Vol.

1, Issue 1

TRENGTH
By Weightlifters, For Weightlifters

May/June 2010

INSIDE THE FRENCH SYSTEM:
ATHLETE & COACH INTERVIEWS, TRAINING SCHEDULE, & TECHNICAL ADVICE

EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS & COMMENTARY
FROM THE 2010 ARNOLD WEIGHTLIFTING CHAMPIONSHIPS

WEIGHTLIFTER SARAH ROBLES DISCUSSES HER TRANSITION FROM THROWING

IS ZYGMUNT SMALCERZ
2008 US OLYMPIC TEAM MEMBER KENDRICK FARRIS EXPLAINS HOW HE BEAT THE ODDS TO BECOME ONE OF AMERICA’S STRONGEST MEN
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RIGHT FOR THE OLYMPIC TRAINING CENTER?

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Thank you to all of our sponsors from the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships. We look forward to an even bigger and BETTER 2011! http://www.columbusweightlifting.org/

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www.arnoldsportsfestival.com/

Credits
Editor—Rachel Crass Assistant Editor—Robert Hall Publisher—Rampant Lion Productions

Contact
Have comments, questions, concerns, or suggestions for future issues of Strength+? Please e-mail Rachel Crass at strengthplusmag@yahoo.com.

Contents
Strength+ is an interactive document. Click on any underlined title or page number to jump directly to that section. Click on advertisements throughout the magazine to go directly to those companies’ websites. To return to this page at any time, click on the logo in the upper, outside corner of each page.

Dedication
To my dad, Derrick Crass, the best father a girl could hope for (and a pretty darn good weightlifter too); to my mom, Sue Adamson, the strongest woman I know; and to my daughter, Nina. I love you, Beanie Butt.—RC To my mom, Debbie Hall, lovingly known as “The Debbie.”—RH

From the Editors, 6 Sponsorship Notice: USAW Announces Partnership with National Car Rental and Enterprise Rent-A-Car, 8 Founding Fathers: Part 1—The Eugen Sandow Story, 10 Jiu Jitsu Champ Credits Weightlifting for Success, 15 Iron Baloney CrossFit Cartoon, 21 Endangered Species: Iron Sport Gym is one of the few gyms left in America dedicated solely to strength athletes., 22 Service Spotlight: Lt. Colonel Bull Ternus, USAF, 24 Sarah Robles’ Snatch and Clean & Jerk Progressions, 29 Featured Workout: A Week in the Gym with Kendrick Farris, 38 Lex Scripta, 47 Competition Results: National Junior Champs., 49 Arnold Wgt. Champs., 54 National Collegiate Champs., 61 Calendar of Upcoming Events: USA Weightlifting, 65 USA Powerlifting, 66 International Federation of Body Building, 66 Indelible Images: Women of the 2010 Arnold Expo, 68
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Terms and Conditions
All content, including, but not limited to, photographs, advertisements, articles, and interviews are reproduced with the express consent of their original owners. The content of this magazine is for your general information and use only. Neither we nor any third parties provide any warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy, timeliness, performance, completeness or suitability of the information and materials found or offered in this magazine for any particular purpose. You acknowledge that such information and materials may contain inaccuracies or errors, and we expressly exclude liability for any such inaccuracies or errors to the fullest extent permitted by law. Your use of any information or materials in this magazine is entirely at your own risk, for which we shall not be liable. It shall be your own responsibility to ensure that any products, services or information available through this magazine meet your specific requirements. This magazine contains material which is owned by or licensed to us. This material includes, but is not limited to, the design, layout, look, appearance and graphics. Reproduction is prohibited other than in accordance with the copyright notice, which forms part of these terms and conditions. Unauthorized use of this magazine may give to a claim for damages and/or be a criminal offense. This magazine may also include links to other websites. These links are provided for your convenience to provide further information. They do not signify that we endorse the website(s), and we have no responsibility for the content of the linked website(s). Any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited other than the following: (1) You may print or download to a local hard disk extracts for your personal and non-commercial use only, and (2) you may copy the content to individual third parties for their personal use, but only if you acknowledge the magazine as the source of the material. You may not, except with our express written permission, distribute or commercially exploit the content. Nor may you transmit it or store it in any other website or other form of electronic retrieval system. Your use of this magazine and any dispute arising out of such use of the magazine is subject to the laws of the United States.

Cover Photo: Kendrick Farris jerks at the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships. Photo taken by John Broz.

On the Cover
2008 US OLYMPIC TEAM MEMBER KENDRICK FARRIS EXPLAINS HOW HE BEAT THE ODDS TO BECOME ONE OF AMERICA’S STRONGEST MEN

PG. 34

INSIDE THE FRENCH SYSTEM:

PG. 40

ATHLETE & COACH INTERVIEWS, TRAINING SCHEDULE, & TECHNICAL ADVICE

PG. 16

IS ZYGMUNT SMALCERZ RIGHT FOR THE OLYMPIC TRAINING CENTER?

PG. 30

EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS & COMMENTARY FROM THE 2010 ARNOLD WEIGHTLIFTING CHAMPIONSHIPS

PG. 26

WEIGHTLIFTER SARAH ROBLES DISCUSSES HER TRANSITION FROM THROWING

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From the Editors
By Rachel Crass The first issue is done, and what a crazy ride it has been. When I chose to create a magazine devoted to Olympic-style weightlifting, I had no idea what I awaited me. But perhaps my naïveté was a good thing, as this magazine might not be here without it; few enlightened people would have taken on such a mindbending project. Nevertheless, here we are. Weightlifting in the United States has a magazine again and, hopefully, will have one for a long time to come. You might have already noticed some peculiarities about this magazine and will certainly notice even more as you flip (or click) through its pages. In an effort to avoid the mundane triteness that fills far too many “From the Editor” columns, allow me to address some questions you probably have concerning the magazine’s title, delivery, and content. Why Strength+? The “+” in Strength+ indicates that becoming a successful weightlifter takes much more than strength alone. It takes an indomitable spirit, unyielding work ethic, exceptional speed and agility, optimal nutrition, durable equipment, competent coaching, and, most of all, an unquenchable desire to learn how to maximize your potential. We here at Strength+ will work not only to address, but also to foster, all of these components of weightlifting. Online, In Print, or Both? The answer to this question has yet to be determined. Ideally, Strength+ will become a newsstand-worthy, bi-monthly publication and will feature a companion website with discussion forums, blogs, follow-up articles, and links to a variety of weightlifting-friendly resources. All of these things are currently in the works, but, as with any new publication, our progress depends largely upon resource availability. We hope you will see Strength+ continue to grow for many years to come. Until then, however, Strength+ will be distributed online as a printerfriendly PDF document. The PDF will be available for download and print from USA Weightlifting’s website, weightlifting.teamusa.org, and will be distributed directly to all USAW members through e-mail. Right now, Strength+ is a free publication to everyone, and we will strive to keep it a free publication for USAW members, no matter what changes the future has in store for us. Content, the Neverending Struggle When we began to mull over potential content for the first issue of Strength+, we focused primarily on the competitive lifts, the snatch and the clean & jerk. In the six months since then, we’ve begun to realize we could spend a lifetime studying each of those lifts and still not know everything there is to know about one of them. That’s not to mention the time commitment involved in exploring the myriad philosophies of other components of the sport, such as periodization, nutrition and supplementation, rest intervals, sexual muscular and neurological dimorphisms, pre- vs. post-pubescent training…. The list goes infinitely on. We will try to cover a variety of topics in each issue, but please send us any particular requests you may have 6

for future issues of Strength+. Let us know what we should keep doing as well as what we should improve upon so that we can best satisfy the needs of our readers. After all, you are the reason we’ve created this magazine. And, by all means, if we get something completely wrong (which, regardless of our best efforts, will happen from time to time), correct us. We’re all weightlifters here; if sticks and stones and iron barbells can’t hurt us, words don’t stand a chance. Closing Thoughts This is the traditional part of my letter in which I parley my sincere desire for all of you to enjoy reading Strength+ and to learn a little something along the way. I know I learned more than a few little somethings over the course of this issue’s production. Now to the “Thank You”s. First and foremost, I’d like to thank Robert Hall for stepping up to be my right-hand man even before I completed the sentence asking him to help out (true story). He’s proof that high school romances can turn into lifelong friendships. :) Thank you, Robert.

I would also be remiss if I didn’t thank Rick Adams, Madison Robelen, Courtney Kulick, and the rest of the USAW office staff for holding my hand through this entire 6-month-long process. Their cell phone numbers are permanently emblazed on the back of my eyelids from so many “What the *&^%!!”s and “But, how do I ….?”s and “Really?! I didn’t know that!”s. Many other people were instrumental in the development of this issue, including John Broz, not only an amazing weightlifting coach, but also one of my best friends and quite possibly the best photographer I’ve ever met. His photos are strewn throughout this issue and will most likely appear in many issues to come. Also, thank you to Mike and Lori Diaz for contributing photos from the Arnold Women’s Body Building competition; to Sera Kim for writing a beautiful article about weightlifting’s application to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu; to Kendrick Farris, Sarah Robles, and Steve Pulcinella for providing candid and thought-provoking interviews; to Bob Guere for allowing us to publish his CrossFit-inspired cartoon, Iron Baloney. (Yes, the misspelling of “Bologna” was intentional.); and to the six members of the French team who visited the US Olympic Training Center this past month: Coach Jean Claude Collinot, Trainer Olivier Tomatis, Translator Juste Dabout, and world-class athletes Venceslas Dabaya Tientcheu, Benjamin

Hennequin, and David Hercule Matam. I will forever be grateful for the many hours you all spent explaining the French weightlifting system to me and for passing on invaluable information concerning lifting technique and training principles (oftentimes while simultaneously entertaining my giggly and oh-soenergetic 4-year-old). We are confident that thousands of our readers will benefit from your advice. Another huge thank you goes out to our supporters, sponsors, and advertisers, as, quite frankly, neither this magazine nor my sanity would exist right now without you all. Finally, I cannot close my acknowledgements without a wholehearted thank you to my other half, Mark Cannella. As a writer, words seldomly fail me, but trying to express my gratitude to him now is one of those times. So, to my best friend and continual source of inspiration, rationality, laughter, and late-night “hang in there”s— to the man who has helped me rediscover myself as a woman, a mother, a weightlifter, and a writer—I will simply say, “Thank You.” Yours in Sport,

***** By Robert Hall To Our Readers, As a child, my aunt and piano teacher once told me that “success comes in cans, not cannots”. While the message was clearly there, for me success came in the form of snatches and clean and jerks. Because of weightlifting, I’ve had the opportunity to live out one of my dreams – to see this beautiful planet that God made for us. It’s been eleven years since I first laced up a pair of lifting shoes, and in that time I’ve had the blessing of seeing twelve countries and thirty-four states. When I thought I was ready to leave the sport for good, at least competitively, earlier this year, I got a phone call from my friend Rachel. Now, I’m back to training, and proud to be an editor of this magazine. In these pages, you will find useful information on training, nutrition, and a few things to make you laugh, but we’re also dedicated to bringing you the heart and soul of our sport and its athletes. This magazine, written ‘by athletes, for athletes’, was created so that we could grow as a sport, unified, to take on the rest of the world. I truly hope you all enjoy reading this as much as we did writing it. In Strength,

Rachel Crass Editor Strength+ Magazine strengthplusmag@yahoo.com

Want to write for Strength+?
Submit your name, contact information, brief summary of writing and weightlifting experience (100-200 words each), and a weightlifting-related writing sample* (250-1000 words) to Rachel Crass at strengthplusmag@yahoo.com.
*Writing samples are for application purposes only and will not be used in publication, unless you expressly grant your permission for such use. 7

Robert J. Hall Assistant Editor Strength+ Magazine rampantlion2010@yahoo.com

From: To: Subject:

USA Weightlifting All USA Weightlifting Members USA Weightlifting selects National Car Rental and Enterprise Rent-A-Car as preferred rental car suppliers effective May 1, 2010

USA Weightlifting continually strives to expand its corporate sponsorship base and is pleased to announce a sponsorship deal with National Car Rental and Enterprise Rent-A-Car as the preferred rental car suppliers for USA Weightlifting effective May 1, 2010. Enterprise Rent-A-Car and National Car Rental are low cost leaders while providing excellent customer service as reflected by the 2009 J.D. Powers & Associates Award. This partnership allows us to reduce annual car rental expenditures and introduce program residuals back into our athlete initiatives. Our program with National and Enterprise provides all USA Weightlifting members with special recognition, service and speed whether renting at an airport or in the local market where members live and work. National provides speed and consistency for our most frequent airport travelers through the Emerald Club. Enterprise provides the custom attention and service needed for local market rentals while also serving the needs of airport travelers. “USAW is thrilled to add National Car Rental and Enterprise Rent-A-Car to our growing list of corporate partners. This program will establish a 5% rebate back to USAW for all rentals booked by eligible renters using our USAW promotion code” said USA Weightlifting CEO Rick Adams (Colorado Springs, Colo.) Before your first rental with National or Enterprise, please take the time to enroll in the Frequent Renter programs noted below. This will ensure you receive the appropriate rates, services and benefits every time you rent. We are pleased to offer you a complimentary membership in the Emerald Club. Please click on the enrollment link below to access the online application and complete the enrollment process. This will take approximately 5 minutes, and your membership will be active immediately upon completion.

As an Emerald Club member, you will receive the following benefits, among others: • Bypass the counter and choose your own car - Bypass the rental counter and go directly to the Emerald Club Aisle® at more than 50 major airports in the U.S. and Canada. On the Emerald Club Aisle, choose your own car from a selection of mid-size and larger vehicles, and pay the reserved mid-size rate. E-receipts for faster returns - There's no need to wait around for a piece of paper when you return your car. Sign up to receive this benefit and we will automatically email your receipts to you within 24 hours of each returned rental.

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• •

Choose your rewards - Earn rental credits towards a Free Rental Day with every seven rental credits earned. Or choose to automatically receive frequent flyer miles for each day rented (average of 50 frequent flyer miles per rental day - amount varies by airline). As an additional convenience, Emerald Club members may reserve at Enterprise Rent A Car locations where National is not available, using their Emerald Club number allowing for the contracted rates and certain profile data availability at the Enterprise counter. NOTE: The above benefits do not apply to Enterprise rentals.

. Enterprise is excited to introduce our free members’ benefit program— Enterprise PlusTM! With Enterprise Plus for Business, you will enjoy the following benefits: + + + +

Faster Reservations – online, on the phone, with your travel agent, and at participating Enterprise locations. Faster Rentals Special Members’ Line at Major Airport Locations Special offers when you subscribe to Email Extras

Joining Enterprise Plus is easy; the registration page takes only a minute to complete and already has your account # and PIN # pre-populated. Just follow these easy steps: Step 1: Go to https://www.enterprise.com/car_rental/deeplinkmap.do?bid=044&cust=XZ12078 Step 2: Complete the form and click on "submit". Step 3: Print off the Welcome page that displays the temporary Enterprise Plus for Business card and unique member number. You will receive your permanent member card within 4 – 6 weeks.

If you have any questions regarding the USA Weightlifting car rental program provided through National Car Rental or Enterprise Rent-A-Car, please contact Aimee Tackes at 720.382.6050 or by email at aimee.e.tackes@ehi.com

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Part I
The Eugen Sandow Story
By Rachel Crass
s marginalized, and perhaps even as ostracized, as strength athletes may feel like we are today compared to athletes in other sports, we can at least take solace in our internationallyrecognized legitimacy. Strongmen 150 years ago weren’t so fortunate. With no Olympic Games, no World Championships, no Mr. Olympia competitions, and no World’s Strongest Man competitions, our predecessors could aspire to achieving little more than headlining the local freak show or traveling circus. A few people were instrumental in changing all that, and the “Founding Fathers” segment is our way of paying homage to those who not only created the sports we currently dedicate our lives to but who are almost singlehandedly responsible for those sports’ world-wide proliferation. The title is also a stark reminder of women’s relative infancy in the strength world. When considering subjects for the debut “Founding Fathers” installment, no one seemed as appropriate as Eugen Sandow. Bodybuilding enthusiasts will likely recog11

nize Sandow as, quite literally, the epitome of their sport, as his namesake, the Sandow Trophy, is awarded every year to the winner of the most prestigious bodybuilding competition in existence today, the Mr. Olympia. Sandow’s name might not be as recognizable to the rest of us, but his contributions to the strength world as a whole are no less significant as they are to bodybuilding in particular. Without Eugen Sandow, weightlifting and other strength demonstrations might very well still be relegated to obscure stages and sideshows.

Eugen Sandow was born Friedrich long, though. Even after their pro- leading to his discovery by an Müller on April 2, 1867, in fessional separation, Sandow and American businessman on vacation Königsberg, East Prussia (modern- Attila—now living in London— across the pond. day Russia). Early into his adult remained in contact through letters, In the summer of 1893, life, the and in one convinced of larger and higherb l o n d e - “The challenge against Sampson letter, Attila paying crowds in America, Sanhaired, blue- and Cyclops proved to be the tip- wrote to dow resettled in New York City. eyed Müller ping point in Sandow’s career…” S a n d o w Unfortunately, the weather was rechristened about a chal- unusually hot and humid that sumhimself as the decidedly less- lenge offered by two popular mer, and few people wanted to Aryan-sounding Eugen Sandow in young stage performers in London spend the afternoon cooped up in order to skip out on Prussia’s man- at the time datory military service. Luckily for n a m e d us, draft-dodging was far from Sampson and Sandow’s only talent. Cyclops. The After a series of falling two bravados outs with his family members, the promised 500 young Sandow joined a passing B r i t i s h circus and quickly found a niche pounds to for himself as an acrobat. anyone who Not long into his career, could better however, the circus went bankrupt, their lifting and the energetic, talented per- feats. former found himself stranded in N o t Brussels, Belgium. There he met in a financial Louis Attila, an early strongman position to and strength showman, who con- pass up such vinced Sandow to take the stage an opportuwith him. nity and conAttila taught Sandow the fident he basics of physique showmanship could beat his and strength demonstrations, and challengers, the two men made a modest living Sandow went as traveling performers. Quickly to London tiring of the hand-to-mouth exis- and handily tence that working with Attila pro- won himself Lean and muscular, Eugen Sandow obliterated contemporary standards for strength performers in Britain and, eventually, vided, Sandow parted ways with 500 pounds. around the world. his mentor in 1889. Still only 22 The chalyears old, the budding strongman lenge against Sampson and Cy- an unventilated entertainment hall traveled across Europe on his own clops proved to be the tipping point to check out the new talent. Money and eventually settled in Venice, in Sandow’s career, catapulting the was slow coming in, and Sandow Italy. attractive German to the top of quickly became disillusioned with Sandow wasn’t in Italy Britain’s strongman scene and his prospects in America. But just
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before he had given up entirely and to marry an English woman named land. These facilities were the first gone back to Europe, a man named Blanche Brookes. After three years gyms ever to be available to the Florenz Ziegfeld happened to catch spent touring the United States, general public. Prior to Sandow’s one of Sandow’s shows. Ziegfeld Sandow moved to England with his Institutes, gyms were luxuries used was as ambitious as he was percep- bride to rejuvenate and rethink his primarily to serve the recreational tive. Upon noticing all of the future. Having established a home desires of the very wealthy. women in the audience that night and finally financially stable In 1897, Sandow wrote a sit upright as soon as Sandow took enough to pursue some long-held book entitled Strength and How to the stage, the enterprising audience personal interests, Sandow began a Obtain It in order to promote his member decided the muscle-bound systematic overhaul of the fitness ideas about the benefits of physical German was worth an inexercise and strength training. vestment. The following year, after the Ziegfeld convinced Sandow name was firmly enSandow to head to Chicago trenched in the rapidlyto perform at the 1894 growing fitness world, the World’s Columbian Exhibistrongman-turnedtion in an effort to reach larentrepreneur began Sandow’s ger audiences and to rebrand Magazine. himself as a strongman/sex In 1901, Sandow orsymbol. The move worked, ganized the first competition and by the end of the Exhiin the world to judge one bition, Sandow had become man’s physique against ana household name. His sucother’s. The winner was decess was due in no small cided by three judges: Sandow part to his virtually nonhimself; Sir Charles Lawes, a existent clothing during his prominent sculptor of the day; performances. His uniform and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, consisted of little more than the author of the Sherlock a strategically-placed tree Holmes series. leaf tied on with a piece of In 1904, Sandow pubThe Sandow Trophy, awarded to the winner of the annual Mr. Olympia body building competition, string. lished his second book—Body depicts the graceful marriage between physique With money pouring Building, or Man in the Makand strength. in and still under Ziegfeld’s ing—finally coining the term for the genre of exercise he’d been guidance, Sandow put together a industry as the world knew it. group of travelling performers His first order of business demonstrating and promoting vircalled The Trocadero Vaudevilles. was to open the Institute of Physi- tually all his life. Sandow took his efforts The Vaudevilles travelled across cal Culture with a mission to North America, their chiseled spread the word to the public about one step further by inventing new leader at the helm of each of their the importance of physical fitness forms of exercise equipment, the almost-nightly performances. and to share his bodybuilding se- most influential and famous of Somehow, during his gru- crets. The gym was an immediate which was an early form of today’s eling time on the road, Sandow success and led Sandow to open dumbbell. He also travelled the found time to court and eventually more Institutes throughout Eng- world in an almost religious effort
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to spread his exercise philosophy; not only did he scour mainland Europe, but he hit South Africa, India, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand as well. By 1911, even members of Britain’s royal family had taken note of Sandow’s message, with the King of England designating him the Special Instructor in Physical Culture to the King. As advisor to the King, Sandow pushed for compulsory physical education classes in schools, because he was convinced that weak children could contract illnesses more easily than strong, healthy children and would, therefore, be unable to maximize their academic performances. Sandow also promoted exercise for pregnant women, believing exercise could alleviate pains involved in childbirth. He was also one of the first people to recognize

that daily exercise breaks can increase worker productivity. Over the course of his lifetime, Eugen Sandow almost singlehandedly created the fitness industry as we know it today. Before Sandow, portly statures were con-

“Sandow almost singlehandedly created the fitness industry as we know it today.”
sidered status symbols, with extra fat symbolizing the wealth it takes to buy extra food and to pay servants to work on one’s behalf. Sandow showed the world that being strong is not only helpful in performing everyday activities, but it’s also healthier and more attractive than being weak, soft, and physically inept. He gave physical fitness the sex appeal that cata-

pulted the industry into the mainstream and invented the gyms, equipment, and competitions that continue to foster industry growth today. Without Sandow, that very first gym you ever walked into and saw someone grinding out a back squat might never have existed at all. Unfortunately, Sandow was not as successful in his personal life as he was in his professional life, and the irreconcilable rift created by his reputation as a philanderer while away from home led to his less-than-royal treatment after his death in 1925. Eugen Sandow is buried in London’s Putney Vale Cemetery in what was, until recently, an unmarked grave. He most likely died of complications from syphilis, contracted during his heyday as an attractive traveling strongman.▪

To sign up for the Straight UP program or for more information, please contact Rachel Crass at Gold’s Gym – Briargate. (719) 548-8400.

Camps begin June 7th! - Sign Up Today! “There is only One Way to the Top.”
A 6-week summer camp offered by Gold’s Gym – Briargate (Colorado Springs), the Straight (drug-free) UP (Ultimate Performance) program will focus on developing speed, strength, and agility in high school and college athletes. Camps will meet with a trainer for 2 hours, twice per week and will learn sport specific exercises, injury prevention techniques, proper nutrition guidance, and various take-home materials to use as reference guides even after the camp concludes. Sign-ups have already started, so reserve your team’s spot today. Individuals not associated with a team are also welcome to participate in the Straight UP program.
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Jiu Jitsu Champ Credits Weightlifting for Success
By Sera Kim duced me to one of the top Olympic weightlifting gyms in Georgia: I was introduced to Brazilian Jiu Coffee's Gym. I needed a routine Jitsu in mid-2008, and it immedi- to get me prepared for the Pan Am ately got my attention. I was doing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Tournament in well, learning techniques, and April, 2010. A few of the lifters starting to understand the sport, but from that gym helped me develop a due to a major injury shortly after, routine to work my weak areas and I was out for six months. Luckily, get me prepared for the Pan Am after great Championphysical ships. Without weightlifting, I believe I therapy, my At would not have been as doctor said first, it was successful at the Pan American I would be Championships for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. d i f f i c u l t ready to learning start back in 2009. I knew the sport movements like snatches, clean was very technical and very chal- and jerks, and their variations. But, lenging, but I was ready get back once I mastered the correct techto what I enjoyed doing. The chal- nique needed to lift heavier lenge of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu re- w e i g h t s , I minded me of chess—there are so found weightmany ways to defend a move, but lifting to be an there are also many rules that had enjoyable alterto be followed. native to my While I knew the tech- normal workniques—and my coaches rein- outs. After two forced that I was a great technical weeks, I could fighter—I felt that many aspects of already sense my game were missing, notably that I was beagility, explosive power, flexibil- c o m i n g ity, and overall strength. After my stronger and first two tournaments back from more exploinjury, I could tell these aspects sive. My movements in Jiu Jitsu were missing. The girls I competed class were becoming much more against were faster, stronger, and natural and powerful. I couldn't more explosive than I was. It was believe it! at this time I knew I needed to I continued my training make a change. schedule at Coffee's, going two to Soon after, a friend intro- three times a week, lifting more
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weight every week. Weightlifting also improved my cardiovascular endurance, a vital component to any athlete's arsenal. I was able to run longer and sprint faster. I knew I was heading in the right direction. Overall, weightlifting helps with everything I do, including daily activities. Originally, I was concerned that adopting weightlifting would make me gain weight, as most women would be concerned with such. The opposite happened though, as I lost weight while also adding much needed muscle. Without weightlifting, I believe I would not have been as successful at the Pan American Championships for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Winning my gold medal was truly a highlight of my career, and one I feel gave me the confidence to win again.▪
*Sera Kim lives in Atlanta, GA, and attends community college, working towards her degree in business accounting and management. She has been active since childhood, participating in a wide variety of sports. She is currently the 2010 Pan American Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gold Medalist, and will compete at the World Championships this June.

Polish Coach and Gold Medalist ZYGMUNT SMALCERZ has been named Head Coach of the Resident Weightlifting Program at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. But is he the right man for the job?

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Results, 52 kg Weight Class, 1972 Olympic Games, Munich, West Germany 
Place  Last Name  1  Smalcerz  2  Szücs  4  Sasaki  5  Aung  7  Sukchinda  8  Hortopan  9  Depthios  10  Francel  DQ  Nasehi       
WR

First Name  Zygmunt  Lajos  Tetsuhide  Gyi  Chaiya  Ion  Charlie  Lester  Arjomand 

Country  Poland  Hungary  Hungary  Japan  Burma  N. Korea  Thailand  Romania  Indonesia 

Press  112.5  107.5  112.5  105.0  95.0  97.5  100.0  97.5  95.0 

Snatch  Clean & Jerk  100.0  95.0  92.5  97.5  105
WR 

Total  337.5  330.0  327.5  322.5  320.0  312.5  312.5  310.0  310.0  302.5  305.0       

125.0  127.5  122.5  120.0  120.0  130.0  120.0  117.5  125* 

3  Holczreiter  Sándor 

6  Dong‐Geun  Pak 

90.0  92.5  95.0  90.0 

Columbia  100.0  85.0  117.5  Iran  Positive Doping Control Test       

 New World Record 

* Set a new world record of 132.5 kg on a 4th attempt 

The latest in a seemingly endless string of controversies to come out of the resident weightlifting program at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs over the last couple of years, the National Office has recently announced the hiring of Polish coach Zygmunt Smalcerz to replace long-time resident team coach Bob Morris.
By Rachel Crass
For many, the hiring of Smalcerz is as unacceptable as it was unexpected. The Olympic Training Center (OTC) is one of, if not the, most sophisticated training facilities in the country, and the resident program is designed to be the most elite program the US has to offer. It naturally follows, then, that the decisions, policies, and procedures made concerning that program would be of high interest to, and therefore subject to immense scrutiny from, other coaches, clubs, and athletes across the country. It’s only to be expected that a changing of the guard at the OTC would garner some strong responses from the USAW membership, whether adamantly in favor of it or vehemently against it. Considerably less expected is a resident athlete voluntarily subjecting herself to that same scrutiny by making a public statement concerning the decision. In my unique position of not only being Strength+’s editor but also being one of Smalcerz’s future athletes, I somehow feel obligated to take the rest of the membership through my journey toward acceptance of Zygmunt Smalcerz as the next head coach of the OTC’s resident weightlifting team. It was by no means a smooth ride for me, as I, along with every weightlifter at the OTC, had to decide whether I was willing to put the best years of my career into the hands of a coach I’ve never met, hired by far-away Board
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members, some of whom I have never met either. Throughout my critique of Smalcerz, the editor in me had the growth and upward mobility of USAW in mind, but the athlete in me cared only about my own best interests. Interestingly enough, both the editor and the athlete eventually came to the same conclusion: Mr. Smalcerz, Welcome to Colorado.
Photos: Above: Zygmunt Smalcerz (POL) clean and jerks his way to a gold medal in the 52 kg class at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, West Germany. Opposite: Almost 40 years after winning his Gold, Smalcerz still approaches weightlifting with passion and intensity.

Being in the resident program at the OTC is undoubtedly a unique experience, and while I don’t live there, I do train there, right alongside the residents, eight times per week—twice on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and once on Tuesday and Saturday. Thursdays and Sundays are rest days. That schedule has, over the past decade, become one of the few constants in the lives of dozens of athletes. We schedule work and school around it. We schedule trips home around it. We schedule time with friends around it. And, for some of us, childcare around it. What will happen to that schedule under a new coach? How flexible and understanding will the new coach be if he changes the schedule to something I’m unable to adhere to? Will he try to change my technique? Will he try to move me back down a weight class after I’ve gotten comfortable as a 75? … Will he even speak English? All of those questions and quite a few more ran through my mind in the seconds following the announcement of hiring a new coach. One of the catches to lifting at the OTC is that we don’t have much say in who the coach is. Sure, we can complain if we don’t like something and hope for a compromise, but the coach comes with the territory. If you want the perks at the OTC, you take the coach at the OTC. Hopefully you like him, but if you don’t, there’s not a whole lot you can do about it beyond foregoing the free stuff and moving to another club. Most of the athletes here have decided to try out the new

coach for a few months to see if they like him. Unfortunately I don’t have that luxury, as I have made a commitment to my daughter to be settled in a final location by the time she starts preschool in August. I need to know now whether Smalcerz is the right coach for me or whether I should follow through with my plans to move to California by summer’s end. Because I don’t live at the OTC, I receive no assistance, finan-

(In case any doubt remains of my motivation for backing Smalcerz, allow me to suggest, at least to a certain “knowing” faction of USAW, that if I weren’t 100% bent on making a go at this whole 2012 Olympic thing, I would have already made the move to a certain state capitol out east.) With the disclaimers now out of the way, let’s turn our attention to Smalcerz himself. Athlete Zygmunt Smalcerz has spent nearly all of his sixty-nine years in his native Poland. He began his athletic career as a gymnast but made the switch to weightlifting at the age of 19. His short, stocky stature made him a natural at the sport and, when combined with his unrivaled work ethic and determination, enabled him to climb to the top of the international rankings. He won his first World Championship in 1971 in Lima, Peru, and the following year reached the pinnacle of his career; at the 1972 Olympic Games, held in Munich, West Germany, Zygmunt Smalcerz won the gold medal for Poland in the 52 kg class. He won his second World Championship in 1975 and was a favorite for gold at the ‘76 Olympic Games in Montreal, Canada. Unfortunately, plagued by

Zygmunt Smalcerz coached Andrzej Cofalik (POL), pictured above, to a bronze medal in the 83 kg class at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, GA.

cial or otherwise, from the program (with the huge exception being the world-class coaching I’ve been receiving from Bob Morris over the past five months). The choice between being coached by Smalcerz or moving to California to be closer to my dad and to the rest of my teammates at Cal Strength was completely unbiased by the auxiliary perks of the OTC. My decision was based solely on an extrapolation of Smalcerz’s track record as a coach.
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injury, the then 35-year-old Smalcerz was unable to qualify for the Polish Olympic team and hung up his shoes soon thereafter. His best lifts in competition in the 52 kg class are 115 kg (press), 105 kg (snatch), 132.5 kg (clean & jerk), 340 kg (3-lift total:

O l y m p i c Weightlifting Team, which obviously included both genders, the Board made sure to put their Coach new recruit Smalcerz through his * The press was removed from competition following the 1972 Olympics.  turned to paces concerning the nuances of coaching soon after retiring as an petent coach—he’s an exceptional coaching women before they deathlete and has since logged decades one. cided to put him in charge of us. of international coaching experience. But one thing still bothered Satisfied that the Board In 2000, four years after coaching 83 me. All of his experience seemed to members had done their due dilikg lifter Andrzej Cofalik to a bronze be with men. What experience, if gence before hiring Smalcerz, I had medal performance at the 1996 any, did Smalcerz have coaching one more personal issue to address: Olympic Games in Atlanta, GA, women? For the answer to this, I lifting technique. I have a few nagSmalcerz was named Head Coach of probed various members of USA ging injuries (Who doesn’t the Polish Olympic at this level?) and needed Weightlifting Team and to make sure Smalcerz’s held that position through brand of lifting (snatching the next two Olympiads. in particular) wouldn’t Smalcerz’s best-known compromise my alreadyachievement during his 8precarious left elbow. A year tenure as Poland’s few cups of coffee and most prestigious coach more than a few hours was leading 94 kg lifter spent frame-by-framing Szymon Kolecki to a silYouTube videos of Smalver medal at the 2008 cerz’s lifters assured me Olympic Games in Beithat he didn’t simply lord jing, China. Proving he’s still got it after decades of coaching, new US over monstrously strong In 2002, Smalcerz Olympic Training Center Head Coach Zygmunt Smalcerz men who muscled their was inducted into the Inled Szymon Kolecki (POL), above, to a silver medal in the 94 kg class at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. way onto the podium; he ternational Weightlifting taught them how to finesse Federation’s Hall of Fame. (Editor’s note: Kolecki shaved his trademark long locks on their way onto those medal He is now a member of the the morning of August 17, 2008, the same day he competed in the Olympics, to show his solidarity with Tibet in protest stands with some of the Polish Olympic Commitof Chinese political actions in the region.) most beautiful lifting I tee and lives in Warsaw, where he serves as a consultant to Weightlifting‘s Board of Directors have ever seen. Last Tuesday, I enrolled my the weightlifting program at Po- and was pleasantly surprised with land’s Olympic Training Center. the answers I received. I had not daughter in a Colorado Springs preAfter doing a little digging been the first person interested in school. Thanks to Smalcerz, I’ll be into Smalcerz’s history both as a Smalcerz’s knowledge of coaching staying put for a while, which is competitor and a coach, I quickly women; although he had been the okay by me. I kind of prefer the realized Smalcerz is not just a com- head coach of the entire Polish mountains to the ocean anyway.■

115 press/ 95 sn/ 130 c&j), and 237.5 kg (2-lift total: (105 sn/ 132.5 c&j).

Zygmunt Smalcerz’s Highest Competition Lifts (52‐kg Weight Class)  Lift  Weight  Year  Location  Competition  Press  115  1971  Lima, Peru  World Championships  Snatch  105  1975  Moscow, USSR  World Championships  Clean & Jerk  132.5  1975  Moscow, USSR  World Championships  340  3‐Lift Total*  1971  Lima, Peru  World Championships  (115/95/130)  237.5  2‐Lift Total  1975  Moscow, USSR  World Championships  (105/132.5) 

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Iron Baloney
by Bob Guere

A cartoonist in his spare time, Bob Guere works as a Range Control Officer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Dryden Flight Control Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Bob also runs CrossFit California City. Check out his club at http://www.crossfitcalcity.com/.

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Endangered Species:
Iron Sport Gym is one of the few gyms left in America dedicated solely to strength athletes.
Owner Steve Pulcinella explains how he has survived the nationwide shift toward mega-chain gyms.

Founded by brothers Steve and Joe Pulcinella in Glenolden, PA, about a halfhour southwest of Philly, Iron Sport Gym has been a strength sport Mecca for fifteen years. Whether you’re into Olympic lifting, powerlifting, strongman, Highland Games, body building, or any other strength sport imaginable, you’ll find everything you need at Iron Sport. From Atlas stones to barbells, Conan’s wheels to squat racks, Iron Sport’s got it. Don’t get me wrong. You don’t need to be an active competitor to fit in around here. As long as you have the desire to discover your limitations and then bulldoze right through them, you’ll find friends at Iron Sport. But before you think Iron Sport Gym couldn’t possibly get any better, read what cofounder and owner (and 1994 World’s Strongest Man competitor) Steve Pulcinella has to say about it. Strength+: What are you most proud of about Iron Sport? Steve Pulcinella (SP): There are just so many things that, as the owner, I am

proud of. The experience of living the American dream and owning my own business, the thousands of people that I have exposed to weightlifting over the years, the friends I have made and the many friends this gym has brought together, the admiration of women everywhere. The think I thing I am MOST proud of is giving my local community the chance to see what gyms should be like and giving them an alternative to this current crop of horrible chain gyms. What's your single favorite piece of equipment in the gym? (SP) Hey I’m easy, just give me a good bar, some bumpers and the floor, and I’m happy as hell. Although I’m not a competitive lifter [anymore], I still do the Highland Games, and my training is based on doing explosive lifts. Plus I just like heavy basic barbell work. Who are some famous people who have trained at Iron Sport? (SP) We get a lot of the WWE guys in here when they do shows in Philly because we are so close to the airport ho22

tels. Big names like Stone Cold Steve Austin, Kane, Kurt Angle, Chyna, Mark Henry, Undertaker etc. I’ve even opened up on a Sunday after hours a couple times and trained with Vince McMahon himself. Jose Canseco was just in here a few months back too. A lot of my old pro strongman buddies from all over have been in here: Magnus ver Magnusson, Karl Gillingham, Jesse Marunde, John Anderson, Shannon Hartnet, Ryan Vierra and many others. Are you affiliated with an Olympiclifting club? (SP) Yes, we are a satellite training cen-

ter for East Coast Gold. When I met my wife, Jalaine Ulsh, she was lifting with Joe Delago over in Moorestown, NJ, and that’s how we started our relationship with East Coast Gold (ECG) and WerkSan. Leo Totten and the other ECG coaches are always there to coach our lifters at meets, so it’s been a really positive thing. What's your opinion on CrossFit? Like it, love it, hate it, or tolerate it to pay the bills? (SP) Although we aren’t a CrossFit affiliate location, we are probably one of the few commercial gyms you can join where you can do CrossFit workouts on your own, and we have many guys here who do. I look the other way at the chalky handprints and puddles of human filth that get left on my floors. We have the bumpers, kettlebells, rings, pull-up bars and floor space needed. We just don’t run classes. I actually like CrossFit though; it has brought a lot of people out of the woodwork and into the sport [of weightlifting]. Plus they aren’t afraid to pay some cash to get a real workout. For people thinking about opening a similar gym in their own hometown, what advice would you give them about how to make a successful go at it? For example, how did Iron Sport start? Did you have a large investor donate the capital, or did you have it? What are the most important, most fundamental, pieces of equipment people should start out with be-

fore they have the money to invest in larger, more specialized equipment? (SP) When my brother, Joe, and I started the first ‘key club’ Iron Sport back in 1995, this concept of a hardcore, lifters only, private training gym wasn’t really a big thing like it is now. We opened the small place first with visions of someday expanding it into a larger commercial gym. We started it with mostly my brother and I throwing in $15,000 a piece. When we put the new place to-

had the open space in my current building to devote to becoming an affiliate, because I would do in a heartbeat. Mega-gyms, like 24-hour Fitness and Gold's Gym, seem to be saturating the market, but Iron Sport has been around for 15 years. What have you done to ensure your longevity? In other words, how have you managed to survive the current shift toward machine-filled, tone-n-firm cookiecutter gyms? (SP) One of the things I have been doing is working 80 hours a week for little or no money for 15 years, so that has really helped. I’m VERY hands on, as you can imagine. But we have a great reputation. I can assure you that there is not one person in the many thousands of people that have ever belonged here that is out there telling people that I ripped them off. I know none of those chains can say that. In the last 15 years, all these chains have driven any of the old school lifting gyms like Iron Sport out of business, so Iron Sport is now THE only gym in the Philly area where you are even allowed to make some noise or do a freaking deadlift or use some chalk without some jackass gym employee waving a finger in your face. We don’t blast disco music and don’t have binding contracts, etc. We have become a niche business. The more the chains try to be the same, the more I try to be different. That’s why I call myself “Steve Pulcinella- The Health Club Maverick”. (Interview continued on next page.)

gether, we borrowed money and got into a lot of debt. My advice to anyone out there is to start small and stay small, just keep striving to make the small place as great as you can. A 2500 sq ft private strength training facility, done right, could easily make you more money than I do, afford you much more free time than what I have, and keep you out of debt. As far as equipment goes, that is really up to the type of facility that someone wants to start. CrossFit is definitely the easiest and cheapest start-up gym to do, and right now one of the most profitable routes to take. I really wish I 23

(Continued from previous page.) Does Iron Sport have any rules? Like, put your s#^* away, or never come in here again? Well, like every business, I have to keep a certain amount decorum. But it’s definitely not like other chain health clubs with the “lunk alarm’ and other ridiculous policies. We have a pretty thick skin down here. I have always said that if you get the lifetime ban from Iron Sport Gym you are truly a colossal asshole. The list of people that I have thrown out of the gym is a short but illustrious one. It also helps that, when you walk into a gym owned by a 300lb strongman who is there almost all the time, people tend not to get too out of hand. Every once in a while I have to address a specific problem in the gym, the most common of which revolves around the men’s toilet, so I have put up a sign in the men’s room stall that I call “Iron Sport Toilet Tips”. It’s funny. It has become legendary. Thanks, Steve, and we wish you much success in the future. Any last words for our readers? My father owned his own printing business for 40 years. When I opened my gym he said to me, “I don’t care how long you stay in business—every single day something will happen that you never saw before and would never have thought would happen”. Well, he was partially right; its not every day. It happens more like TEN TIMES A DAY. But that’s what keeps it exciting.■

Service Spotlight: Lt. Colonel Bull Ternus, USAF
America’s servicemen and -women are far too often overlooked, and we here at Strength+ are doing our best to change that. Lt. Col. Bull Ternus (pictured below, showing respect after making a successful clean & jerk at the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships) has proudly served in the United States Air Force for 27 years. He currently serves as the Executive Assistant to the Director of the Joint Staff at the Pentagon, outside of Washington, D.C. The majority of his illustrious career, however, has been spent in Special Operations. Bull’s wife, Mona, is also a Lt. Col. in the Air Force. Bull began weightlifting at the age of 16 as a means to stay fit for the military. After spendFun Fact: Bull competes in the Arnold Weightlifting Championships every year. His perennially-chosen background music: “Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder,” otherwise known as the Air Force Theme Song.

ing 20 years as a powerlifter, he has been an Olympic-style lifter for nearly a decade. On behalf of all of our readers, Thank You, Bull and Mona, for your life-long dedication and service to our country. Photo taken by John Broz at the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships in Columbus, OH.

Iron Sport Gym www.ironsport.com 505 S. Chester Pike Glenolden, PA, 19036 610-237-3840

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USA Weightlifting Merchandise
New merchandise is being added all this month to the USAW E-Store online! Take a look at all our new items by clicking on the E-Store picture on the right hand side of the USAW website: weightlifting.teamusa.org.

Click this picture on the USAW website!

Mesh Basketball Shorts w/ pockets

Team USA T-Shirt

More to come soon!

18 oz Water Bottles

Wind Breaker Jackets

Messenger Bags for laptops, books and binders 25

Passion, Purpose,
 

American Weightlifter Sarah        Robles Discusses Her Transition   from Throwing. 
                 
Most little girls in America fill their days with daisy chains, princess dresses, and dainty tea parties. They grow up wanting polish on their nails and a size 4 on their butt. Luckily for American weightlifting, Sarah Robles was not “most girls.” A self-described brute from early childhood, Sarah always felt like she fit in better around boys. She could tackle them, wrestle them, and, as we’ll find out later, bench press them without feeling self-conscious about her strength or size. She’s a super heavyweight now and, when asked, wouldn’t have it any other way. In fact, she’s been an outspoken advocate for various organizations, all of which help young girls and women to develop healthy self-images, regardless of their height, weight, or body type. She uses herself as an example of how successful women can be if they can not only accept, but fully embrace, their stature and use it to their advantage. Standing 5’101/2” tall, Sarah was hardly surprised when junior high, high school, and college track and field coaches pegged her as a thrower. She started with the shot put and discuss in 8th grade and continued to throw both of them through high school. By the time she left Arizona State University, she had mastered the hammer and weight throw as well. Her personal best distances are 168.5’ (discus), 49’1 3/4” (shot put), 166’ (hammer), and 53’113/4” (weight). Although
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she has now turned her competitive aspirations toward weightlifting, Sarah still harbors a deep love of the ring and is passing that on to her athletes at LewisPalmer High School in Monument, Colorado, where she is just wrapping up her first season as the throws coach. Sarah’s throwing career hasn’t just helped her to land a job, though. It’s also helped her to earn a spot as one of the best female weightlifters America has ever seen. In the two years since she has started competing, Sarah Robles has qualified for every single international team possible, including the 2008 Junior World team (2nd place), 2009 Senior World team (11th place), and 2009 Pan American team (5th place). Earlier this year, she became the 3rd best super heavyweight in American history when she posted a 243 kg total at the Pan Am qualifying portion of the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships in Columbus, OH. Her next competition is later this month. She’ll represent the United States at the 2010 Pan American Championships, to be held from May 23-31 in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Sarah currently trains at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO, and is coached by Bob Morris. Strength+ interviewed Sarah to find out more about America’s best super and how she has been able to climb the ranks so rapidly.

and Potential:
                            
                     

Strength+: Tell us a little about how you got started in the sport. When and why did you start weightlifting, and who was your first coach? Sarah Robles (SR): I started using the Olympic lifts in 2003 to help with my throwing. It was the summer after my freshman year in high school. My first coach was Rich McClure, and I guess I got lucky, because Rich was an amazing weightlifting coach. He actually coached his wife, Christina Wilson McClure, an American Record holder in the 58 kg class in the mid ‘90s. Melanie Roach eventually beat those records, but Christina held them for quite a few years. Joe Micela is your current personal coach outside of the Olympic Train-

ing Center. Why did you leave Rich, and how did you meet Joe? (SR) I was really happy with Rich but couldn’t take him with me when I went off to college. I didn't have a facility to train in for a couple of weeks before track started at [Arizona State University], so I looked on USAW’s website for a local coach. I saw Joe on there, but I was too nervous to call him— which is silly—so I sent him a text message telling him my lifting numbers and such. Joe called me soon after, and we met a couple of days after that. He's been my awesome coach since. [Coach Micela owns Performance One Advanced Sports Training and is the President and Head Coach of Team Arizona Weightlifting Club].
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You had a promising throwing career. What made you decide to switch from throwing to weightlifting? (SR) I loved throwing and still do, which is why I coach at Lewis-Palmer. Rich [McClure] and Joe [Micela] both told me I could be a good weightlifter, but at first I wasn’t ready to stop throwing. After a little while with Joe, though, I realized that I could go farther in weightlifting than I could with throwing. Once I realized that weightlifting would allow me to compete internationally and to see the world, I began to focus primarily on that. Plus, it’s pretty neat to be able to represent the United States out there on the platform! (Interview continued on next page.)

(Continued from previous page.) Your quick rise to the top of women's weightlifting in the United States is phenomenal. What, or whom, do you credit most for your current success in the sport? (SR) Firstly, God. My parents did a good job too. Other than that, I would say, good genetics, hard work, and great coaching. What weights do you hope to lift by the end of your career, and why? (SR) I would like to snatch 130 kg and clean & jerk 165 kg. The current records are 128 in the snatch and 161 in the clean & jerk [both records held by Cheryl Haworth]. By the time everything is said and done, I would like to beat those. 130 and 165 would make me the Pan Am record holder as well. Those numbers are world class, and I would love to medal at the World Championships and Olympics. Being the strongest woman in a couple continents would be pretty cool too. [We agree, Sarah!] Are there any modifications you make to your workouts to avoid injuries or to deal with any current injuries you might have? (SR) We don’t do anything too crazy, but I do have a few things I do differently. For example, I back squat in every training cycle, like most people do, but I front squat only in every other cycle. Front squatting bothers my shoulders—I guess because of all the throwing I’ve done. I also do heavier snatch and clean pulls, because I like the confidence they give me. That’s not really an injury-prevention thing, but it is something I do differently. Also, I handle volume better than most supers do, I think, so I recover from high intensity workouts fairly quickly. You’ve had the opportunity to meet some pretty legendary weightlifters at the Olympic Training Center (OTC)

and at international competitions. Who, if anyone, stands out? Have you ever gotten star-struck? (SR) Everyone's kinda cool, but no one stands out. I’ve never really been one to get star-struck, and even if I were, I guess you’d get over it pretty quickly by living at the OTC. We’re all just ordinary people doing extraordinary things. It's exciting to lift well enough to be able to compete against people of such a high caliber. I have thrown with and against national champions, record holders, and world record holders. To be able to do that in this sport as well is a treat. Is there anything else you think we'd like to know about you? (SR) Haha! Not really. I do have a few things, though. I’m addicted to CytoSport and Muscle Milk products and can tie a cherry stem with my tongue and unwrap a starburst wrapper in my mouth. [Oh goodness, Sarah…] I’m also the only female state throwing champion in my high school's history. Oh, and I once bench pressed a man weighing 172 lbs, cold, for two reps. [Sarah has also volunteered to do weightlifting demonstrations for Shape Up Arizona and recently entered a photo/poster contest for the National Organization for Women (NOW) Foundation to promote positive body image.]

Sarah Robles’ QuickStats
Sports: Weightlifting & Throwing Age: 21 Height: 5’101/2” Weight: 120 kg (264 lbs) Weight Class: 75+ kg Hometown: Desert Hot Springs, CA Current City: Colo. Spgs, CO Best Training Lifts Snatch: 110 kg Clean & Jerk: 135 kg Best Competition Lifts Snatch: 103 kg Clean & Jerk: 140 kg Best Throws Discus: 168.5’ Shot Put: 49’ 13/4” Weight Throw: 53’ 113/4” Colleges U. of Alabama (1 yr) Arizona State U. (1 sem) Northern Mich. U. (1 yr) Mount Jacinto JC (Current) Degree Field: Physical Education Occupation: Throws Coach at Lewis-Palmer High School in Colorado Facebook “About Me” Section: “I'm Sarah. I'm Mormon. I throw, I lift, I go to school. Pretty much it.”

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Sarah Robles Snatch and Clean & Jerk Progressions

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Weightlifting
Written by Mark Cannella
Columbus Weightlifting Club (CWLC) has been privileged to run the Arnold Weightlifting Championships since the sport made its debut at the Arnold Fitness Expo in 2003. Over the past eight years, we’ve seen some incredible lifting and have had the honor of hosting several national-level competitions in conjunction with the Arnold Weightlifting Championships. We strive to get better every year in an ongoing effort to usher in a new genre of weightlifting competition: a competition filled with head-to-head battles across weight classes, recordbreaking crowds, and ever-increasing prize money. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of Co-Chair Dan Bell, Megan Tornstrom DeFourny, CWLC, generous sponsors, and untold numbers of volunteers, we were able to award more than $17,000 in money and prizes to this past year’s lifters. The Arnold Fitness Expo is the largest multisport fitness convention in the United States. Showcasing nearly 50 sporting events and more than 700 fitness booths, the Expo welcomes larger crowds every year. More than 170,000 people attend, with 18,000 athletes and thousands that witness the weightlifting competition, and with exposure like that, it’s no wonder why many of weightlifting’s most prominent companies and sponsors are proud to support our efforts to grow the sport in the United States. In addition to hosting massive crowds onsite, the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships featured a live webcast, so countless more weightlifting enthusiasts across the world could tune in to the action. Some of my personal highlights from this year’s competition include watching Kendrick Farris pull out his best lifting since the 2008 Olympics, seeing Sarah Robles post the third highest total for a woman in American history, and being there when Caleb Ward and Jon North qualified to join Cal Strength teammate Donny Shankle on this year's Pan Am Team. In addition to hosting more than 250 US weightlifters this year, we were also extremely proud to welcome international competitors, including Istvan Dioszegi from Romania and Itte Detenamo from Nauru. Sir Paul Coffa, a Vice President of the International Weightlifting Federation and President of the Oceanic Weightlifting Federation, made his second trip to Columbus to coach and to rub shoulders with many of America’s top lifters. This year’s Arnold Weightlifting Championships winners included: MEN Fred Lowe—Masters Div. Kendrick Farris—Open Div. Caleb Ward—Junior Div. John Bassler—Schoolage Div. James Washington—WerkSan HS Individual Champ. Sacramento HS—WerkSan Team Champ. WOMEN Jackie Mah—Masters Div. Amanda Hubbard—Open Div. Breanne Bassler—Junior Div. Ruby Haman—Schoolage Div. Jenny Lam—WerkSan HS Individual Champ. Lincoln HS—WerkSan Team Champ. A special congratulations goes out to Patricia Park of Rochester Hills, MI (Team Hercules, Coached by Michael Paquette), who won a $2,000 college scholarship from the Columbus Rotary. Thank you to everyone who made the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships a success. We look forward to seeing you all again in 2011. Sincerely, Mark Cannella

Photos: Opposite Page, Clockwise from Top Left: Itte Detenamo (NAU), Chris Dariotis, Istvan Dioszegi (ROM), Caleb Ward, Mike Calelly, Lou Mangiaracina, Bull Ternus. Center: Amanda Hubbard

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at the Arnold
Photos by John Broz

Three White Lights

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Faces of Frustration, Agony, and Disappointment

Photos: Clockwise from Top Right: Tony Blanksteen, Caleb Ward, Chris McGinnis, Rob Earwicker, Kendrick Farris, Corinne Grotenhuis, Poppet Lippman. Center: Sarah Robles.

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Photos: Left to Right, from Top: Eric McGill, Chad Vaughn, Rachel Crass, Tony Kalisz (before), Tony Kalisz (after), Jon North, Erin Wallace, Jim Storch (before), Jim Storch (after).

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Project 2012 – Kendrick Farris
Farris proves that weightlifting is more than a sport. It’s a way of life. And for some, it’s even more than that.
By Robert Hall

It seems like every few months the fans of USA Weightlifting are given the privilege of seeing excellence personified on the competition platform. The Arnold Classic this past March was no exception. The patrons of our sport welcomed back 2008 Olympian Kendrick Farris to top form in our beloved sport of weightlifting. While the predominant membership can tell you Kendrick’s best lifts in the snatch, the clean and jerk, and even the back squat, most of us have never had the fortune to see the other sides of a man I’ve called “Ken” for ten years. Kendrick’s beginnings are very humble, growing up in the inner city neighborhood of Stoner Hill, just outside of his native Shreveport. Kendrick stated, “Growing up in the Hill was really no different than any inner city neighborhood, but at the same time, there was a lot going on – positive and negative. The negative overshadows the good. There was lots of dealing and using, but for me, my family did a good job keeping us active and busy. I played football and baseball. There are a lot of good people, but a lot of other stuff that leads straight to a dead end. It forces you to grow up quickly.”

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It was there that Kendrick knew that his life was either headed for success or for disaster. As luck would have it, he had the opportunity to try his hand at weightlifting, a sport suggested to him by his uncle Kevin. He recalled that his uncle read an article about the City of Shreveport starting a center for the youth, focusing on promoting athletics and after school programs. It was there that he met the man who would change his outlook on life forever – Dr. Kyle Pierce. “My cousin, brother and I were playing on church league teams for football and my uncle thought it would be good for us to learn to lift. That’s when I met Kyle. I lifted twice a week, and qualified for the Junior Olympics and I just stuck with it.” It would be a decision that would shape the next thirteen years of Kendrick’s life. Kyle Pierce is the head coach and director of the USA Weightlifting Center for High Performance and Development at Louisiana State University in Shreveport. As it pertains to Dr. Pierce, Kendrick has the highest of praise for his mentor, a praise that borders on the relationship between father and son. “We’ve really come a long way. From my childhood to where we are now, it’s almost overwhelming, but Kyle has been more than a coach to me. “When I first came in the gym, I never got the feeling he was just a coach. He just kinda took me under his wing. My parents were separating when I got into lifting, and Kyle told me I had the talent to

see the world. The attention he showed me was overwhelming. It was like he was my dad, man. He showed me the lifts, and showed me a lot of love. I wanted that from my dad, but Kyle was there for me. My dad has never seen me lift. But, as hard as it is God teaches us to forgive. “My mom and Kyle were always there for me, and I’m so blessed to have that in my life. I thank God I was able to let Kyle

“I never got the feeling he was just a coach.”
in, because at first I was so reluctant. But, it’s such a blessing, and I’d never give that away for anything. Weightlifting is just an extra. It goes so much beyond the platform.” This love and respect that Kendrick has received from both his coach and his mother have helped him to become a better father to his four-year-old son, Khalil. Kendrick said of Khalil, “That’s my little dude, man. He just turned four. We had a nice party at the house. He likes Spider Man and Astro Boy, so we did a party like that. His friends, my friends. Really low key. It was great.” Kendrick plans to take his son and younger cousins to the gym more often, to learn the sport that he loves. It’s an opportunity he feels fortunate to have. Positivity is the only attitude Kendrick has. From the influences in his life, to the people he seems to influence, positive energy
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radiates from Kendrick like the guiding light he feels brought him to where he is today. Aaron Adams, 62-kg National Champion, said that, “I’ve seen Kendrick grow in weightlifting since our first meet in 2001 at the Young Louis Cyr in Canada, when we roomed together. He has seen more struggle than I could ever see on a TV show. I look up to him both spiritually and in every other aspect of life. He is truly a loving person that I hope my children can look up to.” Aaron trains with Kendrick on a daily basis in Shreveport, and said that his long standing friendship with Kendrick was a contributing factor to him leaving his home in New Jersey, to train in Louisiana. Jason Brown, a fellow lifter who moved from Florida to train in Louisiana with Kendrick, also added, “On top of being a good lifter, Kendrick is also a great teammate. He constantly pushes not only himself, but also those around him to reach their full potential.” In addition to his family life and training life, Kendrick also has a very interesting personal life. The three-time National Champion enjoys working in recreational centers around the Shreveport area. He has three different centers he travels to, going to each one five to six times each month, teaching lifts, helping

Kendrick Farris can be reached for speaking engagements at farrisk99@yahoo.com or through his manager at katrinagrant21@yahoo.com.

with projects, and being there to mentor. It’s a great way for him to give back to the community that has done so much for him. In addition to his social work, Kendrick loves to entertain, as we’ve all seen on the platform. His avenue for entertaining is stand-up comedy. Ken said, “I tried improv once, and it’s something I enjoy doing. I love getting on stage and taking on the crowd, I love when I can hit them in the head with something and they’re like ‘damn, that’s really funny.’” He attributes his comedy and love for entertaining to weightlifting saying that, “Just like lifting, I like to entertain as much as I can. The people that don’t know me will sit there and they think ‘oh, that guys cocky’, but it’s just about putting a show on.” If that weren’t enough, he is also looking to become an author, with his first book due out in 2011,
Photos: Kendrick Farris poses for a 2008 Olympic Team profile photo (top). Off the platform, Kendrick enjoys spending time with his bride-tobe, Katrina Grant (bottom). Title page: Farris prepares for his second attempt clean & jerk at the 2010 Arnold Weightlifting Championships in Columbus, OH.

just in time for the 2011 Senior Na- It’s such a blessing and inspiration tional Weightlifting Championships. to have her.” His pastor is helping him write the He feels 2012 will be a big book, with a second in mind. The year for him and is anticipating the second book is scheduled to be re- coming Olympiad with lots of hours leased after the London Games in in the gym. “If I’m close, I want the 2012. He also spoke of another medal. That’s what my eyes are set business venture that he “can’t let on. Those are my marks, [and I’m] out of the bag just yet, but it’s working hard every day. I don’t something want to be he is very He constantly pushes not only him- in auto passionate mode, beself, but also those around him to about. I’ve c a u s e reach their full potential.” got a lot of there’s a things I’m limit. I trying to work on, and not just be want to be on! I feel capable of doboxed in as an athlete. I’m just try- ing 170 and 210 at the Worlds, and I ing to build my brand. I’m just try- hope to secure that number one ing to make my mark, I have a ranking in 2011. We’ll see where strong vision, and I’m confident it we go from there.” will fly. I’m just trying to tackle as The eyes are now firmly set many things as I can.” on the man who hopes to lead the If it weren’t obvious by way for USA Weightlifting towards now, that mark has been made. London and beyond. The man I As he looks out toward the know, simply, as “Ken”.▪
Robert Hall currently lives in Marietta, GA, where he is pursuing his Doctor of Chiropractic degree as well as a Masters in Chiropractic Sports Science at Life University. He is the owner of Rampant Lion Enterprises, and the silver medalist at the 2010 Collegiate National Weightlifting Championships. He can be contacted at rampantlion2010@yahoo.com.

horizon, Kendrick is looking towards both Fall 2010 and the London Games. Kendrick will marry his fiancée this October, in Shreveport. “She’s my best friend! She has been with me through thick and thin, she has seen my ups and my downs. She is one of the sweetest women I know. I love her to life!
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A Week in the Gym with Kendrick Farris
USA WEIGHTLIFTING DEVELOPMENT CENTER at Louisiana State University in Shreveport Head Coach: Kyle Pierce HIGH INTENSITY ENDURANCE PHASE MONDAY 1. Push Press – 10RM, -5%, -10% 2. Back Squat – 10RM, -5%, -10% 3. Snatch Grip Push Press – 10RM, -5%, -10% 4. Dumbbell Military Press – 10RM, -5%, -10% 5. Bench Press – 10RM, -5%, -10% 6. Triceps – 3X10 AHAP 7. Weighted Abs TUESDAY 1. Muscle Snatch – 5RM, -5%, -10% 2. Snatch Dead Lift – 10RM, -5%, -10% 3. Cajun Dead Lift – 10RM, -5%, -10% 4. Snatch Grip Shrug – 10RM, -5%, -10% 5. Bent Over Rows – 10RM, -5%, -10% 6. Pull Ups – 3X10 AHAP 7. Weighted Abs WEDNESDAY 1. Push Press – 3-5x10 @10% less than Monday 2. Back Squat – 3-5x10 @10% less than Monday 3. Snatch Grip Push Press – 3-5x10 @10% less than Monday 4. Dumbbell Military Press – 3-5x10 @10% less than Monday 5. Bench Press – 3-5x10 @10% less than Monday 6. Triceps – 3X10 AHAP 7. Weighted Abs THURSDAY 1. Muscle Snatch or Clean High Pull from Thigh – 5RM, -5%, -10% 2. Clean Dead Lift – 10RM, -5%, -10% 3. Cajun Dead Lift – 5x10 @ 10% Less than Tuesday 4. Clean Grip Shrug – 5RM, -5%, -10% 5. Bent Over Rows – 5x10 @ 10% Less than Tuesday 6. Pull Ups - 3X10 AHAP 7. Weighted Abs FRIDAY & SUNDAY REST DAYS SATURDAY 1. Snatch – 12-18 reps @ 75-85% 2. Clean & Jerk – 12 reps @75-85%
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Style Notes

10RM, -5%, -10% = Work up to a 10-rep max load for one set. Then decrease the weight 5% for another set of ten. Decrease the weight another 5% for the third set.
AHAP = As hard as possible Editor’s Note From looking at this program, it’s no wonder why Kendrick has one of the most muscular physiques in USA Weightlifting.—RC

USA Weightlifting Development Center at Louisiana State University in Shreveport
Kyle Pierce, Ed.D., Head Coach Tim McInnis and Zach Schluender, Assistant Coaches

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Coup d’Haltérophilie
By Rachel Crass
The Olympic Training Center (OTC) in Colorado Springs has quite a few perks, but my personal undisputed favorite is its appeal to international athletes. Not only is the facility one of the best in the country; it’s one of the best in the world, and thankfully for all of us here in Colorado (and, by extension, all of you reading this article), that fact has not been lost on some of the planet’s best weightlifters. I often find myself marveling at just how cool it is that Olympic medalists come to us instead of our having to fly all over the world to see them in action and find out their secrets. It would seem a shame to see them back off to their home countries without first picking their brains about how they got to be as great as they are. From April 5-27, USA Weightlifting had the absolute privilege of hosting three members of the French weightlifting team along with their coach and personal trainer. They were joined during part of their trip by friend and translator, Juste Dabout. Venceslas Dabaya Tientchiu, 29, the 2008 Olympic silver medalist in the 69 kg weight
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Coach Jean Claude Collinot
Head coach of France’s men’s weightlifting team, Jean Claude Collinot actually lives in Guadeloupe, a French republic located in the Caribbean Sea and closer to the United States than to mainland France. Mr. Collinot runs a regional training facility there as part of the French Weightlifting Federation’s grassroots outreach program. There are 21 such regional facilities located throughout France and its republics. Mr. Collinot’s goals are to grow weightlifting in Guadeloupe and to recruit lifters to train at France’s central training facility in Paris.

class, has already had a phenomenal career and is far from retiring. Benjamin Hennequin, 25, the youngest member of the French team, placed 6th in the 85 kg class in those same Olympic Games and has been steadily improving since. The veteran of the group, David Hercule MatamMatam, 34, participated in the 2004 Olympics and continues to benefit from a recent move up to the 94 kg class. The three lifters were coached during their visit by French Head Coach Jean Claude Collinot, an unassuming man whose almostwhispered advice to his lifters belies his commanding knowledge of the sport. Trainer Olivier Tomatis expertly taped, poked, prodded, massaged, stretched, and otherwise helped his lifters through every workout. Case Study As an athlete trying to find my groove again after years spent taking Robert Frost a tad too seriously, I was just a tick shy of hell-bent in my quest to discover the reasons for the French team’s recent success. I came in on my days off to watch them train. I practiced my jerk split in flip flops in the hallway

when our paths happened to cross outside of the gym. I took photos and video of them in action to study after-hours and made my babysitter-less child suffer through hours of interviews (At least we were able to entertain her with the longest and most excruciating game of charades any of us had ever played. Thank goodness translator Dabout showed up for a few days.). Now, I’m not saying that the American system is so flawed I feel the need to scrap it and throw myself headfirst into a European system. I’m simply saying Wishing à la Louis Armstrong. From Left: Dragomir Cioroslan, IWF that, by George, it seems like the French Director of International Strategies and Development; Benjamin Hennehave got something, and I want to know quin, athlete (FRA); Olivier Tomatis, trainer and therapist to French team; Venceslas Dabaya Tientchiu, athlete (FRA); David Hercule Matam, what it is. Having spent only three weeks athlete (FRA); Jean Claude Collinot, Men’s Coach & Sport Technical with our cross-pond visitors, I know I am Advisor for French Weightlifting Federation; Rick Adams, USAW CEO; Mike Gattone, USAW Director of High Performance and Coaching Edustill far from understanding all the reasons cation. Photo courtesy of Jean Claude Collinot. they are as successful as they are, but here’s what I’ve uncovered so far. A Typical Training Day Schedule: Disclaimer: I have tried my best to keep my own quality judgments out of this piece and simply to pass on 8:00AM-10:00AM: Wake up. Eat breakfast (They love the advice I received from Collinot, Dabaya, Benji, and fresh fruit, particularly strawberries and blueberries, in David. It’s up to you to decide whether their style and the morning because of their anti-inflammatory propersystem works for you and/or your athletes. ties.). Loosen up. 1) Weightlift, Rest, Repeat One of the first things I noticed about the French team is that they planned on making every minute they spent in America count. They came here to lift, and that’s exactly what they did. All day. Every day. Except when they were sleeping. Or eating. (Or getting their eyebrows pierced in Denver, but that’s a whole other story.) Yes, their lives are about as eventful as this paragraph. Even when they aren’t on a 3-week hiatus from their regular gyms back in France, these guys live to lift. When the conversation turned away from weightlifting, at first I was surprised to hear how similar they were to us. Benji and Dabaya are soldiers in the French military, and David is a personal trainer. They also have girlfriends and like to go out on weekends. But that’s where the similarities come to a screeching halt. Case in point: Benji’s fiancé is a super model and has graced the cover of Glamour magazine. These guys aren’t regular guys.
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10:00AM-Noon: Lift. Noon-12:30PM: Eat lunch. (High protein) 12:30PM-4:00PM: Sleep. (not watch tv or “chill.” Sleep, like, I dream of genie and 180k snatches kind of sleep) 4:00PM-7:00PM: Lift. 7:00PM-7:30PM: Eat. (Again, high protein) 7:30PM-10:00PM: Relax, and wind down for bed. 10:00PM: Lights out Saturdays and Sundays are usually rest days, but if you do the math on the schedule above, you’ll quickly realize that, over the course of a week, they spend 25 hours in the gym. That doesn’t mean they lift at 90%+ intensity for 25 hours a week, but it does mean they are getting

Venceslas Dabaya Tientcheu
Born: 28 April 1981 Age: 29 Height: 167 cm (5’6”) Weight Class: 69 kg Birthplace: Kumba, Cameroon Currently Competes For: France Selected Competition History 2004 Olympic Games: 5th Place 145 kg Snatch 182.5 Clean & Jerk 327.5 kg Total (Represented Cameroon— Flag bearer in Opening Ceremonies) 2005 World Championships: Bronze 145 kg Snatch 179 kg Clean & Jerk 324 kg Total (Represented France) 2006 World Championships: Gold 146 kg Snatch 186 kg Clean & Jerk 332 kg Total 2007 World Championships: 4th Pl. 143 kg Snatch 187 kg Clean & Jerk 330 kg Total 2008 Olympic Games: Silver 151 kg Snatch (Bronze) 187 kg Clean & Jerk (Gold) 338 kg Total 2009 World Championships: DNF 149 kg Snatch —- kg Clean & Jerk —- kg Total

taped, doing the lifts, reinforcing technique, and otherwise devoting their full attention to the sport for 25 hours a week. You also might have noticed that, although I mentioned these guys have jobs, there is very little time left in their schedule MondayFriday to fit those jobs in. Very astute observation. Weightlifting, like other Olympic sports in France, is subsidized by the government, so weightlifters earn enough money by working part-time jobs to make ends meet. For example, Benji stands guard at a post for 3-4 hours a few times a week and is then free to spend the rest of his time in the gym. Also, because the government is involved in their athletic careers, these guys had no problem taking three weeks off of work to come to the United States to train. The French government simply wrote a letter on the lifters’ behalves informing their respective employers of the trip. Dabaya, Benji, and David were to be excused from work, without penalty, for three weeks. 2) Sleep, It Does a Lifter Good If you paid attention to their daily schedule, you noticed that these three guys sleep a lot.
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In fact, when I asked them point blank what the one thing was that I needed to work on most in order to improve my lifting, all five men— coach, trainer, and athletes alike— said, unequivocally, “SLEEP!” Without sleep, they said, my body is throwing away any gains I could be making in the gym. They said the only way for my bones, joints, and muscles to adapt to lifting heavier weights is to allow my body to repair itself during sleep. 3) Technique, Technique, Technique, Repetition, Repetition, Repetition. For the first 10 days of the French team’s visit to the United States, I said very little to any of them, but I watched them intently, jotting down notes about things they did differently than we did. Eventually armed with 10 days’ worth of scribbles, I looked through them for patterns and compiled a list of the major discrepancies between their training method and ours. Two glaring differences jumped off the page almost immediately. The first of these was how

Dabaya, an Olympic bronze medalist in the snatch, closes his eyes to visualize a successful lift with less than 60% of his best snatch. He says, “If you see success, you will have success.”

much time and energy they spent on sub-70% lifts. True, I spend an inordinately short amount of time getting to 80%+ (such is the life of an everrunning, quasi-single parent), and this could have made me more sensitive to their warm-ups, but even the other American athletes wondered just how many times David was going to power snatch 70 kg before he did a full snatch. I didn’t fully realize how much emphasis they put on repetition, though, until I asked them what Olivier makes sure Dabaya’s knees are warmed they thought I needed to do to im- up, loose, and ready to handle the impending workout. prove my jerk. Bob Morris has worked wonders with my jerk, but it worked, great, but if it didn’t, no still lags considerably behind my harm no foul. I figured it was worth clean. My problem: I tend to push a shot. Coach Collinot, not wanting my jerks out forward. to disrespect my coach, was hesitant One Thursday morning (a to give me advice directly, so he had rest day for me), I ran into the his three lifters coach me on his beFrench team as they were heading to half. breakfast. Benji commented on my Dabaya said I need to get clean and (missed) jerks from the stronger in my overhead position and day before and said his coach had suggested that I do push presses, some ideas for how to fix my prob- with my feet split like I had just lem. We arranged for me to meet done a jerk. He suggested that, bethem later that morning in the gym, fore and after every workout, and Coach Collinot would give me whether I had jerks on my program some pointers on my jerk. Hey, if it or not, I take 40 kg and do 4-5 sets of 6-10 reps of push presses in that split stance. Benji said that I do not step out far enough with my front foot, so I am not balanced under the bar. He showed me how far I was supposed to step out when I jerk and suggested that I practice splitting my feet until I get it right. He said that I David, like Dabaya, visualizes success before every attempt, regardless of how light the weight is for him. should start without a bar
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and simply jump and split my feet about 20 times or until it feels comfortable to me. Then, I should practice jerking with just an empty bar. The weight should be light enough that I can focus on my feet, but it will still be allow me to practice moving my feet and arms in concert with each other. David concurred with Dabaya and Benji, and, with Coach Collinot nodding in agreement beside us, went on to tell me that if I can’t jerk correctly with the bar, I won’t be able to jerk correctly with 125 kg. And that, he said, is why

I was continually amazed at how long the French team took to warm up. They would increase the weight only after they felt completely confident and technically sound with the lighter weights.

they do so many reps with light weights to start off each workout; if they can’t clean 90 kg correctly, they won’t be able to clean 200 kg correctly, and weights that heavy only go up if you lift them correctly. With their advice, along with some pointers from Board President and Olympian Mark Cameron about staying solid in my rack position, I jerked 10 kg more that

morning than I had the day before. 4) Be Strong to Lift Strong The other glaring difference I noticed between the French program and ours was how much emphasis they put on strength-building exercises. As a kid, I remember putting my hand sideways between my dad’s spinal erectors (I called them his “bread loaves.”) and being amazed that his muscles were taller than my hand. I haven’t seen back muscles like that on a lifter in the entire decade or so since I’ve been competing. Maybe I haven’t looked hard enough, but maybe the popular training paraBenji’s well-developed back digm has shifted over the last 20 and wide legs seem to be rariyears. Since I tend to believe the latties nowadays. ter, I was blown away when I saw Benji’s heavily-muscled back. A few a question of their own: If two people minutes after regaining my compo- have perfect technique, but one can sure (Alright, I admit it. I am a girl, squat 300 kg and one can squat only and sometimes it is pretty neat to be 250 kg, who do you think will lift in this sport.) I was even more sur- more? Alright, well, it seems to make prised when I saw him—an 85 kg sense to me. lifter with a clean and jerk of 206 Later that evening, David kg—doing RDL-toelaborated and said upright-rows with he likes the extra 150 kg! Not to live muscle to cushion up to my last name his joints. I’m not or anything, but sure how much scithese are some serientific evidence exously strong dudes. ists out there to sugDavid and, gest muscle actually to a slightly lesser cushions joints or extent, Dabaya whether the added wowed me with strength helps him similar feats of pure to control the strength, and when I weights more easily, asked them why but he swears up they put so much Somehow, in the midst of a full trainand down that his ing schedule, David found time to emphasis on knees, shoulders, head to Denver to get a souvenir strength-building, shoved through his eyebrow. I have no and elbows all feel they shot back with clue where (or from whom) he got that better when he’s
idea.

David Hercule MatamMatam
Born: 5 June 1975 Age: 34 (35 by 31 December 2010) Height: 174 cm (5’8.5”) Weight Class: 85 kg Birthplace: Cameroon Currently Competes For: France Selected Competition History 2002 Commonwealth Games: Gold 155 kg Snatch 185 kg Clean & Jerk 340 kg Total (Represented Cameroon) 2004 Olympic Games: DNF 167.5 kg Snatch —- kg Clean & Jerk —- kg Total (Represented France) 2007 World Championships: 17th Pl. 157 kg Snatch 189 kg Clean & Jerk 346 kg Total 2009 European Champ’s: 7th Pl. 164 kg Snatch 198 kg Clean & Jerk 362 kg Total 2009 World Championships: 13th Pl. 167 kg Snatch 198 kg Clean & Jerk 365 kg Total (94 kg weight class)

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This photo shows an ideal snatch pull for the French team. Benji is pushing down through the floor with his legs and pulling up on the bar with his forearms, not with his traps. Instead of trying to lift the bar up, he is trying to pull himself down.

stronger. Again, it makes sense to me (I also notice a direct, positive correlation to left elbow comfort and my upper body strength.). 5) NO SHRUG! If you have a pulse in USA Weight-

Benji still manages to flash a smile while Olivier massages a torn, yet nicely healing, tendon in his left hand.

lifting, you’ve heard this debate. To shrug, or not to shrug. That truly is the question here. The French team’s answer: NOT to shrug! Instead of the lifter trying to shrug with his traps to get a couple more inches of height on the bar before dropping under it, the idea here is that the lifter subscribe to good ol’ Sir Isaac Newton’s idea about equal and opposite reactions. In other words, if the lifter exerts a force down through the floor, an equal and opposite force will send the bar up. Engaging the traps slows the transfer of energy and, as I understand it, leaves the lifter trying to race the bar down instead of being able to jump down under the bar while the bar is still moving up. While I don’t want to interject my opinion here, Dabaya did win an Olympic bronze medal in the snatch by following this advice. Just sayin’… I’m sure readers will flood my inbox with opinions and questions about the French team, so expect a follow-up article to this one in a future issue of Strength+. What’s your stance on the shrug/no shrug debate? Should USAW invite more foreign lifters to the OTC? Let us know what you think!■
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Benjamin Hennequin
Born: 24 August 1984 Age: 25 (26 by 31 December 2010) Height: 172 cm (5’8”) Weight Class: 85 kg Birthplace: Bordeaux, France Competes For: France

Selected Competition History 2007 World Champ’s: 24th Pl. 152 kg Snatch 185 kg Clean & Jerk 337 kg Total 2008 European Champ’s: 4th Pl. 160 kg Snatch 200 kg Clean & Jerk 360 kg Total 2008 Olympic Games: 6th Pl. 162 kg Snatch 205 kg Clean & Jerk 367 kg Total 2009 European Champ’s: 4th Pl. 162 kg Snatch 204 kg Clean & Jerk 366 kg Total 2009 World Champ’s: DNF 160 kg Snatch —- kg Clean & Jerk —- kg Total

French Team Visits US OTC
April 5-27, 2010

Fourteen friends, fourteen bodies with one sport inspir'd. Back Row, from Left: Sarah Robles, David Hercule Matam (FRA), Pat Judge, Casey Burgener, Donovan Ford, USAW Resident Coach Bob Morris. Front Row, from Left: Benjamin “Benji” Hennequin (FRA), Rachel Crass, Venceslas “Vence” Dabaya Tientcheu (FRA), Natalie Burgener, Stephanie Spencer, Vanessa McCoy, Jackie Berube, Zach Krych. Photo courtesy of Zach Krych.

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Lex Scripta
“Strong people are harder to kill and more useful in general.” -Mark Rippetoe, in Starting Strength “You cannot propel yourself forward by patting yourself on the back.” -Chinese Proverb “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” -Albert Einstein “Train like a pit bull on Starbucks!” -Steve Auxier (Powerlifter) “No one ever drowned from his own sweat.” -Lou Holtz (Football Coach)

“Poor form in the gym is caused by insufficient yelling.” -Mark Rippetoe “Youngsters of the age of two and three are endowed with extraordinary strength. They can lift a dog twice their own weight and dump him into the bathtub.” -Erma Bombeck (Comedienne) “Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.” -Mahatma Ghandi “Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength.” -Arnold Schwarzenegger “Correction does much, but encouragement does more.” -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Competition Results
National Junior Championships
Feb. 26-28, 2010 Rochester, MN
Men's 56 kg 
Pl. Name Darren Dominique Max Tim Micheal Barnes Brunson Alpert Aney Mattis Year of Birth 1994 LFL 1994 Tm Savannah 1992 Tm FL Altamonte 1994 Iron Man WL 1992 Tm Savannah Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  2  3  4  5 

54.30 55.55 55.11 54.47 49.41

88 70 70 63 59

90 73 73 70 62

94 76 75 70 64

94 76 75 70 64

112 92 80 80 68

117 92 84 86 72

121 100 87 87 73

117 92 87 87 68

211 168 162 157 132

Men's 62 kg 
Pl. Name Brunson Barnes Borges Phu Freeman Ashworth Summa Hinson Tiongson Jones Year of Birth 1991 Unatt. 1994 LFL 1992 Tm FL Gulfcoast 1991 Tm MN 1991 Tm MN 1994 Tm GA 1996 Kirkwood WLC 1994 Accel Sports 1993 Hassle Free 1992 Tm GA Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  Mack 2  Darrel 3  Ryan 4  Tri 5  Jordan 6  George 7  Tom 8  Paul 9  Chris 10  Jake Men's 69 kg 
Pl.

62.00 60.09 61.91 61.86 60.83 60.58 59.57 61.69 58.57 60.85

95 95 91 74 75 70 74 71 75 65

95 95 91 75 75 75 78 76 75 69

100 100 95 77 77 75 78 79 78 72

100 100 91 77 77 75 74 79 75 72

122 120 110 96 95 100 92 87 91 90

127 130 110 99 98 106 96 92 94 90

132 130 113 103 102 100 100 97 95 94

132 120 113 103 102 100 100 92 91 90

232 220 204 180 179 175 174 171 166 162

Name James Phillip Michael Timothy Andrew Washington Wilhelm Evans Scott Vrabel

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot.

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 

1992 Tm Savannah 1992 Iron Man WL 1991 ECG 1991 Accel Sports 1991 Unatt. 1992 Tm FL Altamonte 1991 Tm FL Volusia 1991 Tm MN 1993 Tm GA 1991 Tm Hercules 1991 Tm GA

Ulbert (Joey) Botero Jerry Nicholas Solomon (Nathanael) Owens Pierce Peck Cretcher Blair

65.25 67.95 68.14 67.71 66.96 68.54 68.45 68.53 68.24 68.38 67.77

104 100 92 89 90 93 80 85 85 85 80 49

104 103 97 93 95 93 85 85 90 85 84

108 107 100 96 100 96 85 88 95 90 87

108 103 100 96 95 96 85 88 90 90 84

130 130 122 125 115 122 122 108 105 105 105

135 130 127 131 120 126 128 111 115 110 110

140 130 132 136 125 126 128 111 115 110 115

135 130 132 131 125 122 122 108 105 105 110

243 233 232 227 220 218 207 196 195 195 194

9  10  Max 11  Sean

12  Ryan 13  Trevor 14  Tracy 15  Anthony ‐‐  James ‐‐  Kristian ‐‐  Matthew ‐‐  Derek ‐‐  Andrew Men's 77 kg 
Pl.

Cook Sullivan Kruchten Gurule Corsitto Pavlov Mitchell Shugart Sears

1992 Fox Valley WLC 1993 Tm MN 1992 Tm MN 1993 Calif. Strength 1991 Metro Elite 1991 Corequest WLC 1993 Unatt. 1992 ECG 1993 Iron Man WL

65.57 68.26 68.90 68.09 65.15 66.95 68.84 68.00 68.10

79 85 82 77 91 101 95 90 80

82 90 87 81 96 101 100 90 80

85 90 91 81 99 105 100 93 80

82 85 87 81 91 0 95 90 0

107 105 102 101 115 125 120 115 100

111 110 102 106 115 130 120 115 106

111 110 109 106 115 130 121 115 106

111 105 102 101 0 125 0 0 100

193 190 189 182 -----------

Name Musa Gute Dougherty Locker Prestwood Hodges Silon Spiridigliozzi Cagle Asbate Steele Gorelik Behrens Hausmann

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot.

1  Peter 2  Chris 3  Nicholas 4  Philip 5  Eric 6  Edward 7  Thomas (Alex) 8  Sergio 9  Chad 10  Michael 11  Nick ‐‐  Dan ‐‐  Matt ‐‐  Andrew Men's 85 kg 
Pl.

1992 Metro Elite 1991 Tm So Cal 1992 Doc's Gym 1991 Windy City WLC 1990 Tm FL Volusia 1991 Tm MN 1994 Tm Savannah 1990 Invictus WLC 1992 Unatt. 1991 Tm FL Altamonte 1991 Tm FL Altamonte 1990 ECG 1990 N. Highland 1993 Tm MN

72.94 76.59 71.94 76.16 77.66 74.00 76.84 75.86 76.37 76.17 72.14 75.38 76.17 76.55

115 115 101 95 90 90 90 98 93 93 93 103 85 90

119 118 105 100 95 95 95 105 97 93 93 103 90 95

121 120 112 100 100 98 100 105 102 93 96 103 93 95

119 118 105 100 95 95 95 98 97 93 93 0 90 90

145 145 120 125 125 115 110 115 116 119 105 120 120 120

152 148 125 131 131 118 115 121 116 123 110 125 121 121

153 148 130 136 131 121 120 123 122 123 114 134 121 121

145 145 130 125 125 121 120 115 116 119 110 125 0 0

264 263 235 225 220 216 215 213 213 212 203 -------

Name Hannah Ziegler Poole Carasia Osorio Wolfe Blackwell Rivera Melady Jakubsen Baker

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot.

1  Kyle 2  Kyle 3  Robert 4  Foster 5  D'Angelo 6  David 7  Robert 8  Joseph 9  Shaun 10  Tayler ‐‐  Edward

1993 Tm FL Volusia 1990 Unatt. 1992 Tm GA 1992 Accel Sports 1993 Hassle Free 1990 Tm FL Volusia 1990 Calif. Strength 1991 Accel Sports 1991 Tm FL Volusia 1995 Coastal Empire 1992 Tm GA

83.86 84.55 81.64 83.26 83.77 79.69 81.22 81.12 82.29 81.96 84.60

101 115 110 102 100 95 95 85 88 100 110

106 120 110 107 105 100 100 90 92 100 115

110 122 115 110 109 105 103 95 96 100 115

110 120 115 110 109 105 103 95 96 100 115

143 135 130 133 130 125 125 123 133 120 143

146 136 135 139 134 130 130 127 137 125 144

151 140 137 143 140 133 135 134 138 125 144

146 136 137 139 134 130 130 134 133 120 0

256 256 252 249 243 235 233 229 229 220 ---

50

Men's 94 kg 
Pl. Name Jared Robert Dean Michael Chris Robert Collin Fleming Adell Beyer Nackoul Lenahen Smith Fossum Year of Birth 1991 ECG 1990 Average Broz 1991 Tm Thunder 1991 Pittsburgh BBC 1991 Accel Sports 1990 Tm FL Manatee 1993 Tm MN 1991 Tm MN Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 

Benjamin Harrison Travis

Pennington 1991 Hoosier Barbell 1995 Tm Savannah

Matthew Provence

Nicholas Scudamore 1990 Tm MN Douglas Minor 1992 Tm FL Volusia

89.78 92.88 93.02 91.87 90.79 93.04 91.56 92.20 90.23 93.47 93.36 89.39

135 130 128 122 110 116 100 102 100 88 87 84

140 130 132 127 115 116 105 102 105 92 90 88

142 140 135 131 120 122 110 106 107 95 97 92

142 140 132 127 120 116 110 106 105 95 90 88

166 165 153 160 135 145 130 131 125 125 126 122

170 165 160 165 140 145 135 134 127 129 126 126

170 173 165 170 145 151 140 138 130 132 127 130

170 165 165 165 145 145 135 134 130 129 127 126

312 305 297 292 265 261 245 240 235 224 217 214

Men's 105 kg 
Pl. Name Donovan Thomas Taylor Mike Joel Ford Braddy Powell Assell Pudenz Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  2  3  4  ‐‐ 

1990 Hassle Free 1991 Accel Sports 1992 Unatt. 1990 Tm MN 1990 N. Highland

101.86 104.35 97.83 102.67 103.30

135 120 125 105 120

135 126 125 110 120

140 126 130 115 120

135 120 125 115 0

175 175 150 135 150

180 186 160 141 155

185 186 165 146 160

185 186 160 146 160

320 306 285 261 ---

Men's 105+ kg 
Pl. Name Spencer Robert David Brennen Moorman Hamill McClain Jaquint Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  2  3  4 

1991 Calpians 1990 Tm FL AFP 1991 Brownsburg BBC 1992 Unatt.

120.21 115.56 107.42 118.00

135 116 102 90

137 121 105 106

142 123 108 ---

137 116 105 90

172 140 127 130

180 146 133 130

185 152 134 136

180 152 127 130

317 268 232 220

Women's 48 kg 
Pl. Name Kaysie Jenny Suzanna Ellen Jaslyn Junco Lam Sanchez Kercher McGraw Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  2  3  4  5 

1991 Tm Fl Volusia 1993 Hassle Free 1990 LSUS 1994 Tm GA 1996 Tm GKC

45.35 47.82 47.40 46.08 47.06

47 45 47 45 42

50 47 50 48 45

52 49 52 50 45

52 49 50 48 42

71 64 63 58 52

71 67 63 61 55

76 70 63 65 58

71 70 63 61 58

123 119 113 109 100

51

6  Britta 7  Raven 8  Nathalie 9  Patricia 10  Shannon 11  Erica Women's 53 kg 
Pl.

Carlson House

1991 Upper Penin. WL 1996 Tm GKC

Mederos-Morales 1992 Tm GA Park Parish Hall 1992 Tm Hercules 1993 Tm Body Club 1995 Coastal Empire

47.79 47.66 46.44 47.61 44.64 45.26

38 35 38 37 32 30

41 38 38 39 35 30

44 40 40 39 37 33

44 38 38 39 35 36

50 48 48 46 48 40

53 51 51 48 51 45

53 54 53 50 51 48

53 54 53 48 51 48

97 92 91 87 86 84

Name Sara Cortney Beth Natalie (Hope) Kathy Randi Shalee Cowles Batchelor Terranova Stockel Tran Rose McKnight

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best Total CJ

1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

1990 Tm FL Volusia 1991 Gayle Hatch 1990 LBH 1995 Tm GA 1994 Hassle Free 1992 Tm MN 1992 Patriot Power

52.95 52.42 52.07 52.71

60 58 52 48

63 61 55 51 47 42 43

66 63 55 53 47 -44 43

66 63 52 53 47 42 43

80 74 65 60 58 57 55

83 78 66 64 60 59 58

86 80 70 65 62 60 60

83 80 70 65 60 60 58

149 143 122 118 107 102 101

52.98 45 51.61 40 49.58 40

Women's 58 kg 
Pl. Name Breanne Inanna Serena Maria Karine Andrea Bassler Felicity Fruechte Tran Bartz Year of Birth 1991 Unatt. 1993 Hassle Free 1994 Tm MN 1993 Hassle Free 1995 Tm MN Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best Total CJ

1  2  3  4  5 

57.02 56.95 57.30 56.87

72 50 54 47

75 52 54 49 46

77 54 57 51 47

75 54 57 49 47

92 69 64 65 60

94 72 66 68 64

94 74 69 71 67

94 74 69 68 67

169 128 126 117 114

56.64 46

Women's 63 kg 
Pl. Name Jessica Megan Robin Ashley Kelly Beed Poole Feuerman Perkovich Charniga Year of Birth 1993 Unatt. 1993 Tm GA 1990 Tm FL Altamonte 1990 Calpians 1993 Dynamic Fitness Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best Total CJ

1  2  3  4  5 

62.03 62.13 62.49 61.61

70 68 70 67

74 70 73 71 71

76 71 76 74 73

74 71 73 71 71

90 88 85 85 73

93 91 89 90 76

96 96 89 90 77

93 91 85 85 76

167 162 158 156 147

60.51 70

Women's 69 kg 
Pl. Name Year of Birth Team Body Wgt 1 Snatch 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best Clean Total & Jerk

1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

Brianna Alicen Mary (Katie) Holly Sarah Alice Madasyn

Barnett Lyrenmann Moorman Krzeminski Skinner Kohler Hofstedt

1992 Wesley WL 1993 Windy City WLC 1991 Unatt. 1991 Unatt. 1993 Calpians 1990 Coastal Empire 1996 Tm MN

66.37 68.80 68.06 64.15 67.17 68.99 66.22

74 63 58 47 53 52 50

77 66 62 50 56 56 53

79 70 62 54 58 60 54

79 66 58 54 58 56 50

95 80 77 72 63 60 67

97 100 100 85 85 85 77 78 77 77 81 77 67 70 67 62 65 62 70 70 67

179 151 135 131 125 118 117

52

Women's 75 kg 
Pl. Name Ashley Sarah Hailey Kelsey Emma Rivera Provenc e Drake Vance Gremer Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Total

1  2  3  ‐‐  ‐‐ 

1990 Tm FL Orlando 1990 Tm Savannah 1992 Tm GA 1991 Tm FL Gulfcoast 1990 Calpians

74.28 72.59 74.08 72.07 74.06

60 62 55 61 53

65 65 60 61 55

70 68 60 61 55

65 65 55 61 0

80 73 65 91 68

86 73 70 91 72

86 76 75 91 72

80 73 70 0 72

145 138 125 -----

Women's 75+ kg 
Pl. Name Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Total

1  Chioma 2  Karen 3  Kari 4  Jaclyn 5  Marissa 6  Cassandra 7  Francia 8  Katie 9  Lyndsey 10  Emelia 11  Ashley (Nicole) 12  Conner 13  Harlie

Amaechi 1992 Hassle Free Wyatt Davis Beed 1990 Unatt. 1992 Charleston WLC 1996 Unatt.

Klingseis 1995 Wesley WL Stafford Acosta Williams 1993 ECG 1990 Unatt. 1993 Tm GA

Callahan 1992 Tm MN Miller Long Dolac Miller 1993 Tm MN 1993 Tm GA 1992 Tm FL Altamonte 1991 Tm MN

112.24 107.71 127.37 89.68 92.64 95.15 90.02 139.81 103.45 85.39 96.93 108.98 75.76

80 85 77 70 70 65 60 55 54 50 55 50 53

83 88 80 75 73 70 62 58 57 53 58 53 56

85 91 83 80 74 70 64 62 60 56 62 56 58

85 91 80 80 73 65 64 58 57 56 62 53 56

109 109 96 90 86 81 77 68 74 70 70 73 67

116 115 100 90 90 85 80 75 76 74 80 77 67

122 115 104 95 90 86 80 80 78 76 80 80 71

122 115 104 90 90 81 77 80 76 76 70 77 67

207 206 184 170 163 146 141 138 133 132 132 130 123

53

Arnold Weightlifting Championships
March 5-7, 2010 Columbus, OH
Day 1: Friday March 05, 2010  LIFTER  SIMPSON BAROSKY MARQUINEZ CARTER WAUGH MOORE CONNOLLY CRAMER GUGLIELMI HUDSON SEPPYES PFEIFFER CARIGNAN LUCAS STORCH RONAN PARK LEHMAN HAMILL WEEKS MALDONADO FAIRCHILD JANSSEN BENJAMIN JOHNSON MORAN LOWE BALLARD ALIGAEN WILLIAMS MARTINEZ HUTH KLUMP MATHEWS SCHMIDT SIMONTON HEADLEY WILLETT MILLER    SCOTT FRANK FRED DARREN BILL ANTHONY KEITH LES RALPH JOHNNIE JOHN JOHN YVES MATTHEW MARY LORI PATRICIA ANNE BRIGID SHANNON THERESA ALEA JILL JAMI REBECCA SHARON FRED DOUGLAS CHARLIE BENYAMIN FREDERICK GERALD CHAD JIM SCOTT ALAN LES JESSE MICHAEL KEITH CLASS  M 77 kg M 85 kg M 62 kg M 62 kg M 85 kg M 69 kg M 62 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 105 kg M 77 kg M 94 kg M 62 kg M 69 kg W 58 kg W 69kg W 48 kg W 48 kg W 63 kg W 58 kg W 58 kg W 69 kg W 53 kg W 53 kg W 75+ kg W 63 kg M 69 kg M 94 kg M 69 kg M 94 kg M 62 kg M 69 kg M 85 kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 94 kg M 85 kg M 77 kg DIVISION  OPEN MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS OPEN MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS JUNIORS MASTERS OPEN JUNIORS MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS OPEN MASTERS MASTERS OPEN MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS JUNIORS MASTERS MASTERS CLUB  ECG CINCI WGT CLUB UNATTACHED DYNAMO HIGH DESERT ATH. N. OKLND TM HERC. CINCI WGT CLUB TR. NAZARENE U. UNATTACHED UNATTACHED SAYRE PARK CINCI WGT CLUB HALTHROS GASP TEAM HERCULES EAST COAST GOLD EAST COAST GOLD TEAM HERCULES SPORTS PALACE UNATTACHED C EMPIRE WGT C EMPIRE WGT PWRSPAVENTEM DYNAMIC FITNESS CWLC REPS/SETS/TM SAL MOORESTOWN WGT TEMPLE OF EX. IRON PIT GUM UNATTACHED CINCINNATI WGT ENGINEERED S.P. TOLEDO WGT CINCINNATI LYNCHS GYM WEST PARK YMCA EAST ALABAMA WGT STEELTON BARBELL INDIANA SPOON BARBELL BEST  BEST  SN  CJ  TOTAL  BDY WT.  90 120 210 76.03 57 81 138 79.57 62 75 137 61.45 55 75 130 60.16 54 72 126 83.5 60 80 140 68.42 67 87 154 60.12 64 83 147 84.55 65 90 155 81.05 66 97 163 100.28 65 96 161 76.8 62 83 145 89.22 68 95 163 66.08 72 95 167 68.45 23 38 40 48 48 42 50 41 46 50 50 53 86 75 75 80 77 80 80 78 75 85 79 85 83 32 51 47 60 63 55 56 63 57 62 63 63 103 110 105 105 95 100 102 100 108 108 110 115 113 55 89 87 108 111 97 106 104 103 112 113 116 189 185 180 185 172 180 182 178 183 193 189 200 196 56.3 67.87 48 50.37 59.74 57.46 59.41 66.1 53.68 52.86 92.82 64.3 68.95 91.88 75.76 96.18 61.2 68.96 84.99 102.8 120.34 94.65 93.18 89.93 80 AGE  COEF  1.000 1.561 1.234 1.147 2.002 1.158 1.000 1.856 1.271 1.417 1.584 1.207 1.449 1.147 1.255 1.158 1.000 1.243 1.000 1.000 1.271 1.207 1.195 1.000 1.072 1.000 1.584 1.217 1.113 1.000 1.113 1.350 1.000 1.350 1.449 1.271 1.000 1.226 1.100 SINCLAIR  265.2320 265.3652 244.5231 218.9744 303.0940 218.1379 226.2645 325.7960 240.3378 256.1380 320.2828 203.7373 325.0447 257.6638 92.6669 122.5446 132.8739 196.7088 142.8903 128.3098 174.0906 151.5463 171.3143 157.7836 126.2848 142.3853 400.8563 258.6891 253.5408 208.5230 277.6937 325.3406 216.7790 264.0670 277.7285 278.3148 215.8499 284.4188 264.8299

54

LIFTER  KALINOWSKI MCINNES DARIOTIS TRAHAN MATTERLEY MUELLER GARLAND BECKLER SUMMERS KENNEDY TERNUS KELLY GOELLER GING CALELLY FEENSTRA FLINT BEYTIN MCDONNELL MEININGER DANILOV BADER BLANKSTEEN STORCH MCGILL EARWICKER THACKER REIF MARSHALL DAVIS HINKLE VAN DORN THRUSH GROTENHUIS DOWNS L.-MCCAULEY CARSON MAH REBMAN EDWARDS

   MATTHEW ALEX CHRIS TIM CHRIS KEVIN WILLIS JOSH RONALD FRANCIS BULL COLIN DAN TREVOR MICHAEL CHRIS JACOB ADAM RUSS TRIQUE OLEG RYAN ANTHONY JAMES ERIC ROBERT JUSTIN DAVE BRYAN BOB TONI CARA KATIE CORINNE MICHELLE SUZANNE TINA JACKIE CHELSEA WENDIE

CLASS  M 85 kg M 85 kg M 94 kg M 94 kg M 77 kg M 94 kg M 105 kg M 77 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 105 M 85 kg M 105+ kg M 85 kg M 77 kg M 94 kg M 77 kg M 85 kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 94kg M 94 kg M 85 kg M 105 kg W 75+ kg W 63 kg W 75 kg W 63 kg W 58 kg W 75 kg W 58 kg W 75 kg W 75kg w 75 kg

DIVISION  OPEN MASTERS MASTERS MASTERS JUNIORS MASTERS MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS MASTERS OPEN OPEN OPEN MASTERS OPEN OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS OPEN MASTERS

CLUB  TEAM S. BUFFALO EAST COAST GOLD CALPIANS TEAM HOUSTON TENNESSEE COLUMBUS WGT PWR SP ATH. CTR C EMPIRE WGT POWER SPORTS UNATTACHED OBX COUGAR MET ELITE EAST COAST GOLD SPORTS PALACE COLUMBUS WGT CINCINNATI WGT EAST COAST GOLD EAST COAST GOLD CALPIANS OK WGT SAND POINT GYM CWLC EAST COAST GOLD TEMPLE OF EX FIT BBC WES CALPIANS COLUMBUS WGT TEAM HERCULES EAST COAST GOLD CALPIANS WINDY CITY EAST COAST GOLD C EMPIRE WGT C EMPIRE WGT HASSLE FREE EAST COAST GOLD DYNAMO

BEST  SN  95 90 91 94 95 104 98 102 102 103 100 100 115 105 115 115 108 125 110 115 117 116 125 124 121 120 135 131 136 130 37 48 56 60 63 65 60 70 75 44

BEST  CJ  TOTAL  BDY WT.  117 212 83.81 110 200 83.56 131 222 89.38 123 217 93.2 118 213 76.78 133 237 93.5 110 208 103.43 130 232 76.9 120 222 112.8 122 225 93 135 235 113.69 150 250 115.58 145 260 92.2 138 243 103.7 145 260 84.18 150 142 155 140 148 151 148 163 162 158 150 170 158 161 170 43 71 68 73 72 85 80 87 92 59 265 250 280 250 263 268 264 288 286 279 270 305 289 297 300 80 119 124 133 135 150 140 157 167 103 107.28 82.87 76.88 93.95 76.67 81.02 92.57 122.33 104.03 121.26 91.02 91.35 93.96 83.18 103.66 76.35 62.07 72.87 63.74 57.55 73.5 57.88 74.75 85.88 62.9

AGE  COEF  1.000 1.217 1.536 1.195 1.000 1.100 1.449 1.000 1.449 1.000 1.195 1.195 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.136 1.000 1.000 1.147 1.000 1.147 1.000 1.000 1.183 1.000 1.072 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.195 1.000 1.113 1.000 1.170 1.000 1.195

SINCLAIR  254.2584 292.3528 396.6303 296.1270 267.5440 297.3029 330.4808 291.1560 342.9263 257.1760 298.6871 316.2661 298.2868 266.2076 311.1454 325.9950 301.5343 351.4461 326.3492 330.6121 375.0825 302.3530 300.4305 370.2370 291.6640 333.9371 351.3289 328.8952 357.5490 328.6961 89.5823 149.3499 141.9777 196.1427 178.3755 190.3426 184.2299 207.7297 178.3722 153.1697

55

Day 2: Saturday, March 6, 2010  LIFTER     SCOTT ADAM HUGGINS MARSHALL CRETCHER GABE HENDERSON ANDREW VELDEY JACK MASI GABE MAIZELS TYLER HOOKS SAM WESTCOTT JT PFEIFFER BRET REINKEMEYER COLE SIEGEL BRYAN HAMAN RUBY ROETHEMEYER SETH MARTIN JONATHAN HAMAN DAISY SWORDS JAMES TAYLOR ROBERT SCHUTZ NICHOLAS KLEVORN MARK PFEIFFER WENTZLOFF HAMAN KMET SUMMA SIMONS ROMPA SWAIN II WALKER GRABER SEXTON COOK COOK LANGE ZAJAC QUICK SWORDS FILIPPINI ROGERS DUSTIN JACK SAM MATTHEW TOM BRYANT BRYON MILO ZANE MICHAEL RYAN RYAN JORDAN KYLE JON JORDAN PATRICK JOHN SEAN

CLASS  M 44 kg M 35 kg M 35 kg M 56 kg M 35 kg M 56 kg M 35 kg M 39 kg M 56 kg M 35 kg M 50 kg M 44 kg W 44 kg M 50 kg M 35 kg W 53 kg M 44 kg M 85 kg M 50 kg M 62 kg M 85 kg M 69 kg M 69 kg M 105 kg M 62 kg M 94 kg M 94 kg M 77 kg M 62 kg M 56 kg M 94 kg M 69 kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 69 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 69 kg M 85 kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 105 kg M 77 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 85 kg

DIVISION  Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age Sch-Age JUNIORS Sch-Age JUNIORS Sch-Age OPEN OPEN OPEN JUNIORS OPEN JUNIORS JUNIORS JUNIORS JUNIORS JUNIORS OPEN Sch-Age OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN Sch-Age JUNIORS OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN

CLUB  Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC Tm Herc Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC ECG Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC Chrlstn WLC Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC PINNACLE Krkwd WLC Krkwd WLC PINNACLE Tm HOUSTON Krkwd WLC WINDY CITY WLC Krkwd WLC Cinci WLC N.Oklnd T.Herc PINNACLE Chrlstn WLC Krkwd WLC DEVILS WL Tm Herc Chrlstn WLC ECG Tm NJ NA FOX VALLEY Tm TEXAS Tm HOUSTON ECG PENN LANCO CROSSFIT T.Herc Tm HOUSTON ECG UNATTACHED MET ELITE Tm NJ Chrlstn WLC TOLEDO WL ECG Tm HOUSTON PENDRAGON Tm NJ WINDY CITY WL Tm TEXAS Scrd Hrt U WLC CALPIAN

BEST SN  BEST CJ  TOTAL  23 31 54 25 35 60 16 22 38 33 53 86 20 29 49 28 50 78 26 36 62 30 42 72 33 41 74 27 41 68 31 44 75 35 40 75 37 45 82 26 37 63 -39 54 0 37 50 87 43 56 99 46 68 114 54 68 122 50 71 121 48 57 67 70 74 78 81 83 70 77 80 87 96 90 98 80 100 85 85 94 100 91 102 -99 104 120 103 100 112 103 110 116 70 76 80 95 98 87 95 98 96 110 100 112 125 110 -112 105 115 115 115 120 120 120 145 116 134 151 135 140 -147 155 144 140 118 133 147 165 172 165 176 181 166 187 180 199 221 200 0 185 215 200 200 214 220 211 247 0 238 271 238 240 0 258 254 256

WT.  43.75 35.73 36.97 57.36 35.07 55.89 33.53 39.64 57.65 32.2 48.75 42.65 42.78 47.7 34.51 52.6 42.95 93.07 53.53 57.56 86 67.77 67.65 103.5 60 93.1 91.4 71.9 56.8 60.23 87.29 65.09 93.35 108.35 66.65 76.8 75.24 87.2 83.01 66.63 84.96 96.78 154.55 74.34 74.61 99.73 75.47 84.97 84.81 141.4 93.83 84.19

SINCLAIR  103.3759 140.9273 86.0624 130.8287 117.4432 121.0392 156.1751 151.7440 112.1459 179.3487 130.1969 147.0918 160.3526 111.4680 0.0000 141.6734 192.8647 130.2607 195.8703 183.5897 139.7473 180.0515 199.2312 180.8816 253.0773 188.5093 202.6854 236.1741 254.4188 274.3866 211.6711 276.6302 252.2005 215.8794 0.0000 232.3401 273.1622 235.3043 241.0220 292.9112 262.0857 237.2353 248.1812 0.0000 303.8476 301.1531 301.8583 285.8953 0.0000 261.8043 289.2319 306.3405

                                                                                                                                                                 

MANGIARACINA LOUIS MATTESSICH ERIC DALPIAZ DAVID LESKO JOHN BERNINGER DOUGLAS MCGINNIS CHRIS BASSLER JOHN SCHNEIDER PHILLIP PLATT BRIAN CARTER CHRISTIAN CHO DAVID QUINTONG JOEL NG MIKE

56

YORKOWITZ HUTCHINSON REBMAN NGUYEN LATTIMER BOFFA OAKLEY BROWER GRANA CLARIDAD BRANT KALISZ WANG JAMES GARCIA JESSOP CHURCHWARD LIPPMAN BASSLER DAVIS YESSIE HUBBARD CRASS WALLACE ROBLES    CERBUS FRY MURRAY NORTH VAUGHN SABATINI OVERKAMP STARKS FARRIS WARD ISTVAN SWART DETENAMO

CHRIS SEAN JACOB DATTON JOHN DAVID CHRISTOPHER HENRY TONY BENJAMIN JACOB TONY MARY ALISON ERIN TRACI RACHEL ARIELLE BREANNE SARAH KARA AMANDA RACHEL ERIN SARAH    MIKE DEREK FRANK JONATHAN CHAD PHIL BENN JASON KENDRICK CALEB DIOSZEGI CAMERON ITTE

M 69 kg M 62kg M 94 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 94 kg M 69 kg M 94 kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 105 kg W 53 kg W 48 kg W 75+ kg W 75 kg W 48 kg W 58 kg W 58 kg W 53 kg W 75 kg W 58 kg W 69 kg W 75 kg W 75+ kg    M 77 kg M 94 kg M 94 kg M 105 kg M 77 kg M 94 kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 85 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 105+ kg

OPEN OPEN JUNIORS OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN JUNIORS OPEN OPEN OPEN JUNIORS OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN    OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN JUNIORS OPEN OPEN OPEN

ECG ECG HDAC ECG MET ELITE Tm NJ Tm SAVANNAH Krkwd WLC HASSLE FREE BBC Tm S. BUFFALO Tm S. BUFFALO FIT BBC Tm FLORIDA Altmnt Tm TEXAS Met. ELITE CALPIAN WLC Met. ELITE UNATTACHED Tm SAVANNAH CATALYST Ath. Tm SAVANNAH CAL STRENGTH LSUS Tm ARIZONA    PENDRAGON ECG Met. ELITE CAL STRENGTH SPOON BARBELL ECG Krkwd WLC Tm TEXAS LSU SHREVEPORT Cal STRENGTH CS DINAMO BUCH. Tm HOUSTON MARCUS CLUB

113 111 115 105 117 115 115 118 125 130 137 135 52 55 55 67 65 0 77 73 85 88 85 93 103    130 136 135 141 142 145 138 -153 157 158 150 143 175

142 136 145 130 146 144 150 140 160 -156 177 171 66 73 72 82 82 88 96 91 106 106 110 114 140    160 165 170 184 175 179 176 181 201 203 180 183 216

255 247 260 235 263 259 265 258 285 0 314 306 118 128 127 149 147 88 173 164 191 194 195 207 243    290 301 305 325 317 324 314 0 358 361 330 326 391

68.75 61.85 88.98 76.54 82.85 78.76 92.66 68.86 92.57 104.23 124.56 101.98 52.93 50.59 84.59 73.41 47.8 57.48 57.56 52.8 76.98 57.76 72.92 74.92 122.37    76.15 93.01 91.71 93.4 76.6 93.5 104.17 131.86 84.67 123.51 90.74 137.88 150.22

342.0653 355.6220 303.0416 295.6943 317.2528 320.8090 303.3715 345.7399 326.4038 0.0000 326.1718 337.2395 166.0620 186.8778 136.3785 169.9798 225.3409 116.3758 228.5566 231.2486 213.0849 255.6670 223.1952 233.8383 243.0685    365.9473 344.0286 350.7246 370.7989 398.6979 369.4904 343.4427 0.0000 427.1996 375.7263 381.2521 332.0591 393.8797

PA PA

PA PA

PA PA PA PA PA PA PA   

57

Day 3: Sunday, March 7, 2010: WerkSan High School Challenge  LIFTER  MARTINEZ STANLEY ANDREWS GRACEY KREITZER MATTIS SOMERA HERNANDEZ MCLAIN EMERY HURFORD SLAWTA RASMUSSEN GLIDDEN CAREY MORGAN PERKINS VANG VANG    YOUNG HORST WILLIAMS HANKEY GIBEAULT BLAKES MEILLIER JOHNSON HOWERTON FREEMAN CONRAD OLSON KRUCHTEN VANG AKINRIBADE BETTINGER STOFKO NEESE    CODY AUSTIN SETH ZACHARY SID MICHAEL CLARO CAMERON BRANDON CHASE NEIL BEN KYLE JEREMY LEE JOHNAITHAN ALEX KEVIN TOU    CHRISTOPHER NICK ANFERNEE YANDELL ERICH JATHAN TUCKER TREVON IAN JORDAN BENJAMIN REID TRACY WECED AJ MATTHEW REED STEELE CLASS  M 62 kg M 56 kg M 50kg M 62 kg M 56 kg M 56 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 85 kg M 77 kg M 105 kg M 105+ kg M 56 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 69 kg M 85 kg M 62 kg M 77 kg    M 77 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 85 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 77 kg M 69 kg M 77 kg M 62 kg M 69 kg M 105 kg M 69 kg M 62 kg M 85 kg M 94 kg M 85 kg M 77 kg TEAM  SAV B-fort HS Hoos BBC SAV B-fort HS Brnsbrg BBC ECG SAV B-fort HS HF BBC Brnsbrg BBC Brnsbrg BBC II Hoos Bbell Brnsbrg BBC Brnsbrg BBC Nfield WL Brnsbrg BB SAV B-fort HS SAV B-fort HS Nfield WL HF BBC HF BBC    Oklnd Co CF Hoos Bbell HF BBC HF BBC HF BBC HF BBC Nfield HF BBC HF BBC Nfield WGT Brnsbrg Bbell II Nfield WGT Nfield WLC HF BBC Brnsbrg Bbell Nfield WLC Hoos Bbell BBC BEST SN  BEST CJ  TOTAL  44 50 94 47 62 109 48 58 106 73 89 162 57 75 132 66 74 140 68 88 156 65 84 149 68 79 147 75 105 180 78 96 174 73 85 158 70 84 154 73 92 165 74 85 159 67 92 159 68 100 168 68 96 164 83 105 188          81 105 186 80 98 178 68 93 161 81 101 182 80 100 180 70 99 169 83 112 195 88 112 200 79 107 186 82 103 185 83 111 194 81 81 88 107 195 89 126 215 85 110 195 83 112 195 75 116 191 90 118 208 WT.  61.9 55.9 53.9 69.3 55.2 49.3 75.1 73.9 82.1 74.6 102.2 113.5 55.9 83.8 79.5 67.4 84.1 61.3 74.1    75.18 87.78 77.47 79.62 74.33 69.68 76.15 61.04 77.7 61.11 68.52 103.78 68.96 65.68 82.56 93.88 81.95 78.65 SINCLAIR  135.2609 169.1211 169.2460 216.2237 206.8253 240.6917 198.4126 191.2824 178.1461 229.8185 191.6136 168.1314 238.9417 197.9016 195.9580 216.0103 201.1425 237.6193 240.9698    236.4248 208.7714 201.2274 224.1238 230.3010 224.7965 246.0680 290.6585 232.0949 268.6394 260.7913 88.7118 261.0758 297.0783 235.6439 221.9983 231.6858 257.8328

58

LIFTER  HANSON WINZIG MELZER NYGREN BENSON HANSON VALLE CALLAHAN LEWIS SEIDEN VIETS LAM GREEN FELICITY CALLAHAN CAI CAI LI SMITH    DUDLEY SCHADLE MAUK SILON SHIMLEY MILKIE CORBIN WYSONG BROUSSARD HILL BOND JAQUINT SAELEE WASHINGTON MCCLAIN JOHNSON MOSER SAMPSON

   RACHEL ASHLEY ERIN KALIN BETTE ANNA VANIA SHELBY MARY ISABEL HELENA JENNI AKIKO SERENA LYNDSEY MICHELLE CATHY KRISLYN JERILYN    CASEY NATHAN ALEX THOMAS CHRIS JACOB JOSH GRANT DALVIN KENNEDY JACOB BRENNEN KYLE JAMES DAVID CLINTON STEFAN BRANDELL

CLASS  W 48 kg W 53 kg W 69 kg W 58 kg W 75 kg W 63 kg W 63 kg W 63 kg W 69 kg W 75 kg W 75 kg W 48 kg W 63 kg W 58 kg W 75+ kg W 69 kg W 69 kg W 63 kg W 75+ kg    M 94 kg M 85 kg M 94kg M 85 kg M 94 kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 85 kg M 105+ kg M 77 kg M 105+ kg M 105+ kg M 77 kg M 69 kg M 105+ kg M 94 kg M 105+ kg M 105 kg

   Nfield WLC Nfield Nfield WLC Nfield WLC Nfield MN Nfield WLC HF Nfield WLC Brnsbrg BBC HF HF HF HF HF Nfield WLC HF HF HF Brnsbrg BBC    HF BBC FIT Brnsbrg Bbell TM Sav B-fort HS Hoos Bbell Brnsbrg Bbell II Nfield WLC Brnsbrg Bbell II TM SavB-fort HS Brnsbrg Bbell Tol WGT Pwr Sp ATHLETIC HF BBC TM Sav B-fort HS Brnsbrg Bbell HF BBC TM Sav B-fort HS HF BBC

BEST SN  BEST CJ  TOTAL  33 46 79 34 52 86 50 61 111 42 54 96 46 57 103 40 56 96 0 47 56 103 47 61 108 43 60 103 48 67 115 50 68 118 51 66 117 56 73 129 57 74 131 53 73 126 53 75 128 53 73 126 65 87 152          100 116 216 95 117 212 95 115 210 100 122 222 85 115 200 95 129 224 93 120 213 -93 114 0 95 120 215 95 127 222 100 124 224 100 130 230 105 137 242 105 140 245 106 135 241 115 141 256 115 136 251 125 150 275

WT.  45.5 52.46 68.4 57.21 74.77 60.14 61.45 65.09 73.93 71.06 50.12 61.42 56.27 102.52 66 68.4 61 112.26    85.05 83.45 89.91 80.38 91.48 93.5 111.68 82.59 118.55 72.53 114.04 119.29 75.36 65.88 108.21 83.25 106.3 97.45

SINCLAIR  126.6483 121.8906 131.4093 127.3855 116.4649 123.0231 0.0000 130.1160 131.5855 117.0983 133.3731 173.6303 147.8489 173.2519 133.4706 152.2518 151.5350 159.9431 152.8622    257.1876 254.8055 243.6131 272.0100 230.2360 255.4502 227.7475 0.0000 226.0516 288.1616 238.0362 241.4327 307.1867 337.8494 260.2434 308.0601 272.6379 308.3465

59

Arnold 2010 Prize Winners 
Top 5 Open Men  Best Sn  Best C & J  157  201  142  175  175  216  150  141  180  184 

KENDRICK  CHAD  ITTE  DIOSZEGI  JONATHAN   

Lifter  FARRIS  VAUGHN  DETENAMO  ISTVAN  NORTH 

Total  358  317  391  330  325 

Body Wt  Sinclair   84.67  427.1996  76.6  398.6979  150.22  393.8797  90.74  93.4  381.2521  370.7989 

AMANDA  SARAH  ERIN  SARAH  RACHEL 

Lifter  HUBBARD  ROBLES  WALLACE  DAVIS  CHURCHWARD 

Top 5 Open Women  Best Sn  Best C & J  88  106  103  140  93  114  73  91  65  82 

Total  194  243  207  164  147 

Body Wt  57.76  122.37  74.92  52.8  47.8 

Sinclair   255.6670  243.0685  233.8383  231.2486  225.3409 

Lifter  JOHN  BASSLER  PATRICK  SWORDS  TOM  SUMMA  SAM  HAMAN    Lifter  HAMAN 

Top 4 Schoolage Men  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  120  151  271  100  115  215  74  98  172  67  80  147  Top 1 Schoolage Woman  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  37  45  82 

Body Wt  99.73  75.24  60  67.65 

Sinclair   301.1531  273.1622  253.0773  199.2312 

Lifter  CALEB  WARD  JACOB  REBMAN  PHILLIP  SCHNEIDER    Lifter  BREANNE  BASSLER  ERIN  GARCIA 

Top 3 Junior Men  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  158  203  361  115  145  260  103  135  238  Top 2 Junior Women  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  77  96  173  55  72  127 

Body Wt  Sinclair   123.51  375.7263  88.98  303.0416  75.47  301.8583 

RUBY 

Body Wt  Sinclair   42.78  160.3526 

Body Wt  Sinclair   57.56  228.5566  84.59  136.3785 

Top 3 WerkSan Highschool Men  Lifter  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  JAMES  WASHINGTON  105  140  245  BRANDELL  SAMPSON  125  150  275  CLINTON  JOHNSON  115  141  256    Lifter  JENNY  LAM  SERENA  FELICITY  KRISLYN  LI 

Body Wt  Sinclair   65.88  337.8494  97.45  308.3465  83.25  308.0601 

Top 3 WerkSan Highschool Women  Best Sn  Best C & J  Total  Body Wt  Sinclair   50  68  118  50.12  173.6303  56  73  129  56.27  173.2519  53  73  126  61  159.9431 

Top 3 Master Men  Lifter  LOWE  DARIOTIS  DANILOV  Best Sn  86  91  117  Best C & J  103  131  151  Total  189  222  268  Body Wt  68.95  89.38  81.02  Age  63  61  41  M‐M Sin‐ clair   400.8563  396.6303  375.0825 

FRED  CHRIS  OLEG   

Top 3 Master Women  Lifter  Best Sn  JACKIE  MAH  70  ANNE  LEHMAN  48  CORINNE  GROTENHUIS  60  Best C & J  87  60  73  Total  157  108  133  Body Wt  74.75  50.37  63.74  Age  43  50  45  M‐M Sin‐ clair   207.7297  196.7088  196.1427 

60

National Collegiate Championships
April 16-18, 2010 Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI
Men's 56 kg  Pl. 
Name Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot.

1  Barnett, Joshua    Men's 62 kg  Pl. 
Name

1988

NMU co-ed

60.90

76

-80

80

80

105

110

-114 110 190

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 242 237 215 183 178 157 145

1  Hutchinson, Sean 2  Brunson, Mack 3  Miller, Jordan 4  Spraggins, Sean 5  Weitz, Keith 6  Smith, Jacob 7  Schroeder, Mark    Men's 69 kg  Pl. 
Name

1987 1991 1988 1989 1987 1990 1990

LSUS men & co-ed Lindenwood men UF USF Mesa CC Madison MI Lindenwood men

61.80 61.75 61.64 60.89 61.17 59.73 60.90

105 93 86 74 -75 -65 55

108 97 90 78 74 65 60

110 102 -93 -82 80 -72 -65

110 102 90 78 80 65 60

128 125 116 100 94 92 75

132 -136 132 -132 135 135 -122 125 125 -105 105 105 -98 98 98 -97 -97 92 80 85 85

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 275 275 263 230 224 220 218 205 204 195 189 189 170 167 ---

1  Lee, Alex 2  Johnson, Derrick 3  Adams, Aaron 4  Scott, Timothy 5  DeFrancisco, Nicholas 6  Evans, Michael 7  Cunanan, Aaron 8  Vrabel, Andrew 9  Powell, Jordan 10  Cretcher, Max 11  Spranger, Kurt 12  Toothaker, Brandon 13  Levy, Jon 14  Morris, Eric ‐‐  Serrano, Ambrose    Men's 77 kg  Pl.  1  2  3  4 
Name

1988 ASU 1985 Lindenwood men 1988 LSUS men & co-ed 1991 Daytona St 1989 UF 1991 NMU co-ed 1985 LSUS men & ALT co-ed 1991 NMU co-ed 1990 Truman State men 1991 NMU co-ed 1988 USAA 1988 Univ. N.Iowa 1983 SCCC 1986 UNH 1987 East Tenn. St.

66.87 68.14 64.71 68.18 68.70 67.24 68.87 67.50 68.72 68.40 66.05 67.94 68.75 67.41 68.84

111 118 110 92 -99 95 -93 90 84 85 82 -82 -72 72 -85

114 116 116 147 152 159 159 123 125 125 -150 150 -155 150 -113 -114 110 145 153 -158 153 -96 97 97 127 133 -138 133 99 -103 99 125 -130 -130 125 -100 -102 95 125 -130 -130 125 93 95 95 115 120 123 123 -96 -96 90 115 -120 ----- 115 87 -90 87 110 114 117 117 -90 -90 85 105 110 -115 110 -85 -85 82 -102 102 107 107 -82 82 82 102 107 -110 107 72 -77 72 93 98 -103 98 -76 -76 72 -90 90 95 95 -85 85 85 -120 -120 -120 ---

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 272 261 260 240

Soha, Walter (Mike) Hall, Robert Bourgeois, Jason Kim, Christopher

1985 LSUS men & co-ed 1983 Life Univ 1986 Ga Tech 1986 LSUS men & ALT co-ed

76.73 115 119 122 122 -150 -150 150 150 76.81 116 120 -125 120 141 141 -146 141 76.48 -114 115 -118 115 -145 145 -146 145 73.46 103 -106 -106 103 133 137 -140 137 61

5  Gorelik, Dan 6  Moss, Alex 7  Klimesh, Simon 8  Locker, Philip 9  Asbate, Michael 10  Berninger, Douglas 11  Steele, Nick 12  Miller, Evan 13  Spurlock, Marc 14  Holde, Jonathan 15  Fong, Eric 16  Gee, Zachary 17  Swain, Milo ‐‐  Litecky, Charles ‐‐  Westbrook, Jonas ‐‐  Wise, Jamie    Men's 85 kg  Pl. 
Name

1990 1987 1986 1991 1991 1986 1991 1989 1989 1988 1983 1987 1989 1989 1983 1987

NMU Univ of North Iowa Hawkeye CC UC Boulder FAU Bowling Green Valencia Univ. of Toledo NMU Truman State men Cal State UofUtah East Ill Normandale CC Univ of Buffalo Auburn

76.10 -105 105 109 109 125 130 -135 130 76.64 76.03 75.96 76.15 74.75 73.46 76.23 75.77 76.01 74.25 76.01 72.53 74.35 76.17 76.33 92 98 -95 97 97 -96 92 95 -87 83 -87 80 -105 105 -100 97 103 95 101 100 -96 -97 98 87 86 87 -84 -105 -108 -100 -101 105 100 -105 -104 96 -97 -101 92 88 -92 84 -105 -110 -100 97 105 100 101 100 96 92 98 92 88 87 84 --105 --126 123 -125 117 119 116 120 115 110 104 110 100 125 -138 120 132 128 125 -121 121 119 125 -119 115 108 -118 -105 130 -138 -127 137 -133 -130 123 -124 123 -128 -119 -120 111 -119 -106 -136 -140 -130 137 128 125 123 121 123 125 115 115 111 110 100 130 --120

239 234 233 225 224 221 219 217 213 207 199 197 184 -------

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 301 300 250 242 232 229 225 224 223 211 205 -----

1  Cooper, Travis 2  Tirrito, Michael 3  Ziegler, Kyle 4  Henriksen, Paul 5  Fischer, Ryan 6  Wright, Bryant 7  Nowasell, Alex 8  Green, Jacob 9  Dennis, Shane 10  Cotton, Andrew 11  Ciaburri, Justin ‐‐  Roberts, William (Paul) ‐‐  Mizuguchi, Satoshi    Men's 94 kg  Pl.  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  ‐‐  ‐‐  ‐‐ 
Name

1988 1984 1990 1988 1986 1985 1988 1988 1991 1988 1987 1985 1983

Ga Tech Farleigh Dickeson USAF Univ. of Minn Univ. of Utah WIU Univ. St. Mary Truman State men FSU Truman State men Farleigh Dickenson Lindenwood men ETSU

84.81 81.31 84.74 80.61 83.85 83.46 82.64 84.49 81.35 83.40 84.02 83.84 82.81

125 130 115 -110 97 98 -105 -92 89 95 88 130 104

130 135 -118 -110 102 102 105 92 93 -101 -92 136 -108

135 -140 -120 110 -107 -107 -110 -97 -97 -101 93 -140 108

135 135 115 110 102 102 105 92 93 95 93 136 108

166 165 -135 122 120 127 120 122 122 116 -105 -160 -133

-172 17 135 127 -126 -130 120 128 126 -123 107 -160 -133

-172 -170 -140 132 130 -131 -126 132 130 -123 112 -160 -133

166 165 135 132 130 127 120 132 130 116 112 -----

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 283 270 257 238 222 222 217 206 -------

Lenahen, Chris Smith, Robert Motoyoshi, David Horschig, Aaron White, Phillip Oliver-Swan, Benjamin Yuen, Kevin Luken, Derrick Goeller, Daniel Moehn, Brendan Dalpiaz, David

1991 1990 1988 1986 1989 1986 1989 1989 1985 1989 1986

NMU co-ed St. College of FL Univ of Minn Univ of Missouri Valencia CC Coastline CC Univ of Cal River USAA Univ of Phoenix Univ. N Iowa Univ of Ill 62

90.97 92.71 90.71 91.22 88.72 87.07 92.31 92.58 93.05 93.01 92.12

115 -115 106 -104 -97 90 90 88 110 90 95

120 115 -111 -104 97 95 -95 -90 115 95 100

125 120 111 104 -105 100 95 -92 120 100 -102

125 120 111 104 97 100 95 88 120 100 100

147 145 -141 -134 125 118 122 -118 -140 -118 -117

153 -150 141 134 -130 122 -127 118 -140 -118 -118

158 150 146 -139 -130 -127 -127 -120 -140 -118 -118

158 150 146 134 125 122 122 118 -------

Men's 105 kg  Pl. 
Name Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Tot. 325 319 300 278 268 265 249 242 220 ---

1  Garcia, David 2  Braddy, Thomas 3  McDermott, Shaughnessy 4  Churchill, Mike 5  Keller, Griffin 6  Jackson, Brandon 7  McCarthy, Russell 8  Bass, Matthew 9  Palozola, Matthew ‐‐  Rostotskyy, Serhiy    Men's 105+ kg  Pl. 
Name

1989 1991 1987 1984 1989 1989 1983 1991 1988 1985

U California, Davis NMU LSUS Hawkeye CC U New Mexico NMU U New Mexico Alvin CC Truman State U Lindenwood U

103.68 103.35 104.82

135 125 129

140 129 133 130 123 -120 107 103 -106 -130

145 -133 135 133 -129 -120 111 108 -108 -130

145 129 135 133 123 115 111 108 100 ---

170 181 -157 138 145 150 130 120 120 ----

175 190 157 -145 -150 -156 134 127 -130 ----

180 -196 165 145 -152 -156 138 134 -130 ----

180 190 165 145 145 150 138 134 120 ----

103.08 125 101.60 -123 103.57 115 102.88 103 101.99 95 102.62 100 102.19 -130

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot.

1  Reis, Fernando 2  Ito, Collin 3  Brant, Jacob 4  Rodden, Tyler 5  Funches, Dominique 6  Ging, Trevor 7  Cappelmann, Ashby 8  Montano, Marco 9  Ridge, John 10  Purser, Charles ‐‐  Bond, Jacob    Women's 48 kg  Pl. 
Name

1990 Lindenwood 1987 NMU 1988 SUNY Col. - Buffalo 1988 MidAmerica Nazarene 1988 College of DuPage 1985 Kent State 1989 USC - Beaufort 1984 CSU - Sacramento 1982 UC - Colorado Springs 1991 Georgia Southern 1987 Macalester College

123.96 155 132.97 145 125.86 -135 137.83 115 114.60 108 107.63 -105 105.22 98 109.04 82 121.66 90 128.42 93 114.55 100

160 150 135 121 112 105 103 87 95 98 -104

168 155 -140 126 -117 110 -107 92 98 -103 -105

168 155 135 126 112 110 103 92 98 98 100

192 190 -180 150 140 -137 128 130 120 123 -126

202 197 180 156 150 137 -134 135 125 -128 -126

-206 -202 -183 162 -155 -143 -138 -140 -130 -131 -126

202 197 180 162 150 137 128 135 125 123 ---

370 352 315 288 262 247 231 227 223 221 ---

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Tot. 134 128 114 89 89 80

1  Guide, Gina 1  James, Alison 2  Sanchez, Suzanna 3  Garcia, Vanessa 4  Carlson, Britta 5  Balster, Jennifer    Women's 58 kg  Pl. 
Name

1985 N. Ill Univ. 1989 Yale 1990 LSUS women & co-ed 1994 Alvin CC 1991 1986 NMU co-ed ALT Orange CC

46.75 47.88 47.81 46.60 47.64 46.63

55 53 45 32 38 33

57 -56 -48 -35 -41 35

59 56 48 36 -41 -37

59 56 48 36 38 35

72 -72 62 50 48 42

75 -72 64 53 -51 45

-77 72 66 -55 51 -48

75 72 66 53 51 45

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Total 144 130 129

1  Batchelor, Cortney 2  Carlson, Breanne 3  Payne, Jacque

1991 1987 1987

Univ. S. AL NMU co-ed Pikes Peak CC

52.58 52.30 52.15

58 59 -58

61 -62 58

64 -62 -61

64 59 58

-75 68 68

77 71 71

80 -73 -72

80 71 71

63

Women's 63 kg  Pl. 
Name Year of Birth Team Body Wgt Snatch 1 2 3 Best Sn. Clean & Jerk 1 2 3 Best CJ Total

1  Kranz, Megan 2  Sisto, Gwendolyn 3  Humeston, Jessie 4  Feuerman, Robin 5  Shimomura, Kari 6  Davie, Laura 7  Cudjoe, Arlene 8  Johnson, Natalie 9  Van Dorn, Cara    Women's 69 kg  Pl. 
Name

1986 LSUS women & co-ed 1982 MIT 1988 Pikes Peak CC 1990 NMU co-ed 1984 Sacramento City 1986 Emory 1989 Suny Brockport 1989 UM, Twin Cities 1905 TownsonUniv

62.40 61.20 62.86 62.82 62.66 62.78 62.39 61.22 61.11

-76 75 68 70 67 -66 60 56 49

76 -80 71 73 70 66 64 58 -52

78 -80 73 -75 -72 -70 -67 60 52

78 75 73 73 70 66 64 60 52

93 90 88 80 80 85 75 71 -68

-97 92 93 85 83 -90 78 74 68

-97 94 -97 89 -85 -90 -80 -77 -71

93 94 93 89 83 85 78 74 68

171 169 166 162 153 151 142 134 120

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Total

1  Lynch, Kelly 2  Henry, Allie 3  Haacke, Stephanie 4  Paul, Brittney 5  Barrera, Brook    Women's 75 kg  Pl.  1  2 
Name

1989 1989 1987 1985 1992

UCCS NMU co-ed Univ of Niowa W. Ill Univ Alvin CC

66.63 68.20 67.03 68.88 67.25

74 74 68 -58 -45

-77 -78 73 -58 46

77 -78 75 58 -48

77 74 75 58 46

-95 85 79 76 -55

95 90 84 79 59

-100 93 -88 -83 62

95 93 84 79 62

172 167 159 137 108

Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt

Snatch 1 2 3

Best Sn.

Clean & Jerk 1 2 3

Best CJ

Total

Zimmerman, Samantha Snodgrass,

1987 1989

US Ala Utah Sate UCentr. Mo.

74.32 71.29 72.72

82 82 73

-84 85 73

-84 -88 78

82 85 78

105 95 92

110 -100 -96

-114 -100 96

110 95 96

192 180 174

3  Maycock, Whitnee 1986    Women's 75+ kg  Pl.  1  2  3  4  5 
Name Year of Birth

Team

Body Wgt 1

Snatch 2 3

Best Sn. 1

Clean & Jerk 2 3

Best Clean Total &

Watson, Coleen Yockey, Rashell Marenco, Arlette Crow, Hannah Martiniez, Lydia

1987 1987 1989 1989 1992

St. Edwards U MidAmerica Naz. U Sacramento State U State College of Fla. Alvin CC

103.32 89.86 97.86 80.8 100.78

73 53 57 53 44

-76 59 60 57 -47

-76 -63 62 -60 47

73 59 62 57 47

87 74 68 72 63

-90 78 72 77 -67

-90 80 75 80 -67

87 80 75 80 63

160 139 137 137 110

64

Calendar of Upcoming Events
For more information, go to http://weightlifting.teamusa.org May 2010 May 22 May 23 May 30 -

USAW: USA Weightlifting

Blue Ridge Open & Virginia State Championships (Bridgewater, VA) Senior Pan American Championships (Guatemala City, Guatemala) North Carolina State Championships & Memorial Day Open (Kill Devil Hills, NC)

June 2010 June 11-13 June 19 June 25-27 -

Senior National Championships (Peoria, IL) Aloha State Games (Honolulu, HI) National School-Age Championships (San Francisco Bay Area, CA)

July 2010 July 1- 5 July 3 July 5 - 10 July 10 July 10 July 17 July 17 July 24 July 31 -

World University Championships (Chinese Taipei) Redwood Empire Championships (Cotati, CA) Weightlifting Camp (PA) Onaga Blast Challenge (Onaga, KS) Washington State Games (Sumner, WA) Florida Elite vs. New South Wales (Altamonte Springs, FL) Ohio Weightlifting Championships and Midwest Open (Sandusky, OH) Keystone State Games (York, PA) Rocky Mountain State Games (Colorado Springs, CO)

Have an Event Coming Up?
E-mail Rachel Crass at strengthplusmag@yahoo.com to submit a listing for our calendar. Make sure to include the event’s date, title, and location. If your event has a corresponding website, please send us the link so that we can more easily direct readers to your site.

65

For more information, go to http://www.usapowerlifting.com/ May 2010 May 22-23 May 25-29 May 25-29 June 2010 June 18-20 June 26-27 June 26 July 2010 July 10 July 10 July 10 July 10 July 11 July 16 - 18 July 24 July 24 July 31 July 31 - Aug 1 July 31 - Aug 1 Women’s Nationals (Cleveland, OH) Men’s/Women’s World Sub-Junior/Junior World Bench Press Championships (Killeen, TX) Men’s/Women’s World Open Bench Press Championships (Killeen, TX) Men’s Open & Teen/Junior Nations (Palm Springs, CA) U.S. Open Bench Press, Deadlift, Push/Pull, and Powerlifting Championships (Miami, FL) 8th Annual Big K Powerlifting Championships (Cleveland, OH) Dells Summer Classic (Wisconsin Dells, WI) California State Games (San Diego, CA) Summer Power Fest 2010 (Spring, TX) Brute Strength Stars and Stripes BP & Powerlifting Championships (Norfolk, VA) 5th USAPL U.S. Open BP, DL, Push/Pull, and PL Championships (Ft. Lauderdale, FL) USAPL Raw/Unequipped National Powerlifting Championships (Denver, CO) 2010 Mississippi State Championships (Hattiesburg, MS) Iron Works Open VI (Midland, MI) New York State BP Championships (Utica, NY) 27th USAPL New Jersey State Bench Press and Powerlifting Championships (Princeton, NJ) Rocky Mountain State Games/State Games of the West (Aurora, CO)

USAPL: USA Powerlifting

IFBB: International Federation of Body Building
For more information, go to http://www.ifbb.com/ May 2010 May 14 - 17 May 24 - 28 May 28 - 31 June 2010 June 14 - 18 June 18 - 21 July 2010 July 2 - 5 -

European Men’s BB and CBB Championships (Maastricht, Holland) Arab Championships (Alexandria, Egypt) European Men’s and Women’s Fitness Championships (Novi Sad, Serbia) Mediterranean Championships (Amman, Jordan) European Juniors and Masters Championships (Donetsk, Ukraine) World Children Fitness Championships (Bratislava, Slovakia)

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Women of the 2010 Arnold Expo
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Women of the 2010 Arnold Expo
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