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THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS
THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016
H EALTH AND WELLNESS
THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of

pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN

Barb Swoboda of Swoboda Chiropractic demonstrates how the two light-emitting diodes on her Erchonia low-level laser are used to focus on an area of the client’s body that is experiencing pain.

LASER FOCUS

Light therapy is being used as a healing stimulant

THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of

by mike JoRDAN Staff Writer

Barb Swoboda of Swo - boda Chiropractic has been treating her clients’ pain for years and keeps abreast of changes in her field that

can benefit her clients. One of those changes is not nec- essarily new to chiroprac- tics, but is to her practice and the area — low-level

laser treatment.

“Low-level laser is a light therapy using light at different frequencies and pulsations to stimulate healing,” Swoboda said. “There are a whole mul- titude of things it can be used for to help in reducing

or eliminating pain, includ- ing acute and chronic pain in the neck and shoulders, joints, plantar fasciitis or pain in the arch of the

feet, tendonitis, bronchitis,

sprains and strains, colic in babies, Crohn’s disease, a lot of intestinal issues, shingles, bed wetting and ear issues.” Swoboda uses the low- level laser treatments in conjunction with the ad -

justments she makes to her clients, which helps those adjustments last longer, she said. “The low-level laser treatment helps with a person’s pain in all soft- tissue stuff,” she said. “It allows the body to work as it should and re-energizes cells. It is safe for all ages and works through a per- son’s clothes. It is a cold,

See LASER on C4

Local hospitals, nursing homes recognized for flu vaccinations

Sanford Jackson, Colonial Manor win blue ribbons

Area hospitals and nurs- ing homes are among the nearly 140 across the state to achieve staff flu vac- cination rates of 70 percent or greater. At least 90 percent

o f s t a f f members at Sanford Jackson Medical Center

THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of

Kristen

Ehresmann

in Jackson and Colonial Manor Nursing Home in Lakefield were vaccinated against influenza. Sanford Worthington Medical Cen- ter in Worthington also hit

the 90-percent mark. Reaching that 90-per - cent mark earns the fa- cilities prestigious blue- ribbon awards through the Minnesota Department of Health’s FluSafe program. In the sixth year of the FluSafe program, 153 health care facilities par- ticipated during the 2015- 216 flu season. Of the 139 facilities earning ribbons, 63 reached vaccination levels of 90 percent or greater, earning blue rib- bons; 47 were in the 80- to 89-percent range, earn - ing red ribbons; and 29 reached 70 to 79 percent, earning white ribbons. “Hospitals and nurs - ing homes in our FluSafe program were striving for ribbons — and the vast majority got one,” said Kristen Ehresmann, di -

See FLU on C2

FluSafe

Vaccinating staff, protecting patients

THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of
o f s t a Results 2015-16 v 63 Blue Ribbon a Winners 35 hospitals 28
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t
a
Results 2015-16
v
63
Blue Ribbon
a
Winners
35 hospitals
28 nursing homes
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e
d
o f s t a v 47 Red Ribbon a Winners 25 hospitals 22 nursing homes
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s
t
a
v
47
Red Ribbon
a
Winners
25
hospitals
22 nursing homes
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o f s t a v 29 White Ribbon a Winners 17 hospitals 12 nursing homes
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29
White Ribbon
a
Winners
17
hospitals
12 nursing homes
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Source: Minnesota Department of Health

Kline delays retirement

by mARc STRom Staff Writer

E a r l i e r t h i s y e a r, Dr. Ronald Kline gave thought to retiring a f t e r a lengthy career as a health care pro - vider,

THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of

more than

Dr. Ronald

20 years

Kline

of which have been spent in Jack- son County. As Kline’s retirement date approached, the de- cision to say farewell to his longtime patients be- come more difficult, lead- ing to a decision to stay around a bit longer, help- ing the Sanford Medical Centers in Jackson and Lakefield in the transition to fill his shoes. Kline said he looks at

additional time with San- ford in Jackson County not as a continuation of work, but as an opportuni- ty to continue serving the people of the community. Because of his view of the people he treats, more time with his patients is also good medicine for him. “I don’t think of pa - tients as patients,” Kline said. “I think of them as people.” The doctor of osteo - pathic medicine consid- ers the communities of Jackson and Lakefield to be filled with “beautiful and talented people,” and he is amazed by the folks he treats. While Kline made his rounds to the Sanford clinics, hospital, emer - gency rooms and nursing homes in the county, he heard folks lamenting

See KLINE on C5

Natural infertility treatment close to home

THURSDAY, SepT embeR 15, 2016 H EALTH AND WELLNESS pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of

pHoTo bY JeSSicA oYe

Women from near and far, up to three hours away, are coming to Sacred Heart Mercy Health Care Center in Jackson to seek help and expertise from Dr. Marie Paul Lockerd.

by JeSSicA oYe Staff Writer

Important work is hap- pening in the battle against infertility — right here in Jackson County. Women from near and far, up to three hours away, are coming to Sacred Heart Mercy Health Care Center in Jackson to seek help and expertise from Dr. Marie Paul Lockerd. Lockerd serves her pa- tients in two ways. She works with female patients using the Creighton Model Fertility Care System, a nat- ural family planning system that teaches a woman to learn how her menstrual and fertility cycles func - tion. With this acquired knowledge, a woman is bet- ter able to understand how her body works and use that information to maintain her health and make family planning decisions. The process is beyond counting days on a calendar and utilizes daily observa- tions of biological mark - ers that indicate times of

fertility. “This can be used to avoid or achieve pregnan- cy,” Lockerd said. Once a woman becomes familiar with her cycle and her body, Lockerd said, it creates better understand- ing of the emotional ups and downs a woman may ex - perience during her cycle and can also help identify abnormalities. Lockerd said the information is impor- tant to know as a couple, as it allows men a greater understanding, respect and appreciation for a woman’s body and everything hap- pening within it. The natural family plan- ning system is 96 percent effective at preventing pregnancy — the same percentage as commonly used birth control, but with none of the cost and side ef- fects. The key to the success of the program, Lockerd said, is the avoidance of intercourse during fertile times. For couples who are not dealing with infertil - ity issues, the method is

See INFERTILITY on C2

C2

Health & Wellness

Thursday, September 15, 2016

C2 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 choose the right type of oTc pain reliever

choose the right type of oTc pain reliever

To alleviate everyday aches and pains, from headaches to muscle aches, many reach for an over-the-counter pain reliever. It’s essential to know how to choose the right type of pain reliever. But a new survey suggests many

do not. A full one in five Ameri- cans do not consider any key safety factors when choosing which OTC pain reliever to take, accord- ing to a national survey conducted by the U.S. Pain Foundation with support from McNeil Consum - er Healthcare. Though 97 percent say they feel

confident when choos -

ing which pain reliever to take, more than half of Americans don’t even consider their pre-existing medical conditions before reaching for an OTC, and two in three do not consid- er other OTC medications they are taking. Medical professionals say keeping one’s personal health profile in mind is crucial in selecting which OTC pain reliever is most appropriate. It’s easy to

reach for the first OTC seen on the shelf, but not every OTC is appropriate for everyone. “When you’re in pain, it’s always important to consider your current health profile first,” said Dr. David Biondi, senior director of Medical Affairs and Clinical Research at McNeil Consumer Health- care. “A pain reliever that was right for you in the past may not be the right choice for you now.” Paul Gileno, the founder of the U.S. Pain Founda- tion, an organization dedi- cated to serving those who live with pain conditions, said finding the right bal- ance between effective relief and safety consider- ations is the key to making the right choice. “When choosing an OTC pain reliever, consumers should always consider their age, current health conditions and other medi- cines they are taking,” he said. “People with pre-ex- isting medical conditions, or those that are currently taking other medicines, need to be especially care- ful when choosing an OTC

medication for pain re - lief.” In order to make more informed decisions when choosing which OTC is appropriate for them, con- sumers can follow these five tips for choosing and using OTCs:

  • 1. Choose the OTC pain

reliever that’s right based on an individual health profile — pre-existing

health conditions, age or other medicines. When in doubt, ask.

  • 2. Always read and fol-

low the Drug Facts label, whether it’s the first time

or the 100th time. Drug Facts labels change.

  • 3. Stick to the recom -

mended dose and keep

track of other medicines being taken and how they might interact.

  • 4. Know the active in-

gredient in medicine and

be sure to take only one medicine that contains the same type of active ingre- dient at a time.

  • 5. Avoid taking OTC

pain relievers longer than directed on the label, un- less told to do so by your health care provider.

INFERTILITY: Close to home

Continued from C1

76 percent effective at achieving pregnancy during the first month, and that success rate goes up to 99 percent after six months. When natural family planning isn’t enough and patients are strug- gling with infertility, Lockerd turns to her expertise and training in NaPro Technology, a natural procreative medical science de - scribed to have the abil- ity to unleash the power of a woman’s cycle. Lockerd has been cer- tified as a medical con- sultant for NaPro Tech- nology since 2001. While the technology may fall under what is referred to as “morally accept- able,” Lockerd does not focus on those terms. “This is beyond reli- gion,” she said. “This is science.” NaPro Technology monitors and maintains a woman’s gynecologi- cal and reproductive health. Lockerd uses the process to help identify the issues surrounding a woman’s infertility and, when abnormalities are found, the treatment is designed to work coop- eratively with the wom- an’s cycle. The cooperative treat- ment Lockerd utilizes is the use of hormones as a medical intervention during the identified

abnormal times. She said once she is able to identify the timing of the abnormal- ity, whether before concep- tion or after, the correct hormones are given to work naturally with the woman’s body. Over the years, Lockerd has witnessed much suc - cess for the couples who have come into her of-

unsuccessful, she refers them to a specialty clinic in Omaha, Neb., that can continue to use the NaPro Technology process in a greater degree of special- ization.

NaPro is not only for those women who are hop- ing to become pregnant. Lockerd said cooperative treatments are success-

fice. Within

her

prac -

tice, Lock -

e r d

h a s

“THiS iS beYoND ReligioN. THiS iS ScieNce.”

ful in man - aging other

gynecologi-

cal health

seen great

Dr. Marie Paul Lockerd

issues such

results for women who have struggled with mul- tiple miscarriages and a history of preterm birth. Using NaPro Technology, Lockerd said couples deal- ing with infertility are see- ing 40 percent success rates in achieving and maintain- ing a healthy pregnancy, compared to the signifi - cantly lower single-digit success rates of more in- vasive and considerably more expensive infertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization. For Lockerd’s patients, the cost is typi - cally low, with office visit co-pays and occasional lab work. Lockerd said there are some patients who will need more than she can provide at her office. She said she typically works with women for six months to a year, depending on what they decide, and if they are still

as menstru- al cramps, premenstrual syndrome, ovarian cysts, polycystic ovarian disease, postpar - tum depression, irregular or abnormal bleeding and other problems. While she has a passion for the process, she said she has chosen not to advertise the service for many years due to the sensitive nature surrounding infertility for women. Most of her clients have come to her based on word-of-mouth advertising, but she said she feels the time is right to let every- one know there are options locally. Lockerd is a board certi- fied family physician and has spent her entire prac- tice serving the community of Jackson at Sacred Heart Mercy Care Center. She been with the local clinic since 1996.

Source: Minnesota Department of Health

Highlights:

  • 153 hospitals and nursing homes participated.

  • 139 (91%) of facilities reached 70% or higher.

63 (41%) of facilities reached the HP2020 goal of 90% or higher.

FLU: Local facilities recognized

Continued from C1

rector of infectious disease epidemiology, prevention and control at MDH. “All FluSafe participants made a commitment to promote flu vaccination for their employees, and they did a

great job. We congratulate and thank them for their hard work.” Ehresmann said many pa- tients in hospitals and nurs- ing homes are at high risk for complications from flu.

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The FluSafe program aims to get all health care work- ers, except those with medi- cal exemptions, at hospitals and nursing homes in Min- nesota vaccinated against flu each season. A high vac- cination rate among health care workers reduces the chances of passing flu to patients, said Ehresmann and Denise Dunn, assis - tant section manager of the vaccine-preventable dis - ease section at MDH, and it helps keep employees and their families healthy. “Participating in FluSafe shows a commitment to patient safety,” Dunn said. “The participating facilities are taking action to prevent the spread of flu by encour- aging their employees to get vaccinated.” The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has set a goal of vaccinating 90 percent of health care workers in its Healthy Peo- ple 2020 objectives. Health care facilities participating in the FluSafe program re- ceive guidance and access to tools and promotional materials from MDH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help them increase their rates. The facilities re - cord and document their vaccination rates through the state’s immunization information system, the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection. There are 147 hospitals and 377 nursing homes in the state of Minnesota.

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C4

Health & Wellness

Thursday, September 15, 2016

C4 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of Swoboda

pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN

Barb Swoboda of Swoboda Chiropractic programs her Erchonia low-level laser prior to using it on a client’s area of pain.

LASER: A healing stimulant

Continued from C1

not hot laser treatment.” But low-level laser treat- ments cannot be used on people with active cancers or pacemakers or on preg- nant women. “You don’t necessarily have to be a chiropractic patient to have this treat- ment,” Swoboda said. “And a person can be going for chiropractic treatments somewhere else and come in to have this done.” The handheld low-level laser uses diodes that emit light, which Swoboda fo - cuses on whatever part of

the body is experiencing pain and the result is an increase in healing of the area that hurts, helping it to get better and deal with the pain. Laser light en - ergy goes deep into tissue using different frequencies and pulsations, she said. “The light from the laser stimulates different re - sponses in the body, such as reduction of inflamma- tion, improves circulation and immune responses stimulating nerve func - tion,” Swoboda said. Swoboda learned about

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low-level laser treatment at seminars and through continuing education. “It usually takes three to six treatments three to 10 minutes a time,” she said. “It is safe for knee replace- ment post-surgery, too, and is approved by and has clearance from the FDA (Food and Drug Adminis- tration).” Swoboda Chiropractic has been using low-level laser treatment since June and Swoboda said she is getting positive feedback from her clients with some of them feeling the results right away while others need six treatments before feeling the effects.

C4 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of Swoboda
C4 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of Swoboda

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easy tips for smart snacking

When it comes to smart snacking, the foods one chooses — and how much one eats — matters. Fruit remains one of the smartest snacks out there. Just 13 percent of Americans eat the 1.5 to 2 cups of fruit recom- mended each day, and snacks offer an oppor- tunity to close that gap. For the perfect pick, think fresh grapes. At just 90 calories per three-quarter-cup serv- ing, their delicious, juicy taste hits the snacking sweet spot. Heart-healthy and hy- drating, they’re a nu - trition bargain com - pared to many pro - cessed snacks high in calories, fat and added sugar that tend to offer little health bang for the buck. Plus, grapes are portable — ideal for munching anytime, anywhere. With grapes, there’s no fuss, no muss — and no peel - ing or coring required. Whether added to the lunch sack to help end the midday meal on a sweet note, or tucked in the briefcase or back- pack at the ready for when hunger strikes,

C4 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 pHoTo bY mike JoRDAN Barb Swoboda of Swoboda

SUbmiTTeD pHoToS

At just 90 calories per three-quarter-cup serving, grapes’ delicious, juicy taste hits the snacking sweet spot.

grapes are a super snack. If late-night noshing is your nemesis, go with grapes for a tasty, healthy and guilt-free option. And if the ice cream carton starts calling, opt for frozen grapes instead — they’re just like a mini-sorbet. Simply rinse grapes and pat them dry, then place them on a sheet pan and pop them into the freezer for two hours. Store any ex- tras in the freezer to keep

them at the ready for the next snack attack. Fresh grapes are a deli- cious addition to heartier snack fare, too, adding color, crunch and a light touch of sweetness:

• Make a fresh trail

mix by combining grapes with cubes of cheese and a sprinkle of chocolate chips and nuts. • Toss grapes into a fa- vorite smoothie recipe.

• Spread celery stalks

with peanut butter and place grapes on top to for a mix of crunch and sweet- ness.

• Put together snack

sandwiches: Smear a dab of cream cheese on top of graham crackers and top with halved grapes. If game day requires a more adult-style snack — perhaps perfectly paired with a beer or glass of wine — try this scrumptious flatbread:

Prosciutto, Red Grape and Pecorino Flatbread

  • 4 prepared 8-inch naan breads

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (divided) 3/4 cup grated Pecorino Romano (divided) 1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest 1/4 pound thinly sliced prosciutto

  • 1 cup red grapes, halved

  • 1 cup arugula for garnish (optional)

Heat the oven to 500 degrees. Brush the naan breads with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on sheet pans. Sprinkle with a half-cup of the pecorino and the lemon zest, then drape the prosciutto over the top. Add the grapes, then sprinkle with the remaining pecorino. Bake until grapes blister, about 10 minutes. Drizzle with the remaining olive oil, cut into wedges and serve. Serves eight as an appetizer.

Jackson County Pilot • Lakefield Standard • September 15, 2016

Six things nobody knows about kiwis

When it comes to fruit, kiwis are often overlooked. But that’s a shame, because these tiny orbs pack big nutritional, culinary and palate- pleasing surprises. Here are six little- known facts about ki- wifruit:

1. There’s no need to peel kiwifruit.

Kiwifruit is the per- fect portable snack be- cause it is easy to eat. Just cut in half with a knife and scoop with a spoon. That’s it — just cut, scoop and enjoy. First, though, make sure it’s ripe. Hold a

kiwifruit in the palm and squeeze gently. A ripe ki- wifruit will give to slight pressure. Once kiwifruit is ripe, can pop it in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

  • 2. Kiwifruit can help stabi-

lize blood sugar.

The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a car - bohydrate-containing food raises blood sugar. Fruits with a glycemic index less than 55 are considered low GI, meaning they produce a gradual rise in blood sugar levels that’s easy on the body. Kiwifruit’s low GI scores and high fiber content allow for a slower rise in blood sugar levels than other fruits, providing energy and helping to fend

off blood sugar spikes and

crashes.

  • 3. Kiwifruit can ease diges-

tive discomfort.

Feeling a bit backed up? Kiwifruit can aid digestive concerns in several ways.

For constipation, research-

ers believe the soluble and insoluble fibers in kiwifruit

can promote laxation. For

bloating, kiwis have actini- din, an enzyme unique to

kiwifruit that helps break down protein and stream- line digestion.

4. Kiwifruit is good for the gut.

Kiwifruit provides prebi- otic “food” for probiotics,

the good bacteria that live in the digestive systems. So when people consume kiwifruit, they’re also feed- ing the 100 trillion little helpers in their gut, which support immunity, mood regulation and metabolism.

5. Kiwifruit is a delicious source of nutrients.

Kiwifruit is tasty, but that’s not all. A serving of green is high in fiber and a good source of folate.

6. Kiwifruit makes a mean meat tenderizer.

The actinidin in kiwifruit that can help beat bloat

also makes the fruit a great meat tenderizer. Make a marinade with two green kiwifruit, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 teaspoon apple

cider vinegar and a dash

of salt and pepper. Simply marinade for 10 to 15 min-

utes before tossing beef, chicken or fish on the grill.

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C5

Health & Wellness

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Foot care tips to keep vacationers on the go

Two of the most essential ingredients in an enjoyable vacation don’t go in the suitcase — your own feet. Healthy feet that feel and look great can make any journey much more enjoyable. Here are some foot care tips to help get feet travel- ready:

Before you go

If a vacation is to a warm

destination where time will be spentin sandals and flip flops, treating oneself to a pre-trip pedicure can help feet look their best. Re - member, toenails should

always be trimmed straight across and never let any- one cut those cuticles. Take care of unsightly and uncomfortable toe and foot fungus infections before departure. Over- the-counter treatments can quickly and easily help clear up toe and foot fun- gus and athlete’s foot. Keep comfort in mind while packing. Walking in uncomfortable shoes can cause blisters and chaf- ing; sore feet can really dim the enjoyment of va- cation. Never take brand- new shoes on vacation. Instead pack a few pairs of

comfortable shoes made of breathable, natural materi- als and try to stick with a lower, cushioned sole. Finally, pack a foot care kit that includes bandages for covering minor cuts and scrapes, antibiotic cream, an emollient-en - riched moisturizer, blister pads, an oral anti-inflam- matory medication to ease tired and swollen feet, sun- screen and sunburn cream.

On the move

While on vacation, change socks daily to help reduce the risk of fungal infection. Avoid walking

barefoot in public places like pools, locker rooms and showers. Remember to apply sun- screen to feet too. Since feet can swell in hot cli- mates, be sure to drink plenty of water. It is important to choose footwear that’s appropri- ate for the type of activity planned. It’s normal for feet to feel a little tired and sore after a long day of walking around seeing the sights. But, if serious pain occurs or persists, see a doctor.

C5 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 Foot care tips to keep vacationers on the

SUbmiTTeD pHoTo

Healthy feet that feel and look great can make any vacation much more enjoyable.

KLINE: Retirement put on hold so as to assist with transition

Continued from C1

the fact they wouldn’t be able to receive care from him after his retirement. Hearing those words from his loyal patients played a role in Kline’s decision to stay practicing a while lon- ger — something Sanford appreciates. “We’re grateful for him to stay on a year so that we can find a replacement,” said Greg Shell, director of clinic operations at San- ford. “Him staying here means a ton to his patients and to the staff. We can’t emphasize enough how that gives us time to have an orderly transition.” Shell said what makes Kline so valuable to the Sanford organization is his longevity in the local com- munity and the precedence he sets for all his peers. “He’s been an anchor in the medical community in Jackson and Lakefield,” Shell said. “He lives in the community, so there’s a benefit to him being a part of it.” Because of the number of years Kline has practiced in the county, Shell said, many of his patients have “grown up” with Kline as their primary physician. In fact, Shell said most of his practice is made up of long-term patients. “That’s something that’s not to be taken for granted in rural America,” Shell said. “It’s becoming more and more difficult to re - cruit physicians to rural ar- eas, and the fact that Jack- son and Lakefield have had the stability that they’ve had says a lot.” Kline is a major con - tributor to the stability of the county’s longstanding physicians. As one of the longest practitioners of medicine in the area, Shell said it is his dedication to his patients and work that has made him the anchor

he is at Sanford. “Dr. Kline is one of the most dedicated physicians I’ve ever encountered,” he said, adding his caring approach to patients influ- ences the staff around him. The example Kline sets is especially helpful for new physicians who are working with him, Shell said, adding because of all the different cases he’s had to deal with over the years, he now has a wealth of knowledge to share. Though Kline will remain practicing for another year, the recruitment process for his replacement is already under way. While the shoes may be big to fill, Shell said Sanford wants to make sure the communities in Jack- son and Lakefield are fully supported by health care providers. “It’s been a good com - munity for the providers and for Sanford,” he said. “They’ve been very sup - portive.”

C5 Health & Wellness Thursday, September 15, 2016 Foot care tips to keep vacationers on the

SUbmiTTeD pHoTo

Dr. Ronald Kline will continue to see patients at Sanford Jackson Medical Center — and the Sanford Lakefield clinic — for the next year while he assists with the effort to fill his shoes upon his retirement in 2017. Kline said he looks at additional time with Sanford in Jackson County not as a continuation of work, but as an opportunity to continue serving the people of the community. Because of his view of the people he treats, more time with his patients is also good medicine for him. “I don’t think of patients as patients,” Kline said. “I think of them as

people.” STORE HOURS: Mon.–Fri. 8 a.m.– 5:30 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.–noon 326 Main St. Lakefi eld,
people.”
STORE HOURS:
Mon.–Fri. 8 a.m.–
5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m.–noon
326 Main St.
Lakefi eld, MN
PHARMACY HOURS:
(507) 662-5817
Mon.–Fri. 8:30
a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Closed Saturday
8322
J.P. Beardsley, D.D.S. P.A. 213 Third Ave. N. Lakefi eld, MN 56150 507-662-5358 4215
J.P. Beardsley,
D.D.S. P.A.
213 Third Ave. N.
Lakefi eld, MN 56150
507-662-5358
4215
Balanced Care for women & children Child and teen checkups are available to anyone enrolled in
Balanced Care
for women & children
Child and teen checkups are available to anyone enrolled in
Minnesota Care or Medical Assistance. Assistance is offered for
scheduling appointments as well as arranging for transportation.
WIC (Women, Infant and Children)
• Can help with healthier pregnancies,
healthier births, and healthier children.
• Provides healthy foods for pregnant
women, breastfeeding moms, infants
and children.
• Call to see if you qualify (507) 831-1987
or (800) 247-1401
Maternal Child Nursing Services
• Provide guidance and education for women through
their pregnancy, after having their baby and also for
children up to age 3.
• Like having your own private nurse!
• Get help with concerns, car seats, safety,
immunizations, dental care and any other topics you
may have questions about.
• FREE to everyone!
• Call with any questions or to set up an appointment
(507) 831-1987 or (507) 847-2366
Fluoride Varnishing
• Giving teeth a healthy start for
a lifetime of smiles!
• Help prevent cavities!
• Infants should see a dentist
by age 1!
• Call for more information
(507) 831-1987 or (507) 847-2366
Des Moines Valley
Health & Human Services
JACKSON
WINDOM
407 Fifth St., P.O. Box 67
11 4th Street, P.O. Box 9
Jackson, MN 56143
Windom, MN 56101
507-847-4000
507-831-1891
www.dvhhs.org
16630
Comprehensive Health Services For All Ages! • DOT Physicals • Well Baby & Child Physicals •
Comprehensive Health
Services For All Ages!
• DOT Physicals
• Well Baby & Child Physicals
• School/Sports Physicals
• Immunizations/Flu Clinic
• Well Adult Physicals and Chronic Disease
Management
• Treatment of Infertility/Natural Family Planning
Seated from left: Dr. Lockerd; Dr. Hart.
Back, Kathy Joyce, LPN; Sister Elizabeth
Now offering access to your
electronic health records
and secure messaging to
your doctors.
Przedwojewski, RN; Linda Miller, receptionist;
Mary Lillegard, RN. Not pictured are: Sr. Mary
Raphael Paradis, administrator; Lori Schmit,
RN, and Mary Fricke, offi ce manager.
Please call 507-847-3571
for an appointment!
Sacred Heart Mercy Health Care Center
www.sacredheartmercy.net
16659
507-847-3571 • 803 Fourth Street • Jackson, MN
Serving your eyecare needs since 1982.
Serving your eyecare needs since 1982.

• Comprehensive eye examinations • Refractive surgery consultation • Treatment and management of eye disease • Emergency treatment of disease or injury • Treatment of “red eye”

Jackson, 709 2nd. St.

507-847-5951

Monday–Friday • 8 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

16660

Serving your eyecare needs since 1982. • Comprehensive eye examinations • Refractive surgery consultation • Treatment

Member of

American Op to m et ric As so cia tion

SPINAL DECOMPRESSION THERAPY offers nonsurgical treatment for bulging disc’s, stenosis, arthritis, headaches, sciatica and more. Fall
SPINAL DECOMPRESSION THERAPY
offers nonsurgical treatment for bulging disc’s, stenosis,
arthritis, headaches, sciatica and more.
Fall Decompression Sale!
Only $15 per session with a purchase of a
12 visit package or greater
......
SAVE UP TO 62%!
Packages must be purchased by 10/31/2016, but session do not expire!
Talk To Dr. Henderson about starting Decompression therapy today!
OptimalHealthandChiropractic.com
Dr. Kerri L. Henderson
Chiropractor
Fairmont Of ce
Jackson Of ce
115½ West Blue Earth Ave.
405 2nd St.
Fairmont, MN 56031
Jackson, MN 56143
507-235-5505
507-847-2112
for your next appointment
for your next appointment
www.OptimalHealthandChiropractic.com
16628
SWOBODA CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Barbara Swoboda Treating area residents with chiropractic care in Lakefi eld for 20
SWOBODA
CHIROPRACTIC
Dr. Barbara Swoboda
Treating area residents with chiropractic care
in Lakefi eld for 20 years.
Offering general chiropractic care while
specializing in treatment of
. .
.
* Pediatrics * Pregnant Women * Newborns
221 3rd Ave. N., Lakefi eld, MN
507-662-5176
16664
YOUR FUTURE STARTS @ IOWA LAKES CHOOSE A HEALTH CARE CAREER THAT’S PERSONALLY REWARDING! • ASSOCIATE
YOUR FUTURE STARTS
@ IOWA LAKES
CHOOSE A HEALTH
CARE CAREER THAT’S
PERSONALLY REWARDING!
• ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING
• PRACTICAL NURSING
• CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT (CNA)
• SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
• MEDICAL ASSISTANT
• MEDICAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY
• MASSAGE THERAPY
ALGONA
• EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT)
EMMETSBURG
• EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER (EMR)
ESTHERVILLE
• ADVANCED EMERGENCY
SPENCER
MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (AEMT)
SPIRIT LAKE

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1-866-IA-LAKES or WWW.IOWALAKES.EDU
1-866-IA-LAKES or WWW.IOWALAKES.EDU

A6

Thursday, September 15, 2016

816 3RD ST. JACKSON, MN 56143 (507) 847-4333 MONDAY–FRIDAY 8 A.M.–5 P.M. SATURDAY–SUNDAY CLOSED 403 COLONIAL

816 3RD ST.

JACKSON, MN 56143 (507) 847-4333

MONDAY–FRIDAY

8 A.M.–5 P.M.

SATURDAY–SUNDAY

CLOSED

403 COLONIAL AVE. LAKEFIELD, MN 56150 (507) 662-6646

HOURS BY APPOINTMENT

“STRIVING FOR EXCELLENCE, REHABILITATION AND WELLNESS.”

16682

816 3RD ST. JACKSON, MN 56143 (507) 847-4333 MONDAY–FRIDAY 8 A.M.–5 P.M. SATURDAY–SUNDAY CLOSED 403 COLONIAL

•NEWLY REMODELED •24–HOUR KEY CARD ACCESS •UPDATED EQUIPMENT

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Prairie Rehabilitation has a highly-knowledgeable staff of Physical Therapists and Physical Therapist Assistants providing services at all of our outpatient and long-term care facilities.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

Prairie Rehabilitation has a staff of highly-knowledgeable Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapist Assistants providing outpatient services to patients particularly in need of upper extremity therapy. Our Occupational Therapy services also include custom splinting.

SPEECH THERAPY

Prairie Rehabilitation has a staff of highly-knowledgeable Speech Therapists providing services at all of our outpatient and long-term care facilities.

HAND THERAPY

Prairie Rehabilitation has occupational therapists and Certifi ed Hand Therapists with specialized training in the treatment of hand and upper extremity injuries and problems or post surgical care.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

Prairie Rehabilitation has therapists who specialize in Occupational Health Services and Return-To-Work strategies. Whether you’re a manufacturing company with goals to balance safety and productivity or a local business owner seeing repetitive motion injuries due to desk strain, we are here to support the safety of your employees and help decrease the costs of work related injuries.

Senior Housing Assisted Living Plus We currently have openings in our Rosewood Villas Senior Housing Fall
Senior Housing
Assisted Living Plus
We currently have openings in our
Rosewood Villas Senior Housing
Fall Move-In Special
• Independent senior living
• Noon meals
• Utilities included in rent
• Weekly housekeeping
• Weekly bedding change
• 24-hour call system
• Availability of staff 24/7
• Additional services
available–see manager
for details
A home that adds value
to our tenants’ lives.
Other features include:
• Friendly, professional, caring staff
• Home cooked meals
• Activities
• Hair salon
• Free cable
• Close to downtown Lakefi eld, MN,
churches and senior center
• 24-hour staffi ng
• Free monthly blood pressure checks
Call Housing Manager for details!
CALL NOW FOR A TOUR
...
MOVE–IN
READY!
BEAT THE SNOW AND THE COLD!
Contact Jessica Neitzel,
Housing Manager, today!
(507) 662-6433
Elderly living, where your care is our #1 priority.
16661