You are on page 1of 32

Holly Turner

11521803
Teaching For Diversity

StudentNameHollyTurner
StudentNumber11521803

SubjectNameMathematicsinthePrimary
Years
SubjectCodeEMM410
LecturerFionaCollins

AssessmentItem2
EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner
11521803
Teaching For Diversity

ProcessesinDesigningLearning

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

Teaching For Diversity

Class Profile
Olive Primary School (OPS) is located in Fern street, Thurgoona; twelve kilometres from Albury. The school delivers an inclusive and
challenging program to all 262 students. OPS hosts years Kindergarten to 6, utilizing twelve classrooms across the school. The year 3 classroom,
3T, is comprised of 22 students; 13 males, and 9 females. Students in the class are aged between 7 years and 11 months, and 9 years and 1
month. Students in this class are working at a mathematical level that is between that of a Year 2 student at the beginning of the year, and a Year
4 student at the beginning of the year. Four students identify as being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. The remainder of the class identifies as
being non-Indigenous. One student is gifted. One student has a minor learning disability. Two students have been diagnosed as ADHD. All
students in the class have attended the school since Kindergarten, so have all participated in the same learning experiences and have been taught
the same content.
Unit of work
Geometry and Measurement

Stage: 2

Class: Year 3

Syllabus Outcomes:
MATHEMATICS
MA2-1WM: uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas
MA2-2WM: selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems
MA2-17MG: uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using compass directions
ENGLISH
EN2-12E: Recognises and uses an increasing range of strategies to reflect on their own and others learning
SCIENCE
ST2-5WT: Applies a design process and uses a range of tools, equipment, materials and techniques to produce solutions that address specific design criteria
CREATIVE ARTS:
VAS2.2: Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter
PDHPE:
COS2.1: Uses a variety of ways to communicate with and within groups
DMS2.2: Makes decisions as an individual and as a group member.

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

Teaching For Diversity

INS2.3: Makes positive contributions in-group activities.


PSS2.5: Uses a range of problem-solving strategies.
HSIE:
CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities
ENS2.6: Describes peoples interactions with environments and identifies responsible ways of interacting with environments
Unit Focus:
Use grid references on maps to describe position
Draw and describe routes or paths on grid-referenced maps and plans
Identify and mark particular locations on maps and plans, given their grid references
Lesson
Syllabus Content
Learning Experiences
Create and interpret
Review creating, and interpreting, simple
Lesson 1: Introducing Grid Maps
simple grid maps to
maps as a whole class (see Stage 1).
show position and
Using the interactive Smartboard, look at
Teaching & Learning Strategies
pathways
simple maps and allow students to identify
(ACMMG065)
places, objects, and directions of how to get
Cooperative strategies
Use grid
there (see Stage 1). An example of this
Whole class discussion of maps
references on
activity is to complete the last two pages of
and, in particular, grid maps
maps to
Mapping Skills Unit for Grades K-3.
describe
Grouping students in pairs,
If using Map A, in Mapping Skills Unit for
position
allowing them to participate in peer
Grades K-3, ask students If I am on Buck
Identify and
teaching/ learning
Hill Road, how might I get to the Fire
Direct-instruction strategies
mark
Station? Also ask questions like, Which is
particular
Direct questioning and prompts at
closer to Butterfly Pond; the Hospital, or
locations on
the beginning and conclusion of
Ridge Mills School? Further questions to ask
maps and
the lesson
students are to identify the position of a place
plans, given
ICT Based strategies
in relation to another. For example The
their grid
Hospital is (left/ right) to St. Marys Church
The use of the Smartboard during
references
(positions are learnt in ES1). Conclude the
whole class work
Draw and
importance of being able to understand
Use of computers and iPads to
describe
position and directions on a map.
play interactive games about grid
routes
and
Introduce the class to grid maps. On the
maps
paths on gridinteractive Smartboard, open Using a Map
Thinking skills strategies
referenced
Grid.
Mental calculations used when
maps and

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Resources
-Smartboard
-Computers/ iPads
-Masking tape/ chalk
Houghton Mifflin
Company. (n.d.). Using
a Map Grid. Retrieved
from
http://www.eduplace.co
m/kids/socsci/books/ap
plications/imaps/maps/
g2_u1/#top

Assessment
Diagnostic Assessment
Hold a discussion, use
questioning, and observe
students during the activity of
looking at simple maps to assess
students prior knowledge about
maps, and their ability to
understand and interpret a map.

Interactivemaths.
(2016). Position.
Retrieved from
https://interactivemaths
.wikispaces.com/Positi
on

Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning to determine
students understanding about
grid maps. Assess that they are
able to comprehend the grid
framework, and can successfully
identify where objects and places
are on the map using the grid
system.

Maps101. (n.d.) Uncle


Sams Farm. Retrieved
from
http://www.maps101.c

Formative Assessment
Create the grid on the floor to
further assess students
understanding about grid maps,

Holly Turner

11521803

completing grid map games


Map making/ analysing skills used
to complete activities
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion and
reflection
Problem solving used to answer
questions about, and complete
activities on, grid maps
Multiple intelligences
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and play interactive
games
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Land links
Catering for diversity
Viewing, and completing activities
about, grid maps on the
Smartboard as well as on the floor
to ensure all students understand
the concept of a grid map
Pairing a student of lower ability
with one of higher ability to ensure
all students are able to complete
the activity

plans
Use digital
technologies
involving
maps, position
and paths

Teaching For Diversity

As a whole class look at the map, and identify


the places, and streets on the map. Explain
that when locating an object or place on a grid
map, we identify where it is by stating the
square it is in. For example, the house is
located in A1.
Ask the class questions about the map, such as
Where is the Police Station, and What is
found in B5?
Using chalk or masking tape, create a small
grid on the floor in front of the students. Place
some small items, such as a pen or stapler,
into some of the squares. Ask students to
identify which squares these objects have
been placed in.
Split students into pairs, pairing a student of
higher ability with one of lower ability. Pairs
will work on a computer or iPad to play
interactive games about grid maps. The games
can be found on Interactivemaths,
Studyladder, and Maps101. Allow students to
choose which games they play.
Allow students to reflect on their learning in
the lesson. Discuss the games that the groups
played, and their level of difficulty.
Play a final game using the grid created on the
floor earlier. Place an object in a square, and
ask the students to state its location. Ask
questions such as,
- What would the objects location be if it
moved two squares to the right?
- How many squares are there between
this object and this object?
- How may I get from the stapler, to the
pen?

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

om/static_items/games/
uncle_sams_farm_grid
_radio2.php
Pericolo, M. (2001).
Mapping Skills Unit
for Grades K-3. See the
city: The journey of
Manhattan Unfurled.
Retrieved from
https://www.randomho
use.com/teachers/pdf/s
eethecity.pdf
Studyladder. (2016).
Interpret simple grid
maps: Activity 2.
Retrieved from
https://www.studyladde
r.com.au/games/activit
y/interpret-simple-gridmaps-activity-2-22911

and if they can successfully


identify where objects and places
are on the map using the grid
system.
Formative Assessment
Observe students working in
pairs to assess their engagement,
and ability to work with others.
Formative Assessment
Observe students completing
interactive games to assess their
understanding of grid maps, and
if they are able to successfully
identify where objects and places
are on the map using the grid
system.
Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning to assess students
ability to reflect on their
learning, and identify strengths
and weaknesses in their abilities.
Formative Assessment
Conduct whole class game,
whereby the grid on the floor is
utilized to assess if students have
extended their knowledge within
the lesson, and to assess that they
are able to understand a grid
map, and identify objects and
places within it.

Holly Turner

11521803

Lesson 2: Interactive grid map


Teaching & Learning Strategies
Activity-based strategies
Creating a large grid map in the
school ground, allowing students to
become a part of the map, and
place objects in the map, which
determined the activities they
completed
Cooperative strategies
Whole class discussion, and
completion of questions, about grid
maps
Students working in groups,
allowing them to participate in peer
teaching/ learning
Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson
ICT Based strategies
The use of the Smartboard at the
beginning of the lesson
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
completing grid map games
Map making/ analysing skills used
to complete activities
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion and
reflection
Problem solving used to answer
questions about, and complete

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use given
directions to
follow routes
on simple
maps
Use and
follow
positional and
directional
language
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe
position
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and
plans, given
their grid
references
Draw and
describe
routes or paths
on grid
referenced
maps and
plans

Teaching For Diversity

Warm up: Using the Smartboard, access a grid


map e.g. question 5 on the McMillian/
McGraw-Hill website. Ask students questions
about the grid map:
- What place/ object is in B1?
- What places are located in B4?
- In what grid would you find Duck
Pond?
- What can you see in C1?
Also prompt students to analyze the grid map
themselves e.g. stating other places or objects
they see and where they are, such as there
being five houses located in A4.
Using the tennis court, or soccer field, create a
grid map using skipping ropes. Allow the
students to assist measuring out one metre
long squares, and placing the ropes to form a
grid.
Line students up at the base of the grid. Select
students to run into the grid and stand in a
square. The other students must say what
location the student is in on the grid. Have
multiple students in the grid at once, and ask
students questions about directions:
- How may John* get to Jordan*?
-What path could he take?
-What other grid locations would John* go
through on his way to Jordan*?
Split students into groups of three or four,
based on their ability (creating mixed ability
groups), and the number of students in
attendance. Allow each group to select one
piece of sporting equipment, and place it
somewhere in the grid.
With a pen and paper, groups must write the

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Smartboard
-Metre ruler
-Skipping ropes
-Sporting equipment
-Pens/ pencils
-Paper/ workbooks
McMillian/ McgrawHill. (2007).
Neighbourhood Grid
Map. Quick Quiz.
Retrieved from
http://www.mhschool.c
om/ss/ca/g2/u2/g2u2_q
uiz.html

Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning and prompts, to
assess students learning from the
previous lesson, and assess their
ability to understand and use grid
maps.
Formative Assessment
Observe students completing
activities on the skipping rope
grid to assess their engagement
and interaction in the lesson, as
well as to assess their
understanding of how to find the
location/ position of a place or
object on a grid map.
Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning, to assess students
sense of direction, and ability to
navigate through a grid map.
Formative Assessment
Observe students working in
groups to assess their ability to
work with others, and partake in
peer teaching/ learning.
Formative Assessment
Listen to students presentation
of their chosen path/ direction to
assess their sense of direction,
and ability to navigate a grid
map, and understand its

Holly Turner

11521803

activities on, grid maps


Multiple intelligences
Body/ kinesthetic intelligence
when placing themselves into the
grid map, and moving from one
object to another
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete activities
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Catering for diversity
Creating a large, interactive grid
map whereby students can gain a
better understanding of how to
move through a map to different
places/ objects, as they can
physically walk through the grid.
Creating a large interactive grid
map, to empower students and give
them a sense of ownership; they
are offered choice in what goes in
the grid and where it is placed, as
well as the choice to determine
which direction/ path to take.
Students working in mixed ability
groups to ensure all students were
able to complete the activities
Lesson 3: Grid maps in the real-world
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Activity-based strategies
Creating a life-size game of
Battleship, allowing students to

Teaching For Diversity

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use given
directions to

location of all of the other groups equipment.


Groups must then write down paths/
directions that they would take to go from
their piece of equipment, to each of the other
groups equipment. Students must state what
other grid locations they would pass through,
and where they would end up.
Each group presents their answers, and
complete path to the class.
Allow students to reflect on the activity. Ask
students questions such as:
- Which groups path was the longest?
Why?
-Which groups path was the shortest? Why?
- How did you decide which path to take?
-If I had asked you to find the quickest path
to each of the pieces of equipment, would that
have changed the route you took? How?
-If I had asked you to find the longest path to
each of the pieces of equipment, would that
have changed the route you took? How?

Warm-up: Set up a life-size battleship board.


Use chalk, tape, or skipping ropes to construct
the grids, and flip tables over, or use sheets or
curtains. to create the divide between teams.
Split the class into two teams, and go through
the rules of Battleship. These can be found
here:

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

locations.
Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning to assess students
ability to reflect on their
learning, identify strengths and
weaknesses in their abilities, and
broaden their understanding of
directions.

-Chalk/ tape/ skipping


ropes
-Arts and/ or sporting
equipment
- Sheets/ curtains/
flipped tables
-Melways

Formative Assessment
Observe students playing lifesize game of Battleship, to
assess their understanding of the
locations on a grid map, and
their ability to work as a team

Holly Turner

11521803

become active participants in the


activity by setting up, selecting
their own equipment, acting as the
battleships, and/ or working with
their team in an attempt to win
Cooperative strategies
Working as a team in Battleship
Whole class discussion and
reflection about the strategies used,
and outcome of the game of
Battleship
Whole class discussion about maps
in real-world contexts, and the
purpose of grid maps. Whole class
reflection about turning a map into
a grid map
Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson
Independent Learning Strategies
Selecting a map that is appropriate
for their level of ability, and
independently turning it into a grid
map and completing the activity
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
completing grid map games
Map making/ analysing skills used
to complete activities
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion and
reflection
Problem solving used to answer
questions about, and complete

follow routes
on simple
maps
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe
position
Use grid
references in
games
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and
plans, given
their grid
references
Draw and
label a grid on
a given map
Discuss the
use of grids in
real-world
contexts
Draw and
describe
routes or paths
on grid
referenced
maps and
plans
Interpret and
use maps

Teaching For Diversity

http://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/Battl
eship.PDF
Allow students to select equipment they
would like to use to mimic battleships, or they
can choose to lie down and act out the
battleships themselves. Students can also
select tokens or mats to place in the locations
where the other teams have aimed and hit.
Act as the umpire of the game, ensuring all
students are able to have a turn selecting a
location to target.
Hold a discussion with the students reflecting
on the game:
-What strategies did you use to try to beat the
other team?
-Did your strategies work?
-How did your learning about grid maps help
you play this game?
-How could you improve for next time?
Students will draw and label a grid on a map
of their choice. Provide students will old
Melways, and various types of maps. Using
the whiteboard, measure out the size the
students are to draw their grid (10cm by
10cm). Each square in their grid should
measure to 2cm by 2cm. Assist students to
select a map that is appropriate for their level
of ability.
When students have drawn their grid, students
are to identify the location of three places on
their map, and draw a path/ route from a
location of their choice, to another, listing the
grids they cross on the way. Students hand in
their map when finished.
EXTENSION: Students who complete their map early,

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Maps
Milton Bradley
Company. (1990).
Battleship. Retrieved
from
http://www.hasbro.com
/common/instruct/Battl
eship.PDF

Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion with the class,
allowing students to reflect on
their game of Battleship,
assessing students
understanding of using grid
references in games, as well as
their ability to reflect on their
learning
Formative Assessment
Observe students drawing a grid
on a factual map, assessing their
ability to construct a grid that is
accurate in scale
Formative Assessment
Observe students identifying the
location of a number of objects/
places on their map, and
following a route or path, to
assess their ability to understand
a map and use the grid system.
Formative Assessment
Collect students maps, and
workings to assess that they can
successfully create, understand,
and follow a grid map
Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning, to assess students
ability to reflect on their
learning, as well as to assess
their understanding of maps in

Holly Turner

11521803

activities on, grid maps


Multiple intelligences
Body/ kinesthetic intelligence
when placing themselves into the
game of Battleship
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete activities
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Non-verbal
Land links
Catering for diversity
Creating a large, interactive game
of Battleship to allow students to
experience for themselves how
grid references can be used in
games. As well as this, students
will also feel a sense of
empowerment from being able to
control the game so much, and it
also enables students who enjoy
competition to have that
opportunity
Providing a variety of maps for
students to choose from, ensuring
that all students can complete the
task, but will still be challenged
Students working individually to
allow them to work at a level, and
speed that is appropriate for their
ability
Having an extension task to allow
gifted/ talented students to

found in
factual texts
and in the
media

Teaching For Diversity

or who require a challenge, can select a different map


of more difficulty, and draw a grid that is 20cm by
20cm. These students can identify five places on their
map, and create two different routes that begin and end
at the same locations.
Hold a discussion about maps in real-world
contexts, prompting students to share their
experiences:
-What is the purpose of maps in the realworld?
-Why may some people choose to use a grid
map?
-Which do you find easier to use: a normal
map, or a grid map?
Did you have any difficulties turning a
normal map into a grid map?

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

real-world contexts, and the


purpose of a grid map

Holly Turner

11521803

challenge themselves and develop


further
Lesson 4: Following a grid map
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Activity-based strategies
Playing an adapted version of
Simon Says, allowing children to
demonstrate their understanding of
direction, while also being
physically active
Participating in a treasure hunt,
allowing students to feel
empowered by selecting their own
path/ route to take, while also
being engaged through physical
activity
Cooperative strategies
Whole class discussion about
directions, and the difference
between right and left, allowing
students to participate in peer
teaching/ learning
Working as pairs to share which
path/ route they would take to get
from location A to location B
Working in pairs during the
treasure hunt, using verbal
instruction to direct their partner to
the treasure
Whole class reflection about
directions and following maps,
allowing students to participate in
peer teaching/ learning

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use given
directions to
follow routes
on simple
maps
Use and
follow
positional and
directional
language
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe
position
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and
plans, given
their grid
references
Draw and
describe
routes or paths
on grid
referenced

Teaching For Diversity

Warm-up: Ask students about left and right:


-Point to your left
-Point to your right
-How do you know which way is left, and
which way is right?
Take students to the field, or tennis court, and
play an adapted version of Simon says. Call
out a direction, for example, left, right,
forward or back, instructing students to take
one step in that direction. Speed up directions
as students understand the game, and try to
trick students by calling out the same
direction multiple times.
Back inside the classroom, use the
Smartboard to access grid maps used in lesson
1 (See resources). Instruct students to find a
path/ route from one location (location A) to
another (location B). Be specific with the
locations, such as asking students to find a
route from the hospital to the school, or find a
route from the forest to the church. In pairs,
students are to share their chosen path/ route,
and must verbally explain to their partner how
they would get there, without running into any
other places or objects. For example, starting
at A4, a student might go right two squares
into A6, forward three squares into D6, left
one square into D5 etc. Allow both partners to
share a route or path, before looking at more
grids.
Working in pairs, students will partake in a
treasure hunt. Each pair is handed a grid map
of the school ground from a birds eye view

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Smartboard
-Grid maps of school
(Appendices 1, 2, 3, 4
& 5)
Houghton Mifflin
Company. (n.d.). Using
a Map Grid. Retrieved
from
http://www.eduplace.co
m/kids/socsci/books/ap
plications/imaps/maps/
g2_u1/#top
Interactivemaths.
(2016). Position.
Retrieved from
https://interactivemaths
.wikispaces.com/Positi
on
Maps101. (n.d.) Uncle
Sams Farm. Retrieved
from
http://www.maps101.c
om/static_items/games/
uncle_sams_farm_grid
_radio2.php
Pericolo, M. (2001).
Mapping Skills Unit
for Grades K-3. See the
city: The journey of
Manhattan Unfurled.

Diagnostic Assessment
Hold a discussion about
directions, specifically left and
right, to assess students prior
learning and understanding of
directions
Formative Assessment
Observe students playing the
adapted version of Simon says
to further assess their sense of
direction, understanding of the
difference between left and right,
and ability to follow directions
Formative Assessment
Listen to students informing
their partners of their route/ path
they would take to get from
location A to location B,
assessing their sense of direction,
and understanding of, and ability
to, follow a map
Formative Assessment
Observe students reading the
map, and selecting a route to
take, assessing their ability to
understand a map, and use it tot
find a specific place or object
Formative Assessment
Observe students verbally
directing their partners around

Holly Turner

11521803

Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson
ICT Based strategies
The use of the Smartboard to
access grid maps
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
discussing, and playing games
about, direction, and selecting a
path/ route to take
Map making/ analysing skills used
to complete activities
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion and
reflection
Problem solving used to answer
questions about, and complete
activities on, direction and
following a map
Multiple intelligences
Body/ kinesthetic intelligence
when participating in adapted
version of Simon says, and
treasure hunt
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete activities
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Land links
Catering for diversity
Playing the adapted version of
Simon says to allow students who

Teaching For Diversity

maps and
plans

(Appendices 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5). One member of


the pair must read the map alone, to find the
treasure, and understand where that treasure is
in the school ground. That member must then
direct their partner verbally through the school
ground to find the treasure, using the
directions of left, right, forward, and back.
Students can choose any path/ route they like
to find the treasure. Place the treasure in the
designated spot prior to the lesson beginning.
The treasure can be a simple prize or reward.
There are five different locations where the
treasure is hidden (Appendices 1, 2 ,3, 4 & 5);
so each pair will be able to follow different
paths.
When a pair has found their treasure, give
them a different map. The partners will swap
roles, so both of them have a turn giving
directions and following the map, and
following directions.
Hold a discussion about the activity. Prompt
pairs to share their experience, and ask them
questions about directions, and following
maps:
-Was it difficult to follow the map while
moving around the school?
-Was anyone not able to find the treasure?
-Did anyone have any problems giving
directions to their partner? Did you get lost?
-How do you think you would find following
a map walking or driving through a city?

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Retrieved from
https://www.randomho
use.com/teachers/pdf/s
eethecity.pdf

the school grounds to the


treasure, assessing their
communication skills, and ability
to give directions

Studyladder. (2016).
Interpret simple grid
maps: Activity 2.
Retrieved from
https://www.studyladde
r.com.au/games/activit
y/interpret-simple-gridmaps-activity-2-22911

Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning, to assess students
ability to reflect on their
learning, as well as to assess
their understanding of direction
and following a grid map

Holly Turner

11521803

may struggle with direction to


practise their right and left, and
how to follow directions
Putting students in pairs to allow
students of lower ability to
participate in peer teaching/
learning
Having a number of different
maps, and different places of
treasure to allow students who may
require a challenge to find the
treasure that is hidden, and
students who may struggle with the
activity to follow the maps where
the treasure is easier to find
Lesson 5: Locating position on a grid map
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Cooperative strategies
Whole class discussion whereby
they discuss the layout of a map
from an aerial view, locate
position, and find routes/ paths on
grid maps.
Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson
ICT Based strategies
The use of the Smartboard at the
beginning of the lesson, and during
students presentations of their
maps
Using computers/ iPads to view
map of Taronga Zoo

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use given
directions to
follow simple
routes on
maps
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe
position
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and

Teaching For Diversity

Warm up: Hold a discussion with the class


about how to make a grid map from an aerial
view. Use the classroom as an example of a
location, and ask:
-If we were making a map of this classroom,
what are some things that we might need to
draw on our map?
-Why would we need to include those
things?
-Places/ objects on maps arent very detailed,
so what kind of symbols or shapes could we
draw to represent a table (for example)?
Begin drawing a rough map of the classroom
on the whiteboard, allowing students to come
up and draw objects that they think need to be
on the map. Draw a grid over the map
Ask students to identify the position of
objects/ items in the classroom using the map:
-What grid location is the door located in?
-What grid location is my desk located in?

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Smartboard/
whiteboard
-Computers/ iPads
-Workbooks
-Pens/ pencils
Taronga Zoo Sydney.
(2016). Taronga Zoo
Map. Retrieved from
http://taronga.org.au/sit
es/tarongazoo/files/do
wnloads/A3_TZMapEd
7v4_PRINT_1.pdf

Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
prompts and questioning, to
assess students understanding of
the important features of a map,
and there layout
Formative Assessment
Observe students participation
during discussion, to assess their
engagement with the activity,
and their ability to locate
position on a grid map, and find
a route or path
Formative Assessment
Observe students working
through their Zoo experience
activity, to assess their ability to
read and understand a grid map,

Holly Turner

11521803

Independent Learning Strategies


Individual problem solving when
selecting animals, positions, and
routes/ paths to take around the
zoo.
Individual presentations of their
Zoo experience, allowing
students to express their ideas
about why they have chosen the
specific animals, positions and
route/path they have.
Inquiry-based strategies
Investigation of school yard to
decide what objects/ places need to
be on the map, how to present
them, as well as deciding on the
scale of the grid
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
finding positions and routes/ paths
Map making/ analysing skills used
to read map of Taronga Zoo
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion, and when
presenting their Zoo experience
to the class
Problem solving used during Zoo
experience activity, to decide what
animals, positions, and routes/
paths to take
Multiple intelligences
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete activities

plans, given
their grid
references
Discuss the
use of grid
maps in realworld contexts
Draw and
describe
routes or paths
on grid
referenced
maps and
plans
Interpret and
use simple
maps found in
factual texts
and in the
media

Teaching For Diversity

-What is in D4?
Inform the students that they need to use this
map to find a route. Starting at their desk, they
need to go to a computer, and then go to the
printer, and then to the teachers desk. Allow
students to come up to the whiteboard and
show you their route; naming the grid
locations of the places they visit.
Using the Smartboard, open up the aerial view
map of the Taronga zoo. Ask students what
the purpose of the map is? What is it trying to
tell us? Explain the key on the bottom, and
draw attention to the grid bordering the map.
Allow students to identify what places/
objects they see.
Students are to pretend that they are going on
an excursion to the zoo. They must each select
five different animals they would like to visit,
and work out which path to take to ensure that
they get to each of those animals. All students
are to start at Zoo Entry, and after visiting
all of their animals, must then visit a toilet,
and meet back with the group at The View
Restaurant for lunch. All of these locations
need to be included in the students chosen
route and positions.
Students use a computer/ iPad to access the
Taronga Zoo map. Students identify animals,
grid position, and chosen route in their
workbooks. Students can print off the map to
draw their route on there, and use a ruler to
find their position, if they like.
EXTENSION: Students who complete the activity
early can complete an additional problem solving task:
We arrive at the Taronga Zoo at 10:00am. You are to

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

as well as their ability to


problem solve
Formative Assessment
Observe and listen to students
presentation of their Zoo
experience, to assess their
ability to problem solve, and
their ability to locate position,
and find a route or path on a grid
map

Holly Turner

11521803

8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Non-verbal
Land links
Catering for diversity
Students working individually to
allow them to work at a level, and
speed that is appropriate for their
ability
Students working individually,
allowing them to select animals
and a route/ path of their choice
Having an extension task to allow
gifted/ talented students to
challenge themselves and develop
further
Lesson 6: Indigenous Australians reference
system in maps
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Cooperative strategies
Whole class discussion about other
means, other than maps, people
may use to find where a location is
and how to get there
Whole class discussion and
reflection about the lesson and
what they learnt about Aboriginal
ways of finding places
Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson
Independent Learning Strategies
Individual work when drawing a

Teaching For Diversity

meet back with the group at The View Restaurant at


1:00pm. Beginning at the Zoo entry, you are to visit
five different animals AND attend one show, talk or
encounter.
Allow students to present their Zoo
experience to the class, talking about the
animals they will visit, the path they will take
around the zoo, and the grid positions they
will pass through.

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Draw simple
maps and
plans from an
aerial view,
with and
without
labeling a grid
Compare
different
methods of
identifying
locations in
the

Invite an Aboriginal elder, or Aboriginal community


members, to talk to the class about the reference
system used in Aboriginal country maps, and the
history of Indigenous Australians methods of finding
places/ locations without maps
Warm up: Hold a discussion with the class
about other means, besides from maps, that
people may use to identify where a location is
and how to get there. On the whiteboard,
brainstorm some ideas of how you may try to
find your way back if you became lost, or how
you may try to walk from the school to the
bakery without a map.
An invited Aboriginal elder, or multiple
Aboriginal community members, talks to
students about Indigenous Australians history
of directions and finding food, water and
locations. This discussion may take place

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Whiteboard
-Paper/ workbooks
-Pens/ pencils

Formative Assessment
Hold a class discussion, and use
prompts and questioning, to
assess students understanding of
various ways we can find
locations, other than using maps
Formative Assessment
Observe students learning from
the Aboriginal elder/ community
members to assess their ability to
accept, understand, and
appreciate another culture
Formative Assessment
Observe students creating a map
using Aboriginal symbols to
assess their ability to create a
comprehensible map, as well as

Holly Turner

11521803

place in the form of a map using


Aboriginal symbols, having the
opportunity to draw a scene of
their liking
Individual work when writing a
story that relates to the map they
have created, and includes
inspiration from what they have
learnt about Aboriginal history and
culture
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
participating in whole class
discussions. Mental calculations
also used when working out how to
write a story that relates to their
drawing
Map making/ analysing skills used
to create map using Aboriginal
symbols
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion, and
reflection
Multiple intelligences
Visual/ Spatial intelligence when
creating drawing of place using
Aboriginal symbols
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete activities
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Non-verbal
Land links

Teaching For Diversity

environment

outside in the land, so students can obtain a


better understanding of their means of finding
locations.
Allow the Aboriginal elder/ community
members to show students some of the
symbols they use to represent certain
locations/ ideas, such as a meeting place,
animal tracks, and a waterhole.
On paper, students draw a place, either a
location they are familiar with, or a fictional
place, in the form of a map using the
Aboriginal symbols.
Students write a story that describes the
symbols and actions that are happening in
their drawing, using some of the information
learnt from the Aboriginal elder/ community
members as inspiration. Students story must
be based on a quest or path, detailing the route
their character takes through their drawing/
map.
Hold a discussion with the students about the
lesson, allowing them to reflect on what they
have learnt:
-What is something you learnt today that you
did not know already?
-Was there anything that you learnt that you
found interesting about Aboriginals means of
finding locations?
-How does the reference system used in
Aboriginal country maps differ from gridreferenced maps?

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

assess what they have learnt


from the local members of the
community
Formative Assessment
Hold a discussion, and use
questioning, to assess what
students have learnt about
Aboriginal ways of finding
locations, and how it differs to
grid maps

Holly Turner

11521803

Community links
Story sharing
Catering for diversity
Students working individually to
allow them to work at a level, and
speed, that is appropriate for their
ability
Students working individually,
allowing them to draw a place that
is significant to them, and being
able to use Aboriginal symbols of
their choice to set the scene
Students individually writing a
story that is related to the map,
allowing them to draw on their
own culture and background, while
also being able to take inspiration
from what they have learnt in that
lesson
Indigenous students can connect
with their community and culture
throughout the lesson
Lesson 7: Problem based grid map
questions
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Cooperative strategies
Whole class discussion analysing
the grid map, allowing students to
partake in peer teaching/ learning
Direct-instruction strategies
Direct questioning and prompts
throughout the lesson

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe
position
Use given
directions to

Teaching For Diversity

Warm up: Using the Smartboard, open the


grid map on edHelper (see resources). Label
the grid with numbers and letters around the
border. Ask students questions about the grid,
and locating places/ objects:
-Where is the Police station located?
-Where would I be if I was in G3?
-What house number is located in grid C1?
-What street are you on if you are in E4?
Describe to students the dfferent directions
you can take on a grid map (up, down, left,
and right). Ask students to locate something

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

-Smartboard
-Pens/ pencils
-22x worksheets
-Summative
assessment task outline

Formative Assessment
Hold a class discussion, and use
prompts and questioning, to
assess students understanding of
how to follow a grid map

Edhelper (n.d.). Map


Symbols. Retrieved
from
http://www.edhelper.co
m/community2_0_1.ht
m

Formative Assessment
Observe students participating in
discussion, and whole class
activities to assess their level of
engagement, and ability to
understand how to read a grid
map, and count the squares on a

Holly Turner

11521803

ICT Based strategies


The use of the Smartboard at the
beginning of the lesson, and when
looking at the summative
assessment
Independent Learning Strategies
Individual work when completing
worksheet
Inquiry-based strategies
Completing problem based
worksheet
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
completing problem-based
questions
Map making/ analysing skills used
to locate positions on grid map,
and draw places. objects
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during discussion
Problem solving used during whole
class discussion, and when
completing worksheets
Multiple intelligences
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in whole class
discussion and complete worksheet
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Non-verbal
Community links
Catering for diversity
Students working individually to
allow them to work at a level, and

follow routes
on simple
maps
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and
plans, given
their grid
references
Draw and
describe
routes or paths
on grid
referenced
maps and
plans

Teaching For Diversity

that is two squares away from the hospital


(F7). Acceptable answers to this question
would be EAT at F5, WYCKOFF WAY at H7,
the HOUSE at D7, and REGENT STREET at
F9.
Ask students to do the same with the Bank at
G4, and the house on C5.
Each student is given the worksheet (See
Appendix 6). Students must locate the
position of the shop, movies, friends house,
and their house on the grid map, ensuring they
are within the described distances. Once all
positions have been located, students draw the
route/ path from their house, to the park,
visiting all other places on the way. Students
can then complete the map by drawing any
other places/ objects they would like to
include on their map. Students hand in their
maps when finished.
EXTENSION: Students who complete the activity
early can complete an additional problem solving task.
Beginning at their house, students can find another
route/ path on their map, whereby they visit three
different places. Student need to identify the positions
they visit, the places/ objects they visit, and draw the
route/ path on their map.
Using the whiteboard, describe the summative
assessment task students will be completing in
the following, and final, lesson. Give an
example of an area of the schoolyard students
could focus on for their map, and the places/
objects they would need to include e.g. If
focusing on the area around the library,
students would need to include the Library
building, where its door is, the path leading to

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

grid map
Formative Assessment
Observe students completing
questions to assess their ability
to problem solve
Formative Assessment
Collect students work to check
their answers, assessing that they
can successfully problem solve,
and complete a grid map

Holly Turner

11521803

speed, that is appropriate for their


ability
Open-ended task allows students to
select where they would like to
position the places/ objects on their
map
Allowing students to complete
their map with places/ objects of
their choice, using symbols/
images they choose, so they can
draw on their culture and
background
Having an extension task to allow
gifted/ talented students to
challenge themselves and develop
further
Lesson 8: Summative assessment
Teaching & Learning Strategies
Activity-based strategies
Investigating the school ground
individually, allowing students to
plan their map while also engaging
in physical activity
Following another students map
around the school ground, allowing
them to demonstrate their ability to
follow a grid map, while also
engaging in physical activity
Cooperative strategies
Whole class reflection about the
experience of creating their own
map, and following the map of
another students, allowing students

Teaching For Diversity

the library etc. Outline that grid squares are to


measure 1cm by 1cm, or 2cm by 2cm. Show
examples of how big these measurements are,
also informing students that their grid map
can be as large or small as they like. Students
can use any symbols or images they like to
present places/ objects on their map, including
Aboriginal symbols. Break down the task, and
define key terms and features, ensuring
students understand what to do

Create and interpret


simple map grids to
show position and
pathways
(ACMMG065)
Use given
directions to
follow routes
on simple
maps
Use and
follow
positional and
directional
language
Use grid
references on
maps to
describe

Students work on their assessment task.


When all students have completed their map,
the teacher will anonymously give students a
map that one of their classmates made.
Students will then follow someone elses map,
from location A to location B, seeing if they
pass all of the objects/ places on the map as
they go.
Collect all students maps for marking. Hold a
discussion about their experience of creating a
map, and following a classmates map:
-Did you have any difficulties making your
map?
-Is there anything you would change about
your map?
-Was your classmates map accurate?
-Was their map easy to understand and
follow?
-Did you successfully follow their route from

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

- Metre rulers
- Pens/ pencils
- Paper/ workbooks
- Computers/ iPads

Summative assessment
Students create a grid map, and
follow another classmates map,
to demonstrate their learning,
acquisition of skills, and
achievement over the unit.
Marking the physical copy of
their map, and observing
students during reflection will
assist to assess students on their
ability to create and read a grid
map, describe directions, find
routes, and follow directions.

Holly Turner

11521803

to partake in peer teaching/


learning
ICT Based strategies
Using computers/ iPads to create a
map using digital technologies
Independent Learning Strategies
Individual investigations of the
school yard, conducting
measurements and observations to
select what objects/ places need to
be included in their map, and how
to present them
Individual work when creating
their maps, and describing a route
from location a to location B
Individual task when following
another students map, allowing
students to demonstrate their
ability to read a map
Inquiry-based strategies
Investigation of school yard to
decide what objects/ places need to
be on the map, how to present
them, as well as deciding on the
size of the grid
Thinking skills strategies
Mental calculations used when
creating grid map, and following
another students map
Map making/ analysing skills used
to create grid map
Oral explanation used to express
ideas during reflection
Problem solving used during

position
Identify and
mark
particular
locations on
maps and
plans, given
their grid
references
Draw simple
maps and
plans from an
aerial view,
with and
without
labeling a grid
Create simple
maps and
plans using
digital
technologies
Use digital
technologies
involving
maps, position
and paths

Teaching For Diversity

location A to location B?
-How was their map different than yours?
Complete the discussion by reflecting on their
learning on grid maps in general:
-Is there any area of learning about grid maps
you think you need to practise more, or want
to do more?
-Do you think you may use grid maps in the
real-world?

Students will develop their knowledge and skills in


position further in the next unit, whereby they will use
scales, legends, and directions to interpret maps, as
well as learning to identify, and use, compass points.

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

investigation, to decide the objects/


places that need to be on the map
and how to present them, as well as
deciding on the size of the grid.
Problem solving also used when
reading another students map, and
following their route
Multiple intelligences
Body/ kinesthetic intelligence
when completing investigations in
the school yard
Visual/ Spatial intelligence when
creating their map on paper, and on
digital technologies
Logical/ mathematical intelligence
to partake in reflection and
complete activities
8 ways of learning
Symbols and images
Non-verbal
Land links
Community links
Catering for diversity
Students working individually to
allow them to work at a level, and
speed that is appropriate for their
ability
Students working individually,
allowing them to use symbols or
drawings from their culture or
background to represent objects/
places on their map
Reflection:

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner

11521803

This section of the unit plan would be filled out at the completion of teaching the eight lessons

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner
11521803
Teaching For Diversity
Summativeassessmenttask
Stage 2/ Year 3
Activity name: Design a grid map
Context
This activity is written to accompany the Stage 2 Unit: Position
Prior to this activity, students have analysed a variety of grid maps so as to learn how to
follow routes, give directions, and describe positions. Students have used, and learnt the
purpose of, grid maps in real-world contexts, and in games.
Description of activity

Students are to create a grid map of an area of the school. Students maps can focus
on one particular area of the school, such as the classroom, or the whole school
ground. Students grid squares should measure to 1cm by 1cm, or 2cm by 2cm.
Students use metre rulers (to decide how big they need their grid) and a pen and
paper to investigate their chosen area and decide what places/ objects need to be
included in the map e.g. buildings, paths, playgrounds.
Students draw a rough draft of their map on paper, before creating their map using
digital technology.
Students write directions from one location on their map to another detailing the grid
squares, and places/ objects on their map they pass on their route.
Teacher collects all students maps and routes. Teacher anonymously gives each
student another classmates map, and described route. Students must go out into the
schoolyard, and follow their classmates map, passing through all the grid squares
they described.
Hold a reflection of the experience at the end of the lesson, determining if the maps
were accurate and comprehensible.

Outcomes
MA2-1WM: uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas
MA2-2WM: selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems
MA2-17MG: uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using
compass directions

Criteria for assessing learning


Students will be assessed on their ability to:

Create a grid map that can be understood and followed

Describe directions, and find routes on a grid map

Read a grid map and follow directions

Recording evidence of learning


Ways of recording this evidence will include:

Work sample

Student reflection

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

Teaching For Diversity

MarkingRubric
Criteria
The grid map is easy to
understand, and can be
read by another person.
All places/ objects are
clearly identified and
labeled, and the map, and
grid, are of an appropriate
size

The routes specified will


successfully allow a
person to go from location
A to location B. Outline of
the position of objects/
places, what grid squares
are passed through, and
directions used in route,
are accurate

The student has an


extensive knowledge and
understanding of how to
create an accurate and
comprehensible grid map,
and can readily apply this
knowledge. In addition,
the student has achieved a
very high level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved in creating a grid
map, and can apply these
skills to new situations.

The student has a


thorough knowledge and
understanding of how to
create an accurate and
comprehensible grid map.
The student has a high
level of competence in the
processes and skills
involved in creating a grid
map, and is able to apply
this knowledge and these
skills to most situations.

The student has a sound


knowledge and
understanding of how to
create an accurate and
comprehensible grid map,
and has achieved an
adequate level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved.

The student has a basic


knowledge and
understanding of how to
create an accurate and
comprehensible grid map,
and has achieved a limited
level of competence in the
processes and skills
involved.

The student has an


elementary knowledge
and understanding of how
to create an accurate and
comprehensible grid map,
and has achieved very
limited competence in
some of the processes and
skills involved.

The student has an


extensive knowledge and
understanding of
direction, and locating
routes, and can readily
apply this knowledge. In
addition, the student has
achieved a very high level
of competence in the
processes and skills
involved in finding
positions, and following
directions, and can apply

The student has a


thorough knowledge and
understanding of
direction, and locating
routes. The student has a
high level of competence
in the processes and skills
involved in following
directions, and is able to
apply this knowledge and
these skills to most
situations.

The student has a sound


knowledge and
understanding of
direction, and locating
routes, and has achieved
an adequate level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved in this skill.

The student has a basic


knowledge and
understanding of
direction, and locating
routes, and has achieved a
limited level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved in this skill.

The student has an


elementary knowledge
and understanding of
direction, and locating
routes, and has achieved
very limited competence
in some of the processes
and skills involved in
finding positions, and
following directions.

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

Teaching For Diversity

these skills to new


situations.
Student can read, and
understand, a grid map
created by another person.
Student can successfully
follow directions to go
from one location to
another

The student has an


extensive knowledge and
understanding of how to
read a grid map, and use it
as a source of direction.
The student can readily
apply this knowledge. In
addition, the student has
achieved a very high level
of competence in the
processes and skills
involved in reading a map,
and can apply these skills
to new situations.

The student has a


thorough knowledge and
understanding of how to
read a grid map, and use it
as a source of direction.
The student has a high
level of competence in the
processes and skills
involved in reading a map,
and is able to apply this
knowledge and these
skills to most situations.

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

The student has a sound


knowledge and
understanding of how to
read a grid map, and use it
as a source of direction.
The student has achieved
an adequate level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved in reading a map.

The student has a basic


knowledge and
understanding of how to
read a grid map, and use it
as a source of direction.
The student has achieved
a limited level of
competence in the
processes and skills
involved in reading a map.

The student has an


elementary knowledge
and understanding of how
to read a grid map, and
use it as a source of
direction. The student has
achieved very limited
competence in some of the
processes and skills
involved in reading a map.

Holly Turner
11521803
Teaching For Diversity
References
Edhelper (n.d.). Map Symbols. Retrieved from http://www.edhelper.com/community2_0_1.htm
Houghton Mifflin Company. (n.d.). Using a Map Grid. Retrieved from
http://www.eduplace.com/kids/socsci/books/applications/imaps/maps/g2_u1/#top
Interactivemaths. (2016). Position. Retrieved from https://interactivemaths.wikispaces.com/Position
Maps101. (n.d.) Uncle Sams Farm. Retrieved from
http://www.maps101.com/static_items/games/uncle_sams_farm_grid_radio2.php
McMillian/ Mcgraw-Hill. (2007). Neighbourhood Grid Map. Quick Quiz. Retrieved from
http://www.mhschool.com/ss/ca/g2/u2/g2u2_quiz.html
Milton Bradley Company. (1990). Battleship. Retrieved from
http://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/Battleship.PDF
NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society & Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Personal Development, Health and Physical Education K-6
Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
NSW Board of Studies. (2012). English K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
NSW Board of Studies. (2012). Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
NSW Board of Studies. (2012). Science K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
Pericolo, M. (2001). Mapping Skills Unit for Grades K-3. See the city: The journey of Manhattan
Unfurled. Retrieved from https://www.randomhouse.com/teachers/pdf/seethecity.pdf
Studyladder. (2016). Interpret simple grid maps: Activity 2. Retrieved from
https://www.studyladder.com.au/games/activity/interpret-simple-grid-maps-activity-2-22911
Taronga Zoo Sydney. (2016). Taronga Zoo Map. Retrieved from
http://taronga.org.au/sites/tarongazoo/files/downloads/A3_TZMapEd7v4_PRINT_1.pdf

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner

11521803

Appendices
Appendix 1

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner

11521803

Appendix 2

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner

11521803

Appendix 3

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner

11521803

Appendix 4

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Teaching For Diversity

Holly Turner

11521803

Teaching For Diversity

Appendix 5

app

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner
11521803
Teaching For Diversity
Appendix 6

9
8
7
6
PARK
5
4
3
2
1
A

1. You are going to visit your friend, and go to the cinemas, shopping centre, and
park together. Beginning from your house, you travel five squares to your
friends house. From your friends house, you travel three squares to the
cinemas. From the cinemas, you travel four squares to the shopping centre.
You then travel two squares to the park. The park is located at H6. Find the
location of the other four places, and draw them on the map.
2. Draw the route from your house to your friends house, the cinemas, the
shopping centre, and the park.
3. DECORATE YOUR MAP. Draw any other places or objects on your map that
you need to finish your town (roads, other houses, trees).

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years

Holly Turner
11521803
Teaching For Diversity

EMM410 Mathematics in the Primary Years