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0 03-2014

FODDER FACTORY RSA

HYDROPONICS
Hydroponics, growing and cultivating plants without soil, has been in existence since ancient
civilization.

The Egyptians, Inca Indian tribes, the Aztecs, The Maya's and the Babylonians are examples of
ancient civilizations which practiced hydroponic gardening without even realizing it, way before the
word "hydroponics" was ever thought of. Although many of us think of hydroponics as a relatively
new method in agriculture, our ancestors, in their efforts to always improve their technology in
farming, have already been working and learning whatever their gardens could teach them,
including soilless gardening.
There, however, remains a lot be learned in the science of hydroponic gardening. Because of its
low cost and easy workload, hydroponics captures the interest of many professionals. New
methods in hydroponic gardening are always being explored and will continue to be studied.
To prove our point , we have added 165 scientific references on Barley Sprouts studies worldwide.

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Animal Fodder Factory RSA Design
Here we make "the" difference.

Our technical teams, which come mostly from an Applied Post Harvest Technology Background,
developed an Animal Fodder Growing machine that incorporates all possible technologies to make
this an "ideal" growing environment factory.

Air temperature control, Air flow, Water Treatment, Water Temperature, Air cleanliness, Airborne
Bacteria removal, Water circulation, Automated controls with alarms, Drainage, LED Growing light
technology (option), tested technology through NASA USA, and a practical system to off load
readily, are all incorporated in the design and are either standard or available in options depending
on what you as a client want. .
We "grow" barley sprouts for animal fodder purposes in a near perfect environment with
photosynthesis.
Why Photosynthesis?
All living creatures require energy and nutrients to survive. Animals can be divided into autotrophs
and heterotrophs according to how they acquire this energy and nutrients. Autotrophs make their
own food from inorganic nutrients and obtain energy from non-living sources. Heterotrophs must
consume other living creatures to gain the energy and nutrients they need to live. Plants, as
autotrophs, must make their own food and do so from sunlight, carbon dioxide and water through
a process called photosynthesis.
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Our designs are based on making full use of the natural resources, combined with technologically
advanced techniques to get the best possible growing results... (see www.fodderfactory.co.za for
more information on this)

We have the following model ranges:

Container standalone units:


FF-500: 45 trays @ day, production from +/- 300 till 500 kg @ day
FF-300: 30 trays @ day, production from +/- 200 till 300 kg @ day
Herewith a brief description of our system:
Container: Fully insulated container, sides with polycarbonate windows PALRAM, made in
Israel UV resistant - one side sliding door (see below) environment with full sunlight on
sides, growing based on Photosynthesis Full separate machine room with lockable door safe environment for all technical equipment full machine is designed to be transported
inside a standard 20 ft container for export - can be transported on normal truck:

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Trays: 610x440 mm better to handle - less labour stress

Trays fully perforated, no mess when taking out fodder, clean process.
Trays stay in one place during 6 days growing process.
Every model gets an "extra day" fodder trays to enable staff to prepare the
next load "at ease and proper".
Roots come out clean:

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All racks fully made of Aluminium: These racks are punched by CNC/laser cut for precision
all 3 mm thick, both stanchions as side bars. Protections at back window.

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Optional LED lights possible:

Doors: Heavy Duty Sliding doors 4 moving doors with cylinder locks for safety less
energy loss no wind damage

Lights: (OPTIONAL)12 x 1200 mm, depending on the models and the option you take,
LED lights with NASA tested and proven technology effective over the whole area
Water: One or two, 1.1 kW no valves Full water temperature control - Big water tank,
with heating system.
Sprayer system: Drilled Pipes 32 with headers in 50 mm diameter Class 16 pipes no
garden sprayers

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Temperature control: Fully integrated air-conditioning unit with both cooling and heating
functions. Growing between 16 and 27+ degrees possible.
System Control: simple system control with electrical timer and protection.
UV treatment of water
Full professional electrical box with protection.
Result after 6 days: (Pictures taken in one of our machines without LED lights)

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These pictures are out of our machines without extra feeding and no, they are not
Photoshopped
That is what you get when you use Photosynthesis and this is even without our LED
growing lights and our engineering
PRICEPRYS

Green house Solutions for productions from 2000 kg/day+

Our technology adapted to the bigger production facilities. Basic Design Principles are still
implemented, but on a totally different level.
We developed also fully automated systems for pre-rinsing, soaking, rinsing and filling of
trays.
Even the cleaning of trays is now automated and done by machine, This is South African
innovation at its best!
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Absolutely top technology never ever seen in South Africa

Why?
First of all fresh barley grass supplements livestock feed.

Barley grass improves milk production in dairy cows. Additionally, milk from cows fed
barley grass contains higher grades of butter fat.
Barley grass increases energy levels in horses while adding shininess to the horses'
coats. Supplementing with barley grass helps improve fertility and foal health for
broodmares on pasture with poor-quality grazing. Recovery time after a hard workout is
lessened for horses fed barley grass, and hoof quality and strength is improved.
Sheep and goats display improved digestion and health as well as good weight gain on
poor-quality pasture.
Feeding barley grass improves the milk yields in dairy goats and improves the
appearance of fleece in goats.
Barley grass supplements also enhance swine production.

The Fodder Factory's units produce sprouted grass that benefits animals in the following ways:
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Increases weight gain


Reduces illness such as colic and gut ulcers
Improves appearance of coat or fleece
Improvements in hoof strength and quality
Improved conception and birth rates
Improves milk yield and levels of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA)

Both ruminants and mono gastric have been shown to benefit from the introduction of fresh,
nutritious hydroponically grown sprouting fodder in their daily diet.
Only birds have been physiologically designed to eat whole grains. They store the grain in the crop
where the moist warm conditions encourage the grain to sprout. Once sprouted they can digest it
properly.
Ruminants especially struggle to digest grain; our growing system and approach enables them to
gain the benefits of fresh sprouting fodder, every day no matter what the weather.
The demonstrable changes and benefits to livestock as varied as cattle, sheep, pigs, horses,
chickens, deer, alpacas, rabbits and goats have been highlighted by many farmers worldwide.

Secondly, being based in Africa, we know that sustainable technologies are needed to continue
farming in our continent and that water is a scarce commodity...
Water management is needed where rainfall is insufficient or variable, and that occurs to some
degree in most regions of the world. Agriculture represents 70% of freshwater use worldwide.
Farmers lost animals due to drought hit areas.
So we must develop systems that help our farmers in these harsh conditions.

Sprouted Barley Grass Property Advantages:


High Vitamin Content
One of the advantages of barley grass is that it contains high levels of vitamins
including B1, B2, B6, B12, good amounts of folate, beta carotene, vitamin K and
more vitamin C than an orange. Along with spirulina, it is one of the few vegetarian
sources of vitamin B12, although there is some doubt as to whether the body
absorbs this form properly. The levels of vitamin B1 in barley grass are higher than
those found in cow's milk.
High Mineral Content
Barley grass contains substantial levels of calcium, copper, magnesium,
manganese, phosphorus potassium and more iron than spinach, along with high
amounts of organic sodium. Organic sodium is a much healthier option than the
more widely used sodium chloride.
Essential and Non-Essential Amino Acids
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Barley grass contains 18 amino acids, including the eight essential ones, making it a
complete protein. These include alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid,
glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline,
serine, threonine, tyrosine and valine. Amino acids are often referred to as "the
building blocks of protein." They are essential for regenerating cell growth and
cellular energy production.

High in Chlorophyll
Due to its high chlorophyll content, barley grass is anti-bacterial and can be used
topically as well as internally. Chlorophyll is an excellent blood cleanser as its
structure is similar to hemoglobin. Chlorophyll helps rebuild tissue and stabilize blood
sugar levels. It detoxifies the liver which in turn helps to flush toxins and heavy
metals from the body.
Medicinal Uses
Studies have shown barley grass to be useful in treating arthritis, rheumatism and other
inflammation- related pain, as it works well as an anti-inflammatory. It is also used to treat
asthma and migraines and may help relieve some intestinal problems. It can reduce LDL or
"bad" cholesterol levels and has been used to combat blood clotting. Barley grass can help
stabilize blood sugar levels so may be useful for diabetics. It is also used to help prevent
some cancers.
Sprouted durum and barley are a palatable, digestible source of nutrients that can be used
in beef cattle diets. Sprouted grains are similar in feeding value to undamaged grain when
fed to cattle. Nutrient levels in sprouted grains tend to be slightly higher than non-sprouted
grain due to the concentration effect that occurs as certain nutrients are utilized during
germination (Lardy and Dhuyvetter, 2000).

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BENEFITS
1. Benefits for Beef Cattle

Our system benefits cattle in the following ways:


Improved weight gain
Improved fat and marbling
Improved general well being in the herd
Improved coat condition
Improved fertility
Farmers will tell you that when winter feeding their bulls sprouting fodder as an integrated
part of their diet they achieved up to a 41% increase in weight versus the control group fed
on a normal winter diet.
In turn the benefits for the health of animals turn into benefits for the farmers with better
prices at markets and more meat per animal at the abattoir.

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2. Benefits for Dairy Cattle

It is well known that a cow only gets 20% of the energy produced through digestion of a
grain based diet such as alfalfa and maize to produce milk.
Hydroponic fodder is so much more easily digestible, full of nutrients and enzymes that the
energy spent on this digestion process would be far less with the resultant extra energy
being diverted to milk production and growth.
Independent trials and studies also point to improved milk yields and content:
La Serenisima
A leading Argentinean dairy conducted trials with 500kg Holsteins over an 8 week
period. A group fed with up to 12kg of fresh hydroponic sprouting barley per day
improved the volume of milk produced by 11% with an increase in milk fat by 23 %

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Ohio State University
Extended trials over 29 years indicate that dairy cattle fed freshly mown grass
outperformed cattle fed the grass that was allowed to dry with increased milk yield of
28% and improved fat content by 14%.
Stanton University et al (1997)
Trials indicate that animals grazing on fresh grass have higher levels of CLA
(unsaturated fatty acid) in their milk and meat than those consuming conserved
forage.
Elgersma et al (2004)
Holstein Frisian dairy cows were fed on pasture then had a phase on a winter diet of
maize/silage. The change in diet dramatically altered the FA composition of the milk.
UFA decreased and SFA increased. The beneficial n-7FA rumenic acid + Vaccenic
acid reduced by 80% within a week.

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3. Benefits for Sheep

Our system benefits sheep in the following ways:


Improved wool quality
Higher fertility
Less teeth wear
The benefits for sheep are well documented. These range from merely keeping a large
number of sheep alive in extreme weather conditions to improvements in condition of the
wool, increased fertility/conception rates and improved birth rate/ lower infant mortality.
In turn these lead to better prices for the sheep at market as the farmer can make the
market when the prices are best for him to do so.
Ross Girdwood - Jerilderie, New South Wales, Australia
Testimonial
I would have lost 1000 sheep if it hadnt been for a fresh animal fodder product In addition
the birth rate increased from 120% to 180%. I think my sheep will live longer due to less
wear and tear on their teeth through eating succulent fodder.
- Ross Girdwood

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4. Benefits for Horses

Our system benefits horses in the following ways:


Improved coat
Better performance in race horses
Improved hydration after race meets
Lower vets bills
Lower feeding costs
Worldwide conducted trials with race horses you can say with a high degree of credibility
that after being fed with sprouting fodder as a supplement for 3 months the win and place
ration was better than ever before.
In addition the incidence of colic, respiratory illness and gut ulcer were significantly reduced
across the stable. The superb digestibility of the fresh sprouting fodder helps with colic and
ulcers. The lack of dust from dry feed, in turn helps with the respiration.

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5. Benefits for Pigs

Our system benefits pigs in the following ways:


Improved weight gain
More piglets
Farmers in Queensland Australia exchanged 1kg of grain for 1kg of sprouting hydroponic
sprouting barley (wet weight) in the diet of their organic pigs for 6 months. They found that
the fat went from 14mm to 7mm, the colour of the meat from light to dark pink and that the
growth rate was much quicker with them finishing 2 weeks early than the pigs in the control
group.
In addition the sows came into heat much quicker, they were visibly more healthy and had a
longer milking period. This enabled the piglets to hang on for longer and grow fatter faster.
Once off the milk the piglets were given a snack of hydroponic sprouting barley and at the
same age were significantly bigger than the piglets.
The vets bill at the farm were reduced by 95% for the sows and piglets on the hydroponic
sprouting barley and the farmer reduced her feeding costs in these trials by approx. 50%.

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6. Benefits for Wild Parks/Zoo's/Deer

The vast majority of feed for Wild Parks & Zoos is purchased and transported from external
sources.
More and more Wild Parks & Zoos are now looking at how they can feed their animals in a
responsible manner with food produced locally, that in turn reduces their costs and more
importantly will benefit the health of their animals.
A huge majority of zoos have ruminants and other grazing animals that feed predominantly
on grass or grass substitutes when in captivity such as hay.
Animals such as camels, elephants, giraffe, okapi, tapir, rhinoceros, antelope (including
impala, kudu, wildebeest, Oryx, springbok, gazelle, eland, dik dik, gnu etc) zebra, bison,
buffalo, deer, not mention petting parts of the zoos with cattle, sheep, horses, goats and
pigs could benefit from the introduction of fresh sprouting fodder into their daily diet.

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7. Benefits for Poultry

Our system benefits poultry in the following ways:


More eggs
Larger eggs
Deep yellow yolk

Trials in Tasmania have shown that when fed fodder, 20 x 1 year old free range chickens
increased their egg laying by from a total of 5 per day to 15 per day within 3 weeks of being
introduced to the fodder.
In addition the yolks were noticeable a deeper yellow.
This trial continues.

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8. Benefits for Goats

Our system benefits goats in the following ways:


Weight gain
Better hoof health
Improved fertility
The manufacture and distribution of goat meat is one of the largest meat industries in the
world.
A farmer in Victoria, Australia who has 3500 goats insists that fodder fed goats fatten more
quickly, have a better coat and have healthier hoofs especially if the season is wet.
In addition conception and birth rates are much improved when compared to a diet of
normal pasture and dry matter/grain, especially during the winter months.

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9. Benefits for Rabbits

Graeme Harris - Highthorpe Farm, Tasmania


Trial with Rabbits
"Farmed rabbits are grown for their meat and we trialled fodder to test for increased weight
gain in a shorter period of time.
Rabbits take very well to sprouting fodder. Our trials showed them consuming all the fodder
given to them by the 2nd day.
On average a Doe has 10-12 sets of babies per year, with an average of 6-8 babies per set
dependant on the age of the doe, although to be viable we need to produce 8 kits per set."
Results
"We have 90 breeding does with a weaned kittens population of 250 at various ages. We found that the
sprouting fodder gave the mothers more milk for the young which gave them a really good start. When the
young were taken off their mother they were given sprouting fodder and some hay.
In addition the mothers were given additional sprouting fodder when the young were taken away to help
recovery times.
The results were better than we had expected.
Normally our rabbits weigh between 2-2.5kg live weight and 1-1.5kg carcass weight at 14 weeks. After feeding
sprouting fodder the rabbits took only 12 weeks to reach this weight.
In addition when previously feeding pellets to the rabbits it would cost $760 to feed 50 does and 70 kittens for 3
weeks. We now feed 90 does and 250 kittens for the same price.
However the real surprise was the increase in birth rates. As stated previously a set of babies is normally 6-8
kittens. After being fed fodder this average increased to 8-12 per set with one mother giving birth to 15."
- Graeme Harris

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Science

It can be seen by the laboratory analysis of the fodder leaf, root mass and left over grain that the
nutrients contained in fodder are rich and varied. In fact they are the majority of what most animals
need on a daily basis.

What is sprouting fodder?


Sprouting fodder is young tender grass grown from a cereal grain. In essence they are the
equivalent to fresh spring grass which is recognized as THE best livestock feed.

Improved Digestion
Fresh sprouting fodder improves digestion and absorption and uses less energy in doing so. Thus
enabling the animal to use the energy for such activities as milk production, reproduction, weight
gain and more efficient waste management.
Grains are high in phytates that inhibit mineral absorption and also inhibit important enzymes such
as trypsin, this means that the pancreas has to work harder. Hydroponic sprouting barley on the
other hand is packed with minerals and enzymes that improve absorption.
Hydroponic sprouting barley eliminates enzyme inhibitors which in turn helps digestion of other
feed and so putting less stress on the whole digestive system.

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More Vitamins

Hydroponic sprouting barley has 23 times more Vitamin A than carrots, 22 times more
Vitamin B than lettuce, 14 times more Vitamin C than citrus.
Grains contain mostly starch. When fed to a ruminant these starches begin fermentation
which leads to D-lactic acid in the rumen. i.e. causes an acidic environment in the rumen
that reduces the efficiency of the digestive process.
Hydroponic sprouting barley on the other hand contains many sugars. Sucrose, fructose,
fructans, glucose, lactose and maltose are all present and produce more energy, more
efficiently for the animal.
Mineral and vitamin levels in hydroponic sprouting barley are significantly increased over
grain, in addition they are absorbed more efficiently due to the lack of inhibitors present in
grain.

Why Sprouting Fodder?

Fresh sprouting fodder enables the digestive system to process food in a much more efficient
manner than it does with grain because:
it eliminates phytates to improve mineral absorption
it eliminates enzyme inhibitors to improve the digestive process
it improves the enzyme activity to make the whole process less stressful on the
pancreas
Feeding fresh sprouting fodder means less energy is needed by the animal for digestion so it
channels this unused energy into production.
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Of the 100% energy that an animal (for example a milking cow) takes on board:
20% is used to generate heat.
20% is used in "system" maintenance
20% is used in production energy (milk, reproduction, growth)
40% is used in waste (30% faecal, 5% gas, 5% urinary)
Feeding fodder will reduce the amount of time the animal spends searching for food in the field.
Feeding fodder will improve the digestive process so the animal absorbs more energy, spends
less energy on the process and spends less energy in producing waste.
This net improvement is in energy available for production, whether this is milk, reproduction or
weight gain.

Dry Matter versus Fodder

Many farmers and nutrionalists use dry matter as the yard stick by which livestock should be fed.
However it is clear that much of that energy in dry matter is wasted by the animal in the digestion
and processing of feed with much of the feed passing though the animal without being processed.
When asked "would you agree that the introduction of fresh green grass into the diet of your
animal on a daily basis is a good thing?" the vast majority reply positively.
The high digestibility of fresh hydroponic sprouting barley means that the animal needs less weight
of feed to produce the same results and is the same as feeding fresh spring grass to your
livestock, every single day.

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Nutritional Energy
Per kg, sprouting fodder holds 12.7 mega joules (MJ) of nutritional energy. The total amount of
digestible matter in fodder is 91% with on average over 15% protein and 20% starch along with all
the trace elements needed such as Potassium, Calcium, Copper, Cobalt, Magnesium, Sodium,
Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Molybdenum, Manganese & Selenium.

Beef Trials
In beef trials conducted in New Zealand, the control group were fed approx.. 25% more
Metabolisable Energy (ME) per day than those fed on fodder. However the fodder group gained
41% more weight.

Fodder Supplement
Ruminants and grazing animals were not designed to process hard dry matter, they were
designed to process grass.
The Fodder Factory RSA does not advocate a complete replacement of dry matter with fodder. In
fact it is suggested that on a daily basis to give fattening livestock 2% of sprouting fodder based on
the animal's current body weight and access to unlimited dry matter in the form of pasture or
straw.
Fodder will help with the digestion of dry matter and the dry matter helps the fodder to fix in the
rumen or gut to be fully absorbed.

Hydroponic sprouting barley as a part of a complete ration


Hydroponic sprouting barley is used by some of our farmers as a complete replacement feed.
These tend to be farmers of sheep, goats and deer where the animal can obtain some additional
feed through normal grazing of pasture. (Fodder Factory RSA does not necessarily advocate using our fodder as a
complete replacement for dry matter.)

(We suggest that on a daily basis to give fattening livestock 2% of sprouting fodder based on the animal's current
body weight and access to unlimited dry matter in the form of pasture or straw.)

Ruminants and grazing animals were not designed to process hard dry matter, they were
designed to process grass.
Our fodder will help with the digestion of dry matter and the dry matter helps the fodder to fix in the
rumen or gut to be fully absorbed. They will work in a complimentary manner.

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COST SAVING

Reduce feeding cost


Significant savings can be made in the cost of feeding livestock.
A riding school in the UK, "The Spanish Bit Riding School", have saved approximately 60% on
their feed bills in the first year since installation.
A case study for beef cattle by an International Company in New Zealand, proved a 27% reduction
in feeding costs per kg of weight gain. This was using only a supplementary volume of sprouting
fodder at 3.75kg, approximately 1.5% of the bodyweight of each beast.
Applying a suggested daily volume of 2-3% of body weight with unlimited access to dry material in
the form of pasture dry feed or hay. It can be seen that further reductions in the cost of feed will
apply.
Reducing the cost of feeding the animals is not the only saving that will be made. Many farmers
worldwide will point to many other incidental savings by changing from producing crops for
winter feed themselves to producing hydroponic sprouting barley using our system.
We used to grow on approx. 30 hectares. Our costs per hectare were in excess of $500 per hectare for weed killer,
ploughing, scarifying, working up, fertiliser and labour. This has been removed through the use of the fodder machine.
Then pray for rain, hope the grubs dont eat it again next year, then spray out the flat weed as they take hold, all in all a
costly exercise. It makes Hydroponics Fodder look very attractive. - Glenda Harris

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Fodder Production Costs

Using a typical FF-500 our experience tells us that to grow 1 kg of sprouting fodder costs in the
region of 105 cents or 9.5 cents US/Australian. So to produce approx. 500 kg per day costs
around R 573-15. (With commercial bought in certified seeds) However these costs will vary
according to local conditions, pricing for grain, electricity, water and labour in many countries may
be considerably less.
We have in the below table outlined the costs involved in the process.
Approx. running costs for a 0.5 tonne per day system:

Description

Purchase price and size

Per kg cost of
fodder (cents)

Total per day


cost (Rand)

hydroponic sprouting
barley seed

(500kg/day =62.5kg per


day of grain/45 trays)

0.625

R 312-50

Electricity

R 800-00/month

0.05

R 27-00

Water

Pump costs

0.015

R 9-00

Nutrient

R 32-50

0.055

R 32-50

Labour

4 hours

0.08

R 48-00

Capital Cost

R 300.000-00 @ prime

0.2883

R 144-15

Total

Daily running costs

1.11

R 573-15

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Capital Costs

Huge savings on capital items can be made.

Machinery
Our system drastically reduces the need to prepare land, sow, spray, harvest and bale. Each of
these parts of the process uses costly machinery such as tractors, harvesters and balers.

Land
The produces the approximate hay equivalent of 350 acres of land. This is land that would not
need to be purchased or could otherwise be used to produce for example a cash crop. Dependant
on location, the cost of land could be the largest saving of all.

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Lower Vets Bills

In worldwide testimonies from several farmers feeding horses, sheep and cattle, there is plenty
anecdotal evidence that vets bills have been reduced drastically, with improved heath of the
animals and especially with horses indications of lower incidence of colic and gut ulcers.

Other Costs
Weed killer, ploughing, scarifying, working up, fertiliser and labour.

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ENVIRONMENT

There are many immediate environmental benefits to be gained from growing hydroponic
sprouting barley on a daily basis on your own premises.

Carbon footprint
The most obvious is the reduction in the need and usage of farm machinery such as tractors,
harvesters and balers, in addition to the reduction in the regular transportation of large volumes of
feed and hay around the country.
Using our hydroponic system can seriously contribute to a reduction in the carbon footprint of a
farm.

Water saving
The savings to be made in the use of water are very important. The use of our water distributions
system with automatic controllers are at the core of this saving, with water constantly being used
in the most effective way. Recirculated and recycled units are available on request. All types of
farming are coming under increased pressure from government to reduce water usage, especially
crop growing farms. Our system ensures that your fresh daily fodder does not come at the
expense of the water supply.

Effective land use


The use of a vertical growing system is key to the high volume production of fresh fodder in such a
small land footprint. One FF-500 system produces over 3942 m2 of fresh green fodder each year.
This makes huge savings in land needed for crop/feed production.
From a land footprint perspective the system is unbeatable. No spraying of weeds on the property,
no fencing, no extra council rates, no road maintenance and the product is extremely water wise.
What would it cost you to go out and buy land to be able to produce the annual fodder tonnage
you produce in an area no bigger than 2.2 x 4.0 meters?

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Labour saving
Only 1 person working 3-4 hours per day is needed to harvest, sow and perform other parts of the
growing process in our systems.

Pesticide free
The nutrient mix contains no pesticides and the production of fodder inside our control
environment removes any need for spraying of outdoor crops.

Dust free environment


The absence of dust during our production process means less respiratory problems for both
animals and human workers.

Reduction of methane production in cows and sheep


It has been well documented that cows are responsible for the production of approx 18% of the
worlds green house gas CH4 or methane.
One of the reasons for this is the constant chewing of the cud and the belching associated with
this. By feeding our highly digestible fodder to cows and sheep they will be able to digest more
quickly thus reducing the volume that is regurgitated and therefore the associated methane
production.

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Nutrients

We control ALL aspects to get to a perfect growing result. There is a system built-in for nutrient
input to the growing grain, roots and leaf.
Part of our team consists of specialised, farming, members that can guide you on a daily basis
with the fodder growing process. Part of our unique approach is that you can contract these team
specialist DIRECT, in order to minimize costs for you.
He can advise you on all aspects of growing fodder at all times. He has developed ways to ensure
that your fodder will grow with high volumes of sprouting fodder within a full 6 day cycle.
The formulae that he uses are a closely guarded secret!
Don't take a chance, work with the best...
His testing and growing results are is regarded as the best in the market and he is constantly and
rigorously testing any new methods prior to release.

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Available Fodder Factory models:

Ask us for a pricelist, you will be


pleasantly surprised on our
affordability even with all our technical
advantages on the competition
+27 (0)22 448 1030

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