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CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mercury

REPORT
Natlia Borges Marcelino

Sumrio
1 Mercury Properties
1.1 Chemical Properties .
1.2 Physical Properties . .
1.2.1 Vapor Pressure
1.2.2 Vapor Density .
1.2.3 Vapor Viscosity
1.2.4 Liquid Density
1.2.5 Liquid Viscosity
1.2.6 Surface Tension

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Mercury Properties
1.1

Chemical Properties
Tabela 1.1: Chemical properties of Lithium
Feature
Name
Mercury
Symbol
Hg
Atomic number
80
Atomic Weight
200.592 10 3 kg/mol
Boiling point
629.77K
Melting point
234.32K
Heat of vaporization (L) 59110J/kg
Heat of Fusion
2295J/kg

1.2

Reference

[1]
[1]
[1]
[1]
[1]

Esta errado

Physical Properties

All equations in this work result in a International System Unit (S.I.) which
means [p] = P a, [] = kg/m3 , [] = P a.s, [ ] = N/m and [T ] = K

1.2.1

Vapor Pressure

The Equation 1.1 is represented in Figure 1.1 and has a uncertainty of 1% for
temperatures of 273 400K, 0.15% for the intermediate temperature region
from 400K to the normal boiling point at 629.77K and 0.5% for temperatures
above the normal boiling point but below 900K [2]

2.94588 1011 f (t)


p=
e
(1.1)
T
where

f (t) =

4.57618368t 1.40726277t1.89 + 2.36263541t2


31.0889985t8 + 58.0183959t8 .5 27.6304546t9

(1.2)

and
t=

T
1764

Figura 1.1: Vapor pressure curve

(1.3)

1.2.2

Vapor Density

Some vapor can be describe as a ideal gas. Mercury is one of them [2] and
Figure 1.2 provides experimental data [3] and ideal gas equation 1.4.

Figura 1.2: Saturated vapor density


Mp
(1.4)
RT
where R = 8.314462J/Kmol is the gas constant, M the atomic weight and
p is given by equation 1.1
v =

1.2.3

Vapor Viscosity

Tabulated values and Equation 1.5 [4] are given in Figure 1.3. The Equation
1.5 has accuracy of 1.7%.

Figura 1.3: Saturated Mercury vapor dynamic viscosity


v = (8.692T + 0.0015265T 2 ).10

(1.5)

1.2.4

Liquid Density

Figura 1.4: Liquid density


The data [1] presented at Figure 1.4 are accurate within: 0.1kg/m3 or
less between 263.15 and 473.15K; and 0.2 between 473.15 and 573.15K .
l = 14247.1

2.39826T

(1.6)

1.2.5

Liquid Viscosity

Figure 1.5 present experimental data [1] and a fit curve describe by Equation
1.7

Figura 1.5: Liquid viscosity

l = e

23.5398+2.05769 ln T + 2289.88
T

(1.7)

1.2.6

Surface Tension

As can be seen in Figure 1.6 experimental data [1] present higher value than
Equation 1.8 propose for National Physical Laboratory, London UK [5] and
values present in chart by Chi [6].
= 0.489

2.31 10 4 (T

235.15)

Figura 1.6: Superficial tension

(1.8)

Referncias Bibliogrficas
[1] HAYNES, W. Crc handbook of chemistry and physics, 96th edition. CRC
Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Taylor & Francis, 2015.
[2] HUBER, M. L.; LAESECKE, A.; FRIEND, D. G. The vapor pressure of
mercury. Technical Report NISTIR 6643, National Institute of Standards
and Technology, 2006.
[3] DEVERRAL, J. E.; KEMME, J. E.; FLORSCHUETZ, L. W. Sonic
limitations and startup problems of heat pipes. Technical Report LA4518, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of The University Of California,
1970.
[4] EPSTEIN, L. F.; POWERS, M. D. Liquid metals. i. the viscosity of
mercury vapor and the potential function for mercury. The Journal of
Physical Chemistry, v. 57, n. 3, p. 336341, 1953.
[5] NPL.
Kaye
&
laby,
national
http://www.kayelaby.npl.co.uk, 2014.

physical

laboratory,

[6] CHI, S. Heat pipe theory and practice: a sourcebook. McGraw-HillHemisphere Series in Fluids and Thermal Engineering. Hemisphere Pub.
Corp., 1976.