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ELECTORAL

REFORM
Community dialogue

Hosted by:
Doug Eyolfson, MP
Charleswood St James Assiniboia
Headingley
doug.eyolfson@parl.gc.ca
canada.ca/democracy

Thank you for participating in the


national dialogue on electoral reform
Canadians expect greater inclusion,
transparency, meaningful engagement and
modernization from their public institutions.

Federal electoral reform is part of the


Governments stronger democracy agenda.

canada.ca/democracy #EngagedinER

Canadian federal electoral reform


Federal electoral reform is part of the
Governments commitment to change. Canada
has a strong and deeply rooted democracy.
One way to protect our democratic values is by
continuously seeking to improve the functioning
of our democratic institutionsincluding our
voting system.

canada.ca/democracy #EngagedinER

Guiding principles

Restore the effectiveness and legitimacy of the voting by


reducing distortions and strengthening the link between
voter intention and the electoral result.
Encourage greater engagement and participation in the
democratic process, including inclusion of
underrepresented groups.
Support accessibility and inclusiveness to all eligible
voters, and avoiding undue complexity in the voting
process.
Safeguarding the integrity of our voting process.
Preserve the accountability of local representation.
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ELECTORAL REFORM
Voting Methods

canada.ca/democracy

First Past the Post


Pros

Favours majority govt. (achieve legislative agenda)


Easily understood
Easily counted
Popular govt, new mandate
Unpopular govt, unseated

Cons

Disproportionate seat count


Only winners votes count, discourage voting
Rewards regional parties
Penalizes parties with diffuse support
Favours nomination of safe candidates

Alternative Vote/Ranked Ballot


Pros

Easily understood
Stable majority governments
Maintain link between constituents & members
Mitigate right or left vote split?

Cons
Seat allocations disproportionate
Exaggerates regionalism

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List Proportional Representation


Pros

Results closer to popular vote


Smaller parties represented
Greater choice
Encourage power sharing & cooperation

Cons

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Difficult to understand
Encourage coalition govts
Ballots long & complicated
Counting ballots time-consuming

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Mixed Member Proportional


Pros

Proportional outcomes
Maintain link between voters & members
Greater choice
Smaller parties represented

Cons
Difficult to understand
2 classes of members (riding vs list)

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ELECTORAL REFORM
Mandatory Voting

canada.ca/democracy

Mandatory Voting: Rationale


Optional Voting

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Consistently low voter turnout


Reflects lack of engagement, cynicism
Result may not reflect majority opinion
Marginalized groups underrepresented
Special interest/single issue votes may be
overrepresented

Australia

Population 23 million (Canada 35 million)


89% urban (Canada 82%)
Government: British parliamentary system
Mandatory voting introduced 1924
Noncompliance: $20 fine
May vote none of above
May drop blank ballot in box

Turnout: 90-95%

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Mandatory Voting
Pros
Parliament better reflects true will of the
people
Less influence of special interest lobbies
Increase voter engagement/education?
Candidates concentrate on issues rather than
turnout
None of the above an option (secret ballot)
Civic duty (taxes ,mandatory schooling, jury)

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Mandatory Voting
Cons

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Undemocratic, infringement of liberty


More uninformed voters casting ballots?
Random votes?
Enforcement, determining valid reasons for not
voting

ELECTORAL REFORM
Referendum

canada.ca/democracy

Referendum
Pros
Major/constitutional issues get direct vote
Referendum campaign allows voter
engagement and education
Add legitimacy to issue
Inform government if unsure how to proceed

Con

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Outcome influenced by how question asked


Expensive (can cost up to $300 M)
Favours status quo
Allows government to pass the buck

Discussion questions
What do you think about the current system for electing
Members of Parliament (benefits/flaws)? Do you feel that
votes are fairly translated?
Do you have a preferred alternative to the current system?
What specific features are important to you in an electoral
system (for example, local representation, proportionality,
simplicity, legitimacy, etc.)?
Why do you think many Canadians choose not to engage in
the democratic process? How would you encourage
participation?
Do you feel that it should be mandatory to cast a ballot? (Can
include spoiling a ballot)
Should Canadians be able to vote online? Would you prefer
to maintain current voting practices? (i.e. presenting oneself
at the polling station, vote secrecy, etc.)
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Stay Connected
canada.ca/democracy

@CdnDemocracy
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Committees/en/ERRE

#ERRE #Q
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TACKLING CLIMATE CHANGE


Canadas Approach

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OBJECTIVE Why we are here?

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CLIMATE CHANGE A rising challenge

The science is clear


Global temperatures have risen
0.85C since 1880

Canadas temperatures have


risen 1.6C since 1880

We must act now

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CLIMATE CHANGE The Paris Agreement

Canada: one of 195 signatories


Limit average temperature rise
to less than 2.0C

Strive to keep increase below 1.5C

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CLIMATE CHANGE In Canada

Many Canadians are already experiencing


climate change:
more extreme weather events
longer, hotter heat waves
thawing permafrost and loss
of Arctic ice

threats to local food sources for


Indigenous peoples in the North

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CLIMATE CHANGE By economic sector


Waste and Others
7%
Oil and Gas
26%

Canadas greenhouse
gas emissions can be
broken down across

Agriculture
10%

Buildings
12%

economic sectors
Electricity
11%
Other Industry
10%
Transportation
23%
Source: Environment Canada and Climate Change (2016) National Inventory Report 19902014: Greenhouse Gas Sources and
Sinks in Canada.

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CLIMATE CHANGE Emission targets


Canadas current greenhouse gas target is 30% below 2005 levels in 2030

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CLIMATE CHANGE At home and abroad

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CANADAS APPROACH Working groups

The First Ministers meeting established four working groups


to develop Canadian options for climate change

Working groups by theme:

Mitigation
Carbon Pricing
Adaptation and Resilience
Clean Technology, Innovation
and Jobs

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CANADAS APPROACH The process

Our discussion will contribute to Canadas


approach to climate change

Ideas will be recorded and posted to


the interactive website, so people will
be able to read them and submit comments

Feedback submitted through the website will


be shared with working group members

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KEY QUESTIONS for discussion


What have been your own experiences with the impacts of climate change?
What are the solutions to reducing greenhouse gases
that you would like to see governments, businesses
and communities implement?

What are your ideas for growing the economy and


jobs while also reducing emissions?

What are some ideas to promote innovation and


new technologies in the effort to reduce greenhouse
gas emissions?

What can Canada do to better adapt to impacts of


climate change and support affected communities,
including Indigenous communities?

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