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SECTION 1

Section 1

Introduction

Introduction

Table of Contents

Introduction
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.1

Carrier Control Systems


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.6
Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.7

Using This Manual


Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.15

Carrier Comfort Network Overview


Carrier Comfort Network Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.16
System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.18
Key Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.19

Control Acronyms
Abbreviations and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.20

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INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE

Introduction

As world leaders in indoor climate control, Carrier provides complete HVAC solutions
for buildings of all types and sizes from the corner retail shop to huge commerce
centers. Additionally, we are proud to be selected time and again for
demanding, one-of-a-kind applications such as the preservation
of the frescos in the Sistine Chapel and, most recently, the
preservation of the Inca maiden discovered in Peru. No
matter how demanding the application, HVAC system
designers need look no further than Carrier for the
equipment, the controls and the communicating network
that seamlessly integrates them brings them together into
one "intelligent" system.
The purpose of this Carriers Commercial Controls Guide
is to provide the HVAC system designer with an overview
of Carriers flexible yet powerful control system architecture, the
Carrier Comfort Network (CCN), and an in-depth look at the most
widely specified Carrier Comfort Systems. A detailed reference section is
also included to give designers an at-a-glance reference on individual control
system components. Look for annual updates on this manual.
Briefly, the Carrier Commercial Controls Systems discussed in this manual are:
Comfort Controller, a field installed general-purpose microprocessor based
DDC controller capable of monitoring and controlling various input / output
field devices.
TEMP, a communicating network of thermostats to coordinate multiple heating
and cooling units
VVT, a flexible zoning system that provides up to 32 zones of control from a
single heating/cooling unit.
ComfortID, an advanced zoning system that offers two-way communication
between the zones and the air source.
PIC, Product Integrated Controls, Factory mounted HVAC equipment controls
designed to provide "plug and run" standalone or net-workable operation.
Are you designing a control system for a specific application? The samples in
Section 4 can help you determine the typical Carrier Comfort Network solution for
your building type and size.
For more information on Carrier Comfort Network, contact your local distributor.
You can also learn more about Carrier products and services at www.carrier.com.

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.1

Carrier Control Systems

Introduction
In 1902, a brilliant young scientist named Willis Carrier invented air conditioning... and created an industry that would bring the advantages of indoor
climate control to buildings of all kinds.
With every generation, Carrier Corporation has consistently led the industry,
not only in HVAC equipment advances, but also in the development of standalone and networked controls that optimize the performance of our world-class
HVAC systems. Today our premier control system, the Carrier Comfort Network
(CCN), is operating reliably in thousands of locations around the world,
including MIT, The Limited Stores, Logan Airport, Princeton University and
the Sistine Chapel.
1902

Willis Carrier installs the first chiller,


with electromechanical controls,
in a Brooklyn printing shop

1959

Carrier Variable Air Volume (VAV)


System introduced

1973

Microprocessor-based, direct
digital controls developed by
United Technologies for MIT campus

1983

Variable Volume/Variable Temperature


(VVT) System introduced

1985

Carrier Comfort Network introduced

1987

First Equipment Product Integrated


Controls (PICs) Introduced

1990

Carrier Digital Air Volume (DAV)


System introduced

1995

ComfortWORKS and
Comfort Controller Introduced

1999

ComfortLink New Generation


Equipment Product Integrated Controls

2000

ComfortID Sophisticated Zone Level


Control System with Demand
Controlled Ventilation

While Carrier control systems have been selected for some very prestigious locations, they also perform dependably for manufacturers, clinics, fast food outlets and
schools in every region of the world. Thats because in our array of control systems,
there is a cost-effective solution for every type of building, from small, one- to twostory structures to large multi-story buildings and complexes.
As you will see in this Control Systems Guide, the Carrier systems approach combines the ultimate in control with the utmost simplicity. Our leading-edge building
automation systems offer several unique advantages, including:
All controls are communications-ready, eliminating the cost and complexity of the
additional hardware required by other systems.
Only Carrier controls are pre-engineered with standard algorithms that can be
commissioned with fill-in-the-blanks ease.
CCNs user interfaces, ComfortWORKS and ComfortVIEW TM are the only
software that allows building managers to select and view all critical system
information on a single PC screen.
Whether your control solution lies in a single piece of equipment or an entire system,
your long-term satisfaction is assured with Carrier. We will continue to set the
standard for control system technology as we strive to create the most comfortable,
energy-efficient indoor environments possible.

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.6

Case Studies

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.7

Case Studies

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.8

Case Studies

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.9

Case Studies

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.10

Case Studies

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.11

Case Studies

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.12

Case Studies

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.13

Case Studies

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.14

Using This Manual

This manual was created to provide you with a comprehensive resource for Carrier
Control Systems. Youll find all the information you need regarding Carrier equipment
with Product Integrated Controls (PICs), Carrier control systems and network
products and options within this manual.
We suggest that you start by reading about the Carrier Comfort Network (CCN)
in Section 1. This illustrates CCN and how it integrates Carrier HVAC equipment,
non-Carrier equipment and related building systems into a seamless,
communicating network of controls designed to provide optimum operating
efficiency and performance.
Section 2 provides you with product-specific technical Data Sheets and accompanying literature. Each Data Sheet presents general as well as detailed information
relative to operational characteristics of each product. Youll also be able to
quickly access important Features and Benefits information for each product
highlighted in this section.
Section 3 contains our Product Guide Specifications. To facilitate your process
to design the best HVAC system solution, each product highlighted in this section
includes an overview, a summary of the controls features and benefits, guide
specifications and, where applicable, a network diagram, control points,
input/output summary and a sequence of operations.
Section 4 illustrates typical system Applications found in a variety of buildings.
Within each application, youll find a complete diagram which identifies each
systems components as well as a complete input/output summary.
The Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) architecture is the most advanced technology
to evolve from Carriers thorough knowledge of both comfort and controls. CCN
addresses a wide range of comfort, operational, air quality and energy management
objectives by allowing separate pieces of Carrier HVAC equipment, non-Carrier
equipment and related building systems to work in harmony.
The Carrier Comfort Networks seamless architecture integrates reliable DDC
control technology with high-quality HVAC equipment to deliver maximum operating
efficiency and precise comfort levels.

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.15

Carrier Comfort Network Benefits

Improved Operational Efficiencies


Carrier Comfort Systems provide all the benefits of energy management systems,
allowing owners to manage energy consumption in an economically and environmentally responsible manner.
Setback scheduling, staging and loadshedding are easily directed for the most
efficient energy use.
Operators can respond immediately to off-normal situations, preserving both
comfort and energy efficiency.
Carrier Comfort Systems can capture data on equipment run-times and
consumables usage, for energy analysis and decision-making.

Comfort And Air Quality


Communicating electronic controls improve occupant comfort through precise
control of temperature, relative humidity and outdoor air ventilation rates.
Multiple comfort zones may be created within a building, providing individualized
comfort control.

Optimal System Control


Centralized control eliminates a host of manual control tasks and simplifies
troubleshooting. The result: more efficient, productive facility management.
Continuous equipment monitoring, from on-site or any remote location, helps
extend equipment life and reduce service costs.
CCNs modular architecture and flexibility facilitate future expansion projects.

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.16

Carrier Comfort Network Benefits


contd

Enhanced Diagnostic Capabilities


ComfortWORKS and ComfortVIEW software gives the operator the ability to
identify which piece of equipment is not operating properly, and what parts
are affected.
All servicing needs can be identified on-site or from a remote location.

Interoperability
Integral to Carriers electronic communicating control strategy, universal interfaces
are available to allow connection to other control and building management systems.
As the industry moves toward a universally accepted standard, such as ASHRAEapproved BACnet, Carrier will continue to meet the interoperability needs
of our customers.

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.17

Carrier Comfort Network

Operator Interfaces

ComfortWORKS

ComfortVIEW

CarrierOne Web
& CCNWeb

Comfort
Controller
6400

VVT/TEMP
System

Building Control

Comfort
Controller
1600

Equipment With Product Integrated Controls

23 Series
Chillers

19 Series
Chillers

30 Series
Global
Chiller

16 Series
Absorption
Chillers

30 Series
Air Cooler
Chillers

Unit
Ventilator

39 Series
Air Handling
Units

35/45 Series
Terminals

48/50HG
Centurion
Rooftop

ComfortID

Water
System
Manager

42 Series
Fan Coil Units

System Management
Chillervisor/
Flotronic
System
Manager

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.18

Key Components

Operator Interfaces
As the main operator interface for CCN, ComfortWORKS and ComfortVIEW
software provide a single point of entry into the entire network. ComfortWORKS and
ComfortVIEW combine superior screen graphics with the multi-faceted capabilities
of Microsoft Windows operating system, and do not require a dedicated PC.
See Section 2 or 3 for more detailed information on Operator Interfaces. CarrierOne
Web Server and CCNWeb Server gives you the power of the internet with the
simplicity of a web browser.

Building Control
These field-installed, general purpose controllers enable non-Carrier or
pre-CCN-compatible products to integrate with Carrier Comfort Network. These
microprocessor based control modules provide all the features necessary for
complete stand-alone or networked control of each piece of equipment. Essential
for control system retrofits, Comfort Controllers are ideal for networking lighting,
cooling towers, boilers and pumps. More information about Comfort Controllers
can be found in Section 2, 3 and 4 under General Purpose Field Installed Controls.

Product Integrated Controls


Factory-mounted Direct Digital Controls (DDC) on Carrier products provide optimum
stand-alone or networked comfort control and equipment efficiency. These Product
Integrated Controls (PICs) are pre-wired, pre-engineered and pre-tested at the factory and arrive pre-programmed to meet specific requirements. Carrier equipment with
PICs are described in Sections 2 and 3 of this manual.

Carrier System Management


CCN capabilities can be easily expanded through product modules such as Data
Collection, Facility Time Scheduling, Load Shedding, Remote Communications and
System Management options.
The four primary Carrier Systems are Chillervisor, ComfortID, TEMP Comfort System
and Variable Volume/Variable Temperature (VVT). Detailed information about these
systems can be found throughout this manual.

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.19

Controls Acronyms

Abbreviation

Description

Abbreviation

Description

Amps

CHLR

Chiller

AA

Automatic Answer

CHP

Chilled Water Pump

AC

Air Compressor

CHPS

Chilled Water Pump Status

AC

Alternating Current

CHRP

Chilled Water Return Pressure

ACMP

Air Compressor

CHRT

Chilled Water Return Temp

AD

Air Dryer

CHS

Chiller Status

AFS

Air Flow Station

CHSP

Chilled Water Supply Pressure

AH

Air Handler

CHST

Chilled Water Supply Temp

AI

Analog In

CHTR

Cabinet Heater

ALM

Alarm

CHWF

Chilled Water Flow

ALRM

Alarm

CHWP

Chilled Water Pump

AO

Analog Output

CHWS

Chilled Water System

AOSS

Adaptive Optimal Start / Stop

CHWV

Chilled Water Valve

ATC

Automatic Temperature Control

CLIP

Closed Loop Current (I) to Press

AUX

Auxiliary

CLWT

Condenser Leaving Water Temp

BLR

Boiler

CM

Centimeter

BPS

Bits per Second

CMP

Compressor

BRLY

Backup Relay

CMPS

Compressor Status

BRU

Backup and Restore Utility

CO2

Carbon Dioxide

BTU

British Thermal Unit

COMP

Compressor

BTU/HR

British Thermal Unit Per Hour

CONV

Converter

BUS

CCN Bus Number

CPS

Characters Per Second

Degrees Celsius

CPU

Central Processing Unit

CAI

Computer-Assisted Instruction

CRC

Cyclic Redundancy Check

CBT

Computer-Based Training

CRT

Cathode Ray Tube

CC

Comfort Controller

CT

Cooling Tower

CCN

Carrier Comfort Network

CT

Current Transformer

CCT

Cooling Coil Discharge Temp

CTFL

Cooling Tower Flow

CCV

Cooling Coil Valve

CTFM

Cooling Tower Fan Motor

CD

Carrier Detect

CTPM

Cooling Tower Pump Motor

CEWT

Condenser Entering Water Temp

CTS

Clear to Send

CFH

Cubic Feet Per Hour

CV

Control Valve

CFM

Cubic Feet Per Minute

CV

Constant Volume

CHFL

Chilled Water Flow

CVAN

Chiller Inlet Vanes

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.20

Controls Acronyms

Abbreviation

Description

Abbreviation

Description

CVLV

Control Valve

DX

Direct Expansion Coil

CW

Condenser Water

DXS

DX Unit Status

CWF

Condenser Water Flow

EAT

Entering Air Temperature

CWFL

Condenser Water Flow

ECC

Error Correcting Code

CWP

Condenser Water Pressure

ECS

Enthalpy Control Switch

CWP

Condenser Water Pump

EF

Exhaust Fan

CWPS

Condenser Water Pump Status

EFS

Exhaust Fan Status

CWRT

Condenser Water Return Temp

EH

Electric Heat

CWS

Condenser Water System

EIA

Electronic Industries Association

CWST

Condenser Water Supply Temp

EMI

Electromagnetic Interference

CWV

Condenser Water Valve

ENC

Enclosure

DCD

Data Carrier Detect

ENT

Enthalpy switch

DCE

Data Communications Equip

EOF

End of File

DDC

Direct Digital Control

EOL

End of Line Terminator

DDT

Dryer Discharge Temperature

EP

Electro-Pneumatic Valve

DDT

Direct Digital Temperature

EQUIP

Equipment

DELTA P OR D P

Pressure Differential

ES

Enthalpy Switch

DELTA T or D T

Temperature Differential

ES

End Switch

DHW

Domestic Hot Water

ET

Exhaust Temperature

DI

Discrete Input

EWT

Entering Water Temperature

DIO

Discrete Input / Output Device

EXV

Electric Expansion Valve

DISP

Discharge Pressure

Degrees Fahrenheit

DLT

Delta Temperature

FBD

Face & Bypass Damper

DM

Damper Motor

FBDM

Face & Bypass Damper Motor

DMP

Damper

FC

Fan Coil

DMPR

Damper

FCC

Federal Communications Comm

DO

Discrete Output

FFLO

Feed Water Flow

DP

Differential Pressure

FID

Field Installed Device

DPV

Differential Pressure Valve

FLT

Filter

DSR

Data Set Ready

FLTS

Filter Status

DST

DX Unit Temperature

FN

Fan

DTE

Data Terminal Equipment

FNS

Fan Status

DTMF

Dual Tone Multiple Frequency

FNSH

Fan Status High

DTR

Data Terminal Ready

FNSL

Fan Status Low

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.21

Controls Acronyms
contd

Abbreviation

Description

Abbreviation

Description

FP

Freeze Protect Pump

HWS

Hot Water System

FPB

Fan Powered Box

HWSP

Hot Water Supply Press

FPS

Freeze Pump Status

HWST

Hot Water Supply Temperature

FRZ

Freeze Status

HWSV

Hot Water Supply Valve

FT

Foot

HX

Heat Exchanger

FT/MIN

Feet Per Minute

HZ

Hertz

FT/SEC

Feet Per Second

I/O

Input / Output

GFLO

Gas Flow

IGV

Inlet Guide Vane

GPD

Gallons Per Day

IN

Inch

GPH

Gallons Per Hour

INT

Intercom

GPM

Gallons Per Minute

IR

Current (I) Relay

GW

Gateway

ISOV

Isolation Valve

H/C

Heat / Cool Switch

KBYTE

Kilobyte

HC

Heating Coil

KG

Kilogram

HCCV

Heat / Cool Valve

KSR

Keyboard Send/Return

HCT

Heating Coil Discharge Temp

KW

Kilowatt

HCV

Heating Coil Valve

KWH

Kilowatt Hour

HEX

Heat Exchanger

LAN

Local Area Network

HL

High Level

LAT

Leaving Air Temperature

HPS

High Pressure Switch

LB

Pound

HRT

Hot Water Return Temperature

LBS/HR

Pounds Per Hour

HSPD

High Speed

LCD

Liquid Crystal Display

HSPS

High Speed Status

LED

Light Emitting Diode

HST

Hot Water Supply Temperature

LID

Local Interface Device

HSV

Humidity Spray Valve

LL

Low Level

HT

High Temperature

LPS

Low Pressure Switch

HTD

High Temperature Detector

LSPS

Low Speed Status

HTR

Heater

LT

Low Temperature

HUMV

Humidifier Valve

LWT

Leaving Water Temperature

HV

Heat and Vent

Main Air

HVAC

Heating, Ventilating and Air Cond

MA

Milliamp

HWC

Hot Water Converter

MAT

Mixed Air Temperature

HWRP

Hot Water Return Pressure

MAXD

Mixed Air Damper

HWRT

Hot Water Return Temperature

MB

Megabyte

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.22

Controls Acronyms

Abbreviation

Description

Abbreviation

Description

MBTU

Thousands / British Thermal Units

PROM

Programmable Read Only Memory

MCR

Monitor Console Routine

PRV

Pressure Reducing Valve

MHZ

Megahertz

PSF

Pounds Per Square Foot

MIND

Minimum Air Damper

PSI

Pounds Per Square Inch

MISC

Miscellaneous

PWM

Pulse Width Modulation

MIXD

Mixed Air Damper

Relay

MR

Modem Ready

RAM

Random Access Memory

NC

Normally Closed

RARH

Return Air Relative Humidity

NO

Normally Open

RAT

Return Air Temperature

NTFC

Night Time Free Cooling

RB

Relay Base

OAD

Outside Air Damper

RD

Receive Data

OADC

Outside Air Dew cell

RF

Return Fan

OADP

Outside Air Dew Point

RFHS

Return Fan High Speed Status

OARH

Outside Air Relative Humidity

RFLO

Return Fan Low Speed

OAT

Outside Air Temperature

RFLS

Return Fan Low Speed Status

OFLO

Oil Flow

RFS

Return Fan Status

OH

Off Hook

RFVD

RF Vortex Dampers

OM

Owner's Module

RH

Relative Humidity

OZ

Ounce

RHCT

Reheat Coil Discharge Temp

Pressure

RHCV

Reheat Coil Valve

PC

Personal Computer

RHD

Relative Humidity Duct

PCM

Processor Control Module

RHT

Reheat Air Temperature

PE

Pressure Electric Switch

RHV

Reheat Valve

PHCT

Preheat Coil Discharge Temp

RMT

Remote

PHCV

Preheat Coil Valve

RO

Read Only/Receive Only

PHT

Preheat Coil Temperature

ROM

Read Only Memory

PHV

Preheat Coil Valve

RPM

Revolutions Per Minute

PI

Proportional Plus Integral

RPS

Revolutions Per Second

PIC

Product Integrated Control

RT

Rooftop

PID

Proportional & Integral & Derivative

RTD

Resistance Temperature Detector

PIP

Peripheral Interface Program

RTS

Refrigerant Temperature Switch

PMP

Pump

RTS

Request To Send

PMPC

Pump Speed Control

RTWV

Return Water Valve

PMPS

Pump Status

RVP

Return Velocity Pressure

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.23

Controls Acronyms
contd

Abbreviation

Description

RWP

Return Water Pressure

RWT

Return Water Temp

RWV

Return Water Valve

SARH

Supply Air Relative Humidity

SAT

Supply Air Temperature

SCFH

Cubic Feet Per Hour, Standard

SCFM

Cubic Feet Per Minute, Standard

SCW

Secondary Water System

SD

Send Data

SD

Smoke Damper

SF

Supply Fan

SFHS

Supply Fan High Speed Status

SFLS

Supply Fan Low Speed Status

SFS

Supply Fan Status

SFVD

SF Vortex Dampers

SI

International System

SMK

Smoke Detector

SP

Static Pressure

SPD

Speed

SPDC

Speed Control

SPHV

Space Humidity Valve

SPRH

Space Relative Humidity

SPT

Space Temperature

SS

Start / Stop

SSH

Start / Stop High Speed

SSL

Start / Stop Low Speed

STAT

Status

STMF

Steam Flow

STMP

Steam Pressure

STMS

Steam System

STMT

Steam Temperature

STMV

Steam Valve

SUBS

Substation Power

SUCP

Suction Pressure

Abbreviation

Description

SUPT

Supply Temperature

SVP

Steam Velocity Pressure

SW

Summer / Winter Switch

SWP

Supply Water Press

SWT

Supply Water Temperature

SWV

Supply Water Valve

SYSGEN

System Generation

TD

Transmit Data

TDR

Time Delay Relay

TEMP

Temperature

TP

Twisted Pair

TR

Terminal Ready

TSP

Twisted Shielded Pair

TXV

Thermostat Expansion Valve

UH

Unit Heater

UL

Underwriters' Laboratory

Volts

VA

Volt Ampere

VAC

Volts Alternating Current

VAV

Variable Air Volume

VDC

Volts Direct Current

VFD

Variable Frequency Drive

VLV

Valve

VOM

Volt Ohmmeter

Watt

WATT

Wattmeter

WB

Wet Bulb

WTHR

Weather Station

ZT

Zone Thermostat

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.24

www.Carrier.com

INTRODUCTION / SECTION 1
1.1.25

CARRIER COMMERCIAL CONTROLS GUIDE


1.1.26