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Thursday, September 15, 2016 Vol. 132, No. 11 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.

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Oregon School District

Village of Oregon

Board OKs
drug dog
searches

Church
site up
for sale

OMS, OHS will get


random sweeps on
one-year trial
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group

Weighing civil liberties and students feelings


against a determination to
help solve a drug problem
in the district, school board
members approved random
K-9 sweeps for the 2016-17
school year. The searches,
which will include students lockers, backpacks
and building parking lots
at Oregon Middle School
and Oregon High School,
will be re-evaluated by the
board in June.
The idea proposed last
fall by Oregon police chief
Brian Uhl got an initial
tepid response from the
board, with concerns about
the effectiveness of random
searches. But after more
than an hour of discussion
Monday night, members
voted 5-2 to give them a try,
though most were hesitant
to make them part of standard district policy.
Board members Krista

Board will discuss


buying it for library
or senior center

Inside

BILL LIVICK

OSD prepares
referendum info

Unified Newspaper Group

Board approves
preliminary budget
Page 7
Flanagan, Barb Feeney, Jeff
Ramin, Gwen Maitzen and
board president Steve Zach
voted yes, with members
Charles Uphoff and Dan
Krause voting no. Asked
by Maitzen if the trial period would work for him,
Uhl, sitting in the back of
the room, said yes.
Maitzen, the most vocal
proponent of instituting
the random K-9 sweeps,
said after numerous conversations with Oregon
Municipal Court Judge
Beth Cox and members of
the Oregon Police Department, said they are willing to work with administration and particularly with students to get
them on the right track

Turn to Searches/Page 7

Raingutter regatta
Shawn Sutter, 8, of Oregon, blows the sail of a
homemade boat while practicing for Brooklyn
Cub Scout Pack 352s raingutter regatta at
Brooklyn United Methodist Church on Sept. 11.

Photo by Samantha Christian

Inside
See more race photos
Page 8

Village of Oregon

Arena gets tryout for liquor sales, board postpones final decision until October
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group

The Oregon Ice Arena management wont


know until at least October whether the village
will allow alcohol sales during hockey games on
a regular basis.
But for the first Whalers home game of the season, at least, they can sell beer and wine.
On Monday, the Village Board gave village
clerk Peggy Haag permission to grant a temporary alcohol license whats known as a picnic
license to the ice arenas agent, Shaun Peterson, for Fridays game against the La Crosse
Freeze, which begins at 7:30p.m.
But the board declined to make a decision about

a license to sell beer and wine during Whalers


games. He said the ice arena board would like to
sell alcohol during all hockey games but would
Board to decide on liquor store
self-restrict and sell only during Whalers
games until the Oregon School Districts alternaPage 7 tive
education program, OASIS, leaves the facility
in
February
2017.
Poole resigns from board
Peterson had applied in July for a liquor license
Page 16 to sell alcohol, and he met with the Village Board
then. At the time, hed planned to operate Lucky
Puckers restaurant in the ice arena and sell alcohol
granting a regular alcohol license to the ice are- as part of his operation.
He withdrew his application last month
na. Instead, it voted to revisit the matter at its first
and explained Monday that the OIA Board of
meeting in October.
Representing the OIA Board of Directors, Peterson appeared before the Village Board seeking
Turn to Liquor/Page 16

Inside

The former Methodist


Church site on North Main
Street could accommodate
a new two-story library or a
senior center, something the
Village Board plans to discuss at its next meeting.
Village planner Mike
Slavney laid out for the
board potential redevelopment opportunities on the
2.7-acre site at 249 and 267
N. Main St. during an initial
discussion with the board
and several neighborhood
residents. He said the village could acquire the property, which is assessed at
$687,000.
Last month, the board
rejected a proposal to build
a 99-unit assisted-living
facility on the site after residents objected to the idea.
With the village in the
midst of planning for a new
civic campus downtown,
the property owners then
contacted officials about
the possibility of the village
buying the land and constructing a new municipal
building there.
Village administrator
Mike Gracz has scheduled
another discussion about
the parcel for the next board
meeting, Monday, Sept. 19.
Slavney told the board
either a senior center or a
two-story library would fit
well on the site with surface parking and room for
expansion to the north. But
the site is not large enough
for both.
Village officials commissioned a space-needs analysis last year, and in February they learned that the
village needs a new senior
center of about 16,000
square feet and a new
library more than twice that
size.

Turn to Church/Page 16

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September 15, 2016

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Oregon Observer

Tracy Jane Comer performs at senior center


It may have been cloudy and rainy outside, but singer-songwriter Tracy Jane
Comer brought bright, upbeat melodies to
the senior center during her performance
Sept. 7.
Originally from the south but now based

in Madison, Comer is an award-winning


multi-instrumentalist with several published recordings in various genres.
For information, visit tracyjanecomer.
com.
Photos by Samantha Christian

Seniors listen to the music.

Tracy Jane Comer sings and plays guitar to Yellow Bike.

Reece Nelson, 7, waits as Brady Bartlett, 7, gets ready to


release some marbles.

Maker Mondays at the library


The Oregon Public Library was the place to be creative for kids on
Monday afternoon, during the librarys latest session of Maker Mondays: Marble Mazes and Runs. The event, designed for students in
kindergarten through fourth grade, allowed them to use their imaginations to build a variety of contraptions to roll marbles down a table.

Connor Nelson, 9, looks on as Brady


Bartlett, 7, prepares the maze they
created during Maker Mondays:
Marble Mazes and Runs at the library
Monday afternoon.
Photos by Scott De Laruelle

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September 15, 2016

Oregon Observer

Oregon Police Department

New officers praise community in village


SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group

A pair of new officers has been


patrolling Oregon since late July.
William Jansen and Lucas
Schuepbach both
praised the smallt ow n c o m m u n i ty atmosphere at
the Oregon Police
Department and the
village as a whole
in separate emailed
responses to the
Jansen
Observer.
Jansen, 29, is
originally from
Walworth and has
worked in law
enforcement for 2.5
years, previously
for the Wisconsin
State Capitol Police
and the Town of Schuepbach
Troy Water Patrol.
Schuepbach, a
23-year-old Dane County native
with cousins and a grandmother
living in Oregon, is in his first law
enforcement job.
Schuepbach graduated from
the University of Wisconsin-Platteville with a bachelors degree
in criminal justice and interned
with the United State Marshals in
western Wisconsin, which allowed
him to get (his) feet wet in the
law-enforcement field, he said in
an email.
Below are their
answers to the
questions from
t h e O b s e r v e r,
edited for space.

Q&

Oregon Observer: Why did


you want to work for the Oregon
Police Department?
Wi l l i a m Ja n s e n : L a rg e l y
because of its reputation of being
a community-oriented department,
and a desire to work for a department that was working its way
toward being accredited.
Lucas Schuepbach: This was a
community near home that I have
been very close with. OPD offered
me the ability to start my career
with a great agency and learn
from excellent officers. Oregon
also offers excellent advancement
opportunities that I can strive for.
As an officer of a smaller department, you are given the opportunity to impact your community
in a positive way and have more
of personal effect on the community. The community recognizes
who you are, and its a rewarding
feeling to get that public support
as an officer. Also, one thing I
have noticed is that every officer
in this department has treated me
extremely well. They are supportive, helpful, understanding, and
willing to go the extra mile every
second of the day when it comes to
serving the public.
OO: Why did you become a
police officer?
WJ: A desire to serve. I volunteered as an EMT through college,
and realized that I wanted to be
able to help more on a variety of
calls, which included overdoses
and victims of sensitive crimes. I
came to the realization that I could
make positive change in citizens
lives through police work.
LS: Many reasons. Since I was
a child, I always told my mother
and father that I would someday
accomplish that goal. I became a
police officer to serve and guard
my community. I understand that

Oregon School District

OHS scores a 98.6


Class of 2016 earns
high graduation rate
Having a temperature of
98.6 is normal. Having a
high school class graduation rate of 98.6 is exceptional.
T h a t s ex a c t l y w h a t
the Oregon High School
Class of 2016 achieved,
and principal Jim Pliner
was proud to announce
the results. In an email to
the Observer, Pliner said
289 students graduated in
June, with four more finishing up requirements to
do so since then.
Rounding up, that gives
the class an enviable 99
percent graduation rate.
That eclipses the Class of
2015s 98 percent, which
was aided by 11 of 15 students who did not graduate in June 2015 following up to do so later in the
year.
The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
has not yet issued results
for the states 2016 graduation rate, but the 2015
rate was 88.4 percent, and
the national rate was 82.3
percent.
Pliner said hes proud of
the work of OHS students
and educators, and said the
high scores are a testament
to staff, students and families working together.
The complexity of all

factors leading to such a


strong result is difficult
to sum up in a few words
(but) I believe weve
helped students find their
pathway to success, he
said.
District superintendent
Brian Busler said the high
rate shows the academic
strength and grit of our students.
A high school diploma is so important in
todays world and we are
so pleased that 99 percent
of the Class of 2016 have
earned one, he said. Of
course, we are not going
to stop at 99 percent, as we
continue to work with the
remaining students to help
them achieve their diploma.
Busler said a high school
graduation rate is a combination of dedicated students and families helping
their son or daughter.
Also, it is a reflection
of the dedication that our
600-plus school staff have
in supporting young people earn their diploma, he
said. We simply cannot
reach this high graduation rate without everyone
working as a team to help
young people.
Im so proud of our
students and everyone that
has helped them along the
way.
Scott De Laruelle

there are dangers involved in the


job, but the benefits outweigh the
dangers. My goal is to ethically
serve this community and my fellow officers with respect, integrity,
and honesty.
OO: What interests you about
Oregon as a community?
WJ: The small-town atmosphere, while being so close to
Madison. However, even though
my tenure at OPD has been short,
I have watched the community
grow, with new houses being built
everywhere I turn on the west
side of the village.
LS: The Village of Oregon
has always interested me. I grew
up in the Village of McFarland,
but have many friends and family that reside in Oregon. I am
interested the public support that
the village has always given the
police department. Citizens as
well as village staff are supportive of this department and do so
much to help our department out.
This was one of the key factors
for me when it came to narrowing down which departments I
want to work for. Also, the village
portrays itself as a tight knit community. An example of this is the
outstanding turnout we had for
National Night Out.
OO: How have your first few
weeks on the job been? Any early
highlights?
WJ: Busy, with a lot of positive community interaction. I
was overwhelmed with the kind
appreciation gestures many citizens were making at the police
department. I think the highlights
of the job so far would be interacting with community members,
its a change of pace coming from
a state agency.
LS: Excellent. The department
staff is incredible and extremely

knowledgeable. They are all willing to help me in a moments


notice if I have any questions.
There is a lot to learn, but I am
confident that I will be trained
extremely well. Oregon expects
a lot from their officers, and it is
rewarding to work for an agency
that strives to be the best.
OO: What previous experiences do you think will help you at
OPD?
WJ: My previous experience
in law enforcement helps me on a
day-to-day basis and has been the
building block of my field training through the Oregon Police
Department. However, I also
know that my previous experience as a WI Emergency Medical
Technician will help the community, as well.
LS: I think that your most
essential set of skills are your
personal communication skills.
This is built through contact
with friends, family, strangers,
coworkers, etc. I believe that
this is the most important tool as
an officer to keep up to date,
so to speak. When it comes to
law enforcement and training, I
believe that the police academy as
well as my internship will serve
me well in my career. The United States Marshals as well as my
academy class was expected to
perform at a very proficient level. This will most certainly carry
over into my law enforcement
career at Oregon Police Department.
OO: What attracts you about
the idea of community policing
in general?
WJ: Community policing is
the main reason I left state service. I never felt like I was part
of a community, as I was out of
the public eye during most of my

tenure at Capitol Police. I believe


that community policing is a
must; especially in a municipal
agency. I absolutely love meeting new people, seeing new faces,
and getting to know residents. I
truly believe that Im a public servant, and will help the community in any way possible.
LS: Community policing is
essential. It is a way to establish
rapport, connections, and excellent relations with the ones we
serve. The community is our eyes
and ears, so we as officers most
certainly will do our best to help
and serve them. Without having a
supportive public, it is much more
difficult to perform our tasks as
officers.
OO: What are you most excited
to learn about Oregon as a police
department and a community?
WJ: Im most excited to come
to work and train as of late, but as
soon as Im off of field training,
I cant wait to get out to community engagements. I hear the
high school has some outstanding
sports teams!
LS: I am most excited to learn
and understand how all the operations in this department work. I
believe in community policing,
and I want to get to know and
establish excellent relations with
them.
OO: Anything else youd like
to add?
WJ: Anytime you see me in
public, dont be afraid to come
introduce yourself. I would love
to know who Im serving.
LS: I look forward to a long
positive career and relationship
with Oregon PD and its citizens.
Contact Scott Girard at
ungreporter@wcinet.com and
follow him on Twitter @sgirard9.

Instructor shortage causes cancellations


OSD pool seeking
certified teachers
for swim classes

The Oregon School District pool staff had to cancel


a weekend swim class due
to a lack of qualified instructors.
Aquatics director Deb
Bossingham said in an email
to the Observer Monday
shes having a difficult time
finding certified water safety instructors to teach on the
weekends and evenings.
I am going to keep
searching and hope that
I can find more teachers so
that I can offer more classes
to handle the demand, she
said.
In a letter to swim families
last week, Bossingham said
she had tried without success
to find a replacement teacher
for the class, and that safety
remains the pools top priority. Payments for canceled
classes were refunded.
Without enough teachers
to keep our numbers low,
we can no longer offer some
lessons this session, she
wrote. If I am able to find
another instructor for next
session, you will be contacted first to see if you would
like to take the course at that
time.
In the letter, Bossingham offered a free family

On the Web
To sign up for swim classes, visit:

registrationcenter.net/
oregon/swim
month pass for those affected.
This way you can bring
your family in during open
and family swim and practice your swimming skills
and have some fun as a family, she wrote.
Scott De Laruelle

Photo by Scott De Laruelle

Staff at the Oregon School District pool had to cancel a


weekend swim class due to a lack of qualified instructors,
but are continuing their search for a new swim teacher.

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Jansen, Schuepbach
started in July

September 15, 2016

Oregon Observer

Opinion

ConnectOregonWI.com

Letter to the editor

Isolation alternatives needed in prisons


In his letter to the editor published in the Sept. 1 Observer,
Mr. Waldron endorses legitimate uses of solitary confinement, and there may be prisons
in Wisconsin that use it only for
these purposes.
However, currently Wisconsin is without department-wide
rules and independent oversight, so there is no way to
ensure a given prison, such as
Waupun Correctional Institution, does not abuse solitary
confinement.
At Waupun Correctional,
where some prisoners continue to hunger-strike in protest,
Rayshun Woods has been in
administrative confinement
since 2012 despite having
perfect behavior the past four
years. Other prisoners have
been in isolation much longer,
with no independent review of
their status. Multiple medical
studies show that long-term isolation frequently creates mental
illness in previously healthy
people. According to prisoners
and advocates, most of those in
isolation at Waupun have been
diagnosed with mental health
conditions.
Not only is this devastating
for those so afflicted, but it
creates more problems and
dangers for staff who now have
to control mentally imbalanced
prisoners. Mentally-taxing isolation also creates a greater risk
for the community, to which

many of the prisoners will


eventually be released.
The former director of Colorados prison system was killed
in 2013 by an inmate released
to the streets after seven years
of isolation. Colorados current
prison director, former Dane
County Sheriff and secretary
of the Wisconsin Department
of Corrections, Rick Raemisch,
says, If an inmate acts up,
we slam a steel door on him.
(Long-term solitary) allows a
prison to run more efficiently
for a period of time, but by
placing a difficult offender in
isolation you have not solved
the problem only delayed
or more likely exacerbated it,
not only for the prison, but
ultimately for the public. Our
job in corrections is to protect
the community, not to release
people who are worse than they
were when they came in.
Effective alternatives to solitary confinement exist. Colorado and several other states
have used them. Since greatly
reducing isolation, Colorado
has seen a marked decrease in
assaults on staff. Wisconsin
should implement alternatives
to solitary confinement in order
to reduce risk to prisoners, corrections staff and the general
public.
Bernadette Maurice,
Village of Oregon

See something wrong?


The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you
see something you know or even think is in error, please contact
editor Jim Ferolie at 835-6677 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we
can get it right.

Thursday, September 15, 2016 Vol. 132, No. 11


USPS No. 411-300

Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices.


Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
The Oregon Observer, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.

Office Location: 125 N. Main Street, Oregon, WI 53575


Phone: 608-835-6677 FAX: 608-835-0130
e-mail: ungeditor@wcinet.com
Circulation customer service: (800) 355-1892

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Community Voices

To find compromise,
bring positive energy

ith all the chaos and


upheaval we are seeing
on the news, some
people are questioning if we are
on the brink of a modern-day
Armageddon.
I have to agree that energetically, it certainly feels like
all hell is breaking loose and
pandemonium is about to be
unleashed.
These subtle
feelings of
unrest appear
to be rippling
through everyones energy
field.
But unlike
the ArmagedDeits
don written
about in the
Book of Revelations, the end is not near.
I believe these events are
helping our country to deepen
its understanding of conflict
and compromise. Our nation is
in a place that it has never been
before and we are teetering on
the edge of some potentially big
changes.
Racial issues and police
shootings are intense social
issues that have culminated to
the point that action must be
taken to improve our situation.
But there is much disagreement
on what changes to make.
The political landscape is also
rocking a lot of boats. Never
before have we seen such a clear
division of viewpoints between
candidates. It seems that supporters of both sides feel it will
be the end if the opposing
candidate wins the election.
It seems that while some people want to come together and
find ways to move forward with
positive change, others want to

go back in time in search of an


illusionary golden era.
These conflicts are creating
division between people. Not
surprisingly, people are feeling
a bit destabilized and even fearful for what our future might
hold.
Everyones thinking, What if
my side/cause loses? Most people feel that losing means we
will be enslaved into the opposing camps way of doing things
like in medieval times to the
victor go the spoils! No wonder
people are freaking out.
I like to think we are being
challenged to restructure our
ideas around winners, losers and
competition. The winner-takesall ideology is quickly becoming a dinosaur. In its place we
may see the round table idea
of equalization, where all have
input into the situation.
Conflicts are inevitable.
Compromise is how we solve
conflicts. Two or more opposing
viewpoints or opinions coming
together and hashing out a plan
where everybody gets something, but not everything, they
want. This is our future.
The planet is and has been,
for several years, experiencing
an influx of potent energies
that carry a positive charge.
This positive-charged energy
is not easy to integrate because
it stimulates negativity within
the human form. This cycle is
whats necessary for change to
occur, giving us an opportunity
for growth.
This creates a weird healing
process because the stimulation
no longer allows us to ignore
the overly negative expressions
in our society and forces us to
deal with it.
This is also happening to

people on a personal level. I


find myself getting swept up in
agitation and quick anger.
On one hand, this is a good
thing, as I am forced to confront
deeper and deeper levels of my
own negative attitudes. On the
other hand, I am easily pulled
into negative thinking and getting worked up over things like
politics and social issues. This
only adds more negative energy
into the system.
In order to not get pulled into
negative thought, we can all
find things positive things to
focus our energy on. It doesnt
improve anything to only focus
on whats wrong. Focus on
something positive and add your
thoughts or energy to that thing.
Many people are taking positive action like giving gratitude
to local police and firemen by
bringing a plate of cookies or
sending a note card.
Others are using mantras
or positive statements several times a day to keep their
minds energy flowing toward
something positive. Posting
good wishes and comments on
Facebook is another way to add
sparkle. Everything we do is
meaningful.
As we move forward into the
difficult issues ahead, we can,
as individuals and as a nation,
make the transition with more
ease and grace by adding our
energy to progressive goals and
making the effort to embrace an
attitude of compromise when
conflict arises.
Doris Diets is the owner of
Peaceful Heart Gifts in Oregon.

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September 15, 2016

Three decades of conservation


Ducks Unlimited
annual meeting is
Sept. 26
Members of the Oregon Chapter 163 of Ducks
Unlimited will soon celebrate their 30th anniversary, and theyre hoping to
prompt some more conservation-minded folks to join
along.
All are welcome to the
groups annual banquet,
set for 5:30p.m. Monday,
Sept. 26 at Headquarters
Bar and Grill. Single tickets
are $50 or $85 for couples,
which includes an annual
$35 Ducks Unlimited membership and a meal. The
evening will feature raffles
consisting of DU merchandise and a wide variety of
outdoor art and recreational equipment. A special
raffle will be held for an
autographed print of Brett
Favre.
Since the chapters inception in 1986, the hometown workers have raised
approximately $400,000,
member Michael Derrick
told the Observer. He noted the group estimates that
for every $250 raised, one
acre of habitat for ducks
can be saved, and that much
of the funds raised go to
area projects close to home.
Wisconsins Ducks Unlimited group has worked with

Photo submitted

The Oregon chapter of Ducks Unlimited is holding its annual banquet at 5:30p.m. Monday,
Sept. 26 at Headquarters Bar and Grill.

If You Go
What: Oregon Chapter
163 of Ducks Unlimited
annual banquet
When: Doors open at
5:30p.m. (dinner at
7p.m.) Monday, Sept. 26
Where: Headquarters Bar
and Grill, 101 Concord
Drive
Info: Rick Diaz at 5169376
the Department of Natural
Resources and U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service to conserve more than 107,000
acres in the state, more than
3,800 of which are in Dane

County.
The Ducks Unlimited
mission has remained the
same since its inception in
1937: to conserve, restore
and manage wetlands and
associated habitats for
North Americas waterfowl,
according to the groups
website. More than 13 million acres have been protected by the groups volunteers.
Oregon committee member and 2014 Wisconsin DU
Volunteer Conversationalist of the Year Nels Swenson said in a news release
that revenue generated at
the banquets are critical
to the groups conservation mission. In Wisconsin, funds from the group

support things like nature


sanctuaries, hiking trails
and observation areas for
wildlife viewing, as well
as birdwatching, education programs and hunting
opportunities, he added.
DU events are fun for
everyone, even if you dont
hunt ducks, as our program
benefits more than 900 species of wildlife by conserving important wetlands and
upland habitat, he said.
Its for anyone who has an
interest in nature.
Tickets are available in
advance or at the door. For
information, contact Rick
Diaz at 516-9376.

Oregon Observer

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Scott De Laruelle

Oregon teen a beauty pageant semi-finalist


best.
Simmons was selected as one of the
top 15 semi-finalists in the teen competition, which is for girls ages 14-18.
She participated in all three segments:
evening gown, athletic wear and interview.
She was asked what her favorite
charity is and responded by saying
the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, because
she loves all animals but especially
dogs. She also said her favorite activity is playing soccer, which she started
doing when she was 3 years old in her
grandmas garden.
According to her family, Simmons
had not been interested in pageantry
until this year as a result of her modeling contract. Because of the positive experience she had this year, she
would like to compete again in the

future.
Her sponsors included the Stoughton Center for the Performing Arts
(where she took dance and voice lessons and performed in Drakula: The
Performance, Veras House of Bridals (which gave her a discount on her
evening gown), Sew Many Threads
(which has provided sewing and alterations over the years), Core Physical
Therapy, Phillips Orthodontics, Salon
Escapes and friends Montee Ball Sr.,
Karen Tucker, Dawn Espinoza, Becky
Hildebrandt, Terry Murray and Paul
and Melody Bacak.
For information, visit
misswisconsinteenusa.com.

Book trailer contest runs through Sept. 23


Screening is Oct. 13
at senior center
The Oregon Public
Library and seven other Dane County libraries
will mark Octobers Teen
Read Week by challenging
teenagers to create a movie trailer for their favorite
book.
The deadline to enter the
Dane County Teen Book
Trailer Contest is Friday,
Sept. 23, and teens can
either work individually
or as a group as long as
the trailer is fully directed,
filmed and edited by them.
The contest will culminate in a Book Trailer Fest
set for 6p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 13 at the Oregon Area
Senior Center where
trailers from Oregon participants as well as those
from other libraries will

On the Web
For a full list of contest rules, visit:

oregonpubliclibrary.org/
teen-book-trailer-contest

be screened to the public.


The event will also include
speed dating with books,
as well as door prizes,
snacks and refreshments,
according to a library news
release.
A panel of teachers,
librarians and fans of teen
literature from Dane County will serve as judges and
decide winners in Best in
Show, Most Creative
and Funniest categories.
Winners will be announced
by Oct. 10, and the Best
i n S h ow w i n n e r w i l l
receive an iPad Mini 2. The
winners of the latter two

categories will win $50


Amazon gift cards.
A r t , m u s i c , m o v i e s
and books are avenues
that they (teens) use to
express themselves and
figure out who they are,
library director Nikki Busch said in the release. The
Teen Book Trailer Contest
allows teens to creatively
voice via video how a book
might have helped them get
through a bad time, opened
their eyes to other peoples
ex p e r i e n c e s , o r s i m p l y
made them happy to be in
a world that contains that
special book.
The contest is sponsored
by Beyond the Page.
For information, contact
Kelly Allen at kallen@
oregonlibrary.org or visit
oregonpubliclibrary.org.
Kate Newton

adno=486499-01

Kirsten Simmons, 14, of Oregon,


was a semi-finalist for the Miss Wisconsin Teen USA competition, held
Sept. 10-11, at the Fond Du Lac Performing Arts Center.
Simmons, who is a freshman at
Oregon High School, is
the daughter of Shawn
and Brandi Simmons.
She was awarded a
$23,000 scholarship to
Lindenwood University
in Missouri, where she
plans to attend to possibly study physics or
Simmons
engineering.
According to pageant
officials, over 500 girls
applied and 42 were selected to participate. The goal of the organization
is to empower women to be self-confident and strive to be their personal

Samantha Christian

Healthy Women Community Talks

Bladder Control:
A Common and Treatable Concern for Women
September 21 from 5:30-7pm
UW Health Digestive Health Center
750 University Row, Madison

Join Dr. Christine Heisler, UW Health urogynecologist, who will explain


why urinary incontinence occurs and offer over twenty ways to manage
or treat symptoms.
Register at uwhealth.org/BladderTalk
(join us in-person or via webinar)

adno=485577-01

OB-46293-16

September 15, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Coming up

Churches

Business expo

ages 12-17 in grades 6-12. Snacks will senior center. Directed by Doris Koster
be provided.
and accompanied by Carolyn White, the
The Oregon Area Chamber of ComFor information, call 835-3656.
Fitchburg Singers have been performing
merce will hold its fall womens business
for 33 years. Reservations are required,
expo from 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. Fill the Boot
and lunch will be available after the
20, at Headquarters Bar and Restaurant,
The Oregon Area Fire/EMS District show. For information or to register, call
101 Concord Drive. Oregon Hometown will hold its Fill the Boot fundraiser 835-5801.
Pharmacy will have their clothing on dis- for the Muscular Dystrophy Association
play and will be offering tips on how to Friday, Sept. 16 through Sunday, Sept. APF annual meeting
tie scarves. Admission is free to the pub- 18, at Bills Food Center, 787 N. Main
The Anderson Park Friends will hold
lic. For information, contact Judy Knut- St., and various Oregon Kwik Trip loca- their annual meeting and potluck from
son at 835-3697.
tions. The department plans to be present 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the
at at least one of the locations from 4-6 Town of Oregon Hall, 1138 Union Road.
OAP open house
p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. SaturAll APF members, their family and
The Oregon Area Progressives will day and Sunday. Because active crews the general public are invited. A short
host an open house to celebrate the will be fundraising and may need to business meeting will be held to elect
opening of its local office from 6-8 leave in case of emergencies, the times two officers to the board of directors.
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at 165 W. are subject to change, and the Kwik Trip The potluck will start around 6:15 p.m.
Netherwood Road. There will be food, locations will be decided at the time of and be followed by year in review
refreshments and information about the fundraising. Look for the fire truck and presentation from the APF Board and
November election. For information, banner. For information, email eithun@ comments from several Dane County
contact Beth Cox at coxlaw2@frontier. oregonareafireems.org.
officials. RSVPs are required by Sept.
com or 469-4843.
16. For information, contact Roe Parker
Ray Lawry recognition
at 835-3580.
Teen Advisory Board
The Oregon Area Historical Society
Join the volunteer group of teens who will host a reception to recognize iPad classes
provide input to the library during a Teen Ray Lawry for his contributions to
Join the library for two classes focused
Advisory Board meeting from 4-5 p.m. the society at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. iPad use during iPad Academy I from
Friday, Sept. 16.
18, at the senior center. Refreshments 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, and
Opportunities for members include will be served. For information, visit iPad Academy II from 6-7:30 p.m.
helping choose books, movies, and oregonareahistoricalsociety.org.
Thursday, Sept. 29. The first class will
music for the library; planning and orgafocus on screen navigation, keyboard
nizing teen programs; volunteering at Singers performance
use, Wi-Fi and the app store. Bring your
library events and kids programs; creChorus members from the Fitchburg fully-charged iPad and your Apple I.D.
ating book talk videos for the librarys Senior Center will perform their show and password. Registration is required.
Youtube channel and more. The group This Land is Your Land...in Song at
For information or to register, call
will meet once a month, and is open to 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the 835-3656.

Community calendar
Thursday, September 15

Monday, September 19

Group, librarys Sue Ames room, orelib@oregonlibrary.org


3-5 p.m., Computer Class: Facebook Intermediate ($20), senior cenTuesday, September 20
ter, 835-5801
10 a.m., Teetering Toddlers Story 6-8 p.m., Anderson Park Friends
time (ages 1-3), library, 835-3656
annual meeting and potluck (RSVP
11 a.m., Bouncing Babies Storytime by Sept. 16), Town of Oregon Hall,
Friday, September 16
(ages 0-12 months), library, 8351138 Union Road, roe.parker@
Oregon Soccer Fall Fury
3656
frontier.com
Tournament (through Sept. 18),
2-6 p.m., Oregon Farmers Market,
Thursday, September 22
oregonsc.com
Dorn True Value Hardware parking
12:30 p.m., Adult Coloring Group
10 a.m., Everybody Storytime (ages lot, 131 W. Richards Road
begins (registration required; repeats
0-6), library, 835-3656
6-8:30 p.m., Womens Business
every third Thursday), senior center,
2 p.m., Free beginner yoga class
Expo: Fall Into Fashion, Headquar835-5801
(registration required), Hamm Chiro- ters Bar and Restaurant, 101 Con 6-7:30 p.m., Getting to Know Medipractic, 971 Janesville St., 835-2225 cord Drive, 835-3697
care class, library, 835-3656
4-5 p.m., Teen Advisory Board
Wednesday, September 21
6-7:30 p.m., iPad Academy I class
meeting (grades 6-12), library,
10 a.m., Everybody Storytime (ages (registration required), library, 835oreyouth@oregonlibrary.org
0-6), library, 835-3656
3656
Saturday, September 17
10:45 a.m., Fitchburg Senior Cen 6:15 and 7:15 p.m., Free beginner
12:30-2:30 p.m., Board Games for
ter chorus performance (registration
yoga classes (registration required),
Everyone (ages 7 to adult), library,
required), senior center, 835-5801
Hamm Chiropractic, 971 Janesville
835-3656
11:30 a.m., Brown Bag Book
St., 835-2225
6-8 p.m., Oregon Area Progressives
office open house, 165 W. Netherwood Road, 469-4843
6:30 p.m., Thursday Night Street
Drags, Madison International Speedway, 1122 Sunrise Road, 835-9700

6:30-7 p.m., Pajama Antics (ages 6


and under), library, 835-3656

Community cable listings


Village of Oregon Cable Access TV channels:
WOW #983 & ORE #984
Phone: 291-0148 Email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net
Website: ocamedia.com Facebook: ocamediawi
New programs daily at 1 p.m.
and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and 1, 4, 7 and 10 a.m.

Thursday, Sept. 15
WOW: Oregon Village
Board meeting
ORE: Oregon School
board meeting (both of
Sept. 12)
Friday, Sept. 16
WOW: Retiree Rebels:
Ditch the Rocking Chair
@ Senior Center
ORE:
Oregon
School
District
Teacher Compensation
Discussion
Progressives Open Mic
@ Firefly Coffeehouse (of
Sept. 9)
Saturday, Sept. 17
WOW: Menopause:
Dont Sweat It @
Stoughton Hospital (of
Sept. 13)
ORE: OHS Varsity Girls
Volleyball vs. Ft. Atkinson
(of Sept. 15)
Sunday, Sept. 18
WOW: Community
of Life Lutheran Church
Service
ORE: Rome Corners
Intermediate
School
Picnic (of Sept. 13)

Monday, Sept. 19
WOW: Oregon Village
Board Meeting LIVE
5:00pm
ORE: OSD Teacher
Compensation
Discussion
Progressives Open Mic
@ Firefly Coffeehouse (of
Sept. 9)
Tuesday, Sept. 20
WOW: Chamber of
Commerce meeting (of
Sept. 15)
ORE: OHS Boys Varsity
Soccer vs. Stoughton (of
Sept. 16)
Wednesday, Sept. 21
WOW: Movie: Around
the World in 80 Days
ORE: Oregon Varsity
Football vs. Monona
Grove (of Sept. 16)
Thursday, Sept 22
WOW: Oregon Village
Board Meeting
ORE: OSD Teacher
Compensation
Discussion
Progressives Open Mic
@ Firefly Coffeehouse (of
Sept. 9)

Senior center
Monday, September 19
*Brat on a Bun
Baked Beans
Fresh Apple, Cookie
VO: Veggie Hot Dog
Tuesday, September 20
Pizza Casserole
Italian Green Beans
Grape Juice
Small Croissant
Strawberry Shortcake w/
Topping
VO: Veggie Pizza Casserole
Wednesday, September 21
BIRTHDAY LUNCH
Pork Roast w/ Gravy
Mashed Potatoes
Roasted Root Vegetables
Chunky Applesauce
Whole Wheat Roll
Pumpkin Bars, Cake
VO: Cottage Cheese w/ Fruit
Thursday, September 22
Chicken Salad on W.W.
Bun
Copper Penny Salad
Fruit Cup, Cookie
VO: Egg Salad on Bun
SO: Chef Salad
Friday, September 23
Three Cheese Lasagna
Buttered California Mix
Fresh Orange
Bread Stick
Sherbet
*Contains Pork

Monday, September 19
9:00 CLUB, Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
10:00 Dominoes
10:30 StrongWomen
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
3:30 Weight Loss Support
Tuesday, September 20
8:30 Zumba Gold Advanced
9:45 Zumba Gold
11:30 Silver Threads
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
5:30 StrongWomen
Wednesday, September 21
9:00 CLUB, Wellness Walk
9:00 Full COA
11:45 Sept. Birthday Party
1:00 Euchre, Get Fit
Thursday, September 22
AMChair Massage
8:30 Zumba Gold Advanced
9:00 Pool Players
9:45 Zumba Gold
10:30 StrongWomen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
12:30 Coloring Group
1:00 Cribbage
5:30 StrongWomen
Friday, September 23
9:00 CLUB
9:30 Blood Pressure
9:45 Gentle Yoga
11:00 Chair Yoga
1:00 Get Fit, Dominoes

All Saints Lutheran Church

2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg


(608) 276-7729
Pastor Rich Johnson
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. classic service
10:45 a.m. new song service

Brooklyn Lutheran Church

101 Second Street, Brooklyn


(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship

Community of Life Lutheran


Church

PO Box 233, Oregon


(608) 286-3121, office@
communityoflife.us
Pastor Jim McCoid
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon

Community United Methodist


Church

201 Church Street, Brooklyn


(608) 455-3344
Pastor George Kaminski
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m. Worship

Faith Evangelical Lutheran


Church

143 Washington Street, Oregon


(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last Sundays

First Presbyterian Church

408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)


Oregon, WI
(608) 835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor Kathleen Owens
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Service
10:15 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m. Fellowship
11:15 a.m. Adult Education

Fitchburg Memorial UCC

5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg


(608) 273-1008, www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-McMahon
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship

Good Shepherd Lutheran


Church ECLA

Central Campus: Raymond Road

and Whitney Way


SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and10:45
a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner
of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road,
Verona
SUNDAY - 9 &10:15 a.m., 6 p.m.
Worship (608) 271-6633

Hillcrest Bible Church

752 E. Netherwood, Oregon


Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972, www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. worship at the Hillcrest
Campus and 10:15 a.m. worship
with Childrens ministries, birth
4th grade

Holy Mother of Consolation


Catholic Church

651 N. Main Street, Oregon


Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.weconnect.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship

Peoples United Methodist


Church

103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon


Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608)835-3755, www.peoplesumc.
org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship and
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. Worship

St. Johns Lutheran Church

625 E. Netherwood, Oregon


Pastor Paul Markquart (Lead Pastor)
(608) 835-3154
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Worship
9:15-10:15 a.m. Education Hour

Vineyard Community Church

Oregon Community Bank & Trust,


105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 513-3435,
welcometovineyard.com
SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship

Zwingli United Church of


Christ Paoli

At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB


Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship

Support groups
Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting, First
Presbyterian Church,
every Monday and
Friday at 7 p.m.
Caregiver Support
Group, Oregon Area
Senior Center, third
Monday of each month
at 9 a.m.
Diabetes Support
Group, Oregon Area
Senior Center, second
Thursday of each month
at 1:30 p.m.
Parents Supporting
Parents, LakeView
Church, Stoughton, third
Tuesday of every month
from 6:30-8 p.m.

Relationship & Divorce


Support Group, State
Bank of Cross Plains,
every other Monday at
6:30 p.m.
Veterans Group,
Oregon Area Senior
Center, every second
Wednesday at 9 a.m.
Weight-Loss Support
Group, Oregon Area
Senior Center, every
Monday at 3:30 p.m.
Navigating Life Elder
Support Group, Peoples
United Methodist
Church, 103 N. Alpine
Pkwy., every first
Monday at 7 p.m.

Overcoming Fear
There are many things to be legitimately afraid of. We
live in a world which can be dangerous, and while we
dont normally prey on our neighbors, we all know that
our worst enemies are often members of our own species.
The Latin proverb Homo homini lupus est expresses this
by saying that man is a wolf to man. Fear is certainly
a useful tool for keeping us alive in a world full of both
natural and manmade perils. A modicum of fear or anxiety
can serve as an alarm bell that something or someone
is worth avoiding. But fear and anxiety can become the
things to fear and the real danger to avoid. Anxiety can
cease to be the useful alarm that warns us to pay attention
and become perpetual fear or fear that is so paralyzing
that we cant live a normal life. On the other hand, in our
macho culture, it can be almost shameful for a man to
admit that he is afraid, and many men dont even have the
words to adequately express their fears or anxieties. They
become paralyzed and mute in the face of their fears. We
would do well to remember that it is alright to be afraid,
and that it sometimes helps to communicate our fears to
friends and family, or trusted advisors. And who better to
trust in times of fear than God. You just might find that in
the very act of voicing your fears, the fears dissolve.
Christopher Simon, Metro News Service
Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you; he
will never let the righteous be shaken.
Psalm 55:22 NIV

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon Observer

September 15, 2016

Searches: Board members decline making random K-9 searches permanent policy
suspicion is used.
While not deliberate, those
again. She said random search- tend to focus on groups that are
es would also limit the districts minority groups, she explained.
liability compared to its current
Privacy, trust concerns
policy of using reasonable suspicion to check students lockers
Feeney disagreed with Maior property, including the use of tzens repeated statements that
drug-sniffing dogs.
students and parents support
With random searches, every- random K-9 searches, saying
one is up for it, she said, noting thats not a consensus.
However, she said she would
that they would be carried out at
no cost to the district. Nobody support using the searches for this
wants this in their schools. This school year with the provision
is the will of the people, and the the board would get a full report
on what happened and what the
board should listen.
But others who voted in favor results were, including false posof the searches had reservations. itives.
I can live with that for a year,
Zach said hes not a fan of random drug searches for a lot of (but) I am not ready to modify
different reasons, while Feeney our policy without having tried
and Krause cited concerns of pri- it out, she said. Im extremely
concerned if members of the pubvacy.
Maitzen said the schools are lic or faculty are subject to having
safe places for drug dealers their cars searched.
to sell to students, and random
Krause, an attorney, supported
searches would be another tool the idea to see whether it helps,
in the chest to help deal with the but he also cited a civil liberties
drug problem in the schools.
issue with random searches.
Its not punitive, its what the
We are invading their privastudents want, and it helps to cre- cy through having drug dogs go
ate a positive atmosphere of edu- through the hallways and lockcation, she said. The process ers, he said.
is unobtrusive and is, to me, an
He also expressed concern that
effective tool. This is another part it would create a negative enviof creating an environment that is ronment at school.
drug-free and alcohol-free.
Are we showing people we
Flanagan suggested the policy dont trust them? he asked. I
be limited to the current 2016- want to make sure that if we do
17 school year as a compromise. adopt this policy, its not carried
She said she would rather have out in a way that students feel
random searches than the risk of the school is becoming a prison,
possible bias when reasonable or a place where theyre always
Continued from page 1

How drug sweeps would work


Oregon police chief Brian Uhl, who was present at Monday nights
school board meeting but did not speak on the issue of K-9 drug
searches, said at a meeting last November the random sweeps through
OHS and OMS would ideally be completed within one class period.
That, he said, would depend on how many K-9 teams he could
bring in from around the county. He said the dogs can sniff out most
illegal drugs, including prescription drugs, but not alcohol.
Uhl said two teams comprising a police officer, a dog and a school
official would sweep the middle school and four teams would sweep
the high school. Students would be put in lockdown in their classes
and would have to place their backpacks, bags and purses in the
hallways for the dogs to check.
Student lockers and all vehicles in the parking lot would also be
checked. During the sweep, students would not be able to leave their
classroom.
suspected.

Going to the source


Uphoff said if students who are
carrying drugs on them arent personally subject to a search, they
wouldnt be effective. He said
random searches would instead
take our eye off the ball of dealing with the symptoms of drug
use at the schools instead of the
problem.
We need to create a safe environment where kids are trusted,
and they are part of the solution,
he said. We need to be engaging students, engaging parents.
Uphoff said. These issues dont

start at school, they end up at


school, and we need to start dealing with the problem at its source.
Ramin said he wasnt happy
with the wording of the suggested
policy change to include random
searches in addition to reasonable
suspicion. He said hed like to see
instead a comprehensive program aimed at the problem.
Our goal is to reduce drug use
among our students, and I dont
think this addresses that, he said.
Im concerned about the atmosphere.

board members of dragging their


feet on the issue, and antics
with semantics.
This is a stall tactic, she said
of the continued debate. Administrators asked for this months
ago, and we are here talking about
it ad nauseum. If we can keep it
out of the schools it becomes
a deterrent and people know they
cant bring it to school. This
is just one tiny thing to do if it
scares off a dealer from coming
into the school and getting somebody hooked.
District superintendent Brian
Busler, who was not asked his
opinion of the matter during the
meeting and did not offer it, said
hell arrange a time to talk with
board members in June about how
the searches went, to leave a few
months to make a decision on a
possible policy change before the
2017-18 school year begins next
September.
Zach said he would be willing
to try the random searches for a
year without changing district
policy.
(Lets) see what issues we
have and see if its effective, he
said. Get feedback and then have
a broader discussion about, OK,
what did we see, what are the positives, what are the negatives?
Then with that experience base,
draft a policy if we want to allow
permanent random sniffs.

Seeking a deterrent
Maitzen accused her fellow

Email Unified Newspaper Group


reporter Scott De Laruelle at
scott.delaruelle@wcinet.com.

Board approves preliminary budget District prepares


Scott De Laruelle

Proposed budget

Unified Newspaper Group

Oregon School Board members unanimously approved Monday night a preliminary budget for the 2016-17 school year,
prepared by district business manager Andy
Weiland. With estimated equalized value in the district up around $900,000, the
proposed levy is $23,687,980, down about
$570,000 (2.35 percent) from 2015-16.
The board will talk more about the budget at the districts budget hearing and
annual meeting at 6:30p.m. Monday,
Sept. 26 at Netherwood Knoll Elementary School. The 2016-17 tax levy will
be adopted and school board salaries for
2016-17 will be decided at this meeting.
The final approval of the budget is due by
Oct. 24.
Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter
Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@
wcinet.com.

Year
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
School levy (million)
$22.8 $23.1 $24.3 $23.7
Percent increase
0.0
1.55
4.87 -2.35
Equalized value (billions) $1.8
$1.9
$2
$2
Percent growth
-0.93 4.39 3.73 4.5
Mill rate
12.31 11.98 12.11 11.32

If You Go
What: Oregon School District Budget Hearing and
Annual Meeting
When: 6:30p.m. Monday, Sept. 26
Where: Netherwood Knoll Elementary School cafeteria
Info: 835-4300

referendum information
Mailers to go to all
district residents

District referendum consultant Joe Donovan handed out


an informational sheet about the
upcoming teacher compensation
referendum at Monday nights
school board meeting. The
material will be used in mailers
to be sent to district residents
later in the month. It includes
background information on the
plan, a timeline on how the idea
progressed, why district officials
believe it is necessary and how
it will be funded.
We went back and forth

about a dozen times on drafts,


he said. It was a great process. Im really pleased with the
results. Now were able to move
full steam ahead.
According to the information,
the $1.5 million recurring referendum, which aims to help the
district attract and retain the best
teachers, would have an annual
tax impact of $112.50 for the
owner of a home assessed at
$250,000.
For more information on the
plan, visit oregonsd.org/referendum, email referendum@
oregonsd.net or call superintendent Brian Busler at 835-4003.
Scott De Laruelle

Village of Oregon

Two applicants vie for former Alpine Liquors spot


Unified Newspaper Group

The Village Board appears


poised to grant a liquor
license to one of two applicants who want to open a
new store where the now-defunct Alpine Liquors operated on North Main Street.
Village President Steve
Staton told the Observer he
expects the board to decide at
its meeting next week, Sept.
19.
Monday, the board held
a public hearing and discussed an application from
Mahendran Namasivayam,
who owns and operates four

Uhl recommended denial of


the application and wrote,
I believe there is a substantial relationship between Mr.
Machovecs habitual criminality as it relates to stalking
women and the solicitation of prostitution and sex
acts.
Uhl reported that Machovec was accused of stalking
three different women from
1995-2009, one of whom
was an employee of his. Uhl
wrote that Machovec was
found guilty of three counts
of criminal damage to property and was given deferred
prosecution for two counts of
felony stalking.
Uhl also reported that
Machovec gave false statements to the board and on
his application about alcohol
violations hed received.
Staton declined to

comment about Machovecs


record, and Machovec did
not return the Observers
phone calls seeking comment.
On Monday, Tim Rikkers,
a representative for Namasivayam, said Machovec
holds a lease to the property
at 905 N. Main St., and that
Namasivayam doesnt have
a sellers permit for the store
because he doesnt hold the
lease.

At Cleary Building Corp.


190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700

next meeting when three


trustees who were absent
Monday would be in attendance.
Machovecs attorney had
requested the board not
decide on his application
until Monday, Sept. 19.
Contact Bill Livick at bill.
livick@wcinet.com

Payroll Processing
608-228-0016

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Were interested in getting a liquor license in the


event that we can secure a
lease, he told the board.
He suggested the board
could grant Namasivayam
a liquor license contingent
on him obtaining a lease for
the store, but Staton said he
would prefer to decide on the
applications at the boards

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Bill Livick

liquor stores in three communities: Lodi, Sauk and two in


Madison.
Namasivayam and another
potential liquor store owner, Patrick Machovec, both
appeared before the board
in early August to discuss
their applications. Machovec
returned Aug. 22 for another
appearance. He owns four
liquor stores, with operations in Fitchburg, Madison, McFarland and Cottage
Grove.
The Oregon Police Department ran background checks
on both applicants, with
starkly different results.
Chief Brian Uhl reported that Namasivayam had
only one minor violation and
that everyone had glowing
things to say about this organization.
In his report on Machovec,

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Board eyes next


meeting for decision;
chief favors one

September 15, 2016

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon Observer

Obituaries
David H. Soldwedel

David Soldwedel

David H. Soldwedel,
79, of Oregon, passed on
Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016 at
Agrace HospiceCare in Middleton.
He was born February 10,
1937, in Pekin, Ill., the eldest
child of Henry and Laura
Klepfer Soldwedel. After
an early start in his familys
farm and dairy business,
Soldwedel Dairy in Pekin,
Dave graduated from Wayland Academy, joined the
U.S. Navy, attended William
and Mary College and graduated from the University of
Wisconsin. He farmed extensively in southern Wisconsin and raised Hampshire,
Holstein and national championship Angus cattle, in
addition to other prize-winning livestock. More notable

Dennis E. Lien

Dennis Lien

Dennis E. Lien, age 57


of Oregon, passed away on
Saturday, Sept. 10, 2016,
at St. Marys Hospital in
Madison.
He was born on Aug.
16, 1959 in Stoughton to
his parents Ole and Elaine
( L eg l e r ) L i e n . D e n n i s
graduated from Belleville
High School in 1977. He

awards include: 1955 Illinois


State Fair Grand Champion
Hampshire Boar; 1970 Western National Stock Show
Senior Grand Champion
and Reserve
Grand Champion Bull;
1993 World
Beef Expo Division Champion Angus; 1993 WI Angus
Association Show Heifer
of the Year; 1994 WI Angus
Association Futurity Show
Reserve Grand Champion; 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002
World Beef Expo Heifer;
2002 WI State Fair Supreme
Angus Show Senior Yearling;
2002 WI State Fair Supreme
Angus Show Reserve Champion Bull; 2003 WI State
Fair Angus Show Champion
Junior Bull; 2005 WI State
Fair Angus Show Champion
Calf and Champion Junior
Heifer Calf. As President of
Stoughton Farms, Dave was
a mentor to many entering
farming.
Dave also worked at
Cullinan and Sons in Tremont, Ill., and operated Sunset Lanes in Pekin with his
uncle, Tim Soldwedel. Dave
was an athlete, an excellent
tennis player, skier and golfer, and on the Wayland Academy football team. He was a
member of the Brooklyn WI
American Legion, the American Angus Association,

Wisconsin Angus Association, Wisconsin Cattlemen


Association, Illinois Pork
Producers Association and
a charter member of the Illinois Valley Riding Club.
David is survived his sons,
Reed (Liz) of Greenview, Ill.,
and Chad; daughter, Courtney (Jeff) Manger and grandson, Vance Manger of Palm
Springs, Calif; sister, Sue
Soldwedel Wollin of Oregon; and his cat, Simon. He
leaves nephews, Arthur (Jennifer) Wirtz III of Glenview,
Ill., and James Wirtz of Chicago; nieces, Laurie Wirtz
(Steve) Jenkins of Glenview,
Ill., Lynsey Wollin (Shawn)
Casey of Evanston, Ill., and
Kelsey Wollin (Todd) Dunn
of Oregon; and cousins,
including Larry Klepfer of
Ecuador.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; and sister,
Sunny Soldwedel Wirtz.
Davids children hosted a bonfire in his honor at
the family farm and wish to
thank all who enriched his
life with friendship. Online
condolences may be made at
www.gundersonfh.com.

worked on the family farm.


Dennis then worked seal
coating asphalt and then
went on to drive truck for
the Oregon Farm Center, Dane County Highway Department, Gabbei
Meats, Mandt Trucking
and Excavating and Goodwill. Dennis was united in
marriage to Cindy Roberts
in 1991, and the couple later divorced after 19 years.
He was an accomplished
racquetball player and also
enjoyed tennis. Dennis also
enjoyed the History Channel and various documentary and informational TV
programs and was a Packer
and Badger fan.
Dennis is survived by
his daughter, Kayla Lien
of Eagan, Minn.; siblings;
Gary (Jody) Lien of Brooklyn, Diane (Greg) Dennis
of Mt. Horeb, Nancy (Jim)
Gerry of Verona, Ronald
(Bonnie Keyes) Lien of
Brooklyn, Lois (Larry)

Janssens of Monroe and


Tammy (Marty) Pulver of
Brooklyn; and former wife,
Cindy Roberts of Oregon.
He is further survived by
many aunts, uncles, nieces,
nephews and cousins.
H e wa s p r e c e d e d i n
death by his parents, Ole
and Elaine, and a brother,
Andy.
Funeral services will be
held at 11a.m. Thursday,
Sept.15, at the First United Church of Christ, 130
E. Church St., Belleville,
with the Rev. Heide Walker
Hackman officiating. Burial will follow in Sunset
Memory Gardens, Madison. Relatives and friends
may call from 4-7p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 14, at
the Becker-Beal Funeral Home, 109 Greenway
Cross, Bellevile.
An online memorial with
guestbook is available at
www.bealfuneralhomes.
com.

Gunderson Stoughton
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1358 Highway 51 N. @
Jackson
(608) 873-4590

Photos by Samantha Christian

Rafi Herrera, 7, and Tristan Harm, 6, of Oregon, race against each other during the raingutter
regatta.

Cub Scouts hold raingutter regatta


Minutes after a Packers win, the Brooklyn Cub Scout Pack 352 held its annual raingutter regatta at Brooklyn United Methodist Church on Sept. 11.
The boys raced homemade boats up and down raingutters filled with water three times
and celebrated with ice cream. They could either blow the sails with straws or by huffing
and puffing, but could not touch the boats.
Samantha Christian

On the Web
See more photos from the
raingutter regatta:

ConnectOregonWI.com

Dawson Zantow, 8,
of Brooklyn, blows
his boat, made of
balsa wood, down
the raingutter.

Birth announcement

Scarlett Jane Debilzen


James and Tara (Hillebrand) Debilzen, of Milton, announce the birth of their daughter, Scarlett Jane, weighing 9 pounds, 2 ounces, on Aug.
18, at Fort Memorial Hospital, Fort Atkinson.
She is welcomed by siblings Amelia, 7,
Roland, 5, and Ezra, 2. Her grandparents are
Jim and Karen Debilzen, of Brooklyn, and Barbara and Randy Hillebrand, of Newville. Her
Photo submitted
great-grandmother is Mary Debilzen, of MadiScarlett Jane Debilzen was born Aug.
son.
18.

Ask The Oregon

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A. Cats may have inappropriate urination for a variety of causes. It is important to screen for

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urinary tract problems with your veterinarian when the problem is first noted. If there is no
infection or signs of irritating stones or crystals in the urine, then make sure your cat has proper
litter box requirements. There should be one litter box, located in a quiet corner, on every floor
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Jeremy Jones, sports editor

845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor


845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550

Sports

Boys soccer

Thursday, September 15, 2016

The Oregon
Observer
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com

Players of the Week


From Sept. 6-13
Names: Jenna
Dobrinsky (right)
and Mary OMalley
Grade: Freshmen
Sport: Swimming
Highlights: Dobrinsky (500 free, 200 IM) and OMalley
(100 free, 100 breaststroke) each swam to a pair of
individual wins Tuesday, Sept. 6, against Stoughton
while also helping Oregon claim the 200-meter medley
and 200 freestyle relays as the Panthers won nine of 11
varsity events.

Both Jenna and Mary have been great additions


to our team, head coach Liz Schneider said. They
are both very hard working and supportive of
their other teammates. Im excited to see how the
season will unfold for these girls.
Honorable mentions: Nik Richardson (football) had a
kickoff return for a TD; Taylor McCorkle (girls golf) finished ninth at the Cardinal invite.
Anthony Iozzo and Jeremy Jones
Photo by Anthony Iozzo

Senior Connor Jones attempts to angle off Verona senior Will Haessig in the first half Tuesday against Verona at Reddan
Soccer Park. Haessig scored twice as the Wildcats knocked off Oregon 5-3.

Second half disappearing act

Hockey

Panthers allow most goals


in a game in over six years
in 5-3 loss to Verona

Whalers excited to
return to Oregon

ANTHONY IOZZO

JEREMY JONES

Assistant sports editor

Sports editor

Defense has been a staple of the


Oregon boys soccer team during the
past decade, which has including a
WIAA Division 2 state title, three
state appearances and four straight
sectional finals appearances.
But the Panthers uncharacteristically allowed five goals Tuesday in a
non-conference match against Verona at Reddan Soccer Park, falling
5-3.
Four of the five goals came in the
second half after Oregon held a 2-1
lead.
Head coach Kevin May said he has
never been a part of a half like Tuesdays.
We just played terribly in the second half defensively, he said. In the
first half, we executed defensively
perfect. The one goal they scored in
the first half was a keeper hesitation.
If our keeper doesnt hesitate coming
out, they dont score and we have a
shutout going into the half.
It was a physical game, but the
Panthers did create plenty of opportunities on offense.
Verona senior Noah Herkert scored
in the 57th minute to put the Wildcats up 3-2, but the Panthers had five
good chances to knot the score up.
Junior Zach Pasley had a shot go
wide right in the 60th minute. Senior
Matt Pearson had a chance in the box
in the 67th minute and headed the
ball over the net.
Senior Ian Murphy had a 1-on-1
with Verona freshman goalie George
Ohm in the 70th minute but couldnt
control the kick.
And the best chance of all came
in the 76th minute when junior
Kyle Rehrauer blasted a shot toward
the top right of the night that was
punched out by Ohm. Senior Luke
Pearson was right there for the
rebound but hit the ball wide left.
Murphy had another chance in
the box go over the net in the 83rd

The Wisconsin Whalers


Tier III Junior A hockey
team will return to Oregon
for their second season this
month, welcoming young
players to the Madison area
from all over the Midwest.
Were happy to be back.
Looking for bigger and
better season here in Oregon, Whalers head coach
Tom McDermott said.
Throughout the year, the
Whalers will be helping
out in the community by
helping with youth hockey, as well as other events
throughout the community.
As of right now, all
players have homes to stay
in but were always looking for more interested

families, as the team can


grow throughout the season, housing director
Melissa Kingsley said.
For more information
about the team, go to
wisconsinwhalers.point
streaksites.com/view/wisconsinwhalers.
Im really looking forward to this season, we
have a lot of the right pieces in place to make a run
at our ultimate goal, the
Silver Cup, Whaler Nick
Miller said. Im excited
to see what happens. Also,
Im super happy to be back
in Oregon.
This place is my second
home and the community here is incredible and I
hope they will back us up
this year by being rowdy at
our games.

Girls golf
Photo by Anthony Iozzo

Junior John Auer (14) battles for a header in the second half Tuesday against
Verona.
minute.
After the misses, Verona picked
up a goal by junior Carlos Mena and
another by Herkert on a header from
a corner kick to deflate Oregon.
Luke Pearson finally gave the Panthers their third goal in the 89th minute, but it was too late.
It was the opposite of how we
wanted to play, May said. We just
decided not to play, and I have never
experienced that with this program
before.
It is uncharacteristic, and I dont
know where it came from. We are
going to make sure it doesnt happen
again.

Turn to Soccer/Page 11

Other scores

Taylor McCorkle finishes


ninth at Cardinal invite
ANTHONY IOZZO

Oconomowoc 1, Oregon 0

Assistant sports editor

Three yellow cards slowed


down the Panthers Thursday in a
1-0 loss at Oconomowoc.
Oregon had four shots on goal,
all of which were saved by goalie
Joshua Bobke, and Brendan Zimmer knocked home the only goal
of the game in the 61st minute.
Junior goalie Shane Sullivan
finished with eight saves, allowing
the goal. Senior goalie Ben Prew
finished the game and had one
save.

Senior Taylor McCorkle continued to play some


of the best golf in the
state Saturday, finishing
ninth overall in the highly competitive Cardinal
invite at Pleasant View
Golf Course.
She finished with an
81, helping Oregon finish
13th out of 21 teams with
a 390.
Ta y l o r M c C o r k l e s
example has also been

rubbing off on the rest of


the team, and head coach
Tom Boookmeier said it
should bode well for the
postseason.
I am looking forward
with getting into postseason play, he said. Every
s c o r e Ta y l o r h a s s h o t
this year has been a good
score, and the other girls
are starting to see that
you dont have to shoot
perfect to have a good
round.
Junior Andi McCorkle

Turn to Golf/Page 10

10

September 15, 2016

Oregon Observer

Girls swimming

ConnectOregonWI.com

Football

Panthers improve to 2-0


in dual meet season
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor

Oregon/Belleville girls
swimming dominated
Fort Atkinson by more
than 30 points Tuesday
to improve to 2-0 in the
Badger South dual meet
season.
The Panthers won
eight of 11 varsity events
to post a 101-68 win at
home against the Blackhawks.
Senior exchange student Ania Grzleweska of
Poland led the 1-2 finish
by Oregon, winning the
200-meter freestyle in 2
minutes, 25.52 seconds.
Freshman Jenna Dobrinsky (4:53.6) and senior
Grace Przybyl (5:30.69)
later helped the Panthers
match the finish in the
400 free.
Freshmen Mary OMalley and Jenna Dobrinsky,

junior Carolyn Christofferson and Grzleweska posted a meet-best


2:01.53 to take the 200
free relay.
Grzelewska added the
100 free title in 1:06.63
and chipped in the 50 free
crown in 29.46.
Christofferson, OMall e y, G r z e l e w s k a a n d
Dobrinsky opened the
meet, giving Oregon a
200 medley relay by more
than six seconds over Fort
Atkinson in 2:12.46.
OMalley went on to
lead the 100 breaststroke
to the wall by more than
five seconds in 1:22.72
and was four-and-a-half
minutes faster than the
rest of the 200 IM field,
posting a meet-best
2:36.83.
O r eg o n t o o k s e c o n d
through fourth in the 100

Turn to Swim/Page 11
Photo by Jeremy Jones

Senior Nik Richardson returns a kickoff 76-yards for a touchdown late in the fourth quarter. It was Oregons lone touchdown
in a 21-7 Badger South loss at home against Madison Edgewood.

Girls tennis

Panthers sweep doubles in win


over Cheesemakers
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor

The Oregon High School


girls tennis team picked
up wins from the top of its
singles lineup and swept all
three doubles flights Thursday on its way to the teams
first Badger South Conference win 5-2 at Monroe.
Lisa Dombrowski rolled
6-0, 6-3 over Jensen Christiansen at No. 3 singles,
while Julia Gerhards took
a 6-4, 6-1 victory against
Grace Tastrud at the top of
the lineup.
Oregon won two of three

matches that went to three


sets, seeing Isabelle Kriers
rally at No. 2 singles fall
just short against Maggie
Setterstrom 6-0, 1-6, 7-5.
Mary Sanford fell 6-3, 6-3
at No. 4 singles.
T h e Pa n t h e r s s w e p t
all three doubles flights,
including a pair of three-set
victories their top two doubles teams.
Kalli and Sophia Choles
closed out a 7-6 (2), 3-6,
6-2 win over Hallie Signer
and Ashley Placek at No.
1 doubles, while Ashley

Turn to Tennis/Page 11

Fumbles cost the Panthers a


chance at beating Crusaders
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor

Oregon football was set


up deep inside the Madison Edgewood red zone
twice Friday night only
to see each drive go backwards before eventually
leading to points.
Unfortunately for the
Panthers faithful, those
p o i n t s w e r e r a c ke d u p
for the visiting Crusaders, who defeated Oregon
21-7 on a pair of fumbles

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Conference schedule
Date
Sept. 2
Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 14

Opponent Time/Result
at Fort Atkinson
L, 34-20
Edgewood
L, 21-7
Monona Grove
7p.m.
Milton
7p.m.
at Monroe
7p.m.
Stoughton
7p.m.

25. A 22-yard pass to Brett


Wannebo, though, gave
the Panthers to a manageable fourth and goal on
the Crusader 3-yard line
before Max Simon capped
the Crusaders win with an
87-yard scoop score.
Having allowed 21 unans w e r e d p o i n t s , O r eg o n

finally got a break on the


ensuing kickoff. Though it
didnt come easily.
Panther senior Nik Richardson bobbled the ball
before getting outside and
returning the ball 76-yards
up the left sideline for the
teams lone touchdown.

Turn to Football/Page 12

Golf: Conference meet on Sept. 21

We are truly a family and

GENE CATE

returns of 68 and 87 yards


for touchdowns.
Down two scores earl y i n t h e f o u r t h q u a rter, Oregon looked like
it might finally be able
to breathe some life into
its offense after pinning
Edgewood deep within its
own end thanks to perfectly placed punt. One play
into the drive saw Panther
senior linebacker Parker
Ehn-Howland recovered
a Crusader fumble which
set up the home team with
first and goal on the Edgewood 8-yard line.
Oregons drive quickly went backwards again
thanks to illegal procedure
and chop block penalties
that moved the team back
to third and goal from the

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Continued from page 9


was next on the team with
an 89, while sophomore
Ally Payne shot a 97. Anna
U r b a n ow i c z ( 1 2 3 ) fi n ished the scoring. Shannon
Kings 124 was thrown
out.
Middleton won the tournament with a 318. Franklin (337) and Milton (341)
finished second and third,
respectively.
M i d d l e t o n s P a y t o n
Hodson (74) was the medalist, while Middletons
Alexis Thomas (76) was
runner-up. Divine Savior Holy Angels Lorenza Martinez (76), Racine
Saint Catherines Sarah
Busey (77), Miltons Taylor Hakula (79), Miltons
Mia Seeman (79), Franklins Courtney Matschke
(79) and Waunakees Sydney Hubbard (81) finished
third through eighth.

skills on the putter, the


Panthers will be able to
hang with any team.
We have to take care
What: Badger Conference
of business against Fort
meet
Atkinson, and that is the
When: 9 a.m. Wednesmentality for the conferday, Sept. 21
ence meet as well, he said.
Where: The Oaks Golf
If we come in and do our
Course in Cottage Grove
job and remain sharp with
18 holes, I think we are
competitive with everyM i d d l e t o n s M o r g a n body.
Miles (82) rounded out the Morgan Stanley
top 10.
The Panthers finish the Shootout
regular season at 3:30p.m.
Oregon was supposed to
F r i d a y, c o n c l u d i n g t h e travel to the University of
B a d g e r S o u t h C o n f e r - Wisconsin-Madisons Unience dual season at Fort versity Ridge Golf Course
Atkinson at Koshkonong on Sept. 7 for the Morgan
Mounds Country Club.
Stanley Shootout but rain
O r eg o n i s 3 - 1 i n t h e forced the invite to be canBadger South.
celled.
The conference meet
The meet will not be
is at 9a.m. Wednesday, made up due to scheduling
Sept. 21, at The Oaks Golf constraints.
Course.
It is normally a good
Boookmeier said that if gauge for how teams will
the girls can sharpen their fare in the postseason.

If you go

ConnectOregonWI.com

September 15, 2016

11

Oregon Observer

Boys cross country

Panthers gearing up
for Smiley Invitational
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor

Sportsmans Club Class AA trap league champions

Photo submitted

The local trap shooting team Sport Products won the 2016 Oregon Sportsmans Club Class AA trap league championship. Sport Products beat out 25 other teams for the title. The Oregon Sportsmans Club hosts an annual trap shooting
league each summer that begins in May and ends in August. From left are: Bryan Jensen, Pat Barry, Steve DOrazio, Ron
Rebman and Bob Everson.

Soccer: Conference schedule starts with Stoughton


the game at 1-1 with a goal in the
25th minute.
Senior Alex Verhagen later gave
Freshman Collin Bjerke started Oregon a 2-1 lead with a goal from
the offense with a goal in the ninth 40-yards out in the 28th minute.
minute.
Haessig knotted the game again
Verona senior Will Haessig tied with his second goal in the 50th

Continued from page 9

minute.
Oregon hosts Stoughton at 7p.m.
Thursday at Huntoon Field and travels to Monona Grove at 7p.m. Tuesday. The matches are the first Badger South Conference matches of
the season.

I was extremely impressed with


all the girls and beyond thrilled that
we have another conference win
butterfly and then finished second under our belts, head coach Liz
in the 100 backstroke and 400 free Schneider said. The girls swam
relay.
their hearts out and with each pracT h e Pa n t h e r s J V t e a m wo n tice and each meet they continue to
41-36.
grow stronger as a team. Im eager

Johnson and Katie Reisdorf claimed


a 2-6, 6-2, 6-3 victory against Parris
Bunker and San Hvizengo.
Addie and Kailey OBrien added a
6-3, 6-1 win at No. 3 doubles.

Oregon 7, Fort Atkinson 0


Oregon swept all seven flights

with ease Tuesday, cruising to their


second conference win of the season
7-0 against Fort Atkinson
No Panthers singles flight lost
more than four games led by Gerhards 6-0, 6-0 win atop the lineup.
Krier added a 6-1, 6-1 win at No.
2 singles and Dombrowski followed
that up with a 6-1, 6-2 win at 3 singles.
Mary Sanford played in the most

The Panthers placed seventh overall with a team score


of 174 on Saturday at the
Madison West Invitational at
Lake Farm Park, recording

Girls cross country

Panther underclassmen win


Badger Challenge race
Sports editor

to see what they bring for our meet


next Tuesday.
Oregon continues its conference
season at 6p.m. Sept. 20 in Milton.
Before that the Panthers will travel to the Plymouth Invitational at
9a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24.

Tennis: Oregon knocks off Fort Atkinson


Continued from page 10

Madison West invite

JEREMY JONES

Swim: Panthers travel to Milton next Tuesday


Continued from page 10

Oregon boys cross country


didnt take its varsity to the
Badger Challenge on Tuesday
at Wyona Park in Portage, and
instead opted to let the rest of
the team run.
Junior Connor Brickley led
all Panthers with a 44th-place
finish in the junior/senior race
with a time of 19:09.56.
Sophomore Hogan Schultz
was Oregons next fastest finisher, taking 31st in the underclassmen race in 19:26.46.
Junior Ben Boerigter placed
50th overall in 19:37.97, while
sophomore Steele Mellum
took 39th place in the frosh/
sopho race in 19:47.74.
Oregons skeleton crew
finished second to last in the
underclassmen race and last in
the upperclassmen race.
The Panthers full varsity squad returns to action at
8:30a.m. Saturday at the Smiley Invitational at Tribute Golf
Course in Wausau.

competitive match of the evening,


beating Martina Walling 6-1, 6-3.
Kalli and Sophia Choles rattled
off a 6-2, 6-3 win over Kastyn Hebbe and Hannah Beckman at No. 1
doubles, while Katie Reisdorf and
Ashley Johnson cruised 6-1, 6-0 at 2
doubles.
Kailey and Addie OBrien cemented the victory with a 6-0, 6-1 win at
No. 3 doubles.

five of a possible seven best


times.
Senior Joshua Klahn ran to
a team-best 23rd-place finish
in 17 minutes, 23 seconds,
while newcomer Hudson
Kugel finished 28th with a
personal-best 17:43.
Nathan Buchert also recorded a personal-record 18:06
to finish 35th, while fellow
senior Ben Lokuta added a
season-best 18:10 good for
37th place.
It was nearly a minute
before junior Connor Brickley
rounded out the Panthers varsity five, taking 51st in a season-best 19:06.
Sophomore Hogan Schulz
and junior Ben Boerigter both
ran but did not count toward
the teams final score.
Madison West placed all
five of its varsity scorers in the
top 18 to take home top honors with 41 points 22 ahead
of second place Monona
Grove and one ahead of thirdplace Madison Memorial.
The Panthers JV team
posted a score of 158 for sixth
place. No one was about to
catch Madison West, which
swept the top five spots for
a total score of 15. Madison
Memorial (54) and Verona
(108) rounded out the top
three.

Oregon girls cross country won the freshman/sophomore race but finished
second to last in the junior/
senior portion of Tuesdays
Badger Challenge in Portage.
Freshman Zoe Frank and
sophomore Kaity Kliminski sixth and seventh in the
frosh/soph race, respectively, while sophomore
Lauren Beauchaine finished one spot out of medal
contention.
Frank covered the 5k
Wyona Park course in a
team-best 21 minutes,
20.62 seconds, while Kliminski finished in 21:24.81.
Beauchaine crossed the
line in 11th place (the top
10 medaled) in 21:51.09.
Freshman Sarah Adams

was the only girl to post a


personal-best, stopping the
clock at 22:15.13 to take
16th place.
Ana Verhagen rounded out the top five varsity scorers for the team,
crossing the finish line in
22:36.28 good for 20th
place.
Junior Taylor Schmidt
w a s t h e Pa n t h e r s t o p
u p p e r c l a s s m e n r u n n e r,
finishing 20th overall in
22:21.74, while senior
Ellie Horsnell finished
56th in 24:36.99.
Oregon finished second
to last out the 12 teams
competing in the junior/
senior race.
T h e Pa n t h e r s va r s i ty travels to Wausau at
8:30a.m. Saturday to compete among the states best
at the prestigious Smiley
Invitational.

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12

September 15, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Volleyball

Panthers fall to
Cheesemakers
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor

The Oregon High School


volleyball team had all the
momentum Thursday at
Monroe in a Badger South
Conference match.
The Panthers jumped out
in front with wins in the
first two games, but Monroe would take the next
three sets to shock Oregon
3-2 (25-22, 25-20, 17-25,
21-25, 8-15).
Sophomore libero Emily Konop had 16 digs and
three aces, while senior
outside hitter Liz Andriacchi collected 12 kills and
13 digs.
Junior outside hitter/
middle blocker Alyssa Milski finished with
10 kills and four blocks,
and senior outside hitter
Emmie Wiedemann also
had four blocks.

Badger
South
Team
W-L
Stoughton
2-0
Monona Grove 2-0
Madison Edgewood2-1
Fort Atkinson
1-1
Monroe
1-2
Milton
1-2
Oregon
0-3

Sophomore setter Erin


Flanagan finished with 24
assists.
Oregon hosts Fort Atkinson at 7p.m. Thursday in
a Badger South match and
travels to Middleton High
School for the Cardinal
invite at 8a.m. Saturday.

Conference schedule
Date
Opponent Time/Result
8-25
Monona Grove
L 0-3
9-1
at Madison Edgewood
L 2-3
9-8
at Monroe
L 2-3
9-15
Fort Atkinson
7p.m.
9-22
at Stoughton
7p.m.
9-29
Milton
7p.m.
10-8
Conference at Monroe
8a.m.

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Senior linebacker Parker Ehn-Howland forces a fumble by Madison Edgewoods Peyton Bondoc in the fourth quarter Friday. Edgewood recovered the fumble and won 21-7 at Oregon.

Football: A road matchup at MG is up next


Continued from page 10

Badger South

Oregon was set up with first


and 10 on the Madison Edgewood
12-yard line after the Crusaders
snapped the ball over the head of
their punter.
The Panthers went backwards
instead of forward, however, going
to third and 16 before Christopher
Imholte knocked the ball lose from
Oregon quarterback Steven Moravec.
Edgewoods Bryce Ternus recovered a 68-yard fumble recovery for
a touchdown with 15 seconds left in
the second quarter.
Moravec had little time to throw
throughout the game with offensive
lineman Hunter Schultz and Davis
Christensen already out for the season.
We didnt hustle up front and it
showed. Losing Hunter and Davis
hurt and it showed, head coach Dan

Team W-L
Monroe 2-0
Stoughton 1-0
Monona Grove
1-1
Madison Edgewood
1-1
Fort Atkinson
1-1
Milton 0-1
Oregon 0-2
Kissling said. We did some nice
things and had some guys open. Steven just got blindsided.
Now we need to come back and
learn from it.
Edgewood senior Will Swita
capped a 10-play drive with a 1-yard
quarterback sneak to start the third
quarter, including a fourth-andeight conversion on the Oregon 22.
It was the longest sustained drive by

the Crusaders of the game and their


only offensive touchdown.
Moravec completed five of seven
passes for 42 yards, including 32
yards to Wannebo. Kardelle Phillips
led the Panthers with 61 yards rushing on four carries.
Swita had 48 yards passing for
Edgewood, completing six of 11
with an interception. Ternus rushed
15 times for 106 yards, while Mandela Deang caught two passes for 21
yards.
Oregon fell to 0-4 overall and 0-2
in the Badger South Conference
with the loss. The Panthers travel to
Monona Grove at 7p.m. Friday to
play the Silver Eagles.
Right now we need to be positive, Kissling said. We are kind of
like a beaten dog. You could see it
on the guys faces. We need to pump
the team back up.
M o n o n a G r ove ( 2 - 2 , 1 - 1 ) i s
coming off a 10-7 lost on the road
against Monroe (4-0, 2-0).

Legals

BUDGET HEARING
1. Call to Order and Introductions:
Steve Zach, President, Board of Education
2. Books have been audited by
Johnson Block & Co., Inc.
3. Financial Report - Andy Weiland,
Business Manager
4. Hearing: 2016-2017 District Budget
ANNUAL MEETING
1. Call to Order and Introductions:
Steve Zach, President, Board of Education
2. Election of Chairperson
3. Appointment of Parliamentarian
4. Adoption of Ground Rules
5. Reading of Minutes, September
28, 2015 Annual Meeting
6. State of the District Brian Busler,
Superintendent
7. Old Business
8. New Business
A. Resolution A Adoption of Tax

Levy
B. Resolution B Adoption of
School Board Salaries for 2016-2017
C. Resolution C Set Date and Hour
for 2017 Annual Meeting
9. Other New Business:
10. Adjournment
Notice is hereby given that a majority of the Oregon School Board is expected to be present at the Annual Meeting.
Published: September 15 and 22, 2016
WNAXLP
***

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


OREGON PLAN COMMISSION
TUESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 20, 2016
6:30 P.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575

NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN for a PUBLIC HEARING to be held on Tuesday,


September 20, 2016 at 6:30 p.m., before
the Town of Oregon Plan Commission at
the Oregon Town Hall, 1138 Union Road,
Oregon, WI 53575.
1. Land Division and Rezone Request. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10968;
Parcel # 0509-142-8800-0 & 0509-1428526-0; west of 5207 Lincoln Rd., Ore-

gon, WI 53575. The request is to transfer


the building site location. No additional
building sites requested. Petitioner is
Paulson & Associates LLC, 135 W. Hlum
St., Deforest, WI 53532. Owners are Steve
Ganser, 6225 Stony Hill Dr., Oregon, WI
53575 & Roger Parsons, 5207 Lincoln
Rd., Oregon, WI 53575.
An effort has been made to notify
neighbors of this proposed change. To
ensure that everyone has been notified,
please share this notice with anyone who
you think would be interested.
Note: Agendas are subject to
amendment after publication. Check the
official posting locations (Town Hall,
Town of Oregon Recycling Center and
Oregon Village Hall) including the Town
website at www.town.oregon.wi.us. It is
possible that members of and possibly
a quorum of members of other governmental bodies of the town may be in attendance at any of the meetings to gather
information; however, no action will be
taken by any governmental body at said
meeting other than the governmental
body specifically referred to in the meeting notice. Requests from persons with
disabilities who need assistance to participate in this meeting or hearing should
be made to the Clerks office at 835-3200
with 48 hours notice.
Denise R. Arnold
Clerk
Posted: September 12, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

TOWN OF OREGON
PLAN COMMISSION AGENDA
TUESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 20, 2016
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD, OREGON,
WI 53575

1. Open Public Hearing:


a. Land Division and Rezone Request. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10968;
Parcel # 0509-142-8800-0 & 0509-1428526-0; west of 5207 Lincoln Rd., Oregon, WI 53575. The request is to transfer
the building site location. No additional
building sites requested. Petitioner is
Paulson & Associates LLC, 135 W. Hlum

St., Deforest, WI 53532. Owners are Steve


Ganser, 6225 Stony Hill Dr., Oregon, WI
53575 & Roger Parsons, 5207 Lincoln
Rd., Oregon, WI 53575.
2. Close Public Hearing.
3. Call Plan Commission meeting to
order.
4. Discussion and possible Recommendation to the Town Board:
a. Land Division and Rezone Request. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10968;
west of 5207 Lincoln Road.
5. Approval of minutes from the last
meeting.
6. Public Comments:
a. Appearance by Susan Kresbach.
7. Discussion and possible Action
re: TORC procedures.
8. Update on Anderson Park.
9. Communications.
10. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to
amendment after publication. Check the
official posting locations (Town Hall,
Town of Oregon Recycling Center and
Oregon Village Hall) including the Town
website at www.town.oregon.wi.us. It is
possible that members of and possibly
a quorum of members of other governmental bodies of the town may be in attendance at any of the meetings to gather
information; however, no action will be
taken by any governmental body at said
meeting other than the governmental
body specifically referred to in the meeting notice. Requests from persons with
disabilities who need assistance to participate in this meeting or hearing should
be made to the Clerks office at 835-3200
with 48 hours notice.
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP

***
ORDINANCE NO. 16-25
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AMENDING SECTION
17.905(5)(A) OF THE VILLAGE
OF OREGON MUNICIPAL
CODE RELATING TO NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS

The Village Board of the Village of


Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, do ordain as follows:
1. Section 17.905 (5)(a) of the Mu-

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nicipal Code of the Village of Oregon is


amended as follows:
(a) The Plan Commission shall
schedule a reasonable time and place
for a public hearing to consider the application within forty-five (45) days after
the acceptance and determination of the
complete application as determined by
the Zoning Administrator. The Applicant
may appear in person, or by agent, and/
or by attorney. Notice of the proposed
amendment and the public hearing shall
be published as a Class 1 notice.
Said notice shall contain a description of the subject property and the
proposed conditional use. In addition,
at least ten (10) days before said public
hearing, the Village Clerk shall mail an
identical notice to the Applicant, and to
the owners of property whose boundaries are within 300 feet of any portion of
the property for which the conditional
use permit has been requested. Failure
to mail said notice or failure to meet the
time requirements herein, provided it is
unintentional, shall not invalidate proceedings under this Section.
2. This Ordinance shall take effect
upon passage and publication pursuant
to law.
The above ordinance was duly adopted on the 12th day of September,
2016.
APPROVED:
_____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
First & Second Reading: September
12, 2016
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

ORDINANCE NO. 16-26


VILLAGE OF OREGON
CREATING SECTIONS 5.05
AND 5.06 REGARDING FIRE
PREVENTION

The Village Board of the Village of


Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, do ordain as follows:
3. Section 5.05 of the Municipal
Code of the Village of Oregon is created
as follows:
5.05 Adoption of National Fire Protection Association 1 Fire Code.
(1) The NFPA 1 Fire Code. That NFPA
1 Fire Code/2012 edition, three (3) copies of which are on file and are open to
inspection by the public in the office of
the Fire Chief of the Oregon Area Fire/
EMS District are hereby adopted and incorporated into this section. The same
are hereby adopted for the purpose of
prescribing regulations governing conditions hazardous to life and property from
fire or explosion and providing for issuance of permits and collection of fees. If
the NFPA 1 is amended, then the future
updated code shall apply to this section
as to its effective date.
(2) Fire Inspection Duties.
(a) The Fire Chief shall be the Fire Inspector of the Village of Oregon. The Fire
Chief shall have the power to appoint one
(1) or more deputy Fire Inspectors and
shall perform all duties required of the
Fire Inspector in accordance with State
laws and regulations, particularly Wis.

Stat. 101.14.
(b) While acting as Fire Inspector
pursuant to Wis. Stat. 101.14 (2), the
Fire Chief, or any officer of the Fire Department designated by the Fire Chief,
shall have the right and authority to enter any building or upon any premise in
the Village at all reasonable hours for the
purpose of making inspections or investigations which, under this section, they
may deem necessary. Should the Fire
Inspector find that any provisions of the
Village Code relating to fire hazards and
prevention of fires are being violated, or
that a fire hazard exists which should be
eliminated, it shall be their duty to give
such directions for the abatement of
such conditions as they shall deem necessary.
(c) The Fire Chief is required, or by
members of the Fire Department designated by the Chief as fire inspectors, to
inspect all buildings, premises and public thoroughfares, except the interiors
of private dwellings, for the purpose of
ascertaining and causing to be corrected
any conditions liable to cause fire, or any
violations of any law or ordinance relating to the fire hazard or to the prevention
of fires. Such inspections shall be made
at least once in six (6) months in all of the
territory served by the Fire Department.
Each six-month period shall begin on
January 1 and July 1 of each year.
(d) Written reports of inspections
shall be made and kept on file in the office of the Fire Chief in the manner and
form required by State law.
(e) No fee shall be charged for the
original inspection and or re-inspection
by the Fire Chief or their designee.
(3) Penalty Provisions.
(a) Any person who violates any provision of this section or standard adopted; or who violates any order made under
this section; or who builds in violation
of any detailed statement of specifications or plans submitted and approved
under this section; or fails to operate in
accordance with any certificate or permit issued under this section; and from
which no appeal has been taken; or who
shall fail to comply with such an order as
affirmed or modified by a court of competent jurisdiction, within the time fixed
herein, shall severally for each and every
such violation, respectively, be guilty of
an ordinance violation, punishable by a
forfeiture of not less than $75.00.
(b) The imposition of one penalty for
any violation shall not excuse the violation or permit the violation to continue;
and all such persons shall be required to
correct or remedy such violations or defects within a reasonable time; and when
not otherwise specified the application
of the above penalty shall not be held to
prevent the enforced removal of prohibited conditions. Each day that prohibited
conditions are maintained shall constitute a separate offense.
(c) If and in the event that a second
re-inspection is needed then an administration fee of $75.00 shall be charged. If
and in the event that a third re-inspection
is needed then an administration fee of
$150.00 shall be charged. If and in the
event that a fourth re-inspection is needed then an administration fee of $ 225.00
shall be charged. If and in the event that
a fifth re-inspection is needed then an
administration fee of $300.00 shall be
charged. If and in the event that a sixth
re-inspection is needed then an administration fee of $375.00 shall be charged.

ConnectOregonWI.com
Each re-inspection after the seventh will
be an additional $75.00 administration
fee until the violation(s) have been corrected.
4. Section 5.06 of the Municipal
Code of the Village of Oregon is created
as follows:
5.06 Mandatory Secured Key Boxes.
(1) Definitions.
(a) A secured key box is a locked
box for keys approved by the Oregon
Area Fire/EMS District Fire Chief for containing:
1. Keys for all locked points of
egress; whether interior or exterior of
such building.
2. Keys to locked mechanical rooms.
3. Keys to locked elevator rooms.
4. Keys to elevator controls.
5. Keys to all fenced or secured areas.
(b) As used throughout this section,
Building includes:
1. Commercial industrial structures
protected by an automatic alarm system or automatic suppression system,
or such structures that are secured in a
manner that restricts rapid access during
an emergency.
2. Multifamily (4 plus unit) residential structures that have restricted access
through locked doors and or common
entrance/corridor for access to the living
units and utility/mechanical rooms.
3. Governmental structures, nursing
care/assisted living centers, daycare facilities, and Educational facilities.
4. Any building or facility containing
a quantity of hazardous materials, which
would require compliance with Title III of
SARA (Superfund Amendment Reauthorization Act).
(2) Buildings Over 25,000 Square
Feet. All buildings over 25,000 square
feet in area must number/letter their
doors (and windows when required by
the Fire Chief or their designee). Numbering will be placed on each door starting
at the main entrance, and progressing
around the building clockwise no less
than eight-inch reflective numbers/letters
that are contrasting color to the door.
Numbers/letters must be at least 5 feet
above ground level. When double doors
or a grouping of doors exists close together, they must be numbered as one.
(3) Mandatory Key Boxes for Fire
Suppression and Standpipe Systems.
(a) Buildings within the Village of
Oregon protected by an automatic fire
suppression or standpipe system shall
be equipped with a secured key box approved by the Fire Chief.
(b) The secured key box shall be installed to the right of the main entrance
door, 4 to 5 feet above ground level. If
this is not possible, a different location
must be approved by the Fire Chief or
their designee.
(c) All keys will be labeled with correct locations.
(d) A floor plan of the rooms within
the Building may be required at the discretion of the Fire Chief or their designee.
(4) Mandatory Secured Key Boxes
for Automatic Fire Alarm Systems.
(a) Buildings protected by an automatic fire alarm system shall be equipped
with a secured key box installed at a location approved by the Fire Chief or their
designee. Instructions for disarming the
alarm system must be posted on or near
the alarm panel with a zone map, if appropriate.
(b) When access to an area within
the Building is unduly difficult because
of secured openings, and therefore more
access is necessary for life saving or
firefighting purposes, the Building shall
be equipped with a secured key box at
a location approved by the Fire Chief or
their designee.
(5) Security Padlocks. Buildings on
properties protected by a locked fence or
gate shall be equipped with either a secured key padlock or a secured key box
installed at a location approved by the
Fire Chief or their designee.
(6) Security Caps. Owners of Buildings protected by an automatic sprinkler system or standpipe system whose
fire department connection has been
exposed to graffiti or damage may be
required to install a secured fire department connection security cap as directed
by the Fire Chief or their designee.
(7) Exemptions. Exemptions of the
requirements of this section may be
granted at the discretion of the Fire Chief
or their designee at the request of a property owner only after the property owner
has waived any potential claim that could
be made against the Village of Oregon as
a result of not installing a secured key
box.
(8) Compliance. After the effective
date of this ordinance, newly constructed Buildings, not yet occupied or Buildings currently under construction and
Buildings or businesses applying for an
occupancy permit shall comply. Existing
Buildings that are not in compliance on
the effective date of this ordinance shall
comply with requirements of this ordinance within eighteen (18) months of the
effective date of this section.
3. This ordinance shall be effective
upon passage and publication or posting
pursuant to law.
The above and foregoing ordinance
was duly adopted by the Village Board of
the Village of Oregon at its meeting held
on September 12, 2016.
APPROVED:
By _____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
By ______________________________
Peggy S. K. Haag, Village Clerk
First Reading: August 15, 2016
Second Reading: September 12, 2016
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

ORDINANCE NO. 16-27


VILLAGE OF OREGON
AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL
SECTION 17-805(5)(I), CREATE
SECTION 17-807, AMEND
SECTIONS 17-805(4) AND
17-831(1)(G), AND AMEND
FIGURES 17-811(2), (3),
AND (4) OF THE VILLAGE
OF OREGON CODE OF
ORDINANCES RELATING TO
SIGNS

The Village Board of the Village of


Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, ordains as follows:
1. Section 17-805(5)(i), defining
Off-Premise Advertising Sign, is repealed as follows:
Section 17-805: Definitions and
Rules Related to Sign Groups, Sign Categories, & Sign Types.
(5) Prohibited Signs. Refer to Section 17-831 for additional sign prohibitions and limitations.
2.
Section
17-807,
entitled
Off-Premise Advertising Signs, is created as follows:
Section 17-807: Off-Premise Advertising Signs.
(1) Off-Premise Advertising Sign. A
sign which directs attention to a business, commodity, service, or entertainment that is conducted, sold, or offered
elsewhere than upon the site where the
sign is displayed. Off-Premise Advertis-

September 15, 2016

ing Signs include billboards.


(a) Off-Premise Advertising Signs
are generally prohibited Village-wide,
with the exception of Institutional Information Signs, Board Signs, Banner
Signs, Stake Signs, Frame Signs, or Arm
& Post Signs.
(b) Existing legal Off-Premise Advertising Signs made nonconforming by this
Section shall be permitted to continue as
legal, nonconforming signs, subject to
the requirements of Section 17-835.
3. Section 17-805(4), entitled Temporary Miscellaneous Sign, is amended
as follows:
Temporary Miscellaneous Sign: A
temporary sign that is intended to accommodate a wide variety of sign purposes. Temporary Miscellaneous Signs
is a Sign Group containing one Sign Category, Yard Signs, which is available to
all land uses. See Figure 17-811(4).
4. Figures 17-811(2), (3), (4) are
amended as attached in Exhibit A.
5. Section 17-831(1)(g) is amended
as follows:
Section 17-831: Sign Prohibition and
Limitations
The regulations contained in this
Subsection apply to signs in all zoning
districts.
(1) Sign Prohibitions.
(g) No billboards or off-premise advertising signs shall be permitted, with
the exception of Institutional Information
Signs, Board Signs, Banner Signs, Stake
Signs, Frame Signs, and Arm & Post
Signs.
6. This ordinance shall take effect
upon passage and posting or publication
pursuant to law.
The above ordinance was adopted by the Village Board of the Village of
Oregon at a meeting held on September
12, 2016.
APPROVED:
_____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
_____________________________
Peggy S. K. Haag, Village Clerk
First & Second Reading: September
12, 2016
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

ORDINANCE NO. 16-29


VILLAGE OF OREGON
DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN
AN ORDINANCE
CHANGING THE ZONING
CLASSIFICATION OF
PROPERTY LOCATED AT 131
W. RICHARDS ROAD (VICTOR
DORN CORPORATION
REDEVELOPMENT)

RECITALS
1. Victor Dorn Corporation (the Applicant) has requested approval of a
General Development Plan for the property located at 131 W. Richards Road, Oregon, Wisconsin (the Property).
2. The Planned Development District
is intended to provide a voluntary regulatory framework designed to encourage
and promote improved environmental
and aesthetic design in the Village by allowing for greater design freedom, imagination and flexibility in the development
of land while insuring substantial compliance with the basic intent of the Village?s
Zoning Ordinance and Comprehensive
Plan. The comparable zoning district for
the Property, used for establishing baseline zoning requirements and identifying
needed flexibility, is Planned Business.
3. The Applicant has submitted a
General Development Plan (the GDP)
consisting of the following:
A. Dimension IV Madison Design
Group Letter to Oregon Plan Commission, dated August 5, 2016, 3 pages, attached as Exhibit A.
B. Dimension IV Madison Design
Group Letter to Vandewalle & Associates,
Inc., dated August 24, 2016, 2 pages, attached as Exhibit B.
C. Letter from Quam Engineering,
LLC re Stormwater Management Approach, dated August 3, 2016, 1 page,
attached as Exhibit C.
D. Plans prepared by Dimension
IV Madison Design Group, attached as
Exhibit D, 9 pages, consisting of the following:
(1) G0.1 Cover Sheet, last dated August 26, 2016.
(2) Aerial View sheet dated August
3, 2016.
(3) Site Development Plan Phase I
sheet dated August 3, 2016.
(4) Site Development Plan Phase II
sheet dated August 24, 2016.
(5) Site Development Plan Phase
III sheet dated August 3, 2016.
(6) First Floor Plan sheet dated August 3, 2016.
(7) Second & Third Floor Unit Plan
sheet (undated).
(8) Schematic Elevation sheet N.
Main Street sheet (undated)
(9) Perspective View sheet dated August 3, 2016.
4. On September 1, 2016 the Village
Plan Commission conducted a public
hearing on the GDP.
5. On September 12, 2016, the Village Board considered approving the
GDP.
6. The Village Board makes the following findings:
A. The GDP furthers the purposes
of the Village?s zoning regulations as
outlined in Section 17-0-05 and the applicable rules and regulations of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
and the Federal Emergency Management
Agency.
B. Due to the availability of new data,
the presence of new roads or other infrastructure, additional development, annexation and other zoning changes that
have occurred in the Village, changing
the zoning classification of the property
is appropriate.
C. The GDP maintains the desired
consistency of land uses, land use intensities, and land use impacts as related to
the environs of the Property.
ORDINANCE
NOW THEREFORE the Village Board
of the Village of Oregon, Dane County,
Wisconsin adopts the following ordinance:
Section 1. The recitals set forth
above are material to and are incorporated in this Ordinance as if set forth in full.
Section 2. Subject to the conditions
set forth in Section 4 below, the zoning
classification of the Property is changed
to Planned Development District and the
GDP is approved, pursuant to section 17914 of the Village Code and Wis. Stat.
62.23(7)(d).
Section 3. The following flexibilities
to the otherwise applicable requirements
of the Planned Business District are approved:
A. The PB zoning district does not
allow for a mix of residential uses. Flexibility is needed to allow for a mixed use
development.
B. The development will not provide
sufficient parking from the beginning of
Phase II through the completion of Phase
III. 138 spaces will be available, but 153
will be required if adhering to the standards of the Zoning Ordinance, inclusive
of all available shared parking adjust-

ments.
C. The minimum street setback of 25
feet is not met on all three sides of the lot.
The proposed street setback for Market
Street is 13 feet 8 inches, for Richards
Road it is 18 feet, and for Main Street it
is 17 feet.
D. At 18%, the proposed development does not meet the minimum landscape surface ratio (LSR) for the PB zoning district of 25%. (The existing LSR is
just under 24%.)
E. At 0.51, the proposed development exceeds the maximum floor area
ratio for the PB zoning district of 0.30.
Section 4. The approval of the General Development Plan will not be effective until all of the following conditions
have been satisfied:
A. Verification by the Village Engineer of adequate stormwater management for all phases of the Project.
B. Approval by Dane County of all
driveway access points serving the Property from North Main Street.
C. Approval by the Village Board and
recording of one or more instruments
providing for permanent cross-access
and shared parking within the Property
in a manner satisfactory to the Village
Board. This condition may be satisfied
using a condominium plat, or another
instrument deemed acceptable to the
Village.
D. Submission by the Applicant,
to the Village, of an amendment to the
GDP (specifically amending the Architectural Design Comments in Exhibit
A), that provides that each residential
unit within the Property, including units
that face the interior of the site, is provided with a functional balcony having
a minimum depth of 6 feet, and that is
deemed acceptable to the Villages Planning Consultant. The amendment to the
GDP (if submitted), and the Village Planning Consultants written approval of the
amendment, shall be deemed part of the
GDP approved by this ordinance. As an
alternative to submitting an amendment
to the GDP, this condition may be satisfied by the Applicant obtaining Specific
Implementation Plan approval for each
building containing residential units.
Section 5. The Property shall be developed and used in full compliance with
the General Development Plan and one
or more Specific Development Plans to
be approved by the Village. The General
Development Plan and Specific Development Plan shall constitute the zoning regulations for the Property, and may be enforced as any other zoning regulation in
the Village of Oregon. A copy of the General Development Plan and the Specific
Development Plan shall be maintained
and kept on file by the Village Clerk.
Section 6. If the conditions in Section 4 of this Ordinance have not been
satisfied by 12:00 noon on March 1, 2017,
or such later date as the Village Board
may approve, this Ordinance shall automatically, and without any further action,
become null and void and of no further
force or effect.
The above and foregoing Ordinance
was duly adopted by the Village Board of
the Village of Oregon at its meeting held
on September 12, 2016, by a vote of 5 in
favor, 0 opposed, and 0 not voting.
APPROVED:
By _____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
By ______________________________
Peggy S. K. Haag, Village Clerk
Attachments:
A. Dimension IV Madison Design Group
Letter to Oregon Plan Commission,
dated August 5, 2016, 3 pages.
B. Dimension IV Madison Design Group
Letter to Vandewalle & Associates Inc.,
dated August 24, 2016, 2 pages.
C. Letter from Quam Engineering, LLC
re Stormwater Management Approach,
dated August 3, 2016, 1 page.
D. Plans prepared by Dimension IV
Madison Design Group, 9 pages.
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

ORDINANCE NO. 16-30


VILLAGE OF OREGON
DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN
AN ORDINANCE
CHANGING THE ZONING
CLASSIFICATION OF 127
DEWEY STREET FROM
SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL
4 (SR-4) TO SINGLE FAMILY
RESIDENTIAL 5 (SR-5). (127
DEWEY STREET)

RECITALS
7. Application has been made for
the zoning classification of the Property
located at 127 Dewey Street (the Property) to be changed from SR-4 to SR-5.
8. On September 1, 2016 the Village
Plan Commission conducted a public
hearing on the Application.
9. On September 12, 2016, the Village Board considered the Application.
10. The Village Board finds that
changing the zoning classification of the
Property to SR-5, is consistent with the
spirit and intent of the Village?s Zoning
Code, is consistent with the Village?s
Comprehensive Plan, and promotes the
public health, safety and general welfare
of the Village.
ORDINANCE
NOW THEREFORE the Village Board
of the Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin
adopts the following ordinance:
Section 1. The recitals set forth
above are material to and are incorporated in this ordinance as if set forth in full.
Section 2. The zoning classification
the Property is changed from SR-4 to
SR-5.
Section 3. This ordinance shall be
effective upon passage and publication
or posting pursuant to law.
The above and foregoing ordinance
was duly adopted by the Village Board of
the Village of Oregon at its meeting held
on September 12, by a vote of 5 in favor,
0 opposed, and 0 not voting.
APPROVED:
By _____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
By _____________________________
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
First & Second Reading: September
12, 2016
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP
***

Oregon Observer

13

Oregon School District Budget Adoption


Preliminary Budget 2016-2017
GENERAL FUND (FUND 10)
Beginning Fund Balance (Account 930 000)
Ending Fund Balance, Nonspendable (Acct. 935 000)
Ending Fund Balance, Restricted (Acct. 936 000)
Ending Fund Balance, Committed (Acct. 937 000)
Ending Fund Balance, Assigned (Acct. 938 000)
Ending Fund Balance, Unassigned (Acct. 939 000)
TOTAL ENDING FUND BALANCE (ACCT. 930 000)
REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
100 Transfers-in
Local Sources
210 Taxes
240 Payments for Services
260 Non-Capital Sales
270 School Activity Income
280 Interest on Investments
290 Other Revenue, Local Sources
Subtotal Local Sources
Other School Districts Within Wisconsin
310 Transit of Aids
340 Payments for Services
380 Medical Service Reimbursements
390 Other Inter-district, Within Wisconsin
Subtotal Other School Districts within Wisconsin
Other School Districts Outside Wisconsin
440 Payments for Services
490 Other Inter-district, Outside Wisconsin
Subtotal Other School Districts Outside Wisconsin
Intermediate Sources
510 Transit of Aids
530 Payments for Services from CCDEB
540 Payments for Services from CESA
580 Medical Services Reimbursement
590 Other Intermediate Sources
Subtotal Intermediate Sources
State Sources
610 State Aid -- Categorical
620 State Aid -- General
630 DPI Special Project Grants
640 Payments for Services
650 Student Achievement Guarantee in Education (SAGE Grant)
660 Other State Revenue Through Local Units
690 Other Revenue
Subtotal State Sources
Federal Sources
710 Transit of Aids
720 Impact Aid
730 DPI Special Project Grants
750 IASA Grants
760 JTPA
770 Other Federal Revenue Through Local Units
780 Other Federal Revenue Through State
790 Other Federal Revenue - Direct
Subtotal Federal Sources
Other Financing Sources
850 Reorganization Settlement
860 Compensation, Fixed Assets
870 Long-Term Obligations
Subtotal Other Financing Sources
Other Revenues
960 Adjustments
970 Refund of Disbursement
980 Medical Service Reimbursement
990 Miscellaneous
Subtotal Other Revenues
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
Instruction
110 000 Undifferentiated Curriculum
120 000 Regular Curriculum
130 000 Vocational Curriculum
140 000 Physical Curriculum
160 000 Co-Curricular Activities
170 000 Other Special Needs
Subtotal Instruction
Support Sources
210 000 Pupil Services
220 000 Instructional Staff Services
230 000 General Administration
240 000 School Building Administration
250 000 Business Administration
260 000 Central Services
270 000 Insurance & Judgments
280 000 Debt Services
290 000 Other Support Services
Subtotal Support Sources
Non-Program Transactions
410 000 Inter-fund Transfers
430 000 Instructional Service Payments
490 000 Other Non-Program Transactions
Subtotal Non-Program Transactions
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
SPECIAL PROJECT FUNDS (FUNDS 21, 23, 27, 29)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 Ending Fund Balance
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
100 000 Instruction
200 000 Support Services
400 000 Non-Program Transactions
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
DEBT SERVICE FUND (FUNDS 38, 39)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 ENDING FUND BALANCES
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
281 000 Long-Term Capital Debt
282 000 Refinancing
289 000 Other Long-Term General Obligation Debt
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
842 000 INDEBTEDNESS, END OF YEAR
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND (FUND 47 & 49)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 ENDING FUND BALANCE
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
100 000 Instruction
200 000 Support Services
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
FOOD SERVICE FUND (FUND 50)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 ENDING FUND BALANCE
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
200 000 Support Services
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
COMMUNITY SERVICE FUND (FUND 80)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 ENDING FUND BALANCE
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
200 000 Support Services
300 000 Community Services
400 000 Non-Program Transactions
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
PACKAGE & COOPERATIVE PROGRAM FUND (FUNDS 91, 93, 99)
900 000 Beginning Fund Balance
900 000 ENDING FUND BALANCE
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
100 000 Instruction
200 000 Support Services
400 000 Non-Program Transactions
TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES
PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX LEVY
FUND
General Fund
Referendum Debt Service Fund
Non-Referendum Debt Service Fund
Community Service Fund
TOTAL SCHOOL LEVY
PERCENTAGE INCREASE -TOTAL LEVY FROM PRIOR YEAR

Audited
2013-14

Audited
2014-15

Published: September 15, 2016


WNAXLP

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

10,887,928.89
71,787.56
147,645.32
0.00
1,081,538.00
10,292,296.94

11,593,267.82
95,274.69
153,981.61
0.00
796,231.00
10,334,007.53

10,887,928.89

11,593,267.82

11,379,494.83

10,703,263.85

3,226.00

4,473.00

4,107.00

0.00

18,337,428.08
1,581.42
370,101.81
87,042.00
10,088.12
318,367.58
19,124,609.01

17,946,525.00
1,068.00
415,186.27
85,295.75
8,779.98
247,347.67
18,704,202.67

19,156,201.00
300.00
423,669.73
83,875.47
16,718.29
260,251.12
19,941,015.61

18,525,237.00
300.00
409,767.89
83,875.47
15,000.00
227,270.78
19,261,451.14

9,401.88
1,346,750.44
0.00
0.00
1,356,152.32

6,662.87
1,460,446.11
0.00
0.00
1,467,108.98

0.00
1,893,290.34
0.00
0.00
1,893,290.34

0.00
2,163,796.27
0.00
0.00
2,163,796.27

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,990.85
2,990.85

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

445,932.61
18,637,974.00
54,618.00
0.00
0.00
135,055.53
25,891.38
19,299,471.52

736,886.56
19,317,276.00
105,935.63
0.00
0.00
140,323.56
14,489.00
20,314,910.75

769,713.93
18,789,116.00
90,855.39
0.00
0.00
140,579.82
17,528.00
19,807,793.14

1,132,018.00
19,974,060.00
56,503.00
0.00
0.00
130,000.00
14,726.00
21,307,307.00

0.00
0.00
29,029.22
161,601.37
0.00
0.00
53,092.00
0.00
243,722.59

0.00
0.00
26,770.76
172,567.92
0.00
0.00
19,334.00
0.00
218,672.68

0.00
0.00
55,766.53
180,321.16
0.00
0.00
27,318.23
0.00
263,405.92

0.00
0.00
98,291.00
232,273.00
0.00
0.00
19,000.00
0.00
349,564.00

0.00
21,739.17
600,000.00
621,739.17

0.00
3,461.50
0.00
3,461.50

0.00
1,591.95
0.00
1,591.95

0.00
2,000.00
0.00
2,000.00

16,400.00
149,173.36
0.00
17,969.64
183,543.00
40,835,454.46

49,443.08
98,881.17
16,314.89
164,639.14
40,877,468.72

31,062.80
78,174.47
0.00
18,163.31
127,400.58
42,038,604.54

0.00
64,767.76
0.00
34,647.85
99,415.61
43,183,534.02

7,676,721.85
7,413,426.56
1,602,381.23
999,562.18
575,537.07
740,757.32
19,008,386.21

7,639,848.92
7,781,969.24
1,712,520.11
985,390.87
561,934.31
813,586.66
19,495,250.11

8,096,378.03
7,979,580.75
1,681,976.48
1,073,881.59
589,127.72
862,279.20
20,283,223.77

8,373,623.35
8,177,122.94
1,802,486.47
1,151,132.02
567,719.00
899,542.95
20,971,626.73

1,332,022.38
2,502,309.77
693,697.45
2,474,243.43
7,022,440.80
1,778,674.32
296,525.86
120,000.00
214,220.74
16,434,134.75

1,342,045.97
2,433,186.32
680,586.62
2,534,151.01
6,719,289.59
999,684.30
347,399.95
120,000.00
195,726.86
15,372,070.62

1,380,560.94
2,548,012.11
729,869.11
2,692,578.65
7,005,664.87
1,297,281.11
333,555.70
120,000.00
164,347.96
16,271,870.45

1,524,507.20
2,653,979.96
724,923.68
2,645,783.44
7,412,001.34
1,112,484.65
356,822.00
120,000.00
156,000.00
16,706,502.27

4,248,895.71
1,153,863.56
9,840.63
5,412,599.90
40,855,120.86

4,063,670.87
1,226,758.76
14,379.43
5,304,809.06
40,172,129.79

4,462,372.65
1,230,783.74
4,126.92
5,697,283.31
42,252,377.53

4,646,675.00
1,531,961.00
3,000.00
6,181,636.00
43,859,765.00

Audited
2013-14

294,999.27
246,946.91
7,382,140.90
5,610,350.20
1,739,676.56
80,166.50
7,430,193.26
Audited
2013-14

967,768.83
939,029.94
10,446,752.11
3,596,601.15
6,510,529.85
368,360.00
10,475,491.00
0.00
Audited
2013-14

0.00
498,584.98
500,409.98
0.00
1,825.00
1,825.00

Audited
2013-14

264,075.43
234,509.35
1,366,807.14
1,396,373.22
1,396,373.22
Audited
2013-14

500,221.68
576,287.59
708,452.71
264,598.33
367,788.47
632,386.80

Audited
2013-14

0.00
0.00
175,278.23
103,885.32
44,991.91
26,401.00
175,278.23

Audited
2014-15

11,379,494.83
0.00
153,981.61
0.00
0.00
10,549,282.24

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

Audited
2014-15

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

Audited
2014-15

Audited
2015-16

Prelim. Budget
2016-17

246,946.91
1,041,237.52
7,950,744.14
5,226,865.30
1,805,355.25
124,232.98
7,156,453.53
Audited
2014-15

939,029.94
5,203,464.88
6,966,285.48
2,329,090.54
0.00
372,760.00
2,701,850.54
0.00
Audited
2014-15

498,584.98
52,951,517.60
54,680,147.94
0.00
2,227,215.32
2,227,215.32
Audited
2014-15

234,509.35
185,153.95
1,342,576.10
1,391,931.50
1,391,931.50

576,287.59
3,268.30
727,627.98
172,357.92
387,071.35
741,218.00
1,300,647.27
0.00
0.00
182,823.09
108,708.56
45,791.53
28,323.00
182,823.09

1,041,237.52
914,429.67
7,331,795.16
5,486,009.27
1,872,335.05
100,258.69
7,458,603.01

5,203,464.88
949,742.28
4,706,347.70
8,588,110.30
0.00
371,960.00
8,960,070.30
0.00

52,951,517.60
35,164,852.42
238,204.41
53,889.40
17,970,980.19
18,024,869.59

185,153.95
191,985.36
1,384,135.85
1,377,304.44
1,377,304.44

3,268.30
38,967.54
581,670.00
114,588.44
431,382.32
0.00
545,970.76
0.00
0.00
172,689.28
117,120.08
27,062.20
28,507.00
172,689.28

914,429.67
914,429.67
7,826,154.00
5,972,675.36
1,755,738.64
97,740.00
7,826,154.00

949,742.28
920,517.28
4,782,220.00
4,441,860.00
0.00
369,585.00
4,811,445.00
0.00

35,164,852.42
7,150,000.42
150,000.00
0.00
28,164,852.00
28,164,852.00

191,985.36
191,985.36
1,402,313.00
1,402,313.00
1,402,313.00

38,967.54
0.00
565,527.00
169,651.49
434,843.05
604,494.54
0.00
0.00
147,000.00
95,372.00
23,228.00
28,400.00
147,000.00

18,333,615.00
3,505,086.00
420,560.00
520,692.00
22,779,953.00

17,946,525.00
4,133,723.00
531,120.00
520,692.00
23,132,060.00

19,156,201.00
4,172,598.00
529,123.00
399,628.00
24,257,550.00

18,525,237.00
525,185.00
4,257,035.00
380,523.00
23,687,980.00

0.00%

1.55%

4.87%

-2.35%

The below listed new or discontinued programs have a financial impact on the proposed 2016-2017 budget:
DISCONTINUED PROGRAMS
NEW PROGRAMS

Audited
2015-16

10,907,595.29
150,774.79
126,209.13
0.00
860,555.00
9,750,389.00

ORDINANCE NO. 16-31


VILLAGE OF OREGON
DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN
AN ORDINANCE
CHANGING THE ZONING
CLASSIFICATION OF
PROPERTY LOCATED AT 336
AND 354 N. MAIN STREET
AND 333 AND 337 SODEN
DRIVE FROM MULTI-FAMILY
RESIDENTIAL-8 (MR-8) TO
PLANNED DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT (Oregon Manor
Expansion)

RECITALS
11. Erstad Enterprises LLC (the
Applicant) has requested approval of
a change in zoning and a General Development Plan for the property located at
336 and 354 N. Main Street and 333 and
337 Soden Drive, Oregon, Wisconsin (the
Property).
12. The Planned Development District is intended to provide a voluntary
regulatory framework designed to encourage and promote improved environmental and aesthetic design in the
Village by allowing for greater design
freedom, imagination and flexibility in
the development of land while insuring
substantial compliance with the basic
intent of the Villages Zoning Ordinance
and Comprehensive Plan. The comparable zoning district for the Property, used
for establishing base-line zoning requirements and identifying needed flexibility,
is MR-8.
13. The Applicant has submitted a

150 Places To Go
HERMANSON PUMPKIN-PATCH,
LLC. FREE ADMISSION. Pumpkins,
squash, gourds, strawmaze,
wagonride, small animals to view.
Opening 9/17-Halloween. Closed
Wednesdays. Open daily 9am-5pm,
weekends 9am-6pm. 127 County
Road N, Edgerton. 608-751-9334.
www.hermansonpumpkinpatch.webs.com.
Directions: Go 8 miles southeast on
Cty Rd N toward Edgerton.

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

General Development Plan (the GDP)


consisting of the following:
A. Plunkett Raysich Architects, LLP
Narrative dated August 16, 2016, 1 page,
attached as Exhibit A.
B. Plans prepared by Plunkett Raysich Architects, LLP, attached as Exhibit
B, consisting of the following:
(1) Sheet Index, Project Date 08-1616.
(2) Topographic Map, (undated).
(3) Proposed Site Plan, 08-16-16.
(4) Oregon Manor Preliminary Grading Plan, dated 5/31/16.
(5) Oregon Manor Preliminary Utility
Plan, dated 5/31/16.
(6) Overall Landscape Plan, Sheet
Number L 100, dated 08 16 16.
(7) Enlarged Landscape Plan, Sheet
Number L 101, dated 08 16 16.
(8) Landscape Notes, Schedules &
Details, Sheet Number L 102, dated 0816-16.
(9) Proposed Floor Plan, dated 0816-16.
(10) Perspective drawing of building,
dated 08-16-16.
(11) Exterior Elevations, dated 0816-16 (East Elevation-Street View (Soden
Dr.), South Elevation, North Elevation).
(12) Wall Sections, Existing Wall
Section and Proposed Wall Section, dated 08 16 16.
(13) Existing Lower Level, dated 0816-16.
(14) Existing First Floor Plan, dated
08-16-16.
(15) Existing Second Floor Plan, dated 08-16-16.
(16) Future Site Master Plan, dated
08-16-16.
14. On September 1, 2016 the Village

Plan Commission conducted a public


hearing on the GDP.
15. On September 12, 2016, the Village Board considered approving the GDP.
16. The Village Board makes the following findings:
A. The GDP furthers the purposes
of the Villages zoning regulations as
outlined in Section 17-0-05 and the applicable rules and regulations of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
and the Federal Emergency Management
Agency.
B. Due to the availability of new data,
the presence of new roads or other infrastructure, additional development, annexation and other zoning changes that
have occurred in the Village, changing
the zoning classification of the property
is appropriate.
C. The GDP maintains the desired
consistency of land uses, land use intensities, and land use impacts as related to
the environs of the Property.
ORDINANCE
NOW THEREFORE the Village Board
of the Village of Oregon, Dane County,
Wisconsin adopts the following ordinance:
Section 1. The recitals set forth
above are material to and are incorporated in this Ordinance as if set forth in full.
Section 2. Subject to the conditions
set forth in Section 4 below, the zoning
classification of the Property is changed
to Planned Development District and the
GDP is approved, pursuant to section 17914 of the Village Code and Wis. Stat.
62.23(7)(d).
Section 3. The following flexibilities
to the otherwise applicable requirements
of the MR-8 District are approved:

A. The minimum setback of 30 feet


is not met for the northern portion of the
Soden Drive street frontage. The setback
is just under 22 feet at the northeast corner of the building addition.
B. The development exceeds the
density maximum for the MR-8 zoning
district. The MR-8 zoning district requires
a minimum of 5,445 square feet of lot
area per dwelling unit, for an average of
8 dwelling units per acre. The expansion
will result in a density of approximately
19 dwelling units per acre.
C. At 41.9%, the development slightly
exceeds the maximum building coverage
ratio for the MR-8 zoning district of 40%.
D. The development provides 25
parking spaces. The Zoning Code requires the facility to provide 27 parking
spaces, enough for all employees on the
largest working shift.
E. The development will contain two
principal structures on one lot: Oregon
Manor and a two family home on Main
Street. MR-8 zoning limits each lot to one
principal structure.
F. At 41%, the development does not
meet the minimum landscape surface
ratio for the MR-8 zoning district of 50%.
Section 4. The approval of the General Development Plan will not be effective until all of the following conditions
have been satisfied:
A. Applicant must provide evidence
satisfactory to the Village that the owner
of the parking lot on Lincoln Street, North
of the Property (the off-site parking lot)
has granted an easement, for the benefit
of the Property, authorizing the use of not
less than 16 parking spaces in the off-site
parking lot by employees, residents and
guests of the Property.

B. Applicant must obtain approval


of and record a certified survey map in
substantially the same form attached as
Exhibit C.
C. Submission by the Applicant, to
the Village, of an amendment to the GDP,
that addresses the following issues: (1)
demonstrates a bufferyard of .20 opacity along the zoning district boundary to
the south of the proposed addition, in
compliance with Table 17-610(4)(b) of the
Village Code; (2) provides windows or
tall shrubs or other screening landscaping on the east elevation (Soden Drive)
and south elevation; (3) provides exterior finishing materials of fiber cement or
composite siding rather than aluminum
siding; (4) provides that materials used
for the building eaves and gables will be
fiber cement or composite siding rather
than aluminum; (5) provides that the columns on the north elevation should be
made of wood or faux wood, rather than
aluminum; and, (6) provides that the patio fencing should be metal picket, wood
picket or cedar. The amendment to the
GDP (if submitted), must be approved by
the Village Planning Consultant, and both
the amendment and the Village Planning
Consultants written approval of the
amendment, shall be deemed part of the
GDP approved by this ordinance. This
condition may alternatively be satisfied
by obtaining Village approval of a Specific Implementation Plan that addresses
the foregoing issues to the Villages satisfaction.
Section 5. The Property shall be
developed and used in full compliance
with the General Development Plan and
one or more Specific Implementation
Plans to be approved by the Village. The

350 Motorcycles

355 Recreational Vehicles

2013 KAWASAKI Ninja 300. 14K+miles.


Custom paint job on rims. Full Yoshirmura exhaust. Pirelli Diablo Rossi II tires.
Puig racing windscreen. Red shorty
levers. Carbon Fiber panels & tank protector. Fender eliminator. HID headlights.
LED integrated turn signal taillight. Single bar end mirror. Frame sliders,
Great beginner bike, super fun. looks and
sounds good. Most unique 300 you'll see.
$3700 OBO. 608-212-6429

FOR SALE: 2007 Tioga 26Q Motorhome. 6.8L engine. Very good condition,
only 38,600 miles. $25,000 Call 608291-2106

DRIVERS
HELPER/WAREHOUSE.
Looking for a person to help our driver
stock our products on shelves in the
grocery stores we deliver to, Grocery
store experience helpful. 35-40 hours
er week, M-F with few Saturday's during
holiday weeks. Call or e-mail Darrell at
L & L Foods 608-514-4148 or dmoen@
landfoods.com

SKI & PATIO SHOP


SALES ASSOCIATES
We are now accepting applications for
part time and full time positions in our
skiwear department during the winter
and outdoor furniture in the summer.
If you enjoy winter sports and working
with people, like to ski, or have a flair
for color and fashion, this might be the
opportunity you've been looking for.
Chalet is a fun and friendly place to
work with local owners who have great
appreciation for our employees and
customers. All positions are year round
jobs with flexible shifts from 15-40 hours
per week.
We offer a generous base salary with
incentive pay, great benefits, employee
discounts and free local skiing. Stop by
our store and apply in person:
Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Road
Madison, WI 53711
608-273-8263

CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It


pays to read the fine print.

BROOKLYN VETERANS MEMORIAL


CONSIGNMENT AUCTION
SATURDAY, SEPT. 17, 2016 10:00AM
4658 Hwy 92, Brooklyn, WI 53521

This large auction is to raise funds for the Brooklyn Area


Veterans Memorial. Auction is requesting quality donations
or consignments. Donations may be tax exempt under
Oregon-Brooklyn Legion Post 160 501C-19 status. Not all
items listed. No Junk allowed.
Go to www.wanlessauctiongroup.com for pictures.
VEHICLE: (Sold at Noon) 1999 Chev. Cavalier, 4 Dr, Auto,
74m Miles (Vets Moms Car) New Tires, Great Condition.
FIREARMS: H&R New England 12 Ga., 3'' Chamber, 28''
Bbl.,w/Box; Traditions Tracker 50 Cal. Muzzle Loader, Model
209, w/Box; Crossman Air Gun Model 750c.; Gun Cases etc.
KILN: Duncan Model KC 402, Electric, Stilts, Equipment etc.
Ready to go. AG EQUIPMENT: Bobcat Diesel, Model 734;
Flat 16 FT Tandem Utility Trailer; Horse Arena Drag; Single
Drag; Horse Feeder; Barn Fans; Old Fanning Mill; 3 Pt Hitch
Hoist. ART: Several Prints; Metal Arts Pieces; Elvis Bust;
BUILDING SUPPLIES: Construction Dimensional Lumber;
Blocks; Materials; 6000# Heavy Duty Shelving Assembly;
4 Units 4500# Industrial Shelving. COLLECTIBLES: School
House Globes; Michelob Neon Beer Sign; Old Style Neon
Guitar Sign; Old Bikes; Violin, Bow and Case; 48 Star Flag;
Old Toys; Wringer; & More. LAWN AND GARDEN: Lawn
Spreader/Sweepers; Toro 18HP Poland 52'' Commercial
Mower; Cub Cadet 2146 Riding Mower; Wheel Horse C-120
Riding Mower & Snow Blower; Ryobi 19 HP RT 190 Rider
Mower; Craftsman 32CC Tiller; Homelite & McCulloch
Chains; Wheelbarrows; Hand Carts; Lawn Sweeper; Reel
Lawn Mower; More coming in. RECREATION: Yamaha 4x4
ATV, Runs Well; Alum. Metal Framed 14 Cu. FT. Fish Boat w/
Trailer; (2) Alum. Canoes; Pair of 12'' Tires and Rims; 3 HP
Johnson Outboard; Snow Blade (Fits ATV); Rods and Reels;
Life Jackets; And others. SHOP/EQUIPMENT SUPPLIES:
Hand Tools; Cabinets; New Delta Table Saw; Craftsman /
Cutter; 8'' UL Drill Press; Miter Saw; (2) Pneumatic Nailers;
Battery Charger; Electrical Generator; 60 Hz. Elect. Welder;
OMC 295 Elect. Welder; Oxy Acetylene Torch and Tanks;
Toyota Gas Forklift, 12 FT.; Extension Ladders; Tool Chests,
Tarps; Rubber Made 4x8' ATV Cart; Etc. FURNITURE:
Shelving, Cabinets; Bookshelves; Couch; Love Seat; Coffee
Tables; Dresser w/Mirror; Childs Armoire; Wooden Bench;
Small Rocker; Piano Stool; And more. OTHER: Pallets of
Mystery Boxes; 20x30 FT. Tent; 4x8 FT. Cattle Comfort Pads;
Whirlpool Tub w/accessories; Miscellaneous. AUCTION
EQUIPMENT: (2) Extension Farm Display Wagons; PA
System etc.
TERMS: Cash Good Checks; Credit cards will have a service fee of $5.00. Sellers Commission will be donated to
American Legion Post #160 for the Monument. All items
are sold as is and adjustments are between buyer and
seller, not the Auction Company. 10% buyers fee applied.

WANLESS AUCTION & REALTY, LLC


4658 Hwy. 92, Brooklyn, WI 53521
Email: lyle@wanlessauctiongroup.com
Web: www.wanlessauctiongroup.com
Phone: (608) 516-5401 or 628-2755

adno=486492-01

402 Help Wanted, General


COOK & Dishwasher Full or Part time.
Pay based on experience. Apply at Koffee Kup 355 E. Main St, Stoughton
DISHWASHER, COOK,
WAITRESS, & DELI STAFF
WANTED.
Applications available at
Sugar & Spice Eatery.
317 Nora St. Stoughton.
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.

NOW HIRING: RHD plumbing, Inc. is


looking to enhance their growing team.
the following positions are available:
Project Coordinator Assistant, Estimator/
Service Assistant, & general Laborers.
All positions are Full time, Hourly Benefits include: Health Insurance, Dental
Insurance, 401K, Vacation pay. Wage
based on experience. How to Apply:
Apply in person at RHD Plumbing, Inc. or
find our posting on Indeed. RHD Plumbing, Inc. is an EEO/AA Participant.

Donnie Doyle
Shop/property Maintenance/
huMMel auction
Saturday, September 24 10:00 am
4232 olD Stage rD., Brooklyn Wi
auction Location: From Madison-Hwy 14 towards Evansville,
East on Old Stage Rd. approx. 1 miles.
This is an exceptional sale with most items being very well kept and
clean. Selling contents of personal shop, lawn and garden supplies,
home maintenance items, a small amount of household items and a
large collection of Hummel figurines. Most items are new or like new.
Lawn tractorS and utiLity vehicLe: JD Z465 zero turn
mower, 54" w/JD 27HP engine (60 hrs-2 yrs old); JD GX335 (297
hrs); JD X485, cab w/heat (169 hrs); 47" snow blower; 54" plow;
54" deck; Club Car XRT800E electric utility vehicle (new batteries).
Lawn & Garden equipment: Agrifab HD2000 4 wheel
lawn cart; utility trailer; DR walk behind string trimmer; Troy-Bilt rear
tine garden tiller; lawn blowers; 5 HP power broom; 20' fiberglass
extension ladder; hoses on reels; live traps; foothold traps.
tooLS & Shop equipment: Puma 60 gal. upright air compressor; bench grinder; table saw; nail guns; drill press; work benches; bench vise; full bolt rack; assorted nuts & bolts in containers; saw
horses; bolt cutters; aluminum pipe wrenches; Generac generator;
Chicago Electric welders; battery charges; jump start packs.
pouLtry equipment: Plastic tube feeders; 2 gal. waterers; misc
feeders & waterers; portable electric netting fence.
miSc.: Toy Model T car w/3.5 HP Tecumseh engine; Lawn ornaments; single burner propane stoves.
hummeL: Close to 200 pieces of Hummel figurines, plates, wall
plaques, bells and books. Call for complete inventory list.
houSehoLd: GE upright freezer; micro fridge; Nesco roaster;
meat slicer; lawn chairs; coolers; shop vac; luggage; electric wok;
electric kettle; rice cooker; pressure cooker; fryer; electric griddle;
Hoover steam vac; hand held vac.
termS: All purchases must be settled day of sale. Cash or check
w/letter of credit. ID req. Number system will be used. No Buyers
fee. Not responsible for accidents or losses. This list is subject to
change. All announcements made sale day take precedence over
printed matter.
auctioneer: Ryan George, WI Registered Auctioneer #1971.
www.georgerealtyandauction.com

adno=378834-01

SUPER 8 VERONA
Immediate Openings!
Assistant Front Desk Supervisor (F/T)
$10-11/hour.
Front Desk Associates:
(F/T, P/T )$10/hour
Driver (P/T)$10/hr
Housekeeper (P/T)$8.50/hr
Experience preferred,
but willing to train
right people.
Paid training, vacation, uniform. Free
room nights.
Apply in person:
131 Horizon Dr., Verona

423 Work Wanted


EXPERIENCED
BACKGROUND
screened Childcare Nanny OR Elder
care woman available From 8am-2:30pm
in Oregon. 608-469-5912

434 Health Care, Human


Services & Child Care
GREAT PART time opportunity. Woman
in Verona seeks help with personal cares
and chores. Two weekend days/mth
(5hrs/shift) and one overnight/mth. Pay
is $11.66/awake hrs & $7.25/sleep hrs.
A driver's license and w/comfort driving
a van a must! Please call 608-347-4348
if interested.
UNITED CEREBRAL Palsy of Dane
County is looking for experienced, confident care providers. We support a wide
variety of children and adults with developmental disabilities throughout Dane
County. Part-time positions available
immediately! For more information, or to
request an application, please visit our
website at www.ucpdane.org or contact
Shannon at shannonmolepske@ucpdane.org or (608) 273-3318. AA/EOE

446 Agriculture,
Landscaping & Lawn Care
STUDENT HELP Wanted: Sunday
8:30am-2:30pm.
Starts 9/18-Xmas.
Lawn, leaf racking, various house & yard
projects. Must have car & able lift to 40
lbs. $12.50 per hour. Email kristine@
kegonsa.com & leave phhone number.

B & R PUMPING
SERVICE LLC
Dave Johnson

(608) 835-8195
We recommend septic
pumping every two years

Increase Your sales opportunitiesreach over 1.2 million households!


Advertise in our Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 835-6677.
ANTIQUES
Chippewa Falls Antique Show at Northern Wisconsin State
Fairgrounds. 9-5 Friday, September 30. 9-4 Saturday, October
1. Admission $5. Food Available. Free Parking. Professional
Dealers. (CNOW)

HELP WANTED- SALES


Customized Newspaper Advertising, the sales affiliate of the
Wisconsin Newspaper Association, is seeking an Outside
Account Executive. Located in Madison Wisconsin-Represent
newspapers across Wisconsin selling advertising solutions in
print and digital. Work with base accounts+ responsible for new
business. Cover letter/resume: sfett@cnaads.com (CNOW)

HELP WANTED- MISCELLANEOUS


NOW HIRING: Work and Travel. 6 Openings Now. $20+ PER
MISCELLANEOUS
HOUR. Full-Time Travel, Paid Training, Transportation Provided. ADVERTISE HERE! Advertise your product or recruit an
Ages 18+, BBB Accredited. Apply www.protekchemical.com applicant in over 178 Wisconsin newspapers across the state!
1-866-751-9114. (CNOW)
Only $300/week. Thats $1.68 per paper! Call this paper or 800227-7636 www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
adno=486170-01

General Development Plan and Specific


Implementation Plan shall constitute the
zoning regulations for the Property, and
may be enforced as any other zoning regulation in the Village of Oregon. A copy
of the General Development Plan and the
Specific Implementation Plan shall be
maintained and kept on file by the Village
Clerk.
Section 6. If the conditions in Section 4 of this Ordinance have not been
satisfied by 12:00 noon on December
31, 2017, or such later date as the Village
Board may approve, this Ordinance shall
automatically, and without any further
action, become null and void and of no
further force or effect.
The above and foregoing Ordinance
was duly adopted by the Village Board of
the Village of Oregon at its meeting held
on September 12, 2016, by a vote of 5 in
favor, 0 opposed, and 0 not voting.
APPROVED:
By ______________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
By ______________________________
Peggy S. K. Haag, Village Clerk
Attachments:
Exhibit A: Plunkett Raysich Architects,
LLP Narrative dated August 16, 2016,
1 page.
Exhibit B: Plans prepared by Plunkett
Raysich Architects, LLP, 16 pages.
Exhibit C: Certified Survey Map, Sheet
1 of 4.
First & Second Reading: September
12, 2016
Approved: September 12, 2016
Posted: September 13, 2016
Published: September 15, 2016
WNAXLP

452 General
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton MonFri 4 hours/night. Visit our website: www.
capitalcityclean.com or call our office:
608-831-8850

532 Fencing
BADGERLAND FENCING, LLC.
Agricultural, Residential, Commercial
Fencing. Quality work. Competitive
pricing. Free estimates.
608-444-9266

548 Home Improvement


A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Summer-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
RECOVER PAINTING Offers carpentry,
drywall, deck restoration and all forms of
painting Recover urges you to join in the
fight against cancer, as a portion of every
job is donated to cancer research. Free
estimates, fully insured, over 20 years of
experience. Call 608-270-0440.
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160

554 Landscaping, Lawn,


Tree & Garden Work
ART'S LAWNCARE: Mowing,
trimming, roto-tilling. Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
GARDEN MAINTENANCE & Clean-Up.
Completed Master Gardener Course.
Connie 608-235-4689.
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOW REMOVAL
Residential & Commercial
Fully Insured.
608-873-7038 or 608-669-0025

602 Antiques & Collectibles


COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL
& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
MUSEUM
"Wisconsin's Largest Antique Mall"!
Enter daily 8am-4pm 78,000 SF
200 Dealers in 400 Booths
Third floor furniture, locked cases
Location: 239 Whitney St
Columbus, WI 53925
920-623-1992
www.columbusantiquemall.com
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
ALL ADS SUBMITTED SUBJECT TO
APPROVAL BY PUBLISHER OF THIS PAPER.

PAR Concrete, Inc.


Driveways
Floors
Patios
Sidewalks
Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)

adno=455980-01

September 15, 2016

adno=454249-01

14

ConnectOregonWI.com

WOODWORKING TOOLS FOR


SALE:
Craftsman Router and Router table
w/vacuum and Router blades $250.
10" table saw. Cast Iron table
Craftsman brand w/vacuum and extra
blades in wall mountable storage
container. $250.
Delta 10" compound adjustable table
miter saw w/electric quick brake
(#36220 Type III) $155.
Craftsman Soldering Gun (w/case)
$10
Power Fast Brad (Nail) Gun-1" $30.
S-K Socket Set 1/4 SAE. 3/8" both
Sae & Metric (speed wrench, breaker
bar & ratchet included) $25 (in case)
Bench grinder on cast iron stand $70
Dowel set-up kit $35
Call John 608-845-1552

705 Rentals
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS
Apartments for Seniors 55+, currently
has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $750 per month, includes
heat, water, and sewer.
608-835-6717 Located at:
139 Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
STOUGHTON- 108 West Street, 2 bedroom, appliances, water, A/C heat, ceiling fan, on site laundry,well kept and
maintained. Off street parking. Next to
park. On site manager. Available September 1st, 2016. $770 a month. Please
call 608-238-3815 or email weststreetapartments@yahoo.com with questions

646 Fireplaces,
Furnaces/Wood, Fuel

STOUGHTON-112 N. Forest. Beautiful


3 Story Townhouse. 2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Huge kitchen, natural wood decor, decks/
patios, large yard, laundry. Water, Hot
water & sewer included. Available 9/1.
$850.00. Call Connie 608-271-0101

SEASONED SPLIT OAK,


Hardwood. Volume discount. Will
deliver. 608-609-1181

652 Garage Sales


STOUGHTON- 1000 Keenan Ln. 9/169/17 8am-5pm. Antique Trunk, sofa,
2-chairs, record player, pool table. something for everyone
STOUGHTON- 1731 Severson Dr 9/159/17 10-5pm. Crafts Quilting Sale. Material, notions, patterns etc
STOUGHTON- 2763 Alice Circle 9/169/17 8am-? Tools, Household items and
misc
STOUGHTON- 2825 Williams Dr 9/15
& 9/16 8am-noon. BARN SALE Vintage books & magazines, collectables,
antiques, holiday decor, baskets, tins,
craft supplies and much more! See ad
on Craigslist.
STOUGHTON 551 Cty Hwy-N 3-miles
South of 51. 9/16 8am-5pm. 9/17
8am-3pm. Books, toys, collectibles, furniture, kitchen, bath, aquariums, much
more
STOUGHTON- 925 Roosevelt Moving
Sale! 9/16 2-6pm, 9/17 8-noon. Patio set,
large dresser, rug shampooer, more

688 Sporting Goods


& Recreational

STOUGHTON 1616 Kenilworth Ct.


Large 2-BR apts available now.
Pets welcome. Many feature new wood
laminate flooring.
$775-$825/mo. 608-831-4035.
www.madtownrentals.com
STOUGHTON, 2 b/r apt, $770, includes
heat, water/sewer. 608-222-1981, x3. No
dogs, 1 cat ok. EHO
STOUGHTON 3-BEDROOM lower level
of two-flat, near downtown, River Bluff
School. Newly renovated. Central air.
W/D, water included. No pets, no smoking $895/month +security deposit. 608873-7655 or 608-225-9033.
STOUGHTON- 525 W South St, Upper.
No Pets/Smoking. Heat included, stove
and refrigerator. $750/mo. 1st and last
months rent. 608-219-4531
STOUGHTON- NEWER Duplex 3 bedroom 3 bath 2 car. Laundry room with
washer/dryer large family room, stainless
appliances extra storage $1795+utilities.
2375 sq ft Available 9/15 or 10/01/16
Evans Properties LLC 608-839-9100

720 Apartments
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+. 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $750 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. Located at
300 Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI
53589 608-877-9388

FOR SALE
1 SET OF MEN'S AND 1 SET OF
WOMEN'S GOLF CLUBS. EACH
COMES WITH GOLF BAG, PULL
CART AND HEAD COVERS. $100
PER SET
Men's full set (for tall right handed
player)
Women's full set (left handed player)
Contact: 608-845-1552
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.

STOUGHTON LARGE ONE Bedroom


2nd Floor Flat.
Quiet east side neighborhood. Heat
Included. Separate entrance. No
smoking, pets considered. $695/month.
Available Oct. 15. 608-873-2016

adno=486177-01

Minimum
Bid: $275,000

CREEKSIDE CUSTOM HOME

DEER POINT STORAGE


Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$60/month
10x15=$70/month
10x20=$80/month
10x25=$90/month
12x30=$115/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
OREGON SELF-STORAGE
10x10 through 10x25
month to month lease
Call Karen Everson at
608-835-7031 or
Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-520-0240

View: 12:00pm - 2:00pm, Sept. 17

Part-Time Commercial Cleaners Wanted!!

801 Office Space For Rent

Programmed Cleaning Inc. has several openings


for part time cleaners in the Madison, WI and
surrounding areas, FOR IMMEDIATE HIRE!!

OFFICE SPACES FOR RENT


In Oregon facing 15th hole
on golfcourse
Free Wi-Fi, Parking and
Security System
Conference rooms available
Kitchenette-Breakroom
Autumn Woods Prof. Centre
Marty 608-835-3628

Hours: 3-4 hours per eveing, start time 5-5:30pm,


M-F, NO WEEKENDS!
Hourly pay rate starts at $9.00.
Must be independent, reliable and detail oriented.
Must have own transportation.

970 Horses

Apply now in person at 2001 W. Broadway, Mon.


Fri., 9 a.m. 5 p.m. If you have questions please call
608-222-0217, or fill out an online application at:
www.programmedcleaning.com

WALMERS TACK SHOP


16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725

990 Farm: Service


& Merchandise
FRITZ PAINTING Barns, rusty roofs,
metal buildings. Free-estimate . 608221-3510
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.

WISCONSIN STATE
JOURNAL CARRIER

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon


Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.

The Wisconsin State Journal


is looking for a carrier to
deliver in the Stoughton
area. Must be available early
A.M.s, 7 days a week, have
a dependable vehicle. Route
earns approx. $1,000/month.

DANE COUNTYS MARKETPLACE.


The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
873-6671 or 835-6677.

For more information call


Pat at 608-212-7216

312.278.0600

8% Buyers Fee. Fine and Company WI, LLC License #936681-091 Renee Jones, Reg. WI Auctioneer #2110

Call 608-442-1898

WE ARE HIRING
Part-time positions implementing project-based learning while
building relationships with families and children in grades K-5.
Varying schedules Mon.-Fri., earning $10-12.50 per hour with no nights,
weekends or holidays
Program locations: Stoughton, McFarland, Madison, Middleton,
Mt. Horeb & Waunakee

Apply online at
www.wisconsinyouthcompany.org/employment |

WERE HIRING!
Located in Fitchburg, WI

A small town, Five Star Skilled Nursing


Facility is seeking WI licensed CNAs. If
youre looking for a position where youll
be appreciated and where your input
matters, come and join our growing team.

EOE

Assembler
Monday Thursday
(2:15pm 12:15am)

We are an Equal Employment


Opportunity Employer.
adno=486122-01

Apply at:
www.oregonmanor.biz or
call Deb at (608) 835-3535.

Youll work in a fast-paced environment,


cleaning and stocking equipment used by
our culinary team. You will also participate in
kitchen cleaning and a variety of other tasks.
As a member of our dynamic team, youll work in
a state-of-the-art, air conditioned facility, enjoy
consistent, full-time hours, earn competitive
wages, and receive benefits befitting a leading
software company (401k match, great health
insurance, life insurance, performance bonuses
and stock appreciation rights).
To learn more and to apply visit careers.epic.com

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EXCELLENT COMPENSATION
& BENEFITS INCLUDE:
n

Hourly Rate of $18.23


plus $.40 shift premium

Medical

Dental

401(k)/Pension Plans

On-Site Training

Holiday and Vacation Pay


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APP LY ON LINE AT

www.subzero-wolf.com/careers

Employee-Owned.
Forward Thinking.
Community Focused.

Community Reporter/
Page Designer

2016-2017 School Year

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Seeking caregivers to provide care


to seniors in their homes.
Need valid DL and dependable vehicle.
FT & PT positions available.
Flexible scheduling.

Epic is looking for a reliable, full-time dishwasher


to help our dining service run smoothly while
serving over 6,000 meals each day.

come join the YMca and make a


difference in a childs life!
We are looking for lead teachers in Oregon who will
create a fun and positive environment.

YOU can make a DIFFERENCE here

Comfort Keepers in Madison

Dishwasher Wanted

Lead Teacher

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Broker Participation Invited

15

PROGRAMMED CLEANING, INC.

If you can make a positive impact, have fun while


getting a free membership, complete an application
at: http://www.ymcadanecounty.or/work.

94 WATER, ROCKDALE, WI (Minutes from Madison)

3,200+ sq. ft. artisan home surrounded by nature


along the Koshkonong Creek with beautiful
natural light, walls of windows, sparkling water
views, soaring ceilings, 2 or 3 bedrooms with spa
baths and much more!

FineAndCompany.com

C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904

ALL ADS SUBMITTED SUBJECT TO


APPROVAL BY PUBLISHER OF THIS
PAPER.

SEPT. 20 REAL ESTATE

UNION ROAD STORAGE


10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road

ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE


10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900

Oregon Observer

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750 Storage Spaces For Rent

WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.


We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114

adno=482982-01

696 Wanted To Buy

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642 Crafts & Hobbies

September 15, 2016

If you want to be involved in relaying information


people cant nd on Google, CNN or even the local
TV station, take a look at Unied Newspaper Group.
We are looking for a journalist with good
organizational skills who can handle a range of
duties that will include reporting, photography, editing
and possibly pagination with InDesign, as well as
familiarity with websites and social media. Beats
could include community and features, government
or both, depending on the skills of the top candidate.
Photo equipment is provided.
The job is 35 hours per week, with a full benets
package available. The company is part of
Woodward Community Media, a division of
Woodward Communications Inc., an
employee-owned company based in Dubuque, Iowa.

To learn more about these opportunities,


submit your application and resume by
September 15th at www.wcinet.com/careers
Woodward Communications, Inc., is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
WCI maintains a tobacco-free campus.
adno=486079-01

16

September 15, 2016

Church: Options weighed


Continued from page 1
The study called for
increasing the library
from its present 10,500
square feet to 35,000
square feet. The existi n g s e n i o r c e n t e r,
which shares a parking
lot with the library, is
7,700 square feet.
Slavney said the main
advantage of building on the North Main
Street site is it would
allow the village to
sequence the construction without having to
move more than once.
If a library were to be
built there, the senior
center could stay where
it is and expand to
where the library now
exists next to it, he suggested.
Slavney explained
the main drawback to
the village buying the
property is that its in
a tax-increment financing district, and placing
a municipal building
there would reduce the
value of the district,
Doing so would also
reduce its cash flow.
As a general principle, you dont want to
reduce the value in the
district, he said.
Vi l l a g e P r e s i d e n t
Steve Staton said he
expects the board to
give village staff some
direction next week to
either continue pursuing the idea of acquiring the property or not.

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon Observer

The owners need


to know, because they
have other people
interested, he told the
Observer. They cant
wait forever for us to
decide what to do.
The property
includes the former
Peoples United Methodist Church, built in
1862, and a former
school that was constructed in 1972. The
church was abandoned
in 2004 when the congregation built a new
church on the villages
west side.
Investors Marshall
Mennenga and Robin Roberts bought the
buildings shortly after
they were vacated and
for the past 12 years
have been trying to
either develop the property or sell it.
In 2012, Mennenga
told the Observer he
and Roberts were thinking about demolishing
the buildings and turning the area into a green
site after their plans to
develop the parcel fell
through. That was after
the investors in 2008
had planned to build an
assisted-living facility
themselves but ran up
against the nationwide
recession and couldnt
put together financing
for their plan.
Contact Bill Livick at
bill.livick@wcinet.com

Village of Oregon

Poole resigns from Village Board


BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group

Longtime Trustee Eric


Poole resigned suddenly from
the Village Board Monday.
Poole, whose wife is
employed by the village, said
he was upset that he wasnt
going to be allowed to speak
during Mondays meeting on
an agenda item a 1.5 percent

salary increase
for village
employees
because of the
villages ethics rules. So
he decided to
resign his seat.
P o o l e h a s Poole
served continuously on the board since being
elected in April 2001.

M i ke G r a c z ( v i l l a g e
administrator) and I had a disagreement about the employee
raise, Poole said. I let him
know what my feelings were
and said maybe in the long run
it would be best for everybody
if I quit. He said I cant tell
you what to do, and so I handed in my keys and left.
After Mondays meeting,
Poole told the Observer he and

his wife are planning to sell


their home and move to another community, so he would
have been leaving the board
some time in the near future
anyway.
Ive been on for over 16
years and just thought its time
for somebody else, he said.
Contact Bill Livick at bill.
livick@wcinet.com

Liquor: Arena will sell beer and wine for Fridays game
Continued from page 1
Directors decided I should be the (alcohol) agent instead of a restaurant operator.
I am going to be in charge solely as the
alcohol manager, he told the board, adding he is an independent agent representing the ice arena board.
Peterson said hed met with the Oregon
school board last month, which voted 5-2
against alcohol sales at the ice arena as
long as OASIS operates in the facility.
He told the Village Board he would be
willing to remove alcohol from the ice arena when the Whalers arent playing, have
deliveries made outside of school hours
and remove all beer advertising signs
when OASIS is in session.
Village attorney Matt Dregne told the
board it has to decide two things: if Peterson is acceptable as the alcohol agent and
whether the village should grant the ice
arena an alcohol license.
A member of the OIA board, Jason
Leatherberry, told trustees that alcohol
sales would provide supplemental revenue
to help the ice arena remain financially

viable and benefit the Wisconsin Whalers.


The Whalers head coach and general
manager Tom McDermott told the Village Board the Whalers are the only team
in the league that doesnt sell beer during
games. He said selling alcohol would generate $10,000 to $12,000 a year and would
help us immensely.
Leatherberry said the ice arena board
would monitor the alcohol sales and do
our best to make sure that everything is on
the up and up at all times.
Peterson vowed to have security officers
in place when alcohol is being sold and
said he would hire only licensed bartenders.
We are willing to start small and be
under the microscope, he said.
After the meeting, Village President
Steve Staton told the Observer granting a
picnic license gives the ice arena a chance
to try it out Friday night and see how that
works.
He credited the organization for making
progress in dealing with the issue.
The OIA board applied for a picnic
license last year for two dates in September, which the Village Board denied.
Then, and again last month, the Oregon

School Board opposed selling alcohol in


the ice arena as long as students are receiving instruction in the facility.
Last year, rink manager Ben Cowan represented the OIA in its quest for a liquor
license.
Ice Arena representatives withdrew their
application for a liquor license in August
one day after Cowan was arrested in the
village for alleged drunken driving what
would have been his fourth offense and a
felony. Charges were dismissed in May.
But the organization appears to have
gotten past that rough period, and on Tuesday, Staton said the group presented very
well at Mondays meeting.
Its by far the best theyve done, which
is good, he said. I think people are beginning to get the message that in doing sales
of alcohol, we have a high priority that its
done right.
Last year they put in for a license and
nobody showed up, he added. So theyre
kind of getting this figured it out, and
thats good because they need to if theyre
going to make this work.
Contact Bill Livick at bill.livick@wcinet.
com

When others lift

ANCHOR

and change direction

OCB REMAINS LOCAL AND ON A STEADY COURSE.

733 North Main Street


Oregon,WI 53575
(608) 835-3168

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