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How assessment is used for learning, as learning and of learning in relation to these activities

When creating assessments that are aimed to improve student learning and allow students to gain a
deeper understanding, three overarching purposes are required: Assessment for learning, assessment
as learning, and assessment of learning (Department of Education and Training Victoria, 2013).
When creating consolidate, remedial, and extension activities for the students detailed above, I
ensured that these purposes were considered and included, to clearly define what the intention of
each activity was, and how the activity would act to develop the students learning.
Assessment for learning, also referred to as formative assessment, involves teachers using
information about the students knowledge and understanding to inform their teaching (NSW Board
of Studies, 2012). In relation to the activities above, assessment for learning has been considered as
the primary purpose for the consolidation learning activities, aiming to clarify student learning. The
consolidation activities, including the class discussion and worksheet designed for Cameron and his
Stage 2 peers, and the class discussion and cut-and-paste worksheets designed for Mel and her
Stage 4 peers, were created after marking students assessments, assessing what students did well,
and determining in what areas they needed further learning and development. Based on this
information, the teacher is aware of, and can plan, what needs to be taught in the following lesson,
or what topic the class needs to spend more time on, so as to ensure that students are learning the
required skills, and are expanding their knowledge (NSW Board of Studies, 2012).
Assessment as learning occurs when students reflect on their own learning and progress, to grasp an
understanding of what they know, what they would like to know, and how to use assessment for
new learning (Department of Education and Training Victoria, 2013; NSW Board of Studies, 2012).
As self-assessment is an essential component of formative assessment, allowing students to
understand the main purpose of their learning and grasping what they need to do to achieve, it has
been incorporated into each stage, after their assessment and consolidate, remedial, or extension
activity (Black and Wiliam, 1998). As noted above, after completing the assigned activity in all

three of the stages, students are offered the opportunity to reflect on their learning, considering what
they have learnt, and what they would like to learn next. By doing this, students are taking
responsibility for their learning, are asking questions about their learning, and can create learning
goals to encourage their development (NSW Board of Studies, 2012).
Assessment of learning, also referred to as summative assessment, occurs when teachers use
evidence of student learning to make conclusions about student achievement against outcomes,
goals, and standards (Department of Education and Training Victoria, 2013; NSW Board of Studies,
2012). In relation to the activities above, assessment of learning is the purpose of all of the
consolidate, remedial, and extension activities described, as each one of them aims to reiterate or
revise prior learning, and offer students further opportunities to demonstrate their abilities to show
that they can meet the required outcomes. By planning activities that act to allow students to
demonstrate they can meet, or are working beyond the outcomes and standards, evidence of the
achievement of students can be obtained (NSW Board of Studies, 2012).
Assessments for, as, and of learning are the purposes of assessment, and each acts to determine, or
measure, a students learning and development, and inform both the student and teacher what
should be taught in future lessons (Brady and Kennedy, 2012). When creating the activities
described earlier, each of these purposes of assessment was considered, to ensure students would be
partaking in activities that would extend their knowledge, and would be beneficial to their learning.
References
Black, P. and Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the Black Box: Raising standards through classroom
assessment. In Synopsis of key research papers on assessment. England: Kings College
London.
Brady, L. & Kennedy, K. (2012). Assessment and Reporting: Celebrating Student Achievement (4th
ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

Department of Education and Training Victoria. (2013). Assessment Advice. Retrieved from
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/support/pages/advice.aspx
NSW Board of Studies. (2012). Assessment For, As and Of Learning. In English years K-10
syllabus. Retrieved from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/assessment-for-asand-of-learning/
NSW Board of Studies. (2012). Work Samples. In English years K-10 syllabus. Retrieved from
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/work-samples/