 or GXParts.com (MBM)

RENTAL EQUIPMENT
Liquid vacs, wet/dry industrial vacs, combination jetter/vacs, vacuum street sweeper &
catch basin cleaner, truck & trailer mounted jetters. All available for daily, weekly,
monthly, and yearly rentals. VSI Rentals, LLC, (888) VAC-UNIT (822-8648)
www.vsirentalsllc.com.
(CBM)

SERVICE/REPAIR
Dynamic Repairs - Inspection Camera
Repairs: 48 hour turn-around time. General
Wire, Ratech, RIDGID, Electric Eel Mfg, Gator
Cams, Insight Vision, Vision Intruders. Quality
service on all brands. Rental equipment
available. For more info call Jack at 973478-0893. Lodi, New Jersey.
(CBM)

WATERBLASTING
20,000 - 55,000 psi Sapphire Nozzles, OS4,
OS6, OS7 replacements, UHP hoses & replacement parts. Excellent quality & prices.
772-286-1218, info@alljetting.com, www.
alljetting.com.
(CBM)
Gardner Denver T-375M: Bare Shaft
pump. Gardner Denver T450M Bare Shaft
pump. Gardner Denver TF-375M 21 gpm
@ 10,000 psi. Gardner Denver TX-450HB
21gpm @ 20,000 PSI. Gardner Denver TF450MB 52gpm @ 10,000 psi. NLB 10-200.
34 gpm @ 10,000 psi. HT-150S 25 gpm
max 10,000 psi max, Shell Side Machine,
Wheatley 165: 30 gpm @ 10,000 psi.
Wheatley 125 with aluminum bronze fluid
end. Boatman Ind. 713-641-6006. View @
www.boatmanind.com.
(CBM)
WATER JETTING EQUIPMENT: We sell, repair and retrofit water blasters. Visit us at:
www.waterjettingequipment.com or phone
714-259-7700.
(CBM)

NEW
CONCERTOR
PUMPING SYSTEM WITH
INTEGRATED

INTELLIGENCE

WORLDS FIRST WASTEWATER PUMPING SYSTEM WITH INTEGRATED INTELLIGENCE

This revolutionary system delivers optimal performance while reducing your total cost of ownership.
It also offers unparalleled flexibility and simplicity on a whole new level. You might even say it thinks
for itself. We invite you to enter a new era in wastewater pumping with Flygt Concertor.
One powerful solution. Unlimited possibilities.
To find out more, visit us at WEFTEC in New Orleans
September 26-28, 2016 BOOTH 2529

www.flygt.com