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Statistics

Handbook

Special Edition

Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Rio 2016

Produced in collaboration with ATFS
Edited by Mark Butler

ATHLETICS STATISTICS BOOK
Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Rio de Janeiro 2016

© IAAF Communications Department 2016

Editor: Mark Butler
Produced by the IAAF Communications Department

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P R E S I D E N T ’ S

M E S S A G E

IAAF PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
MESSAGE DU PRESIDENT DE L’IAAF
Athletes often speak about the ‘record books’ in a figurative sense, but this publication is as close as you can
get to a definitive book of records for track and field at the Olympic Games. I, along with thousands of
athletics fans around the world, will regularly be consulting its hundreds of pages as the action unfolds in
Rio later this year.
This book features results and reports of all 951 Olympic athletics finals to date, along with a full country
index and countless other fascinating facts and figures. In short, each and every significant athletics moment
in Olympic history is covered. Therefore this publication will hopefully mean that you won’t have to spend
hours trawling the internet for elusive Olympic-related information and statistics.
On behalf of the IAAF, I would like to thank the Association of Track and Field Statisticians (ATFS) for
the tireless work that has gone in to producing a book such as this one. We are equally grateful to the
International Society of Olympic Historians (ISOH) whose sterling efforts mean that events from bygone
eras are reported as accurately as possible.

Les athlètes parlent souvent de «livre des records» au sens figuré, mais cette publication constitue le nec
plus ultra du livre des performances d’athlétisme aux Jeux Olympiques. A l’instar des milliers de fans
d’athlétisme à travers le monde, je consulterai régulièrement les centaines de pages de cet ouvrage lorsque
débuteront les Jeux de Rio cet été.
Ce volume contient tous les résultats et comptes rendus des 951 finales olympiques d’athlétisme qui ont
eu lieu à ce jour, ainsi qu’un index complet par pays et un nombre incalculable de chiffres et d’anecdotes
captivantes. Bref, tous les moments importants de l’histoire olympique y figurent. Par conséquent, grâce à
cette publication, vous n’aurez plus à écumer internet à la recherche d’informations et de statistiques
olympiques.
Au nom de l’IAAF, je tiens à remercier l’Association des statisticiens d’athlétisme (ATFS) pour son
inlassable labeur qui trouve sa raison d’être dans la production d’un tel ouvrage. Nous sommes également
reconnaissant à la Société internationale des historiens olympiques (ISOH) dont les efforts considérables
ont permis de rendre compte d’épreuves appartenant à des époques révolues avec la plus grande précision
possible.

Sebastian Coe
IAAF President

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C O N T E N T S

CONTENTS
IAAF PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE .......................................................................................................2
CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................3
EDITOR’S NOTE .................................................................................................................................5
NOTES ON CONTENTS .....................................................................................................................5
IAAF WORLD RECORDS ..................................................................................................................8
OLYMPIC RECORDS .......................................................................................................................10
FACTS & FIGURES ...........................................................................................................................11
Chronology of the Games........................................................................................................12
Competing Countries...............................................................................................................12
The Greatest Olympic Athletes? .............................................................................................16
Youngest & Oldest...................................................................................................................23
Medals Across Three Games or More.....................................................................................29
Most Games Contested............................................................................................................30
Most Finals Contested .............................................................................................................30
Most Rounds Contested...........................................................................................................30
Medal Sweeps..........................................................................................................................31
Olympic Track Circumferences...............................................................................................31
Doping Violations at Olympic Games.....................................................................................32
Placing Tables..........................................................................................................................35
IOC Medal Tables....................................................................................................................62
OLYMPIC ATHLETICS FINALS 1896-2012 ..................................................................................69
BEST NATIONAL PLACINGS .......................................................................................................317
COUNTRY INDEX ...........................................................................................................................357

TABLE DES MATIÈRES
MESSAGE DU PRÉSIDENT DE L’IAAF..........................................................................................2
TABLE DES MATIÈRES.....................................................................................................................3
NOTE DE L’ÉDITEUR ........................................................................................................................5
NOTES A PROPOS DU CONTENU...................................................................................................5
RECORDS DU MONDE DE L’IAAF .................................................................................................8
RECORDS OLYMPIQUES ...............................................................................................................10
FAITS ET CHIFFRES ........................................................................................................................11
Chronologie des Jeux ..............................................................................................................12
Nations participantes ...............................................................................................................12
Les plus grands athlètes?.........................................................................................................16
Des plus jeunes aux plus vieux................................................................................................23
Médailles à travers trois Jeux ou plus .....................................................................................29
Records de participation (athlètes) ..........................................................................................30
Records de finales disputées....................................................................................................30
Records de tours franchis par un athlète .................................................................................30
Les grands chelems du podium ...............................................................................................31
Circonférences des différentes pistes olympiques...................................................................31
Infractions au Règles Antidopage aux Jeux Olympiques........................................................32
Tableaux de classement ...........................................................................................................35
Tableaux Médaille du CIO ......................................................................................................62
FINALES OLYMPIQUES D’ATHLETISME 1896-2012................................................................69
MEILLEURES PLACES NATIONALES ......................................................................................317
INDEX PAR PAYS ............................................................................................................................357

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EDITOR’S NOTE
Welcome to the IAAF “Athletics Statistics Book” for Rio 2016. It is designed to be useful for those seeking
answers to those odd statistical questions which might arise as we follow athletics events at the Olympic
Games in Rio de Janeiro. The core of the book is the section giving reports and results from all 951 finals.
Tantalisingly, we will be up to Olympic athletics final number 998 in Brazil.
The mass of results, details and reports for London 2012 is not the only addition to the book which was
produced four years ago. Several sets of series and draws have been added from early Games. For instance
you can now read from which lane Thomas Burke became the first ever Olympic 100m Champion.
Historical nuggets such as these regularly come to light because of the diligence of my statistical
collaborators. Thanks to one of those (Tom Hunt) we now have a “new” oldest ever Olympic medallist. Tom
discovered that multi hammer throw medallist Matt McGrath was born in 1875, not 1877.
A less welcome reason for change is to set the record straight in the wake of doping disqualifications.
This has become a major task, but one which we must take seriously if only to give credit to the rightful
champions, medallists and finalists. As this book’s deadline is reached, there are numerous unconfirmed and
ongoing cases such as the mass IOC re-tests from Beijing 2008 and London 2012. These pages contain the
ranking changes resulting from cases closed by the IAAF as at June 10, 2016. In some events the IOC have
yet to confirm the resultant re-allocation of medals. On May 17, 2016 the IOC reported that they are also retesting the samples of those athletes who could be awarded medals following the disqualification of others.
The two main contributors to this book are Tomas Magnusson and Richard Hymans. Tomas generated
the masses of tables and lists as well as keeping on top of historical twists. Richard has carefully unearthed
extra details from many past results as well as providing reports from 2012. Despite having a ringside seat
for the race, it was only on reading Richard’s report that I realised Mohamed Farah’s 5000m win in London
was the first home victory in that event at the Olympics. Thank you to Tomas and Richard and also Hilary
Evans and Bill Mallon from the International Society of Olympic Historians. I am especially grateful to the
Alice Annibali and IAAF Communications Department, the IOC The Media Relations Team, and the
following individuals who sent corrections and supplied additional data:
Thomas Byrne, David Eiger, Tom Hurst, Andrew Huxtable, Bruce James, Dave Johnson, Winfried
Kramer, Gerald Lipp, Phil Minshull, Jon Mulkeen, Walt Murphy, Pierce O’Callaghan, Brian Roe, Piotr
Rostkowski, Chris Turner, Johan Wallerstein, Aleksandar Vangelov and Pierre-Jean Vazel.
Mark Butler (Editor)
June 10, 2016
mbutler@worldscope.eu

IAAF
6-8, Quai Antoine 1er
B.P. 359, MC 98007 Monaco Cedex
Telephone: +377 93 10 88 88
Telefax: + 377 93 15 95 15
E-Mail: headquarters@iaaf.org

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ★ ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Notes on Contents
General Abbreviations & Symbols
AAU
DQ
DNF
DNS
DT
GANEFO
GS DT
HJ
HT
IC4A
JT
km
m
LJ
M
NCAA

Amateur Athletic Union (USA)
Disqualified
Did not finish
Did not start
Discus Throw
Games of the New Emerging Forces
Greek Style Discus Throw
High Jump
Hammer Throw
Inter-Collegiate Amateur Athletic Association of America
Javelin Throw
Kilometres
metres
Long Jump
Miles
National Collegiate Athletic Association

NH
NM
o
OR
PV
SC
SHJ
SLJ
SP
STJ
TJ
TR
WB
WR
y
x
XC
-

No Height
No mark
Clearance (in High Jump or Pole Vault series)
Olympic Record
Pole Vault
Steeplechase
Standing High Jump
Standing Long Jump
Shot Put
Standing Triple Jump
Triple Jump
Team Race
World Best
World Record
Yards
miss or foul
Cross Country
pass

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D A T A

Technical Data (from IAAF Competition Rules 2016-2017)
Event
3000m Steeplechase

100m Hurdles

110m Hurdles

400m Hurdles

High Jump

Pole Vault

Long/Triple Jump

Shot Put

Discus Throw

Hammer Throw

Javelin Throw

Relays

Number of Hurdles
Height
Minimum Width
Cross-section of Top of Barrier
Number of Water Jumps
Length of Water Jump
Width of Water Jump
Water depth at Barrier
Number of Hurdles
Height
Start to First Hurdle
Between Hurdles
Last Hurdle to Finish
Number of Hurdles
Height
Start to First Hurdle
Between Hurdles
Last Hurdle to Finish
Number of Hurdles
Height
Start to First Hurdle
Between Hurdles
Last Hurdle to Finish
Crossbar Length
Crossbar Weight
Landing Area (minimum)
Crossbar Length
Crossbar Weight
Landing Area (minimum)
Take-off Board Length
Take-off Board Width
Plasticine Board Width
Pit Width
Weight
Diameter
Sector Angle
Circle Diameter
Stop Board Height
Stop Board Length
Weight
Diameter
Sector Angle
Circle Diameter
Weight
Diameter of Head
Length
Sector Angle
Circle Diameter
Weight
Length
Sector Angle
Baton Length
Baton Weight
Length of Takeover Zone
Baton Diameter

Senior Men
Senior Women
28 (4 each lap)
28 (4 each lap)
91.4cm (±3mm)
76.2cm (±3mm)
3.94m
3.94m
12.7cm square
12.7cm square
7 (1 each lap)
7 (1 each lap)
3.66m (±2cm)
3.66m (±2cm)
3.66m (±2cm)
3.66m (±2cm)
50-70cm
50-70cm
10
83.8cm (±3mm)
13m
8.5m
10.5m
10
106.7cm (±3mm)
13.72m
9.14m
14.02m
10
10
91.4cm (±3mm)
76.2cm (±3mm)
45m
45m
35m
35m
40m
40m
4.00m (±2cm)
4.00m (±2cm)
Up to 2Kg
Up to 2Kg
6m x 4m x 70cm
6m x 4m x 70cm
4.50m (±2cm)
4.50m (±2cm)
Up to 2.25Kg
Up to 2.25Kg
6m x 6m x 80cm
6m x 6m x 80cm
Plus a minimum of 2m front pieces
1.22m (±1cm)
1.22m (±1cm)
20cm (±2mm)
20cm (±2mm)
10cm (±2mm)
10cm (±2mm)
2.75-3m
2.75-3m
7.26Kg
4Kg
110-130mm
95-110mm
34.92°
34.92°
2.135m (±5mm)
2.135m (±5mm)
10cm (±2mm)
10cm (±2mm)
1.21m (±1cm)
1.21m (±1cm)
2Kg
1Kg
219-221mm
180-182mm
34.92°
34.92°
2.5m (±5mm)
2.5m (±5mm)
7.26Kg
4Kg
110-130mm
95-110mm
Up to 1.215m
Up to 1.195m
34.92°
34.92°
2.135m (±5mm)
2.135m (±5mm)
800gm
600gm
2.6-2.7m
2.2-2.3m
28.96°
28.96°
28-30cm
28-30cm
Not less than 50gm
Not less than 50gm
20m
20m
4cm (±2mm)
4cm (±2mm)

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7

Countries
IAAF Members (214)
AFG Afghanistan
AIA Anguilla
ALB Albania
ALG Algeria
AND Andorra
ANG Angola
ANT Antigua & Barbuda
ARG Argentina
ARM Armenia
ARU Aruba
ASA American Samoa
AUS Australia
AUT Austria
AZE Azerbaijan
BAH Bahamas
BAN Bangladesh
BAR Barbados
BDI Burundi
BEL Belgium
BEN Benin
BER Bermuda
BHU Bhutan
BIH Bosnia & Herzegovina
BIZ Belize
BLR Belarus
BOL Bolivia
BOT Botswana
BRA Brazil
BRN Bahrain
BRU Brunei
BUL Bulgaria
BUR Burkina Faso
CAF Central African Republic
CAM Cambodia
CAN Canada
CAY Cayman Islands
CGO Congo
CHA Chad
CHI Chile
CHN PR of China
CIV Ivory Coast
CMR Cameroon
COD DR of Congo
COK Cook Islands
COL Colombia
COM Comoros
CPV Cape Verde Islands
CRC Costa Rica
CRO Croatia
CUB Cuba
CYP Cyprus
CZE Czech Republic
DEN Denmark
DJI Djibouti
DMA Dominica
DOM Dominican Republic
ECU Ecuador
EGY Egypt
ERI Eritrea
ESA El Salvador
ESP Spain
EST Estonia
ETH Ethiopia
FIJ Fiji
FIN Finland
FRA France
FSM Federated States of
Micronesia
GAB Gabon
GAM The Gambia
GBR Great Britain & Northern
Ireland
GBS Guinea Bissau
GEO Georgia

GEQ
GER
GHA
GIB
GRE
GRN
GUA
GUI
GUM
GUY
HAI
HKG
HON
HUN
INA
IND
IRI
IRL
IRQ
ISL
ISR
ISV
IVB
ITA
JAM
JOR
JPN
KAZ
KEN
KGZ
KIR
KOR
KOS
KSA
KUW
LAO
LAT
LBA
LBR
LCA
LES
LIB
LIE
LTU
LUX
MAC
MAD
MAR
MAS
MAW
MDA
MDV
MEX
MGL
MHL
MKD
MLI
MLT
MNE
MNT
MON
MOZ
MRI
MTN
MYA
NAM
NCA
NED
NEP
NFI
NGR
NIG
NMI
NOR

Equatorial Guinea
Germany
Ghana
Gibraltar
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guam
Guyana
Haiti
Hong Kong, China
Honduras
Hungary
Indonesia
India
Iran
Ireland
Iraq
Iceland
Israel
Virgin Islands (US)
British Virgin Islands
Italy
Jamaica
Jordan
Japan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kyrghizstan
Kiribati
Korea
Kosovo
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Kuwait
Laos
Latvia
Libya
Liberia
Saint Lucia
Lesotho
Lebanon
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Macao
Madagascar
Morocco
Malaysia
Malawi
Moldova
Maldives
Mexico
Mongolia
Marshall Islands
Former Yugoslav Republic
of Macedonia
Mali
Malta
Montenegro
Montserrat
Monaco
Mozambique
Mauritius
Mauritania
Myanmar
Namibia
Nicaragua
Netherlands
Nepal
Norfolk Island
Nigeria
Niger
Northern Mariana Islands
Norway

NRU
NZL
OMA
PAK
PAN
PAR
PER
PHI
PLE
PLW
PNG
POL
POR
PRK
PUR
PYF
QAT
ROU
RSA
RUS
RWA
SAM
SEN
SEY
SIN
SKN
SLE
SLO
SMR
SOL
SOM
SRB
SRI
SSD
STP
SUD
SUI
SUR
SVK
SWE
SWZ
SYR
TAN
TGA
THA
TJK
TKM
TKS
TLS
TOG
TPE
TTO
TUN
TUR
TUV
UAE
UGA
UKR
URU
USA
UZB
VAN
VEN
VIE
VIN

Nauru
New Zealand
Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Palestine
Palau
Papua New Guinea
Poland
Portugal
DPR Korea
Puerto Rico
French Polynesia
Qatar
Romania
Republic of South Africa
Russia
Rwanda
Western Samoa
Senegal
Seychelles
Singapore
Saint Kitts & Nevis
Sierra Leone
Slovenia
San Marino
Solomon Islands
Somalia
Serbia
Sri Lanka
South Sudan
DR of São Tomé & Principé
Sudan
Switzerland
Surinam
Slovak Republic
Sweden
Swaziland
Syria
Tanzania
Tonga
Thailand
Tadjikistan
Turkmenistan
Turks & Caicos Islands
East Timor
Togo
Chinese Taipei
Trinidad & Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Tuvalu
United Arab Emirates
Uganda
Ukraine
Uruguay
United States
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Venezuela
Vietnam
Saint Vincent & the
Grenadines
YEM Yemen
ZAM Zambia
ZIM Zimbabwe
Former names and former members:
AHO Netherlands Antilles
AMS American Samoa (now ASA)
ANO Angola (now ANG)
ANG Anguilla (now AIA)
AUA Australasia

BGU
BHR
BHO
BIR
BKF
BOH
BOS
BSH
BUR

BVI
BWI
CEY
CKI
CUR
CVD
DAH
DMN
ENG
EUN
FRG
GBI
GDR
GOL
GUD
HOL
IRN
IOA

IOP
KHM
KZK
LAN
LIT
MAL
MLD
MOL
MRT
MSH
NAU
NIR
NBO
NRH
NMA
NWF
OMN
PAL
PRY
RHO
ROC
ROM
SAA
SAF
SCG
SCO
SER
STK
STL
STV
UAR
URS
TAH
TCH
TON
VOL
WAL
YAR
YUG
ZAI

British Guiana (now GUY)
Bahrain (now BRN)
British Honduras
Burma (now MYA/Myanmar)
Burkina Faso (now BUR)
Bohemia
Bosnia & Herzegovina (now BIH)
Bosnia & Herzegovina (now BIH)
Burundi (now BDI, BUR is now
Burkina Faso)
Was also the code for
Burma/Myanmar at the 1960
Olympic Games
British Virgin Islands (now IVB)
British West Indies
Ceylon (now SRI)
Cook Islands (now COK)
Curucão
Cape Verde Islands (now CPV)
Dahomey (Now BEN/Benin)
Dominica (now DMA)
England
Unified Team (Formerly USSR)
Federal Republic of Germany
(now GER)
Great Britain & Ireland (pre1922)
German Democratic Republic
(now GER)
Gold Coast (now GHA/Ghana)
Guadeloupe
Netherlands (now NED)
Iran (now IRI)
Individual Olympic Athletes
(2000) or Independent Olympic
Athletes (2012)
Independent Olympic
Participants (1992)
Kampuchea (now
CAM/Cambodia)
Kazakhstan (now KAZ)
Lesser Antilles
Lithuania (now LTU)
Malaya
Maldives (now MDV)
Moldova (now MDA)
Martinique
Marshall Islands (now MHL)
Nauru (now NRU)
Northern Ireland
North Borneo
Northern Rhodesia (now ZAM)
Northern Mariana Islands (now
NMI)
Newfoundland
Oman (now OMA)
Palestine (now PLE)
Democratic People’s Republic
of Yemen (now YEM)
Rhodesia (now ZIM/Zimbabwe)
Republic of China
Romania (now ROU)
Saar
South Africa (now RSA)
Serbia & Montenegro (fomerly
Yugoslavia, now SRB & MNE)
Scotland
Serbia (now SRB)
St Kitts & Nevis (now SKN)
St Lucia (now LCA)
St Vincent (now VIN)
United Arab Republic (now
EGY & SYR)
USSR
Tahiti (now PYF)
(Up to 1992) Czechoslovakia
Tonga (now TGA)
Upper Volta (now BUR/Burkina
Faso)
Wales
Yemen Arab Republic (now
YEM)
Yugoslavia
Zaire (now COD)

18 Michael Johnson USA Sevilla 26 Aug 99 800 Metres 1:40.69/-0.01.45 Javier Sotomayor CUB Salamanca 27 Jul 93 Pole Vault 6. Asbel Kiprop 3:32.285m Haile Gebrselassie ETH Ostrava 27 Jun 07 25. Ben Blankenship 3:51. Wilfred Bungei 1:45.63 Jamaica Nassau 24 May 14 (Nickel Ashmeade 20.91 David Rudisha KEN London 9 Aug 12 1000 Metres 2:11.79 Hicham El Guerrouj MAR Berlin 7 Sep 99 3000 Metres 7:20. Yohan Blake 19.8.53 Kenenisa Bekele ETH Bruxelles 26 Aug 05 20.6.00.4. John Kariuki 7.80 Aries Merritt USA Bruxelles 7 Sep 12 0. Mekubo Mogusu 10km/27:56.195km) 20 Kilometres Walk 50 Kilometres Walk 1:16:36 3:32:33 Leonard Komon KEN Utrecht Leonard Komon KEN Nijmegen Zersenay Tadese ERI Lisboa Zersenay Tadese ERI Lisboa Dennis Kimetto KEN Berlin Eliud Kipchoge KEN London Stanley Biwott KEN London Emmanuel Mutai KEN Berlin Dennis Kimetto KEN Berlin Takahiro Sunada JPN Tokoro Kenya Chiba Josphat Ndambiri 13:24/5km.8) 4 x 200 Metres Relay 1:18. Martin Mathathi 27:12/10km. Michael Johnson 42. Butch Reynolds 43. LJ: 7.3 Triple Jump 18.73.63.35 Kenenisa Bekele ETH Hengelo 31 May 04 10.84 Jamaica London 11 Aug 12 (Nesta Carter 10.50 United States Nassau 3 May 15 (Kyle Merber 2:53.000 Metres Walk 2:01:44. Daniel Mwangi 5km/13:59.9 200 Metres 19.000 Metres Walk 1:17:25. Warren Weir 19.9.34.38.4) ROAD: (+ = en route to longer distance) 10 Kilometres 1:26:44 15 Kilometres 1:41:13 20 Kilometres 1:55:21+ Half Marathon 1:58:23 25 Kilometres 1:11:18 30 Kilometres 1:27:13ª 30 Kilometres 1:27:13ª 1:27:37+ Marathon 2:02:57 100 Kilometres 6:13:33 Ekiden Relay (6-stage) 1:57:06 (5km/10km/7.3 Shot Put 23.24/1600m) 4 x 1500 Metres Relay 14:22.5.R I O 8 2 0 1 6 ★ W O R L D R E C O R D S IAAF WORLD RECORDS ª = Awaiting ratification as at June 10.2.43 Kenya Bruxelles 25 Aug 06 (Joseph Mutua 1:46.94) 4 x 800 Metres Relay 7:02. SP: 14.20.95 Mike Powell USA Tokyo 30 Aug 91 0.195km/19:59 Yusuke Suzuki JPN Nomi Yohann Diniz FRA Zürich 26 Sep 10 21 Nov 10 21 Mar 10 21 Mar 10 6 May 12 24 Apr 16 24 Apr 16 28 Sep 14 28 Sep 14 21 Jun 98 23 Nov 05 15 Mar 15 15 Aug 14 .000 Metres 56:26.56/1200m. Quincy Watts 43.13 Hicham El Guerrouj MAR Roma 7 Jul 99 2000 Metres 4:44.74 Yuriy Sedykh URS Stuttgart 30 Aug 86 Javelin Throw 98.0+ Haile Gebrselassie ETH Ostrava 27 Jun 07 One hour 21. James Magut 3:38.6.6 Bernardo Segura MEX Bergen 7 May 94 Two Hours Walk¢ 29.08 Jürgen Schult GDR Neubrandenburg 6 Jun 86 Hammer Throw 86. 400m: 45.1 Maurizio Damilano ITA Cuneo 3 Oct 92 50.3 400 Metres Hurdles 46. PV: 5.22 Kenya Nassau 25 May 14 (Collins Cheboi 3:38.5. JT: 63.4+ Moses Mosop KEN Eugene 3 Jun 11 30.88/0.000 Metres Walk 3:35:27.29 United States Stuttgart 22 Aug 93 (Andrew Valmon 44.4) 4 x 400 Metres Relay 2:54.63 Saif Saaeed Shaheen QAT Bruxelles 3 Sep 04 110 Metres Hurdles 12.2 Yohan Diniz FRA Reims 12 Mar 11 4 x 100 Metres Relay 36.48 Jan Železný CZE Jena 25 May 96 Decathlon 9045 Ashton Eaton USA Beijing 29 Aug 15 (100m: 10.1. 110mH: 13.16i Renaud Lavillenie FRA Donetsk 15 Feb 14 Long Jump 8.52.2. DT: 43.58 Usain Bolt JAM Berlin 16 Aug 09 0.52) 20.75/800m. HJ: 2. Ismael Kombich 1:45.78 Kevin Young USA Barcelona 6 Aug 92 High Jump 2.4 Moses Mosop KEN Eugene 3 Jun 11 3000 Metres Steeplechase 7:53. 2016 ¢ =No longer an IAAF world record event according to IAAF Rule 261 MEN Wind 100 Metres 9.0.000 Metres 26:17. 1500m: 4:17.95/400m. Brandon Johnson 1:44.572m Maurizio Damilano ITA Cuneo 3 Oct 92 30. Usain Bolt 8.00 Hicham El Guerrouj MAR Roma 14 Jul 98 One Mile 3:43.67 Daniel Komen KEN Rieti 1 Sep 96 5000 Metres 12:37. Yohan Blake 9.29 Jonathan Edwards GBR Göteborg 7 Aug 95 1. Brycen Spratling 45.000 Metres 1:26:47.0.96 Noah Ngeny KEN Rieti 5 Sep 99 1500 Metres 3:26.5. Jermaine Brown 19.3 400 Metres 43.6.000 Metres 1:12:25. William Yiampoy 1:44. Michael Frater 8.23. Onesmus Nyerre 5km/14:36.12 Randy Barnes USA Los Angeles 20 May 90 Discus Throw 74.40) Distance Medley Relay 9:15.23/-0.92.19 Usain Bolt JAM Berlin 20 Aug 09 -0. Silas Kiplagat 3:32.

12/400m.19.195km) 0: Jiang Bo 15:42/5km. Olga Bryzgina 47.517m Dire Tune ETH Ostrava 12 Jun 08 20.81 Gulnara Samitova-Galkina RUS Beijing 17 Aug 08 100 Metres Hurdles 12.9 Shot Put 22.0 200 Metres 21.195km ROAD/WOMEN ONLY: (none for 100km & Ekiden Relay) 10 Kilometres 1:30:29 Asmae Leghzaoui 15 Kilometres 1:46:59+ Lornah Kiplagat 20 Kilometres 1:62:57+ Lornah Kiplagat Half Marathon 1:66:25 Lornah Kiplagat 25 Kilometres 1:22:47+ Paula Radcliffe 30 Kilometres 1:39:11+ Mary Keitany 1:39:11+ Edna Kiplagat 1:39:11+ Florence Kiplagat Marathon 2:17:42 Paula Radcliffe 20 Kilometres Walk 1:24:38 Liu Hong MAR NED NED NED GBR KEN KEN KEN GBR CHN New York Udine Udine Udine Helsinki London London London London La Coruña 23 Feb 03 15 Feb 15 15 Feb 15 15 Feb 15 9 May 10 25 Sep 05 13 Apr 03 25 Jun 00 28 Feb 98 8 Jun 02 14 Oct 07 14 Oct 07 14 Oct 07 14 Aug 05 17 Apr 11 13 Apr 14 13 Apr 14 17 Apr 05 6 Jun 15 . HJ: 1.49/1.80. Li Na 22:16/7.0 Tegla Loroupe KEN Warstein 6 Jun 03 3000 Metres Steeplechase 8:58.17 USSR Seoul 1 Oct 88 (Tatyana Ledovskaya 50. DT: 46.22w/2.56/1.43. 1500m: 5:15.92/1600m) 4 x 1500 Metres Relay 16:33.27/0. HJ: 1.000 Metres 65:26. 400m: 57.60 Marita Koch GDR Canberra 6 Oct 85 800 Metres 1:53.28 Barbora Špotáková CZE Stuttgart 13 Sep 08 Heptathlon 7291 Jackie Joyner-Kersee USA Seoul 23/24 Sep 88 (100mH: 12.78.63 Natalya Lisovskaya URS Moskva 7 Jun 87 Discus Throw 76. Dong Yanmei 31:36/10km.08/800m.42.50 Inessa Kravets UKR Göteborg 10 Aug 95 0.23 Nadyezhda Ryashkina URS Seattle 24 Jul 90 20.000 Metres Walk 1:26:52.10. LaTasha Colander-Richardson.12/1.6.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ W O R L D R E C O R D S 9 WOMEN Wind 100 Metres 10. JT: 48.000 Metres 1:27:05.6 Tegla Loroupe KEN Borgholzhausen 3 Sep 00 25.7 400 Metres Hurdles 52. Ajeé Wilson 2:00.11 Wang Junxia CHN Beijing 13 Sep 93 5000 Metres 14:11.06 Yelena Isinbaeva RUS Zürich 28 Aug 09 Long Jump 7.000 Metres Walk 41:56.34 Florence Griffith Joyner USA Seoul 29 Sep 88 1.07 Genzebe Dibaba ETH Monaco 17 Jul 15 One Mile 4:12.56 Svetlana Masterkova RUS Zürich 14 Aug 96 2000 Metres 5:25. 200m: 22. PV: 3. Carmelita Jeter) 4 x 200 Metres Relay 1:27.82 United States London 10 Aug 12 (Tianna Madison.4.28 Jarmila Kratochvílová TCH München 26 Jul 83 1000 Metres 2:28.000 Metres 29:31. JT: 45.000 Metres 1:45:50. 800m: 2:08.51) Decathlon 8358 Austra Skujytė LTU Columbia 15 Apr 05 (100m: 12.52 Galina Chistyakova URS Leningrad 11 Jun 88 1. LJ: 7. SP: 15. Irina Podyalovskaya) Distance Medley Relay 10:36.08 Anita Włodarczyk POL Władysławowo 1 Aug 15 Javelin Throw 72.86) 10.78 Wang Junxia CHN Beijing 8 Sep 93 One Hour 18.80) 4 x 800 Metres Relay 7:50.21 Yordanka Donkova BUL Stara Zagora 20 Aug 88 0. Lyubov Gurina.5.46 United States “Blue” Philadelphia 29 Apr 00 (LaTasha Jenkins.09 Stefka Kostadinova BUL Roma 30 Aug 87 Pole Vault 5.17 USSR Moskva 5 Aug 84 (Nadyezhda Olizarenko.69/0. Bianca Knight.9 Tegla Loroupe KEN Mengerskirchen 21 Sep 02 30.7.36 Sonia O’Sullivan IRL Edinburgh 8 Jul 94 3000 Metres 8:06.38/1200m. Shannon Rowbury 4:27.98 Svetlana Masterkova RUS Bruxelles 23 Aug 96 1500 Metres 3:50.58 Kenya Nassau 24 May 14 (Mercy Cherono 4:07. Lyudmila Borisova.12. 0: Lan Lixin 15:50/5km. SP: 16. Hellen Obiri 4:07.3 Olimpiada Ivanova RUS Brisbane 6 Sep 01 4 x 100 Metres Relay 40. Olga Nazarova 47.49 Florence Griffith Joyner USA Indianapolis 16 Jul 88 0.34 Yuliya Pechonkina RUS Tula 8 Aug 03 High Jump 2. Irene Jelagat 4:10. Mariya Pinigina 49. Sanya Richards-Ross 50.15 Tirunesh Dibaba ETH Oslo 6 Jun 08 10.1) ROAD/MIXED: (+ = en route to longer distance) 10 Kilometres 1:30:21 Paula Radcliffe GBR San Juan 15 Kilometres 1:46:14+ Florence Kiplagat KEN Barcelona 20 Kilometres 1:61:54+ Florence Kiplagat KEN Barcelona Half Marathon 1:65:09 Florence Kiplagat KEN Barcelona 25 Kilometres 1:19:53 Mary Keitany KEN Berlin 30 Kilometres 1:38:49+ Mizuki Noguchi JPN Berlin Marathon 2:15:25 Paula Radcliffe GBR London 100 Kilometres 6:33:11 Tomeo Abe JPN Yubetsu Ekiden Relay (6-stage) 2:11:41 PR of China Beijing (5km/10km/7.50 United States Nassau 2 May 15 (Treniere Moser 3:18. LJ: 6.78.6.86.19. Allyson Felix.5. Faith Kipyegon 4:08.6. Nanceen Perry.5.82. Ma Zaijie 31:01/10km.66.3 400 Metres 47.5.80 Gabriele Reinsch GDR Neubrandenburg 9 Jul 88 Hammer Throw 81. 100H: 14. 0: Zhao Fengdi :15:16/5km.4 Triple Jump 15. Marion Jones) 4 x 400 Metres Relay 3:15.

Olga Bryzgina 47.91 400 Metres Hurdles 46.97 Long Jump 8.17 Additional wind-assisted marks: Men’s Triple Jump 18.39 Shot Put 22.07 5000 Metres 12:57.80 Javelin Throw 90.09 Shot Put 22.000 Metres 29:54.62 200 Metres 21.82. Allyson Felix.82 10. Angelo Taylor 43.96 5000 Metres 14:40.18 Javelin Throw 71.000 Metres 27:01.30 Hammer Throw 78.3 2.43 1500 Metres 3:53.54w Usain Bolt JAM London 5 Aug 12 Usain Bolt JAM Beijing 20 Aug 08 Michael Johnson USA Atlanta 29 Jul 96 David Rudisha KEN London 9 Aug 12 Noah Ngeny KEN Sydney 29 Sep 00 Kenenisa Bekele ETH Beijing 23 Aug 08 Kenenisa Bekele ETH Beijing 17 Aug 08 Samuel Wanjiru KEN Beijing 24 Aug 08 Julius Kariuki KEN Seoul 30 Sep 88 Liu Xiang CHN Athína 27 Aug 04 Kevin Young USA Barcelona 6 Aug 92 Charles Austin USA Atlanta 28 Jul 96 Renaud Lavillenie FRA London 10 Aug 12 Bob Beamon USA Ciudad de México 18 Oct 68 Kenny Harrison USA Atlanta 27 Jul 96 Ulf Timmermann GDR Seoul 23 Sep 88 Virgilijus Alekna LTU Athína 23 Aug 04 Sergey Litvinov URS Seoul 26 Sep 88 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR Beijing 23 Aug 08 Roman Šebrle CZE Athína 24 Aug 04 Chen Ding CHN London 4 Aug 12 Jared Tallent AUS London 11 Aug 12 Jamaica Beijing 22 Aug 08 (Nesta Carter.84 4 x 400 Metres Relay 2:55.35 400 Metres Hurdles 52.18) (e=estmated time) Florence Griffith Joyner USA Seoul 24 Sep 88 Florence Griffith Joyner USA Seoul 29 Sep 88 Marie-José Pérec FRA Atlanta 29 Jul 96 Nadezhda Olizarenko URS Moskva 27 Jul 80 Paula Ivan ROU Seoul 1 Oct 88 Gabriela Szabo ROU Sydney 25 Sep 00 Tirunesh Dibaba ETH Beijing 15 Aug 08 Tiki Gelana ETH London 5 Aug 12 Gulnara Samitova-Galkina RUS Beijing 17 Aug 08 Sally Pearson AUS London 7 Aug 12 Melaine Walker JAM Beijing 19 Aug 08 Yelena Slesarenko RUS Athína 28 Aug 04 Yelena Isinbaeva RUS Beijing 23 Aug 08 Jackie Joyner-Kersee USA Seoul 29 Sep 88 Françoise Mbango CMR Beijing 16 Aug 08 Ilona Slupianek GDR Moskva 29 Jul 80 Martina Hellmann GDR Seoul 29 Sep 88 Tatyana Lysenko RUS London 11 Aug 12 Osleydis Menéndez CUB Athína 27 Aug 04 Jackie Joyner-Kersee USA Seoul 23-24 Sep 88 Yelena Lashmanova RUS London 11 Aug 12 United States London 10 Aug 12 (Tianna Madison.b and 260. Carmelita Jeter) USSR Seoul 1 Oct 88 (Tatyana Ledovskaya 50.40 Triple Jump 15.90 Triple Jump 18. Mariya Pinigina 49.25 800 Metres 1:53.4 1.80) Mike Conley Florence Griffith Joyner USA USA Barcelona Seoul 3 Aug 92 25 Sep 88 Wind 1.9 0.9 0. David Neville 44.5 -0.41 Discus Throw 72.22. MEN 100 Metres 9.d.16.53 Heptathlon 7291 20 Kilometres Walk 1:25:02 4 x 100 Metres Relay 40. Yohan Blake. 260.17 Marathon 2:06:32 3000 Metres Steeplechase 8:05.34 400 Metres 48. Olga Nazarova 47.63 200 Metres 19.81 100 Metres Hurdles 12. Bianca Knight.64 High Jump 2. Usain Bolt) United States Beijing 23 Aug 08 (LaShawn Merritt 44.66 Marathon 2:23:07 3000 Metres Steeplechase 8:58.39 Pole Vault 5.0 -0.30 400 Metres 43.82 4 x 400 Metres Relay 3:15.89 Hammer Throw 84.79 10. wind-assisted marks (see IAAF rules 260.47 Discus Throw 69.7e.49 800 Metres 1:40.78 High Jump 2.57 Decathlon 8893 20 Kilometres Walk 1:18:46 50 Kilometres Walk 3:36:53 4 x 100 Metres Relay 36.4e.51 110 Metres Hurdles 12.26.12.2 0.0 .17w Women’s 100 Metres 10.0 1.3 -0.27) should not be regarded as Olympic records. Therefore.R I O 10 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C R E C O R D S OLYMPIC RECORDS It is the policy of the IAAF to recognise a World Championship or Olympic record as the best performance achieved at a championship which conforms to all criteria for World Records (IAAF Rule 260) except that there is no obligatory doping control test.43. Michael Frater.39 Women 100 Metres 10.06 Pole Vault 5.1 3.91 1500 Metres 3:32.5 2.05 Long Jump 7. Jeremy Wariner 43.

Allyson Felix and Sanya Richards Ross (both USA) took their fourth golds. She was officially placed fourth and that result has so far not been amended. Included in the total of 952 are golds from three 2012 events where the winner has been disqualified by the IAAF for drug-taking. The most finals or placings in the top eight at the same event is six by discus thrower Lia Manoliu (ROU) who placed 6th-9th-bronzebronze-gold-9th in 1952-1972. high jumper Dragutin Topić (IOP/YUG/SCG/SRB) in 1992-2012 and walker Jesús Ángel García (ESP) also in 1992-2012. Gamze Bulut (TUR) and Ghribi – are shown as the victors on placing tables. but the IOC did not pass her medal to the runner-up. The most medals won by an individual athlete is 12 by distance runner Paavo Nurmi (FIN) in 1920-28. Fanny Blankers-Koen (NED) won the 100m. who ran the second leg for the winning sprint relay team in 1952 at 15 years 123 days.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S 11 FACTS & FIGURES Some 20. That total includes South Sudan and Curacão. Three more countries have missed just one year. The oldest female winner was Ellina Zvereva (BLR). The medals and placings of those disqualified are not counted. winner of the triple jump in Athens on April 6. 2016. 2012. 3000m team and cross country (individual and team). Veronica Campbell-Brown (JAM) could well join Merlene Ottey/Page as a medallist at five different Olympics. plus the additional two golds awarded posthumously to Jim Thorpe for the 1912 Pentathlon and Decathlon. 5000m. The most by a man is five by the Ukrainian Vladimir Golubnichniy (URS) at 20km walk in 1960-1976. missing the 1996 100m gold by a margin of just five-thousandths of a second. 200m and 4x100m in 1980. This total includes 950 regular golds plus three more. though Athletics Australia have made a new bid for Strickland to be awarded an additional medal. She won three silvers and six bronzes. 80m hurdles and 4x100m relay in 19481956. Betty Cuthbert (AUS) won at 100m. 1992 and 1996. The most by a woman is nine by sprinter Merlene Ottey/Page (JAM) at 100m. That’s never been done in any individual track event. As at June 10. That is the women’s 100m of the 2000 Olympic Games. The most Games contested by a country in athletics is 28 (all of them. For the purpose of this book. Four golds at one Games were won by Alvin Kraenzlein (USA) in 1900. The number of participants was more than double that of the Games of 1968. whose representatives competed as Independent Olympic Athletes. most recently by Jamaica in the men’s 200m of 2012. Currently 953 gold medals have been awarded across 951 events. The first Olympic Champion in athletics was James Connolly (USA). The youngest male winner was Bob Mathias (USA). An extra gold in the 1908 men’s pole vault where there were two champions. Richards Ross won the 4x400m in 2004.8 by the United States. Ville Ritola (FIN) in 1924. France. The most by a man is 33 by Pietro Mennea (ITA) at 100m. He scored 10 wins from 10 starts in the standing high. 2016. and not redistributed as at June 10. the winners of those three events – Tallent. 2008 and 2012 and also the individual 400m in 2012. She won 25 of these. so is set to equal Merlene Ottey’s outright appearance record of seven Games. In 2012. including 1906) by four countries. and Virgilijus Alekna (LTU) at discus throw in 1996-2012. who won the marathon in London on August 13. decathlon champion in 1947 at 17 years 263 days. The oldest Olympic Champion in athletics was Pat McDonald (USA). Evelyn Ashford (USA) won the 100m and 4x100m in 1984 and went on to take sprint relay golds at the next two Games. Bärbel Eckert/Wöckel (GDR) won at both 200m and 4x100m in 1976 and 1980. Jesús Ángel García (ESP) is already selected for the 50 kilometres walk. Tirunesh Dibaba (ETH). 1984 and 1992-2000. Excluded from that golds total is one more which was taken back by the IOC. Feats which could be achieved in Rio 2016 include a first woman to win individual gold at the third successive Games. a bronze from the 200m. The longest winning streak of Olympic titles at four successive Games is a distinction achieved four times by three men. Barbora Špotáková (CZE) and Valerie Adams (NZL) all have the chance to do that. but that included Nauru. Australia. 200m. with victories at 1500m. The largest edition of Olympic athletics was in Sydney 2000 with 2137 athletes from 193 countries competing in 46 events. though Habiba Ghribi (TUN) already received a gold medal in a special ceremony on June 4. These events are the men’s 50km Walk and women’s 1500m & 3000m Steeplechase. 1988. but never in a final. 1964 and 1968. The most recent champion was Stephen Kiprotich (UGA). 1904. but the biggest Jamaican feat could be from Usain Bolt if he can win a third successive gold at 100m or 200m. long and triple jumps. 1976 or 1980. 2016. 1896. The official total of countries in 2000 was 194. Denmark (1904). Carl Lewis was long jump champion in 1984. By far the most medals won by a country is 785. all from the United States: Ray Ewry succeeded at the standing high and long jumps in 1900. Shelly-Ann FraserPryce (JAM). The most golds won at a single Games is five by Paavo Nurmi (FIN) in 1924. 1906 and 1908. Photo-finish evidence from London 1948 proved that she should have taken one more medal. discus throw champion in 2000 at 39 years 316 days. 200m and both relays across seven Games. 200m. 1960. His greatest year was 1924 with five golds including the 1500m and 5000m within 90 minutes. The most individual medals.000m in 1992-2004 of gold-4th-gold-bronze. Felix won the 4x400m in 2008 and the 200m with both relays in 2012. Jan Železný (TCH/SVK/CZE) in the javelin throw 1988-2004. who won the 56-pound weight throw in 1920 at the age of 42 years 26 days. The women’s record is held by Merlene Ottey/Page (JAM) at 100m (three medals) and 200m (four). Al Oerter won the discus throw in 1956. with the fraction resulting from the 1904 team race where only four-fifths of the silver-winning team were actually American. Great Britain & NI and Greece. all events which have been discontinued. the IOC have not publicly announced any re-allocations of all these medals. The most golds won by a woman is four by six women. Finally. and also the most gold medals won is 10 by Ray Ewry (USA) at standing jumps events in 1900-1908. whose one entrant (Cherico Detenamo) did not actually compete in the first round of the men’s 100m. Jesse Owens (USA) in 1936 and Carl Lewis (USA) in 1984. Marion Jones (USA) was disqualified for a doping violation. The best “four Games” sequence by a woman is now held by Derartu Tulu (ETH) with her series of finishes in the 10. Sweeps of all available medals have been achieved 88 times. The most Games contested by an athlete is seven by sprinter Merlene Ottey/Page (JAM/SLO) in 1980-2004. Another is planned for Jared Tallent (AUS) on June 17. The youngest gold medallist was Barbara Jones (USA). Shirley Strickland (AUS) won seven medals at 100m. Could the USA’s Allyson Felix or Sanya Richards Ross become the first woman to win a fifth Olympic gold in athletics? Another sprinter. The most races run in Olympic competition are 53 by Merlene Ottey/Page (JAM) in the various rounds of the 100m. Fanny Blankers-Koen (NED) was also a quadruple champion in 1948 as noted above. The most countries to have competed at a Games is 202 in 2012. will the first South American Olympics see triple jumper Caterine Ibargüen win Colombia’s first Olympic athletics gold? . The men’s record is six by distance runner João N’Tyamba (ANG) in 1988-2008. 80m hurdles and 4x100m in 1948. Sweden (1904) and the United States (1980). 200m and both relays in 1972-1988. Katerína Thánou (GRE) as noted on page 227.629 athletes from 219 country teams have competed in athletics at 28 stagings of the Olympic Games. 200m and 4x100m in 1956 then took the 400m title in 1964. 2016.

USA Olympic Stadium 190 2057 Sydney. MAD. NZL (additionally some New Zealand athletes competed with Australia in 1908 & 1912). TUR 18 ESP. FRA Bois de Boulogne 15 119 St Louis. DOM. ISV. PER. TUN. AUS Olympic Stadium 193 2137 Athens. JPN. KEN. PHI. MEX. PAK. Therefore they may be lower that totals published elsewhere. TPE (including as ROC/Republic of China in 1972) 12 BER. BRA. GRE Panathenaikon Stadium 9 63 Paris. Number of Games contested 28 AUS. then Helsinki. NEP. ZAM (including as NRO/Northern Rhodesia in 1964) 11 BAR (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960). GRE Olympic Stadium & Olympia 196 1995 Beijing. SWE Olympic Stadium 26 534 Berlin. SUI 23 NED 22 IND 21 CHI. LUX. FIJ. JPN. YUG (including as IOP/“Independent Olympic Participants” in 1992) 17 COL. HUN. USA Memorial Coliseum 34 386 Berlin. URU. FIN. FIN London. ZIM (including as RHO/Rhodesia in 1960 & 1964) . TTO (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960) 14 BAH. C O M P E T I N G C O U N T R I E S CHRONOLOGY OF THE GAMES The participation figures below are a count of the actual number of competitors and exclude those who were declared but did not start in opening rounds. LBR. NGR. CAN Olympic Stadium 79 1006 Moscow. MAR. and Individual Olympic Athletes (2000) and Independent Olympic Athletes (2012) are counted. GBR. POR 20 ARG. NED Olympic Stadium 40 707 Los Angeles. KOR Olympic Stadium 148 1617 Barcelona. ETH. Year 1896 1900 1904 1906 1908 1912 1916 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 Athletics Dates Apr 6-10 Jul 14-22 Aug 29-Sep 3 Apr 25-May 1 Jul 13-25 Jul 6-15 Cancelled Aug 15-23 Jul 6-13 Jul 29-Aug 5 Jul 31-Aug 7 Aug 2-9 Cancelled Cancelled Jul 30-Aug 7 Jul 20-27 Nov 23-Dec 1 Aug 31-Sep 10 Oct 14-21 Oct 13-20 Aug 31-Sep 10 Jul 23-30 Jul 24-Aug 1 Aug 3-12 Sep 23-Oct 2 Jul 31-Aug 9 Jul 26-Aug 4 Sep 22-Oct 1 Aug 18-28 Aug 15-24 Aug 3-12 City Venue Countries Athletes Athens. PUR. TCH 15 KOR. SUD. IRL (additionally some Irish athletes competed with Great Britain in 1896-1920). NOR 24 BEL. CMR. FRA. SUR. AUS Melbourne Cricket Ground 59 720 Rome. ECU. JPN National Stadium 80 1018 Mexico City. CHN. GBR Olympic Stadium 202 2080 Men Women Events 63 0 12 119 0 23 118 0 24 233 0 21 431 0 26 534 0 30 (Men/Women) 12/0 23/0 24/0 21/0 26/0 30/0 509 660 612 332 678 0 0 95 54 98 29 27 27 29 29 29/0 27/0 22/5 23/6 23/6 601 776 573 812 782 785 961 703 694 895 1063 1104 1302 1257 1079 1082 1088 144 187 147 204 236 243 369 303 266 385 554 622 755 880 916 974 992 33 33 33 34 36 36 38 37 38 41 42 43 44 46 46 47 47 24/9 24/9 24/9 24/10 24/12 24/12 24/14 23/14 24/14 24/17 24/18 24/19 24/20 24/22 24/22 24/23 24/23 COMPETING COUNTRIES A total of 219 different country teams have competed in Olympic Games athletics. RSA. CUB 16 BUL. USA 26 CAN. GHA (including as GOL/Gold Coast in 1952) GUY (including as BGU/British Guiana in 1948-1964). USA Memorial Coliseum 124 1280 Seoul. ISL. GBR Wembley Stadium 53 745 Helsinki. GBR White City Stadium 20 431 Stockholm. POL 19 GER (includes when FRG/FR of Germany & GDR/German Democratic Republic participated as a combined German team in 1956-1964). CHN Olympic Stadium 200 2056 London. ITA 25 AUT. FRG Olympic Stadium 104 1330 Montreal. MYA (including as BIR or BUR/Burma in 1948-1988). LIE. Four countries have competed at all 28 Games including 1906.12 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / C H R O N O L O G Y . KUW. FRA Stade de Colombes 40 660 Amsterdam. IRI. VIE. CIV. ISR. BEL Champs de Beerschot Stadium 25 509 Paris. LIB. GRE 27 DEN. MEX National Stadium 92 1028 Munich. ITA Olympic Stadium 72 1016 Tokyo. GER Antwerp. EST. Countries of Independent Olympic Participants (1992). URS Lenin Stadium 70 960 Los Angeles. VEN 13 EGY. SEN. MLI. PAN. ESP Montjuic Stadium 156 1726 Atlanta. GBR London. CHA. TAN. HAI. four fewer than at the IAAF World Championships. GER Olympic Stadium 43 776 Tokyo. SRI (including as CEY/Ceylon in 1948-1972). THA. CGO. ROU. SWE. GRE Panathenaikon Stadium 19 233 London. JAM (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960). USA Washington University 11 118 Athens. UGA. FIN Olympic Stadium 57 963 Melbourne. INA. MAS.

GBR. FRA. CHI. HKG. GBR. BRA. ZIM (as Rhodesia) ARG. ECU. RSA. NZL. GRE. GEO. VIE. AUS. BOT. GDR. MEX. TPE. NCA. ETH. BER. PHI. GHA. MOZ. YUG ARG. GRE. RUS. CUB. USA AUS. TOG. CYP. PER. SUI. USA AUS. PRK. EGY. NED. RWA. TUN. SLE. GUA. GEQ. IRL. NOR. ARG. MEX. SRB MHL. LUX. UGA. LBA. CAN. DEN. DEN. YUG ARG. DEN. HUN. THA. VIE. BAH. BRA. THA. TUV. GRE. FRA. BEL. LUX. CAN. KEN. YUG ARG. TUR. AND. FRA. MGL. CIV. GUY (as British Guiana). GBR. USA. FIN. GRE. TGA. VEN. ITA. FRG. BUL. NZL. IRQ. ISR. MYA (as Burma). CUB. FRA. SWZ. COL. KEN. GUY. RSA. IRL. SYR. ESP. USA AUS. LAT. DEN. PAK. NWF. GAB. IRI. MAR. IRL. AUT. DEN. KUW. PUR. TUR. NGR. KGZ. SUD. ISR. PUR. FIN. GHA. GER. NED. GER. CZE (and as BOH/Bohemia in 1900-1912). GBR. LAT. GBR. AUS. NOR. SWE. TUR. ISL. PER. POL. GER. ETH. MAR. NZL. GER. CAY. GRE. TCH. KIR. LUX. NOR. JPN. YUG. SUI. BRA. EST. IRI. HUN. NCA. CHI. BEL. ROU. MRI. LAT. HUN. HUN. NED. SWE. GRE. CAN. AUS. ITA. FIJ. POR. SWE. DJI. GUA. INA. NWF. BDI. FRA. DOM. JPN. GAM. HUN. PHI. MLT. KOR. HUN. PRY. ITA. KOR. USA AUS. CHA. TAN. ZIM (as Rhodesia) ARG. YAR BWI (1960. CHN. COL. SWE. USA. DEN. PAN. BEL. LUX. PHI. CHN. BAH. SRI (as Ceylon). TCH. CHI. SUI. MLT. URS. MAR. URU. NOR. SIN. MEX. EST. CPV. IND. CAN. MYA (as Burma). TLS (including as IOA/“Individual Olympic Athletes” in 2000) BRU. CAN. SLO. USA AUS. COM. SIN. FRA. ITA. SUR. CHI. TCH. TUN. CAN. MKD. LBR. NOR. BEL. ROU. CAN. CUB. EGY. PAN. POR. ISL. LUX. JPN. VIN AFG. ROU. HUN. UAE. ROU. ETH. SWE. COD (including as ZAI/Zaire in 1984-1996). VEN. YUG. CRO. FIN. COL. TTO. GER. BUR (including as VOL/Upper Volta in 1972). TKM. RSA. NED. GRE. IND. POR. GRE. BEN (including as DAH/Dahomey in 1972). ERI. MYA (as Burma). FIN. CHI. FIJ. NOR. THA. ITA. URU. ISL. IRQ. GRE. MDA. VEN. PER. PAK. GRE. SUI. MEX. SAM. GBR. SIN. SUI. BEL. AUT. PUR. SSD (as IOA/“Independent Olympic Athletes” in 2012). LTU. SOM AHO. CAN. DEN. RSA. CAN. FRA. ISL. DEN. NGR. VIE. BRN. AUS. BRA. RSA. BEL. TTO. FRA. AUT. COL. SUD. PNG. AUS. IND. CUR (as IOA/“Independent Olympic Athletes” in 2012). NZL. TJK. SAA. POL. IRL. KOR.R I O 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / C O M P E T I N G C O U N T R I E S 13 ALG. PHI. GBR. AZE. URS. TCH. SAA. ISR. BOL. GBR. URS. GER. BER. IND. LES. FRA. LIB. USA ARG. SIN. PUR. TCH. GRN. LCA. TUR. BRA. RUS. BWI. BAH. CAN. IRQ. CUB. MEX. ASA. CAN. TCH. JAM. VAN. MEX. ESA. PHI. IND. KAZ. NED. PAR. USA. NGR. CHI. IRL. NGR. FRA. RSA. FIN. CHN. CHI. DEN. ESP. ITA. MYA (as Burma). GHA (as Gold Coast). USA NED. ECU. CMR. AUT. IND. MEX. MON. EGY. RSA. MAS. JAM. SUI. PAN. BEL. FRA. PHI. ESP. GBR. SEN. SWE. NOR. JPN. LIE. IND. SLE. NGR. POL. TUR. LUX. FIN. HON. USA. BUL. CAN. ESP. TCH. NZL. NAM. PLE. POL. GRE. PAK. AUT. URU. SCG. TUN. YUG ARG. GBR. SRI (as Ceylon). FRA. SRI (as Ceylon). NZL. HUN. FIJ. IRL. CAM (including as KHM/Kampuchea in 1972). GUI. SKN. GBR. SEY. POR. UAR (incorporating Egypt & Syria). PUR. IRI. NED. ITA. BAN. IRL. TTO. AUS. SUI. CAF. BLR. NED. LUX. HAI. UAR Participation by year 1896 9 1900 15 (6 new) 1904 11 (3) 1906 19 (5) 1908 20 (2) 1912 26 (4) 1920 25 (6) 1924 40 (11 1928 40 (2) 1932 34 (2) 1936 43 (5) 1948 53 (13) 1952 57 (11) 1956 59 (9) 1960 72 (7) 1964 80 (13) 1968 92 (14) AUS. AUT. ZAM (as Northern Rhodesia). KEN. TPE. IRL. ITA. POR. UGA. BUL. SWE. MON. POL. LIE. AUT. TUR. TUR. YEM ARM. BRA. CHI. MON. HUN. DEN. FRA. FRA. EGY. NED. MAD. TPE. TCH. PAK. UGA. POL. RUS AUS. GER. NOR. ETH. CAN. IRQ. INA. ISL. BRA. MAD. MLT. FIN. YUG AFG. BUL. POL. NZL. GER. POR. LIE. POR. MLI. SRB. NEP. LUX. CAN. CHI. DEN. MGL. NED. SWE. NZL. GBR. FIN. POR. NED. PHI. SUI. DEN. JAM. ISL. NBO. GBR. RSA. HUN. comprising BAR/Barbados. GRE. EGY. ESP. LTU. SWE. HAI. IND. POL. GER. TCH. USA. RSA. LUX. IRL. CRC. EST. DEN. URS. MYA (as Burma). LBR. FSM. RSA. GER. OMA. IND. JPN. GER. AUS. ROU. AUS. LBR. SWE. ISR. EUN. SWE. AUT. JPN. KOR. SUI. HUN. DEN. PAK. NOR. LBA. SIN. DMA. AUS. CAN. USA. MON. FRA. GUA. NOR. TTO. JAM. GBR. BEL. MAS. ARU. SWE. KSA. PUR. GBR. URS (excluding EUN/United Team in 1992) ANG. MTN. YUG ARG. BEL. SUI. BEL. VEN. COL. GBS. LIE. SWE. HON. GER. GDR. BIZ (as British Honduras). GHA. PHI. GUY (as British Guiana). LIE. YUG. FIN. HUN. GRE. FRA. PLW. RSA. THA. BRA. CGO. GRE. NOR. BAR. HUN. USA. FIN. FRG. BEL. EST. BRA. NZL. SVK. CMR. NZL. BUL. ALB. MEX. POL. HUN. HUN. ITA. JPN. CHI. SUI. BUL. GUM. CUB. NOR. ARG. BOH. URU. SEN. BEL. IRI. FIN. BOH. MDV. MEX. URS. ITA. CUB. GRE. JPN. ITA. TUR. SUI. ISV. MEX. ITA. ESP. CAN. EGY. USA. AUT. JPN. ITA. YUG AFG. PER. LUX. SRI (as Ceylon). AUT. SMR ANT (including as LAN/Lesser Antilles in 1976). BEL. JPN. JOR. NZL. GER. NED. BIZ (including as BHO/British Honduras in 1968 & 1976). IVB. CHI. USA. ITA. AUT. IND. CRC. BOH. LAT. ESA. DEN. GBR. UKR. BAH. QAT. IRI. GBR. HUN. SWE. ROU. TCH. FIN. EST. UGA. ISR. MAS. HKG. URU. NED. PHI. LUX. LAO. KOR. AUT. BER. HAI. PHI. AUT. ITA. JAM. TAN. SRI (as Ceylon). AUT. KOR. IND. UZB BOH. COK. ZAM . FIN. INA. POL. NOR. CIV. STP. LUX. SOL. SWE. TCH. CUB. MNE (and as part of SCG/Serbia & Montenegro in 2004). AUS. SRI (as Ceylon). JPN. POR. VEN. LAT. BIH. CUB. GRE. SUI. COL. USA. RSA. NOR. MAW. ISL. GRE. TPE. FRA. MGL. ROU. TUR. SWE. POR. CHA. NOR. NIG. JAM/Jamaica and TTO/Trinidad & Tobago). NBO. CAF. MAS. RUS. MLI. BOH. FIN. GUY (as British Guiana). DEN. ESP. KEN. DOM.

FIN. SUR. BAH. RUS. ISL. BUL. ARG. NGR. SUI. MYA. CRO. NIG. NOR. TAN. FIJ. TTO. CRC. SOM. MYA (as Burma). KOR. FIN. TPE. MAD. DJI. BOT. BOL. FRA. BAR. GUI. ZIM . USA. URS. AND. BDI. PAN. TUR. JOR. ITA. JPN. NOR. ISR. UGA. LBR. GRN. POR. ECU. PRK. CGO. EGY. CHN. UGA. AUS. GEO. MDV. ESP. AUS. IRL. KAZ. URU. CAF. URU. ISR. ROU. TUN. VEN. KUW. VIE. MLT. IRI. SEY. BOT. PAR. CYP. THA. ISV. DEN. SWE. UGA. GBR. FSM. COL. MAS. KEN. NEP. ARG. AUS. MEX. SIN. MRI. HON. LIB. FIJ. BIZ. NGR. CGO. ALG. CUB. RWA. COD (as Zaire). TUN. GRE. ANT. KSA. OMA. AND. MDV. PNG. POR. MLI. IVB. UAE. GBR. ASA. LAO. ETH. ROU. ROU. HUN. NOR. HAI. NCA. ISL. TGA. BEN (as Dahomey). CAN. EGY. JPN. GDR. BUR. UGA. VIN. BAN. KEN. SUI. BUL. UKR. QAT. URU. ZAM. DOM. ALB. MTN. GAM. ARM. CMR. GAM. FRA. THA. LUX. NAM. INA. KOR. TAN. BRN. BEN. PER. BAR. PUR. UKR. POR. ALG. GAM. SWZ. URU. ARG. MRI. AUS. JPN. JOR. SUI. CHA. PYR. CIV. BEL. SOM. MAR. MLI. YAR. GUY. COL. ISR. ZIM AHO. GHA. BDI. BEL. CAN. BRA. LIB. SWZ. IRL. GEQ. PNG. CHA. BIZ. CMR. TOG. GUI. SUD. ANT. PHI. BAH. NED. TKM. RSA. FIJ. IND. ROU. SEY. LAO. SIN. GRE. KEN. GHA. MAR. MLT. SLE. MAD. NED. TPE (as Republic of China). YUG ALG. ZAM. ANT. THA. TOG. BRA. CAY. DJI. ESP. CAN. JAM. MOZ. BUR. MYA. URU. SUD. KSA. TLS (as IOA). CRC. MYA (as Burma). VIE. DMA. BAR. UZB. MAR. PUR. MTN. ECU. BAR. SMR. BAH. ANT. ECU. NEP. ESA. ISV. CGO. MDV. BRN. BIH. AZE. SYR. MLI. BAR. MLI. ISV. HAI. POL. BAN. IRL. PHI. MEX. SYR. SWE. SRI. KUW. NED. JAM. EST. YAR. PER. AUT. IND. BAH. CYP. GEQ. SRI. AUT. SMR. TAN. MAR. CGO. MOZ. BUR. SEN. COK. TKM.R I O 14 1972 104 (14) 1976 79 (4) 1980 70 (6) 1984 124 (20) 1988 148 (12) 1992 156 (7) 1996 190 (22) 2000 193 (6) 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / C O M P E T I N G C O U N T R I E S ALG. NZL. MON. SLE. MEX. MKD. YUG. COM. POR. EGY. ITA. NZL. YEM. BEL. TTO. CHA. LIB. ECU. BER. CZE. GUA. ANG. ARG. ECU. GHA. COL. GEQ. MDA. GAB. TPE. CAF. MLT. SVK. BEN. BUL. BRA. HUN. INA. CHN. IRI. HKG. PRK. LIB. NCA. TJK. ISR. URS. SYR. SUI. SMR. IRI. URU. BRA. CAY. PUR. ZAM AHO. QAT. BEL. CGO. ISL. MAW. GAB. NED. ESP. IRI. KOR. SOM. SLO. LBA. ITA. DEN. PER. LIE. TOG. CHA. ISV. JOR. ITA. CAY. ETH. ZIM AFG. PAK. LBR. SIN. BOL. BRA. CMR. IRL. SEY. NEP. YUG. GAM. SEY. HON. SUR. PNG. PUR. COL. LUX. HON. PAR. UAE. SLO. PAK. POL. SMR. AUT. SUI. VIN. CUB. ZAM. COL. PUR. IRI. EUN (ex URS). ISL. FRG. PER. NED. LBA. BRU. COM. SUI. TTO. NOR. DOM. LCA. CHN. HAI. FRA. LIB. IRL. SUD. NAM. CAN. CHN. MAS. LAT. LAO. PAK. SOL. SEN. CAY. INA. AUT. NIG. PAN. AUT. ZAM. USA. CUB. CHI. USA. MLI. TUN. GEQ. POR. ITA. SOL. NED. TTO. JAM. MAD. KSA. UGA. VEN. OMA. ECU. COK. FIJ. HUN. HAI. NAM. VAN. SWZ. GUY. GRE. YUG. TGA. MOZ. TTO. GBS. DJI. PLE. KOR. GRE. CAN. BUL. EST. ARG. SEN. MAW. MTN. MGL. ESP. CIV. TPE. IVB. ISV. NCA. COD (as Zaire). IVB. PUR. PER. MAW. POL. VAN. MLT. SWE. CYP. ESA. GRE. VAN. GER. MEX. PAR. VIN. CRC. CHI. MEX. SLO. PAK. SWZ. RSA. MTN. VEN. LTU. HAI. LAT. FIJ. NEP. LUX. GBS. PUR. GBR. TAN. GUA. BAR. NZL. GUI. PAR. BER. ESA. ARG. KAZ. ESA. DJI. SWE. SRI. BRN. KEN. MAD. POR. GRN. KOR. CYP. YEM. SUR. TGA. CGO. PER. GUY. ESA. ZIM ALG. PAK. SOL. SEN. USA. PAN. COK. BAN. OMA. NGR. UAE. BEN. GUY. MEX. AUS. NOR. TCH. FIN. HKG. SKN. JPN. BUL. INA. GUA. HUN. BAN. LIE. COL. STP. LBR. UZB. CAM. NGR. ETH. MAR. IND. CPV. RUS. YEM. MYA. NGR. VIE. CIV. MAS. GHA. SEY. ISL. CIV. THA. GUM. ZAM. BUR (as Upper Volta). MRI. BLR. FIN. ALB. BIZ (as British Honduras). ETH. PAR. MEX. FIN. GRE. ARU. TUR. IRQ. BOL. TPE. FIJ. BOL. SWZ. LES. UAE. CAN. PRK. BIH. ROU. JOR. GRE. SVK. ARG. NEP. CYP. COD (as Zaire). DOM. NOR. NEP. SEN. PHI. KEN. TUN. DEN. SUD. GAB. ISV. MOZ. BAH. INA. ARU. ARU. BIZ. SAM. CHI. LES. USA. ALG. HAI. SOM. GUI. IND. LIE. CAN. EGY. KSA. BOT. ASA. PLE. PHI. SUI. CRO. POL. KUW. HUN. PAN. JAM. TOG. SMR. NED. MAR. SWZ. CUB. ESP. IRL. GAM. FRA. GBR. UGA. SWE. PHI. MAS. JPN. CMR. MRI. SLE. THA. MDA. MOZ. CHA. PER. DMA. IRI. COL. ESP. VIE. POL. AZE. PHI. BOT. MAS. SEN. SUD. MAW. GBR. PHI. BER. HON. SLE. HON. BOL. DEN. ANT. IRQ. FRA. SRI (as Ceylon). COL. BRA. PNG. PNG. CIV. PAN. HON. ANG. LUX. MGL. VIN. TUR. ITA. AHO. KEN. TOG. NZL. CHI. ESP. CRC. POL. HAI. KUW. SWE. KSA. CGO. TPE. MYA (as Burma). SEN. GRN. DEN. BRA. HKG. URS. LTU. YUG (effectively SRB). ISR. BIH. AUS. SYR. CHA. UGA. NGR. ITA. MOZ. SAM. DJI. CRC. MLI. FRA. IVB. SUR. TUR. OMA. TUR. JPN. PRK. CUB. CRO. RWA. ISL. IRQ. LAT. ANG. IRL. NCA. COD. YUG (as IOP). PAK. AUS. SYR. GUM. PNG. PAK. LIB. MEX. IND. TJK. NOR. CZE. CHI. VEN. MLI. COD (as Zaire). NGR. GAB. NIG. SLE. NIG. KGZ. PRK. ALB. CAM (as Kampuchea). BER. BEN. VEN. LES. MAW. PER. OMA. BRA. IND. KUW. AND. LBR. RWA. BUL. KUW. SKN. ANG. GEO. STP. GHA. ROU. LES. EST. NCA. CIV. HKG. LES. IRQ. FRG. IRL. BRN. BAN. BEL. RWA. BAH. LUX. CPV. ARU. SEN. SAM. ITA. GEQ. ARM. BER. FRG. CAM. ESP. ALG. DEN. NZL. LTU. CRC. ANG. GRN. KSA. TAN. PLW. BAH. SLE. HUN. GER. FRG. FIN. FIN. RSA. CUB. BEL. ERI. ISR. CIV. DOM. INA. THA. PRK. GAB. ROU. AND. USA. FRA. JAM. USA. TAN. CAF. FRA. LBA. ZIM AHO. GBR. TTO. LIE. NZL. SRI. DEN. FIJ. KGZ. JAM. JPN. NZL. ETH. PAR. LCA. LES. AUT. MAD. AUT. SUD. KOR. MRI. BER. GHA. GUI. TCH. TOG. AUS. QAT. THA. JAM. SMR. NCA. VEN. TUR. NEP. LBA. HUN. TCH. GDR. LUX. IND. SOL. BIZ. BOT. TCH. VAN. KUW. LBR. GUA. GDR. GUY. CHI. GRN. TAN. ISV. CHI. SUR. BEL. ZAM. GUA. DEN. MGL. SWE. QAT. CMR. NEP. BOL. YUG. COK. FIN. RWA. PAN. VIE. ISL. GER. GDR. TUR. BAR. KUW. TGA. GUM. GRE. NED. SYR. LAO. LIB. TTO. BUR. GBR. LBA. SRI. PAR. ASA. CAF. LAO. GBR. MAD. ZIM AHO. SWE. CAF. SUI. BEL. MGL. ISL. ROU. TCH. TUN. POR. AUT. GUY. JAM. BEN. GUM. DOM. BRN. POL. POR. SUR. QAT. LES. LIE. DOM. MAW. IVB. HKG. MDV. CMR. SUR. NIG. BOL. IND. SOM. BIZ. TTO. BLR. BOT. URS. SMR. CHN. BUL. MAS. MAS. ANT (as Lesser Antilles). YUG (effectively SRB). CMR. TUN.

CAN. DJI. HAI. JAM. SUI. GRN. KAZ. TGA. ETH. RUS. JOR. VEN. GRE. FRG. JOR. URU. GEO. ITA. MLT. UGA. BEL. SMR. CAY. AUT. NCA. FIJ. PAR. ARM. RWA. MHL. TJK. and Turks & Caicos Islands (TKS). AHO. GAM. CYP. LES. LIB. URU. ZIM AFG. LBA. BLR. ALB. Macao (MAC). ESA. CIV. MAR. ESA. IVB. KEN. DEN. CGO. MOZ. PLE. GHA. PER. THA. CHA. SUR. TPE. IRL. ALB. SEN. CAY. VIN. JAM (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960). NEP. EGY. GUA. ETH. AUT. MAW. BAN. BOH. MAR. GUM. NCA. ITA. SWZ. GBR. FIJ. YEM. NGR. DJI. MNE. COD. TPE. KIR. OMA. SOL. NCA. VIN. UAE. BEN. BEL. ARG. EGY. CMR. LTU. ZIM AFG. GUM. MON. DOM. CAF. MNE. FRA. SEY. MDV. GEO. SMR. SRB. MAW. HAI. ZAM (including as NRO/Northern Rhodesia in 1964). FSM. ZIM (including as RHO/Rhodesia in 1960 & 1964) . DEN. GHA (including as GOL/Gold Coast in 1952) GUY (including as BGU/British Guiana in 1948-1964). SVK. GRE. SIN. DOM. SYR. SLE. CRO. COD. AUT. SOL. KOR. BRA. Gibraltar (GIB). URU. LBR. VIN. BOL. BOL. IND. MYA. MRI. CAM. UZB. MNE (and as part of SCG/Serbia & Montenegro in 2004). MLI. RUS. CYP. SUR. UKR. SRB. BAH. FIN. BIH. EST. BUL. BEN. ARU. ETH. ALG. FIN. SRI. MAS. BOL. SUR. BEL. SWE. POR. SLO. KSA. IRL (additionally some Irish athletes competed with Great Britain in 1896-1920). NIG. NAM. MTN. TTO. BRN. SUD. COL. CAF. BIZ. NWF. SKN. CHI. RWA. UGA. VAN. CHI. ANG. CHA. KGZ. ESP. LBR. CUB. RWA. CAF. MTN. SLE. ZAM. RUS. EGY. GHA. CAY. YEM. MAS. AUS. BRN. FIN. LIE. KGZ. BAN. AND. RWA. IRQ. ANG. BAN. ASA. SRB. AND. MAR. TGA. MAW. EST. PHI. HUN. PLE. PAK. LIB. COM. BIH. TJK. BDI. GBR. MAD. COM. JOR. ZAM. LCA. USA. ARG. GER. VAN. MON. USA. MAS. PNG. MAR. IVB. SYR. NIG. SOM. MOZ. IND. CAN. PHI. UKR. RSA. LAO. AZE. HKG. Kosovo (KOS). KEN. SIN. NZL. PLW. TUR. JOR. ISL. TOG. MDA. CUR (as IOA). VIE. GAM. POL. NOR. HUN. VIE. SMR. AUS. ITA. ESA. SMR. ASA. UZB. LAT. NAM. LES. SLO. MKD. LAT. EGY. PER. GAB. MOZ. SSD (as IOA). ZAM. UKR. NCA. MLI. CUB. LBA. CIV. VIE. CAM (including as KHM/Kampuchea in 1972). with codes given on page 7. SEY. KUW. ESP. MDV. NOR. SCG. CZE. CYP. POL. GUM. HKG. LAO. MEX. KAZ. PYR. CGO. ARM. VEN. YAR. LBR. MGL. MYA. TKM. QAT. HAI. KOR. ARM. FSM. SAM. SWE. VEN. CRO. CPV. UAE. NED. IRI. GBS. CZE. IRI. YEM. TOG. CAN. FRA. KGZ. GAB. ANG. ISV. MKD. NGR. TLS. ISR. STP. GUM. GUA. BER. BWI (1960. PAK. SOL. SKN. PAN. Nauru (NRU). LES. French Polynesia (PYF). GAM. ISL. GRE. BRU. MDV. VIN. comprising BAR/Barbados JAM/Jamaica and TTO/Trinidad & Tobago). SVK. TPE. GAB. LTU. KSA. INA. GUY. BEL. JPN. NGR. ALG. MDA. IRI. GUY. BAH. ISR. CAF. ITA. SEY. INA. CPV. GAM. SLE. GUA. COL. PUR. BER. BAH. AUS. RSA. MHL. ALG. BUR. BRA. QAT. GRN. GEQ. TKM. ARM. COL. PAR. PAN. BAR. ROU. SKN. the following 11 have not yet participated in Olympic Games athletics: Anguilla (AIA). ESP. VEN. IND. BER. ALG. IRL. GBS. PNG. MAW. TUV. ISL. KIR. LCA. QAT. CMR. SUD. PRK. AND. ECU. GEQ. LBA. TLS (including as IOA/“Individual Olympic Athletes” in 2000). CGO. SAM. COL. PLW. SOM. CGO. BUL. TPE (including as ROC/Republic of China in 1972). COD (including as ZAI/Zaire in 1984-1996). KEN. RUS. YEM. CIV. TJK. PNG. LTU. UGA. LUX. PHI. BUL. ISV. Bhutan (BHU). MTN. HON. ANG. SLO. ZIM Of current IAAF members. BRU. ASA. CMR. COD. KEN. NOR. MON. SWZ. BEN. CHN. SUR. SUD. GUI. PAN. COK. NGR. STP. HUN. MAD. BAR (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960). BUR. LCA. CAM. SVK. TJK. BAH. PUR. UAE. SWZ. THA. STP. HON. DMA. LAO. BOT. SUI. TUV. BUR (including as VOL/Upper Volta in 1972). SOM. GEO. HON. NAM. ECU. ECU. FIJ. DMA. LIE. GEO. BRA. FSM. UAE. JPN. LIB. KIR. GRN. KAZ. IRL. AZE. DEN. GHA. SWZ. ISV. BUL. AHO. MGL. LAO. TAN. DEN. COK. CAN. ALB. GUA. STP. ESP. GUI. CHA. SIN. OMA. GDR. PUR. KUW. GBS. TUN. MEX. TUV. THA. SUD. KUW. TUN. SIN. AZE. GBR. NEP. GEQ. LBA. KUW. LUX. HUN. CIV. COM. PAN. TAN. IND. PHI. YUG (including as IOP/“Independent Olympic Participants” in 1992). UAR. CHN. INA. HKG. IVB. RSA. CAY. LBR. OMA. CUB. URU. SEY. KOR. ERI. ECU. TTO. BLR. POL. The full alphabetical list of 219 country teams is as follows. MOZ.R I O 2004 196 (2) 2008 200 (3) 2012 202 (2) 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / C O M P E T I N G C O U N T R I E S 15 AFG. ARU. VAN. THA. ROU. GER. JPN. SLE. CHA. TUN. MLT. QAT. IRQ. AND. AHO. EST. COK. SAM. BOT. BIH. MKD. TUR. SYR. USA. SRI. JPN. SCG. PRK. NED. Norfolk Island (NFI). SOL. DMA. GER (includes when FRG/FR of Germany & GDR/German Democratic Republic participated as a combined German team in 1956-1964). COM. SVK. MAS. VIE. NED. ESA. GUI. PAK. BDI. AUS. HON. IRQ. SEN. ETH. SEN. KSA. CRC. GUY. TGA. MRI. NIG. PAR. NBO. POR. MLT. PAK. TAN. INA. BRU. ARG. TTO (and as part of BWI/British West Indies in 1960). NED. GRN. TKM. POL. URS (excluding EUN/United Team in 1992). ASA. TLS. PLE. TUR. NEP. UZB. MRI. JAM. SSD (as IOA/“Independent Olympic Athletes” in 2012). NEP. MGL. LAT. MAD. SWE. BOT. SYR. MDA. BAR. FRA. MTN. MLT. KAZ. PNG. MHL. PAR. LIE. ANT. CZE (and as BOH/Bohemia in 19001912). DJI. TOG. NIG. VAN. BUR. RSA. PER. SRI (including as CEY/Ceylon in 1948-1972). POR. CHI. CHN. CHI. BOL. MGL. FRA. GBS. BAR. ALB. Montserrat (MNT). SOM. ISV. FSM. CYP. BLR. MDV. EUN. IRI. POR. SAM. MLI. SAA. MYA (including as BIR or BUR/Burma in 1948-1988). LCA. TAN. CPV. CRO. CHN. NZL. ANT. CPV. HAI. TGA. KGZ. TKM. DOM. CRC. SEN. AZE. TUN. AUT. ISL. OMA. BRN. GUI. JAM. BRA. ISR. ISR. ROU. SKN. FIJ. GRE. NZL. BDI. HKG. PUR. BEN (including as DAH/Dahomey in 1972). PLW. SWE. CRC. PLW. MEX. PER. AFG. ERI. IVB. GER. BER. MKD. PRK. ERI. MON. ROU. KOR. EST. PLE. MAD. ARG. NOR. ANT (including as LAN/Lesser Antilles in 1976). BAN. UKR. IRQ. GEQ. ERI. MDA. CUR (as IOA/“Independent Olympic Athletes” in 2012). COK. MEX. BDI. BIZ (including as BHO/British Honduras in 1968 & 1976). CAM. LAT. CUB. SUI. SLO. BRN. DOM. CRO. TOG. NZL (additionally some New Zealand athletes competed with Australia in 1908 & 1912). CZE. TTO. KSA. FIN. CMR. LIB. NAM. SRI. TUR. BIZ. UZB. LTU. ANT. BIZ. USA. Northern Mariana Islands (NMI). TCH. BIH. DMA. GAB. PRK. UGA. MLI. TLS. SUI. LES. BOT. MRI. KIR. GBR. BLR.

Ville Ritola 7. 2. Veronica Campbell-Brown is up from =11th to third place. another Jamaican has made a dramatic move in the women’s rankings. Perhaps Tokyo 2020 will beckon. Irving Baxter =22. That race linked two great eras which now feature in all-time positions one and three. Angelo Taylor Valeriy Borzov UKR =28. Campbell-Brown. Harry Hillman Kenenisa Bekele Walter Tewksbury George Bonhag =26. as could 400m veteran Chris Brown (BAH).16 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T A T H L E T E S THE GREATEST OLYMPIC ATHLETES? Here we present the most successful Olympic athletes. she’ll be the first athlete other than Ottey (Page) to win medals at five successive Games. Not far behind. The biggest riser after London 2012 is. but Rio could well affect the picture: Men – 1. Oerter. Hannes Kolehmainen Mel Sheppard 20. the second two consider individual placings only. is Allyson Felix. Blankers-Koen. Ottey wore what would be her ninth Olympic medal. not so easy for Felix to perform with such distinction across as many as 10 races! Looking only at individual women’s events. many would regard him as the greatest ever. Nurmi. Robert Garrett =15. From outside the top 50. Of other currently active athletes. I hope someone will publish a picture of the silver medal podium from the 2000 women’s 4x100m. My personal selection for the greatest Olympic athletes is unchanged.5 4 40 5 40 1 3 40 5 39 5 39 4 38 5 37 4 36 4 36 5 36 3 36 4 35 5 35 3 34 4 34 4 34 4 34 4 34 3 34 1 4 33 3 33 4 33 4 33 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 3 32 . Elmer Niklander Phil Edwards 13. Myer Prinstein Ralph Rose 10. will surely be within range of more medals in Rio and if she is successful. otherwise Jesse Owens (USA) would not be down in =38th place. John Flanagan 21. The Ethiopian has never won an Olympic silver. The Jamaican team on that occasion included 40 year-old Merlene Ottey and 18 year-old Campbell. Robert Korzeniowski Jackson Scholz Nate Cartmell Frankie Fredericks =38. Usain Bolt =8. Paavo Nurmi 2. even Ottey’s total of 70 could come under threat. Lewis. Joyner-Kersee. Kenenisa Bekele is within range of the top 20 should he possibly be declared to run by Ethiopia and “score” this year. 400m and both relays. Like Bolt in the men’s list. Women – 1. Ray Ewry 3. If the American can score highly in Rio in the 200m. Impact and historic importance cannot be determined only by placements. Lasse Virén Mal Whitfield Pietro Mennea =18. Painless for us to speculate. down to one for eighth. 2. Harrison Dillard Archie Hahn Michael Johnson Alvin Kraenzlein Al Oerter Jesse Owens Don Quarrie Linford Christie FIN USA USA USA SWE FIN JAM USA USA USA FIN CAN TCH USA FIN USA ITA FIN USA USA USA USA ETH USA USA USA URS USA KEN USA JAM JAM BAH POL USA USA NAM USA USA USA USA USA USA JAM GBR Gold 9 10 9 5 4 5 6 4 3 4 1 4 2 4 3 1 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 Silver 3 1 2+1= 3 1 2 2 2 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 4 2 2 Bronze 4 1 2 2 4+2= 1 1 2 5 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 5 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 1 1 1 - 8 Medals Points 12 93 10 80 10 79 9 76 1+1= 6 73. unsurprisingly. and with the potential to overtake all above her. Mark Butler MEN – ALL EVENTS 1. but he still wouldn’t have enough points to crack the top three. Campbell had the first of seven.5 8 61 6 48 5 47 6 47 6 46 1 4 44 5 44 5 42 6 41. Should he win more golds again in Rio. Frank Wykoff Kip Keino Charles Paddock Arthur Wint Herb McKenley Chris Brown =34. 3. Tirunesh Dibaba has more points than either Campbell-Brown or Felix. 3. Eight points are scored for a first. Carl Lewis 4. but that medal or better by her in Rio and she would pass the great Irena Szewińska for third place on the all-time list excluding relay points. the Jamaican is now seventh and among Olympic legends. We should remember that these lists cannot solely be used as a measure of greatness. James Lightbody =11. Emil Zátopek CZE (SVK) 14. Martin Sheridan 5. The first set of tables include team events (mainly relays). according to their placings in the first eight. Eric Lemming 6. as she is now. Points are shared in the case of a tie. Usain Bolt. Szewińska.

Mariya Itkina ★ F A C T S GRE USA URS CZE/TCH USA URS LTU GRE USA SWE ESP JAM AUS JAM USA POL USA USA USA USA AUS GER NED USA RUS/URS USA ETH GER RUS USA GER USA AUS GER FRA BAH BAH URS URS GER BAH USA JAM USA JAM GBR GBR URS JAM USA GER GER RUS URS GBR JAM JAM URS ETH RUS MOZ URS & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T Gold 1 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 Gold 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 4 3 1 3 3 2 1 3 2 3 4 4 3 1 1 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 - A T H L E T E S 17 Silver 1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 Bronze 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 - 5 1 - 6 1 1 - 7 1 - 8 Medals Points 1 4 31. Sherone Simpson =47. Wyomia Tyus Annegret Richter 21. Heike Drechsler Tatyana Lebedeva =19. Florence Griffith Joyner 14. Allyson Felix Irena Kirzenstein/Szewińska 6. Irina Privalova =15. Evelyn Ashford Sanya Richards Ross Raelene Boyle 11. José Marín WOMEN – ALL EVENTS 1. Nazarova RUS Derartu Tulu Yuliya Gushchina Maria Mutola Greatest Success without medal =57. Wilma Rudolph Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Jearl Miles Clark Sandie Richards Kathy Smallwood/Cook =36. Fanny Blankers Koen 13. Shirley Strickland 3. continued 46. Kóstas Tsiklitiras =47.5 4 31 4 31 4 31 4 31 4 31 3 31 4 31 3 31 5 31 - - 2 2 - - Silver 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1+1= 2 - Bronze 4 6 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1+1= 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 2 6 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 - 7 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 - 8 Medals Points 1 9 70 7 58 7 55 6 50 7 50 5 49 6 47 5 45 5 45 3 45 6 44 4 39 5 38 4 37 4 36 5 36 5 35 5 35 4 34 4 34 3 33 4 32 4 32 3 32 2 32 2 32 4 31 4 31 1 4 31 3 31 4 30 4 30 3 30 2 30 3 30 3 29 2 29 3 29 3 28 1 2 28 4 28 4 28 3 28 2 28 1 1 28 3 27. Merlene Ottey/Page 2. Olga V.R I O 2 0 1 6 Men all events. Renate Stecher 12. Gail Devers =22. Valerie Brisco-Hooks Tirunesh Dibaba =17. Olga Bryzgina UKR Tamara Press RUS Marlies Oelsner/Göhr Pauline Davis =31. Kelly Holmes Irina Press RUS Deon Hemmings =39. Steve Lewis Viktor Saneyev GEO Jan Železný SVK/CZE Jeremy Wariner Vladimir Golubnichniy UKR Virgilijus Alekna Nikólaos Georgantas Dennis Mitchell Edvin Wide Greatest Success without medal =168.5 3 27 3 27 3 27 2 27 - - 1 - - - 1 4 - 0 19 24 . Gwen Torrence 7. Veronica Campbell-Brown =4. Chandra Cheeseborough Ingrid Becker/Mickler Christina Brehmer/Lathan Natalya Antyukh Galina Zybina RUS Christine Ohuruogu Grace Jackson 46. Jackie Joyner-Kersee =8. Betty Cuthbert Bärbel Eckert/Wöckel Marie-José Pérec Chandra Sturrup Debbie Ferguson McKenzie =27.

John Flanagan 15. Heike Drechsler Tatyana Lebedeva 8. Myer Prinstein Ralph Rose 8. Ville Ritola 9.5 3 28 3 28 4 28 3 28 4 27.5 3 26 3 26 3 26 3 26 3 26 3 26 2 26 2 26 WOMEN – INDIVIDUAL EVENTS 1. Phil Edwards 46. Elmer Niklander 10. Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3. Robert Garrett 12. James Lightbody 14. Tirunesh Dibaba =6. Archie Hahn Hannes Kolehmainen Alvin Kraenzlein Al Oerter Usain Bolt 27. Paavo Nurmi 5. Matt McGrath Charles Paddock Arthur Wint Gyula Zsivótzky Mamo Wolde Herb McKenley Fay Moulton Lajos Gönczy USA USA SWE FIN USA USA USA FIN FIN TCH USA FIN USA USA USA USA ETH USA KEN POL NAM USA FIN USA USA JAM GRE URS CZE/TCH URS LTU GRE ITA GBR FIN FRA FIN USA USA USA USA TUN SWE USA CAN USA USA USA JAM HUN ETH JAM USA HUN Gold 10 5 4 6 7 4 3 3 1 4 2 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 3 3 2 2 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Silver 2+1= 3 1 1 2 3 2 1 1+1= 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 4 1+1= 1 1 1 2 2 1 3 1= 1 1 1 2 1 1+1= 1= 2 2 2 2 1 3 1 1 Bronze 4 1 2 2 4+2= 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 5 2 2 1 1 1 2 2+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 - 7 1 1 1 1 - 8 Medals Points 10 80 9 76 1+1= 6 73. Shirley Strickland 5. Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska 4.5 4 40 5 39 4 38 5 37 4 36 4 36 5 36 4 34 1 4 33 4 33 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 4 32 1 4 31. Robert Korzeniowski Frankie Fredericks =22. Veronica Campbell-Brown =9. Platt Adams =40.5 3 27 2 26.18 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T A T H L E T E S MEN – INDIVIDUAL EVENTS 1. Tamara Press RUS Raelene Boyle =11. Galina Zybina RUS JAM USA POL AUS ETH GER RUS JAM URS AUS GER GBR URS Gold 3 2 2 3 2 1 2 3 2 2 1 Silver 2 1 2 1 3 1 3 1 1 Bronze 4 5 1 2 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 - 6 - 7 1 1 8 Medals Points 7 53 6 47 6 42 5 39 5 36 5 35 5 35 4 33 4 31 3 31 4 29 3 29 3 28 . Irving Baxter =16. Kóstas Tsiklitiras =28. Kip Keino =20.5 9 69 8 63 5 47 6 47 6 45 1 4 44 5 42 6 41. Harry Hillman Kenenisa Bekele Walter Tewksbury 19. Ugo Frigerio Sebastian Coe =35.5 4 31 4 31 4 31 3 31 4 31 4 30 4 30 4 29 4 29 3 29 3 29 2 28. Eric Lemming 4. John Biller =47. Volmari Iso-Hollo Alain Mimoun Verner Järvinen Lawson Robertson 39. Martin Sheridan 3. Lasse Virén 13. Merlene Ottey/Page 2. Renate Stecher Kelly Holmes 13. James Connolly 45. Emil Zátopek CZE 11. Ray Ewry 2. Carl Lewis =6. Viktor Saneyev GEO Jan Železný SVK/CZE Vladimir Golubnichniy UKR Virgilijus Alekna Nikólaos Georgantas =33. Pat McDonald Parry O’Brien Mohamed Gammoudi John Ljunggren 44.

Valerie Brisco-Hooks Nadezhda Chizhova RUS Gabriela Szabo Ellina Zvereva Sanya Richards Ross =44. Gail Devers Sara Simeoni =22. MEN FIN Paavo Nurmi USA Ray Ewry SWE Eric Lemming JAM Usain Bolt CAN Phil Edwards CZE Emil Zátopek TCH (SVK) ITA Pietro Mennea ETH Kenenisa Bekele UKR Valeriy Borzov URS BAH Chris Brown KEN Kip Keino NAM Frankie Fredericks POL Robert Korzeniowski GBR Linford Christie GRE Kóstas Tsiklitiras GEO Viktor Saneyev URS LTU Virgilijus Alekna 9 10 4 6 4 1 3 2 1 2 4 1 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 4 2 1+1= 1 - 2 5 2 2 1 1 1 4+2= 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 - 12 10 1+1= 6 6 5 5 1 3 4 5 3 4 4 1 4 3 1 4 4 3 93 80 73. with the country code under which they competed given after the name.5 31 31 .R I O 2 0 1 6 Men all events. Yugoslav and Czechoslovakian competitors are listed against their actual country. Allyson Felix Tatyana Samolenko/Dorovskikh UKR Gwen Torrence =20. The same principle has been followed for Irish athletes who competed with Great Britain in 1896-1920. Betty Cuthbert Tatyana Kazankina RUS Marie-José Pérec Irina Press RUS =26. Iolanda Balaş Mary Bignal Stefka Kostadinova Natalya Sadova Aleksandra Chudina RUS Gunhild Hoffmeister =50. continued =14. Former Soviet.5 48 44 42 40 36 35 34 34 33 33 32 31. Fanny Blankers Koen Derartu Tulu Maria Mutola =17. Mildred “Babe” Didriksen Florence Griffith Joyner Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Lia Manoliu Grace Jackson =31. Micheline Ostermeyer Nina Romashkova/Ponomaryova RUS Yelena Isinbaeva Meseret Defar Dana Ingrová/Zátopková Trine Solberg/Hattestad Gabriella Dorio Yipsi Moreno =39. Wyomia Tyus Evelyn Ashford Margitta Helmbold/Gummel Annegret Richter Tilly Fleischer Irina Privalova RUS Gete Wami Debbie Ferguson McKenzie ★ F A C T S NED ETH MOZ USA URS USA USA ITA AUS URS FRA URS USA USA JAM ROU JAM FRA URS RUS ETH TCH (CZE) NOR ITA CUB USA URS ROU BLR/URS USA ROU GBR BUL RUS URS GER USA USA GER/GDR GER GER EUN/URS ETH BAH & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T Gold 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 - Silver 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 - Bronze 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 5 1= 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - A T H L E T E S 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 1 4 19 8 Medals Points 3 27 3 27 2 27 3 26 3 26 2 26 2 25 3 25 3 24 3 24 3 24 2 24 3 23 3 23 3 23 3 23 1 23 3 22 3 22 3 22 3 22 2 22 2 22 1 1 22 2 22 2 21 3 21 3 21 2 21 2 21 2 20 2 20 2 20 2 20 3 20 3 20 2 19 2 19 2 19 2 19 2 19 2 19 3 19 1 19 THE BEST ATHLETES BY COUNTRY These tables show the best points totals by individuals for each country having finishers within the top eight at the Olympic Games.

20 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ Best men by country continued FRA Alain Mimoun TUN Mohamed Gammoudi TTO Ato Boldon AUS Stan Rowley BRA Róbson da Silva HUN Gyula Zsivótzky Lajos Gönczy ECU Jefferson Pérez NZL Peter Snell CUB Alberto Juantorena GER Hanns Braun Karl-Friedrich Haas JPN Chuhei Nambu MAR Hicham El Guerrouj LAT Jānis Lūsis URS MEX Raúl González NOR Arne Halse IRL Con Leahy GBR RSA Bevil Rudd ESP José Marín KAZ Vladimir Muravyov URS RUS Aleksandr Aksinin URS SLO Primož Kozmus BAR Obadele Thompson BLR Igor Astapkovich URS Vasiliy Kaptyukh DOM Félix Sánchez EST Jüri Tamm URS BEL Gaston Roelants ERI Zersenay Tadese POR Carlos Lopes SUI Werner Günthör AZE Yuriy Konovalov URS NGR Enefiok Udo-Obong Olapade Adeniken Innocent Egbunike DEN Wilson Kipketer NED Churandy Martina PAN Lloyd LaBeach TPE Yang Chuan-Kwang ARG Delfo Cabrera Juan Carlos Zabala ISL Vilhjálmur Einarsson PHI Simeon Toribio ROU Marian Oprea SEN Amadou Dia Bâ ALG Noureddine Morceli BUL Petar Petrov CHI Manuel Plaza BDI Vénuste Niyongabo CHN Liu Xiang Chen Ding GRN Kirani James KGZ Otto Barch URS KOR Hwang Yeong-Jo LUX Josy Barthel SKN Kim Collins SUD Ismail Ahmed Ismail SVK Jozef Pribilinec TCH TJK Andrey Abduvaliyev URS UGA John Akii-Bua Stephen Kiprotich AUT Hermann Wraschtil BER Brian Wellman BOT Nijel Amos CIV Gabriel Tiacoh GUA Erick Barrondo HAI Silvio Cator IRI Ehsan Hadadi F A C T S & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T Gold 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Silver 3 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Bronze 4 1 3 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - 5 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 - A T H L E T E S 6 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 - 7 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 - 8 Medals Points 4 29 4 28 4 27 4 26 2 26 3 26 2 26 2 25 3 24 2 23 3 23 2 23 2 23 3 23 1 3 22 2 22 2 22 3 21 3 21 0 19 2 19 2 19 2 19 1 18 1 2 16 1 16 2 16 2 16 1 15 1 15 2 15 1 15 2 14 2 14 1 14 1 14 2 13 0 12 2 12 1 1 12 1 11 1 11 1 11 1 11 1 11 1 11 1 10 1 1 10 1 10 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 7 0 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 .

R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S Best men by country continued KSA Hadi Al-Somaily SRB Ivan Gubijan YUG Franjo Mihalić YUG SRI Duncan White TAN Filbert Bayi Suleiman Nyambui TUR Eşref Apak VEN Lloyd Murad ZAM Samuel Matete DJI Ahmed Salah PUR Javier Culson QAT Mohamed Suleiman AHO Churandy Martina GHA Joshua Owusu IND* Milkha Singh ZIM Brian Dzingai Ngonidzashe Makusha ARM Armen Martirosyan BRN Yousef Saad Kamel ISR Konstantin Matusevich CRO Zvonko Bezjak YUG MRI Stéphane Buckland SOM Abdi Bile UZB Ramil Ganiyev URS BIH Dako Radošević YUG MAD Jean-Louis Ravelomanantsoa OMA Mohamed Al-Malky RWA Mathias Ntawulikura * & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T Gold - Silver 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Bronze 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 1 1 1 1 - A T H L E T E S 6 1 1 1 1 - 7 - 21 8 Medals Points 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 0 7 1 7 1 6 1 6 1 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 If Norman Pritchard (British India) is regarded as Indian then he would be the most successful man from that country with two silvers from 1900: IND Norman Pritchard 2 2 14 WOMEN JAM Merlene Ottey/Page AUS Shirley de la Hunty POL Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska USA Allyson Felix GER Renate Stecher GDR NED Fanny Blankers-Koen RUS Irina Privalova URS ETH Tirunesh Dibaba BAH Chandra Sturrup Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie FRA Marie-José Pérec UKR Olga Bryzgina URS GBR Kathy Smallwood/Cook MOZ Maria Mutola ITA Sara Simeoni BLR Mariya Itkina URS ROU Lia Manoliu CUB Yipsi Moreno CZE Dana Ingrová/Zátopková TCH NGR Mary Onyali NOR Trine Solberg/Hattestad BUL Stefka Kostadinova CAN Fanny Rosenfeld Marita Payne NZL Valerie Adams GEO Nadezhda Khnykina URS KEN Vivian Cheruiyot CMR Françoise Mbango CHN Wang Junxia IRL Sonia O’Sullivan TUR Elvan Abeylegesse GRE Anastasía Kelesídou MAR Hasna Benhassi POR Rosa Mota Fernanda Ribeiro Gold 3 3 4 3 4 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 Silver 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 - Bronze 4 6 1 3 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 1 1 1 1+1= 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 - 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 4 1 3 1 - 8 Medals Points 1 9 70 7 58 7 50 6 50 6 44 4 39 4 37 5 36 2 32 2 32 3 32 4 31 3 30 2 27 3 25 0 24 3 23 2 22 2 22 2 22 2 22 2 20 2 19 2 19 2 18 2 17 2 17 2 16 2 15 1 15 1 2 15 2 14 1 2 14 2 14 2 14 .

22 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ Best women by country continued RSA Hestrie Storbeck/Cloete AUT Herma Bauma BEL Kim Gevaert JPN Yuko Arimori KAZ Olga Rypakova ESP María Vasco FIN Pirjo Wilmi HUN Márta Rudas LTU Austra Skujytė BRN Maryam Jamal MEX Ana Guevara DEN Lily Kelsby ALG Nouria Mérah-Benida ALG Hassiba Boulmerka BRA Maurren Maggi CRO Sandra Perkovic KGZ Tatyana Kolpakova URS Mariya Pinigina URS LAT Inese Jaunzeme URS SVK Mária Faithová TCH SWE Ludmila Engquist Carolina Klüft SYR Ghada Shouaa TPE Chi Cheng TUN Habiba Ghribi ARG Noëmi Simonetti CHI Marlene Ahrens COL Caterine Ibargüen IND P. T. Usha SLO Brigita Bukovec Nataša Urbančič YUG SRI Susanthika Jayasinghe YUG Nataša Urbančič SLO BOT Amantle Montsho ISL Vala Flosadóttir CIV Murielle Ahoure GHA Alice Annum SLE Eunice Barber SRB Marija Radosavljević YUG SUD Yamilé Aldama SUI Cornelia Bürki Meta Antenen BDI Francine Niyonsaba EST Laine Erik URS ISR Esther Rot PRK Mun Gyong-Ae SCG Olivera Jevtić TTO Kelly-Ann Baptiste UZB Tatyana Biryulina URS LUX Danièle Kaber CAY Cydonie Mothersill KOR Kim Hee-Sun F A C T S & F I G U R E S / G R E A T E S T Gold 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Silver 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Bronze 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - A T H L E T E S 6 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 - 8 Medals Points 2 14 1 13 1 13 2 13 1 13 1 12 0 12 1 12 1 12 1 11 1 11 1 10 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 0 7 1 7 0 7 1 7 0 7 1 0 6 1 6 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 1 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 1 0 1 1= 0 0.5 .

with the overall youngest and oldest in each category shown in bold EVENT Men 100 Metres 200 Metres 400 Metres 800 Metres 1500 Metres AGE G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C 19 18 16 16 20 17 17 16 19 18 18 14 20 17 17 13 19 19 18 13 128 234 100 55 74 287 270 57 135 268 268 226 237 263 263 225 50 50 33 227 YOUNGEST COUNTRY DATE Reggie Walker Donald Lippincott Aléxandros Khalkokondilis* Angelos Lambrou1 RSA 22 Jul 1908 USA 7 Jul 1912 GRE 10 Apr 1896 GRE 29 Jul 1928 CAN 1 Aug 1928 USA 26 Jul 1976 GBR 8 Aug 1984 GRE 31 Jul 1928 USA 28 Sep 1988 DOM 6 Aug 2012 DOM 6 Aug 2012 GAM 4 Aug 1984 USA 8 Jul 1912 KEN 9 Aug 2012 KEN 9 Aug 2012 TUR 25 Apr 1906 KEN 19 Aug 2008 KEN 19 Aug 2008 GRE 7 Apr 1896 TUR 27 Apr 1906 Percy Williams Dwayne Evans Ade Mafe Angelos Lambrou Steve Lewis Luguelín Santos Luguelín Santos Dawda Jallow Ted Meredith Timothy Kitum Timothy Kitum Vahran Papazyan Asbel Kiprop Asbel Kiprop Dimitri Tombroff2 Vahran Papazyan AGE 32 32 36 38 28 30 36 36 33 33 33 37 31 32 36 36 31 32 34 38 121 121 116 230 323 219 329 353 12 12 296 222 146 58 42 42 148 237 270 323 OLDEST COUNTRY DATE Linford Christie GBR Linford Christie GBR Linford Christie GBR Stefan Burkart SUI Michael Johnson USA Shawn Crawford USA Frankie Fredericks NAM Harouna Pale BUR Michael Johnson USA Michael Johnson USA Chris Brown BAH Joe Rodan FIJ Albert Hill GBR Arthur Wint JAM Johnny Gray USA Johnny Gray USA Albert Hill GBR Kip Keino KEN Joseph Chesire KEN Vyacheslav Shabunin RUS 1 Aug 1992 1 Aug 1992 27 Jul 1996 26 Jul 1996 1 Aug 1996 20 Aug 2008 26 Aug 2004 3 Aug 1992 25 Sep 2000 25 Sep 2000 6 Aug 2012 24 Sep 1988 17 Aug 1920 22 Jul 1952 31 Jul 1996 31 Jul 1996 19 Aug 1920 10 Sep 1972 8 Aug 1992 15 Aug 2008 . footnotes are given for those athletes where there may be younger or older alernatives whose exact birthdates are unknown.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T & O L D E S T 23 YOUNGEST & OLDEST These lists show the youngest and oldest gold medallists (G). but regardless of the actual date the athlete would still be the youngest or the oldest in their respective category. medallists (M). OVERALL YOUNGESTS & OLDESTS EVENT AGE ATHLETE COUNTRY DATE Youngest men Decathlon Standing HJ Long Jump 800 Metres G M F C 17 263 17 146 16 97 13 225 Bob Mathias USA 6 Aug 1948 Joseph Stadler USA 31 Aug 1904 Aléxandros Halkokondilis* GRE 7 Apr 1896 Vahran Papazyan TUR 25 Apr 1906 Oldest Men 56lb Throw Hammer Throw Hammer Throw Marathon G M F C 42 26 48 195 48 195 52 199 Pat McDonald Matt McGrath Matt McGrath Percy Wyer USA 21 Aug 1920 USA 10 Jul 1924 USA 10 Jul 1924 CAN 9 Aug 1936 USA USA AUS CIV Youngest Women 4x100m Relay G 4x100m Relay M 4x100m Relay F 800 Metres C Further individuals: High Jump G High Jump M 800 Metres F 15 123 15 123 15 63 13 3 Barbara Jones Barbara Jones Debbie Wells Céléstine Ndrin 16 123 16 123 15 175 Ulrike Meyfarth FRG 4 Sep 1972 Ulrike Meyfarth FRG 4 Sep 1972 Gertruda Kilosówna POL 2 Aug 1928 Oldest Women Discus Throw 4x100m Relay Discus Throw Marathon 39 40 47 48 Ellina Zvereva Merlene Ottey Ellina Zvereva Lourdes Klitzkie G M F C 316 143 276 234 27 Jul 1952 27 Jul 1952 31 Jul 1976 23 Jul 1976 BLR 27 Sep 2000 JAM 30 Sep 2000 BLR 18 Aug 2008 GUM 23 Sep 1988 EVENT BY EVENT. only the birth year is known. Conversely. Where an asterisk is shown against a name. finalists (F) and competitors (C) in each Olympic event.

000 Metres Marathon 3000mSC 110m Hurdles 400m Hurdles High Jump Pole Vault Long Jump Triple Jump Shot Put Discus Throw Hammer Throw Javelin Throw Decathlon 20km Walk 50km Walk 4x100m Relay 2 0 1 6 AGE G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G 20 19 18 15 21 20 17 17 20 19 17 17 20 19 19 18 20 17 17 17 20 18 18 17 19 18 17 16 17 17 17 16 19 19 16 16 20 19 17 17 20 19 18 18 20 20 18 17 20 19 19 19 19 19 17 17 17 17 17 17 19 19 19 17 23 23 22 19 18 321 237 92 293 42 161 330 327 301 100 169 1 33 24 24 127 304 344 344 201 329 325 325 214 214 140 26 316 360 360 341 329 17 17 97 97 225 96 349 119 167 97 269 179 69 57 9 244 161 187 101 74 131 131 212 211 263 263 263 193 365 365 0 283 240 240 114 217 118 ★ F A C T S YOUNGEST & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T COUNTRY DATE Joseph Guillemot FRA 17 Aug 1920 Fita Bayissa ETH 8 Aug 1992 Hagos Gebrhiwet ETH 11 Aug 2012 Anwar Al-Harazi YAR 28 Sep 1988 Brahim Boutayeb MAR 26 Sep 1988 Richard Chelimo KEN 3 Aug 1992 Marko Hhawu3 TAN 29 Jul 1996 Marko Hhawu5 TAN 26 Jul 1996 Juan Carlos Zabala ARG 7 Aug 1932 Kharilaos Vasilakos* GRE 10 Apr 1896 Arthur Newton USA 19 Jul 1900 Carlo Speroni ITA 14 Jul 1912 Matthew Birir KEN 7 Aug 1992 Brimin Kipruto KEN 24 Aug 2004 Brimin Kipruto KEN 24 Aug 2004 Abdullah Al-Akbari6 OMA 6 Aug 1984 Fred Kelly USA 12 Jul 1912 Frederick Moloney USA 14 Jul 1900 Frederick Moloney USA 14 Jul 1900 Károly Solymár7 HUN 11 Jul 1912 Edwin Moses USA 25 Jul 1976 Eddie Southern USA 24 Nov 1956 Eddie Southern USA 24 Nov 1956 Abdullah Sabt Ghulam UAE 3 Aug 1992 Jacek Wszoła POL 31 Jul 1976 Valeriy Brumel URS 1 Sep 1960 Sorin Matei ROU 1 Aug 1980 Mutale Mulenga8 ZAM 10 Aug 1984 Lee Barnes USA 10 Jul 1924 Lee Barnes USA 10 Jul 1924 Yeóryios Banikas GRE 25 Apr 1906 Renato Dionisi ITA 15 Oct 1964 Randy Williams USA 9 Sep 1972 Randy Williams USA 9 Sep 1972 Aléxandros Khalkokondilis* GRE 7 Apr 1896 Aléxandros Khalkokondilis* GRE 7 Apr 1896 Gustaf Lindblom SWE 15 Jul 1912 Ioánnis Persakis* GRE 6 Apr 1896 Rolland Romero USA 4 Aug 1932 Nikólaos Andreadakis* GRE 30 Apr 1906 Ralph Rose USA 31 Aug 1904 Miltiadis Gouskos* GRE 7 Apr 1896 Dimitri Zaitz9 USA 2 Aug 1936 Elmer Niklander10 FIN 16 Jul 1908 Al Oerter USA 27 Nov 1956 Richard Byrd11 USA 12 Jul 1912 Mihaíl Dorizas GRE 25 Apr 1906 Folke Fleetwood SWE 16 Jul 1908 József Csermák HUN 24 Jul 1952 Uwe Beyer GER 18 Oct 1964 Karl Staaf SWE 16 Jul 1900 Sukhrob Khodzhayev UZB 3 Aug 2012 Keshorn Walcott TTO 11 Aug 2012 Keshorn Walcott TTO 11 Aug 2012 Terje Pedersen NOR 8 Sep 1960 Terje Pedersen NOR 7 Sep 1960 Bob Mathias USA 6 Aug 1948 Bob Mathias USA 6 Aug 1948 Bob Mathias USA 6 Aug 1948 Stelios Benardis* GRE 12 Jul 1924 Chen Ding CHN 4 Aug 2012 Chen Ding CHN 4 Aug 2012 Wang Hao CHN 16 Aug 2008 Stefano Casali SMR 24 Jul 1980 Alex Schwazer ITA 22 Aug 2008 Alex Schwazer ITA 22 Aug 2008 Peter Selzer GDR 17 Oct 1968 Karl-Heinz Stadtmüller GDR 3 Sep 1972 Johnny Jones USA 31 Jul 1976 AGE 36 36 37 41 36 36 36 43 37 40 41 52 32 32 35 42 30 33 33 39 34 34 36 38 28 32 35 41 31 36 36 40 35 35 35 37 34 35 35 37 33 37 42 43 35 37 43 46 40 48 48 48 34 37 38 41 30 30 34 37 33 37 40 47 38 48 48 49 32 78 78 243 50 73 123 203 188 176 90 235 199 231 231 105 359 237 50 220 68 342 342 186 85 222 347 279 146 347 160 338 330 28 28 28 181 138 361 361 184 350 59 23 77 240 46 246 110 168 195 195 195 99 332 73 320 102 166 60 257 110 71 359 88 126 120 120 74 21 & OLDEST O L D E S T COUNTRY DATE Miruts Yifter ETH 1 Aug 1980 Miruts Yifter ETH 1 Aug 1980 Bernard Lagat USA 11 Aug 2012 Nikifor Popov URS 22 Jul 1952 Miruts Yifter ETH 27 Jul 1980 Mamo Wolde ETH 13 Oct 1968 Valter Nyström4 SWE 20 Jul 1952 Anton Tsvetanov* BUL 6 Jul 1924 Carlos Lopes POR 12 Aug 1984 Mamo Wolde ETH 10 Sep 1972 Eusebio Guiñez ARG 7 Aug 1948 Percy Wyer CAN 9 Aug 1936 Kip Keino KEN 4 Sep 1972 Kip Keino KEN 4 Sep 1972 Simon Vroemen NED 24 Aug 2004 Leonard Richardson RSA 7 Jul 1924 Mark McKoy CAN 3 Aug 1992 Willie Davenport USA 28 Jul 1976 Colin Jackson GBR 25 Sep 2000 Don Finlay GBR 3 Aug 1948 Félix Sánchez DOM 6 Aug 2012 Félix Sánchez DOM 6 Aug 2012 Danny McFarlane JAM 18 Aug 2008 Luigi Facelli ITA 3 Aug 1936 Charles Austin USA 28 Jul 1996 Javier Sotomayor CUB 24 Sep 2000 Jamie Nieto USA 7 Aug 2012 Dragutin Topić SRB 5 Aug 2012 Tim Mack USA 27 Aug 2004 Charles Jacobs USA 24 Jul 1908 Erling Kaas NOR 22 Jul 1952 Jeff Hartwig USA 20 Aug 2008 Carl Lewis USA 29 Jul 1996 Carl Lewis USA 29 Jul 1996 Carl Lewis USA 29 Jul 1996 James Connolly USA 27 Apr 1906 Jonathan Edwards GBR 25 Sep 2000 Fabrizio Donato ITA 9 Aug 2012 Fabrizio Donato ITA 9 Aug 2012 James Connolly USA 30 Apr 1906 Pat McDonald USA 10 Jul 1912 Denis Horgan GBR 16 Jul 1908 Pat McDonald USA 18 Aug 1920 Guðmundur HermannssonISL 13 Oct 1968 Ludvík Danek TCH 2 Sep 1972 John Powell USA 10 Aug 1984 Adolfo Consolini ITA 7 Sep 1960 František Janda-Suk TCH 13 Jul 1924 John Flanagan USA 14 Jul 1908 Matt McGrath USA 10 Jul 1924 Matt McGrath USA 10 Jul 1924 Matt McGrath USA 10 Jul 1924 Jan Železný CZE 23 Sep 2000 József Várszegi HUN 4 Aug 1948 Jan Železný CZE 28 Aug 2004 József Várszegi HUN 23 Jul 1952 Helge Løvland NOR 21 Aug 1920 Chris Huffins USA 28 Sep 2000 Erki Nool EST 24 Aug 2004 Roman Šebrle CZE 9 Aug 2012 Peter Frenkel GDR 31 Aug 72 Peter Frenkel GDR 23 Jul 1976 John Ljunggren SWE 2 Sep 1960 Alex Oakley CAN 23 Jul 1976 Tommy Green GBR 3 Aug 1932 Tebbs Lloyd Johnson GBR 5 Aug 1948 Tebbs Lloyd Johnson GBR 5 Aug 1948 John Deni USA 21 Jul 1952 Jon Drummond USA 30 Sep 2000 .R I O 24 EVENT 5000 Metres 10.

but exact birthdate is unknown Miltiadis Gouskos GRE – born 1877 and competing on 7 Apr 1896 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Angelos Fetsis GRE – born 1878 and competing on 7 Apr 1896 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Birchall Pearson CAN – born 1914 and competing on 7 Aug 1932 – could be younger. Usha IND 8 Aug 1984 Jana Pittman AUS 24 Sep 2000 30 40 40 44 34 36 36 44 30 30 32 36 34 34 37 39 34 37 40 40 34 34 34 38 28 31 38 38 28 32 38 38 38 38 39 48 30 30 34 36 32 34 34 39 31 34 34 36 98 136 136 103 81 83 83 106 66 66 257 246 126 126 354 321 131 40 58 58 12 12 358 56 265 69 325 325 193 159 318 318 207 207 257 234 39 183 28 199 101 95 95 74 310 319 319 361 Fanny Blankers-Koen NED 2 Aug 1948 Merlene Ottey JAM 23 Sep 2000 Merlene Ottey JAM 23 Sep 2000 Merlene Ottey SLO 21 Aug 2004 Pauline Davis-Thompson BAH 28 Sep 2000 Merlene Ottey JAM 1 Aug 1996 Merlene Ottey JAM 1 Aug 1996 Merlene Ottey SLO 24 Aug 2004 Irena Szewińska POL 29 Jul 1976 Irena Szewińska POL 29 Jul 1976 Mariya Itkina URS 17 Oct 1964 Norfalia Carabalí ESP 23 Sep 2000 Kelly Holmes GBR 23 Aug 2004 Kelly Holmes GBR 23 Aug 2004 Jearl Miles Clark USA 23 Aug 2004 Letitia Vriesde SUR 21 Aug 2004 Kelly Holmes GBR 28 Aug 2004 Tatyana Tomashova RUS 10 Aug 2012 Yekaterina Podkopayeva EUN 8 Aug 1992 Yekaterina Podkopayeva EUN 8 Aug 1992 Maricica Puica ROU 10 Aug 1984 Maricica Puica ROU 10 Aug 1984 Cornelia Bürki SUI 25 Sep 1988 Maricica Puică ROU 23 Sep 1988 Meseret Defar ETH 10 Aug 2012 Roberta Brunet ITA 28 Jul 1996 Joanne Pavey GBR 10 Aug 2012 Joanne Pavey GBR 10 Aug 2012 Derartu Tulu ETH 30 Sep 2000 Derartu Tulu ETH 27 Aug 2004 Joanne Pavey GBR 3 Aug 2012 Joanne Pavey GBR 3 Aug 2012 Constantina Tomescu-Diță ROU 17 Aug 2008 Constantina Tomescu-Diță ROU 17 Aug 2008 Cilla Welch GBR 5 Aug 1984 Lourdes Klitzkie GUM 23 Sep 1988 Gulnara Samitova-GalkinaRUS 17 Aug 2008 Yekaterina Volkova RUS 17 Aug 2008 Clarisse Cruz POR 6 Aug 2012 Korene Hinds JAM 4 Aug 2012 Ludmila Engquist SWE 31 Jul 1996 Karin Balzer GDR 8 Sep 1972 Karin Balzer GDR 8 Sep 1972 Nadezhda Bodrova UKR 25 Sep 2000 Irina Privalova RUS 27 Sep 2000 Tatyana Tereshchuk-AntipovaUKR 25 Aug 2004 Tatyana Tereshchuk-AntipovaUKR 25 Aug 2004 Princesa Oliveros COL 5 Aug 2012 25 . but exact birthdate is unknown Athanásios Skaltsogiannis GRE – born 1878 and competing on 7 Apr 1896 – could be younger. T. but exact birthdate is unknown Women 100 Metres 200 Metres 400 Metres 800 Metres 1500 Metres 3000 Metres 5000 Metres 10. but exact birthdate is unknown Miltiadis Gouskos GRE – born 1877 and competing on 7 Apr 1896 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Hammou Boutayeb MAR – born 1956 and competing on 3 Aug 1992 – could be older.000 Metres Marathon 3000mSC 80mH/100mH 400m Hurdles G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C 16 16 16 14 18 17 17 15 19 18 16 13 18 18 15 13 20 19 19 15 27 23 18 15 20 18 17 15 20 20 17 15 22 22 22 16 28 24 20 18 17 17 17 16 22 22 20 17 343 343 343 261 224 116 116 58 344 152 165 5 257 257 175 3 7 227 33 266 44 357 76 335 278 327 14 278 139 139 106 82 223 223 223 266 119 266 3 291 19 19 19 163 115 115 80 320 Betty Robinson USA 31 Jul 1928 Betty Robinson USA 31 Jul 1928 Betty Robinson USA 31 Jul 1928 Katura Marae VAN 20 Aug 2004 Betty Cuthbert AUS 30 Nov 1956 Raelene Boyle AUS 18 Oct 1968 Raelene Boyle AUS 18 Oct 1968 Debbie Wells AUS 26 Jul 1976 Monika Zehrt GDR 7 Sep 1972 Christina Brehmer GDR 29 Jul 1976 Linsey MacDonald GBR 28 Jul 1980 Céléstine Ndrin CIV 25 Jul 1976 Pamela Jelimo KEN 18 Aug 2008 Pamela Jelimo KEN 18 Aug 2008 Gertruda Kilosówna POL 2 Aug 1928 Céléstine Ndrin CIV 23 Jul 1976 Gamze Bulut TUR 10 Aug 2012 Qu Yunxia CHN 8 Aug 1992 Gabriella Dorio ITA 30 Jul 1976 Marcellina Emmanuel TAN 30 Jul 1980 Tatyana Samolenko URS 25 Sep 1988 Yvonne Murray GBR 25 Sep 1988 Zola Budd GBR 10 Aug 1984 Helen Kimaiyo KEN 8 Aug 1984 Meseret Defar ETH 23 Aug 2004 Tirunesh Dibaba ETH 23 Aug 2004 Vivian Cheruiyot KEN 25 Sep 2000 Francine Niyonizigiye BDI 20 Aug 2004 Derartu Tulu ETH 7 Aug 1992 Derartu Tulu ETH 7 Aug 1992 Alice Timbilil KEN 30 Sep 2000 Lydia Cheromei KEN 1 Aug 1992 Fatuma Roba ETH 28 Jul 1996 Fatuma Roba ETH 28 Jul 1996 Fatuma Roba ETH 28 Jul 1996 Menuka Rawat* NEP 23 Sep 1988 Habiba Ghribi TUN 6 Aug 2012 Sofia Assefa ETH 6 Aug 2012 Gesa Felicitas KrauseGER 6 Aug 2012 Veronica Wanjiru KEN 15 Aug 2008 Maureen Caird AUS 18 Oct 1968 Maureen Caird AUS 18 Oct 1968 Maureen Caird AUS 18 Oct 1968 Betty Taylor CAN 3 Aug 1932 Nawal El-Moutawakel MAR 8 Aug 1984 Nawal El-Moutawakel MAR 8 Aug 1984 P. but exact birthdate is unknown Sotírios Versis GRE – born 1876 and competing on 7 Apr 1896 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Arthur Muggridge GBR – born 1904 and competing on 29 Jul 1928 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Benjamin Kogo KEN – born 1946 and competing on 15 Oct 1964 – could be younger.R I O EVENT 4x400m Relay 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 2 0 1 6 AGE M F C G M F C 18 18 14 18 18 17 16 77 77 232 131 131 63 165 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T YOUNGEST COUNTRY DATE Émile Ali Khan Émile Ali Khan12 Dawda Jallow Enefiok Udo-Obong Enefiok Udo-Obong Francis Galtier Hassan Masallam FRA 22 Aug 1920 FRA 22 Aug 1920 GAM10 Aug 1984 NGR 30 Sep 2000 NGR 30 Sep 2000 FRA 13 Jul 1924 KSA 30 Jul 1976 AGE 36 36 41 33 33 34 39 62 62 271 300 300 89 225 & O L D E S T OLDEST COUNTRY DATE Nobuhara Asahara Nobuhara Asahara Troy Douglas Chris Brown Chris Brown Luigi Facelli Luis Soriano JPN 22 Aug 2008 JPN 22 Aug 2008 NED 27 Aug 2004 BAH 10 Aug 2012 BAH 10 Aug 2012 ITA 7 Aug 1932 DOM 19 Oct 1968 Aléxandros Khalkokondilis GRE – born 1880 and competing on 6 Apr 1896 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Arthur Muggridge GBR – born 1904 and competing on 29 Jul 1928 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Nikólaos Andreadakis GRE – born 1889 and competing on 1 May 1906 – could be younger.

discontinued events 60 Metres G 23 215 M 19 308 F 17 217 C 17 217 3000m Team G 20 20 M 20 20 F 19 22 C 17 145 3 Miles Team G 21 199 M 19 207 F 19 207 C 18 284 Alvin Kraenzlein William Hogenson Edmund Minahan Edmund Minahan Abel Kiviat Abel Kiviat Jean Keller Stig Reuterswärd Norman Hallows Jean Bouin Jean Bouin Alexandre Fayollat USA 15 Jul 1900 USA 29 Aug 1904 USA 15 Jul 1900 USA 15 Jul 1900 USA 13 Jul 1912 USA 13 Jul 1912 FRA 13 Jul 1924 SWE 11 Jul 1924 GBR 15 Jul 1908 FRA 15 Jul 1908 FRA 15 Jul 1908 FRA 14 Jul 1908 23 28 28 28 30 31 31 31 29 31 31 31 350 144 144 144 332 151 151 151 160 239 239 239 Archie Hahn USA Fay Moulton USA Fay Moulton USA Fay Moulton USA Sameli Tala FIN Albert Hill GBR Albert Hill GBR Albert Hill GBR Joe Deakin GBR Louis Bonniot de FleuracFRA Louis Bonniot de FleuracFRA Louis Bonniot de FleuracFRA 29 Aug 1904 29 Aug 1904 29 Aug 1904 29 Aug 1904 13 Jul 1924 22 Aug 1920 22 Aug 1920 22 Aug 1920 15 Jul 1908 15 Jul 1908 15 Jul 1908 15 Jul 1908 .R I O 26 EVENT High Jump G M F C Pole Vault G M F C Long Jump G M F C Triple Jump G M F C Shot Put G M F C Discus Throw G M F C Hammer Throw G M F C Javelin Throw G M F C Pentathlon/Heptathlon G M F C 10km Walk G M F C 20km Walk G M F C 4x100m Relay G M F C 4x400m Relay G M F C 1 2 0 1 6 AGE 16 16 16 15 22 22 18 18 20 16 16 15 23 23 20 20 21 21 17 17 20 20 16 15 17 17 17 17 17 17 15 15 21 20 18 15 24 22 21 17 19 19 18 16 15 15 15 15 18 16 16 14 123 123 57 72 82 82 160 88 287 332 103 360 19 19 88 49 186 186 352 131 123 100 103 272 330 330 248 111 86 86 202 202 201 200 57 284 124 356 190 2 273 273 290 91 123 123 63 30 154 169 169 173 ★ F A C T S YOUNGEST & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T COUNTRY DATE Ulrike Meyfarth FRG 4 Sep 1972 Ulrike Meyfarth FRG 4 Sep 1972 Julie White1 CAN 28 Jul 1976 Cindy Gilbert USA 3 Sep 1972 Yelena Isinbaeva RUS 24 Aug 2004 Yelena Isinbaeva RUS 24 Aug 2004 Silke Spiegelburg GER 24 Aug 2004 Liz Parnov AUS 5 Aug 2012 Tatyana Kolpakova URS 31 Jul 1980 Willye White USA 27 Nov 1956 Beverly Weigel NZL 27 Nov 1956 Alice Annum GHA 14 Oct 1964 Tereza Marinova BUL 24 Sep 2000 Tereza Marinova BUL 24 Sep 2000 Kaire Leibak EST 17 Aug 2008 Viktoriya Brigadnaya TKM 22 Sep 2000 Galina Zybina URS 26 Jul 1952 Galina Zybina URS 26 Jul 1952 Nada Kotlušek YUG 26 Jul 1952 Maren Seidler USA 20 Oct 1968 Evelin Schlaak GDR 29 Jul 1976 Ruth Osburn USA 2 Aug 1932 Ko Nakamura JPN 4 Aug 1936 Mariana Canillas PAR 25 Sep 2000 Kamila Skolimowska POL 29 Sep 2000 Kamila Skolimowska POL 29 Sep 2000 Ivana Brkljačić CRO 29 Sep 2000 Galina Mityaeva TJK 18 Aug 2008 Mihaela Penes ROU 16 Oct 1964 Mihaela Penes ROU 16 Oct 1964 Marjorie Larney USA 24 Jul 1952 Marjorie Larney USA 24 Jul 1952 Carolina Klüft SWE21 Aug 2004 Tatyana Chernova RUS 16 Aug 2008 Manon Bornholdt FRG 16 Oct 1968 Cathy Hamblin USA 16 Oct 1968 Chen Yueling CHN 3 Aug 1992 Li Chunxiu CHN 3 Aug 1992 Cui Yingzi CHN 3 Aug 1992 Miki Itakura JPN 3 Aug 1992 Yelena Lashmanova RUS 11 Aug 2012 Yelena Lashmanova RUS 11 Aug 2012 Lu Xiuzhi CHN 11 Aug 2012 Fumilay da Fonseca STP 23 Aug 2004 Barbara Jones USA 27 Jul 1952 Barbara Jones USA 27 Jul 1952 Debbie Wells AUS 31 Jul 1976 Mapotlaki Tsehlo LES 2 Aug 1996 Christina Brehmer GDR 31 Jul 1976 Linsey MacDonald GBR 1 Aug 1980 Linsey MacDonald GBR 1 Aug 1980 Heather Gooding BAR 9 Sep 1972 AGE 31 31 37 38 30 30 32 35 35 35 35 38 32 32 39 39 34 36 39 42 39 39 47 47 33 33 33 39 34 37 40 43 33 33 35 35 30 30 30 37 24 36 39 44 35 40 40 40 34 35 35 36 131 131 62 57 183 183 147 64 288 288 288 357 125 228 357 357 255 212 257 226 316 316 276 276 326 326 326 251 165 348 327 64 59 59 97 169 179 179 179 57 82 216 118 155 115 143 143 332 26 296 296 270 & OLDEST O L D E S T COUNTRY DATE Stefka Kostadinova BUL 3 Aug 1996 Stefka Kostadinova BUL 3 Aug 1996 Inga Babakova UKR 28 Aug 2004 Venelina Veneva-MateevaBUL 9 Aug 2012 Jenn Suhr USA 6 Aug 2012 Jenn Suhr USA 6 Aug 2012 Becky Holliday USA 6 Aug 2012 Alejandra García ARG 16 Aug 2008 Heike Drechsler GER 29 Sep 2000 Heike Drechsler GER 29 Sep 2000 Heike Drechsler GER 29 Sep 2000 Valentina Gotovska LAT 25 Aug 2004 Françoise Mbango CMR 17 Aug 2008 Chrisopiyí Devetzí GRE 17 Aug 2008 Yamilé Aldama GBR 5 Aug 2012 Yamilé Aldama GBR 5 Aug 2012 Ivanka Khristova BUL 31 Jul 1976 Larisa Peleshenko RUS 28 Sep 2000 Antonina Ivanova URS 7 Sep 1972 Judy Oakes GBR 27 Sep 2000 Ellina Zvereva BLR 27 Sep 2000 Ellina Zvereva BLR 27 Sep 2000 Ellina Zvereva BLR 18 Aug 2008 Ellina Zvereva BLR 18 Aug 2008 Olga Kuzenkova RUS 25 Aug 2004 Olga Kuzenkova RUS 25 Aug 2004 Olga Kuzenkova RUS 25 Aug 2004 Elena Teloni CYP 23 Aug 2004 Trine Hattestad NOR 30 Sep 2000 Dana Zátopková TCH 1 Sep 1960 Felicia Moldovan ROU 21 Aug 2008 Laverne Eve BAH 19 Aug 2008 Mary Peters GBR 3 Sep 1972 Mary Peters GBR 3 Sep 1972 Sabine Braun GER 24 Sep 2000 Cindy Greiner USA 2 Aug 1992 Yelena Nikolayeva RUS 29 Jul 1996 Yelena Nikolayeva RUS 29 Jul 1996 Yelena Nikolayeva RUS 29 Jul 1996 Victoria Herazo USA 29 Jul 1996 Wang Liping CHN 28 Sep 2000 Kjersti Plätzer NOR 21 Aug 2008 Kerry Saxby-Junna AUS 28 Sep 2000 Joanne Dow USA 21 Aug 2008 Evelyn Ashford USA 8 Aug 1992 Merlene Ottey JAM 30 Sep 2000 Merlene Ottey JAM 30 Sep 2000 Chandra Sturrup BAH 9 Aug 2012 Jearl Miles Clark USA 30 Sep 2000 Sandie Richards JAM 28 Aug 2004 Sandie Richards JAM 28 Aug 2004 Rosa Kutty IND 29 Sep 2000 Janice Cooper AUS – born 1940 and competing on 1 Dec 56 – could be younger. but exact birthdate is unknown Men.

R I O EVENT 5000m Team G M F C 4 Miles Team G M F C 5 Miles G M F C Cross Country G M F C Cross Country Team G M F C 2500mSC G M F C 2 MilesSC G M F C 4000mSC G M F C 200m Hurdles G M F C Standing HJ G M F C Standing LJ G M F C Standing TJ G M F C Shot Put BA G (both arms) M F C Discus GS G (Greek style) M F C Discus BA G (both arms) M F C Javelin FS G (freestyle) M F C Javelin BA G (both arms) M F C 2 0 1 6 AGE 22 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 23 19 19 18 22 22 21 18 21 19 18 18 22 21 17 17 22 22 22 21 22 22 20 20 22 22 19 17 26 17 17 17 23 19 17 16 26 17 17 17 28 22 20 20 27 24 18 17 21 21 21 20 26 20 18 18 20 19 19 19 80 279 279 279 304 304 304 304 300 265 265 294 219 219 183 332 76 136 332 332 167 211 165 165 124 124 124 152 80 80 14 14 359 359 196 346 275 146 146 146 252 264 177 278 275 149 149 149 116 174 202 202 112 197 15 246 352 352 35 58 63 90 188 188 354 176 176 176 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T YOUNGEST COUNTRY DATE Jack Rimmer Gaston Ragueneau Gaston Ragueneau Gaston Ragueneau George Underwood George Underwood George Underwood George Underwood Henry Hawtrey Edward Dahl Edward Dahl Jack Tait Hannes Kolehmainen Hannes Kolehmainen Ville Kyrönen Fritz Danild Henrik Nordström Lucien Dolquès Fritz Danild Fritz Danild James Lightbody Arthur Newton Arthur Newton Arthur Newton Arthur Russell Arthur Russell Arthur Russell Charles Hall Jack Rimmer Jack Rimmer Franz Duhne Franz Duhne Harry Hillman Harry Hillman Eugène Choisel* Frederick Moloney Ray Ewry Joseph Stadler Joseph Stadler Joseph Stadler Kóstas Tsiklitiras Kóstas Tsiklitiras Kóstas Tsiklitiras Douglas Melin Ray Ewry Joseph Stadler Joseph Stadler Joseph Stadler Ralph Rose Elmer Niklander Paavo Aho Paavo Aho Martin Sheridan István Mudin Mihaíl Dorizas Folke Fleetwood Armas Taipale Armas Taipale Einar Nilsson Richard Byrd Eric Lemming Mihaíl Dorizas Arne Halse Arne Halse Julius Saaristo Urho Peltonen Urho Peltonen Urho Peltonen GBR 16 Jul 1900 FRA 16 Jul 1900 FRA 16 Jul 1900 FRA 16 Jul 1900 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 3 Sep 1904 GBR 25 Apr 1906 SWE 25 Apr 1906 SWE 25 Apr 1906 CAN 15 Jul 1908 FIN 15 Jul 1912 FIN 15 Jul 1912 FIN 15 Jul 1912 DEN 15 Jul 1912 SWE 15 Jul 1912 FRA 12 Jul 1924 DEN 15 Jul 1912 DEN 15 Jul 1912 USA 29 Aug 1904 USA 29 Aug 1904 USA 15 Jul 1900 USA 15 Jul 1900 GBR 18 Jul 1908 GBR 18 Jul 1908 GBR 18 Jul 1908 USA 17 Jul 1908 GBR 16 Jul 1900 GBR 16 Jul 1900 GER 16 Jul 1900 GER 16 Jul 1900 USA 1 Sep 1904 USA 1 Sep 1904 FRA 16 Jul 1900 USA 16 Jul 1900 USA 16 Jul 1900 USA31 Aug 1904 USA 31 Aug 1904 USA 31 Aug 1904 GRE 8 Jul 1912 GRE 20 Jul 1908 GRE 25 Apr 1906 SWE 8 Jul 1912 USA 16 Jul 1900 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 3 Sep 1904 USA 11 Jul 1912 FIN 11 Jul 1912 FIN 11 Jul 1912 FIN 11 Jul 1912 USA 18 Jul 1908 HUN 1 May 1906 GRE 1 May 1906 SWE 18 Jul 1908 FIN 13 Jul 1912 FIN 13 Jul 1912 SWE 13 Jul 1912 USA 13 Jul 1912 SWE 26 Apr 1906 GRE 15 Jul 1908 NOR 26 Apr 1906 NOR 26 Apr 1906 FIN 9 Jul 1912 FIN 9 Jul 1912 FIN 9 Jul 1912 FIN 9 Jul 1912 AGE 29 29 29 29 22 25 25 25 25 27 30 30 27 33 33 41 32 33 33 42 27 27 27 27 22 29 29 31 22 29 29 29 23 27 27 27 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 30 30 30 30 28 33 33 33 36 38 38 38 21 24 29 42 28 28 36 38 20 25 32 35 200 200 200 200 264 247 247 247 169 78 175 175 29 124 124 364 292 209 209 364 186 186 186 186 124 90 90 241 80 200 200 200 216 168 168 168 283 283 283 283 280 280 280 280 325 325 325 325 116 351 351 351 58 136 136 136 352 233 49 131 144 144 53 133 354 104 287 159 & OLDEST O L D E S T COUNTRY DATE Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Howard Valentine USA 3 Sep 1904 Albert Corey* FRA 3 Sep 1904 Albert Corey* FRA 3 Sep 1904 Albert Corey* FRA 3 Sep 1904 Emil Voigt GBR 18 Jul 1908 John Svanberg SWE 18 Jul 1908 Charles Hefferon RSA 18 Jul 1908 Charles Hefferon RSA 18 Jul 1908 Paavo Nurmi FIN 12 Jul 1924 Earle Johnson USA 12 Jul 1924 Earle Johnson USA 12 Jul 1924 Leonard Richardson RSA 12 Jul 1924 Teodor Koskenniemi FIN 23 Aug 1920 Christopher Vose GBR 23 Aug 1920 Christopher Vose GBR 23 Aug 1920 Leonard Richardson RSA 12 Jul 1924 George Orton CAN 15 Jul 1900 George Orton CAN 15 Jul 1900 George Orton CAN 15 Jul 1900 George Orton CAN 15 Jul 1900 Arthur Russell GBR 18 Jul 1908 Arthur Robertson GBR 18 Jul 1908 Arthur Robertson GBR 18 Jul 1908 Louis Bonniot de FleuracFRA 17 Jul 1908 Jack Rimmer GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Charles Bennett GBR 16 Jul 1900 Alvin Kraenzlein USA 16 Jul 1900 Frank Castleman USA 1 Sep 1904 Frank Castleman USA 1 Sep 1904 Frank Castleman USA 1 Sep 1904 Ray Ewry USA 23 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 23 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 23 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 23 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 20 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 20 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 20 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 20 Jul 1908 Ray Ewry USA 3 Sep 1904 Ray Ewry USA 3 Sep 1904 Ray Ewry USA 3 Sep 1904 Ray Ewry USA 3 Sep 1904 Ralph Rose USA 11 Jul 1912 Pat McDonald USA 11 Jul 1912 Pat McDonald USA 11 Jul 1912 Pat McDonald USA 11 Jul 1912 Verner Järvinen FIN 1 May 1906 Verner Järvinen FIN 18 Jul 1908 Verner Järvinen FIN 18 Jul 1908 Verner Järvinen FIN 18 Jul 1908 Armas Taipale FIN 13 Jul 1912 Emil Magnusson SWE 13 Jul 1912 Carl Johan Lind SWE 13 Jul 1912 Verner Järvinen FIN 13 Jul 1912 Eric Lemming SWE 15 Jul 1908 Eric Lemming SWE 15 Jul 1908 Verner Järvinen FIN 26 Apr 1906 Verner Järvinen FIN 15 Jul 1908 Julius Saaristo FIN 9 Jul 1912 Väinö Siikaniemi FIN 9 Jul 1912 Otto Nilsson SWE 9 Jul 1912 Arvid Ohrling SWE 9 Jul 1912 27 .

but exact birthdate is unknown TOP 10 YOUNGEST & OLDEST CHAMPIONS Youngest Men Decathlon 17 263 Bob Mathias USA Pole Vault 17 360 Lee Barnes USA 4x100m Relay 18 118 Johnny Jones USA 4x400m Relay 18 131 Enefiok Udo-Obong NGR 4x100m Relay 18 281 Frank Wykoff USA 10. but exact birthdate is unknown Kharilaos Vasilakos GRE – born 1877 and competing on 30 Apr 1906 – could be older.R I O 28 EVENT 56Ib Throw Stone Throw Pentathlon All Around 1500m Walk 3000m Walk 3500m Walk 10. but exact birthdate is unknown Richard Wilhelm GER – born 1888 and competing on 14 Jul 1908 – could be younger.000m Walk 10 Miles Walk Medley Relay 1 2 3 2 0 1 6 AGE G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C G M F C 31 31 20 20 26 18 18 18 22 22 20 17 34 25 24 24 24 23 21 21 18 18 18 18 33 29 20 19 18 18 18 18 33 26 26 19 24 17 17 17 210 210 168 168 46 11 11 11 117 117 15 188 314 266 234 234 89 119 119 119 340 340 340 339 129 168 193 332 337 216 216 213 132 255 89 334 324 207 207 206 ★ F A C T S YOUNGEST & F I G U R E S / Y O U N G E S T COUNTRY DATE Étienne Desmarteau CAN 1 Sep 1904 Étienne Desmarteau CAN 1 Sep 1904 Ralph Rose USA 1 Sep 1904 Ralph Rose USA 1 Sep 1904 Nikólaos GeorgantasGRE 27 Apr 1906 Mihaíl Dorizas GRE 27 Apr 1906 Mihaíl Dorizas GRE 27 Apr 1906 Mihaíl Dorizas GRE 27 Apr 1906 Eero Lehtonen FIN 16 Aug 1920 Eero Lehtonen FIN 16 Aug 1920 Inge Lindholm SWE 7 Jul 1912 Stelios Benardis* GRE 7 Jul 1924 Tom Kiely GBR 4 Jul 1904 Truxtun Hare USA 4 Jul 1904 John Grieb USA 4 Jul 1904 John Grieb USA 4 Jul 1904 George Bonhag USA 30 Apr 1906 Konstadínos Spetsiotis* GRE 30 Apr 1906 Yeóryios Saridakis* GRE 30 Apr 1906 Yeóryios Saridakis* GRE 30 Apr 1906 Ugo Frigerio ITA 21 Aug 1920 Ugo Frigerio ITA 21 Aug 1920 Ugo Frigerio ITA 21 Aug 1920 Ugo Frigerio ITA 20 Aug 1920 George Larner GBR 14 Jul 1908 Harry Kerr AUS 14 Jul 1908 Einar Rothman SWE 14 Jul 1908 NED 14 Jul 1908 Jan Huijgen3 Ugo Frigerio ITA 18 Aug 1920 Fernando Altimani ITA 11 Jul 1912 Fernando Altimani ITA 11 Jul 1912 Fernando Altimani ITA 8 Jul 1912 George Larner GBR 17 Jul 1908 Edward Spencer GBR 17 Jul 1908 William Palmer GBR 17 Jul 1908 Jan Huijgen NED 16 Jul 1908 Mel Sheppard USA 25 Jul 1908 Pál Simon HUN 25 Jul 1908 Pál Simon HUN 25 Jul 1908 Pál Simon HUN 24 Jul 1908 AGE 42 42 42 42 26 26 36 36 26 28 32 35 34 34 34 34 24 28 28 28 27 37 37 37 33 34 34 36 38 38 44 44 33 34 34 36 25 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 46 46 54 54 77 261 221 229 314 314 314 314 89 200 200 200 256 208 208 208 129 80 80 196 234 234 137 137 132 83 83 198 265 297 297 297 & OLDEST O L D E S T COUNTRY DATE Pat McDonald USA 21 Aug 1920 Pat McDonald USA 21 Aug 1920 Pat McDonald USA 21 Aug 1920 Pat McDonald USA 21 Aug 1920 Nikólaos GeorgantasGRE 27 Apr 1906 Nikólaos GeorgantasGRE 27 Apr 1906 Verner Järvinen FIN 27 Apr 1906 Verner Järvinen FIN 27 Apr 1906 Eero Lehtonen FIN 7 Jul 1924 Hugo Lahtinen FIN 16 Aug 1920 Hugo Lahtinen FIN 7 Jul 1924 James Andromedas* GRE 16 Aug 1920 Tom Kiely GBR 4 Jul 1904 Tom Kiely GBR 4 Jul 1904 Tom Kiely GBR 4 Jul 1904 Tom Kiely GBR 4 Jul 1904 George Bonhag USA 30 Apr 1906 Don Linden CAN 30 Apr 1906 CAN 30 Apr 1906 Don Linden1 CAN 30 Apr 1906 Don Linden2 György Sztantics HUN 2 May 1906 Richard Remer USA 21 Aug 1920 Richard Remer USA 21 Aug 1920 Richard Remer USA 21 Aug 1920 George Larner GBR 14 Jul 1908 Ernest Webb GBR 14 Jul 1908 Ernest Webb GBR 14 Jul 1908 Jack Butler* GBR 14 Jul 1908 John Mikaelsson SWE 27 Jul 1952 John Mikaelsson SWE 27 Jul 1952 Émile Maggi FRA 27 Jul 1952 Émile Maggi FRA 27 Jul 1952 George Larner GBR 17 Jul 1908 Ernest Webb GBR 17 Jul 1908 Ernest Webb GBR 17 Jul 1908 Jack Butler* GBR 16 Jul 1908 John Taylor USA 25 Jul 1908 József Nagy HUN 25 Jul 1908 József Nagy HUN 25 Jul 1908 József Nagy HUN 25 Jul 1908 Kharilaos Vasilakos GRE – born 1877 and competing on 30 Apr 1906 – could be older.000m Walk 18 337 Ugo Frigerio ITA 3000m Walk 18 340 Ugo Frigerio ITA Long Jump 19 17 Randy Williams USA 1500 Metres 19 50 Asbel Kiprop KEN 4x400m Relay 19 100 Edgar Ablowich USA 6 Aug 1948 10 Jul 1924 31 Jul 1976 30 Sep 2000 5 Aug 1928 18 Aug 1920 21 Aug 1920 9 Sep 1972 19 Aug 2008 7 Aug 1932 Youngest Women 4x100m Relay 15 123 High Jump 16 123 100 Metres 16 343 80mH/100mH 17 19 Javelin Throw 17 86 4x100m Relay 17 271 Hammer Throw 17 330 4x100m Relay 18 20 4x100m Relay 18 64 High Jump 18 87 Barbara Jones USA Ulrike Meyfarth FRG Betty Robinson USA Maureen Caird AUS Mihaela Penes ROU Margaret Bailes USA Kamila Skolimowska POL Ewa Klobukowska POL Florence Bell CAN Miloslava Rezková TCH Oldest Men 56Ib Throw Hammer Throw Hammer Throw 10.000m Walk 50Km Walk Marathon Hammer Throw Hammer Throw Marathon 5000 Metres 21 Aug 1920 14 Jul 1908 18 Aug 1920 27 Jul 1952 3 Aug 1932 12 Aug 1984 29 Aug 1904 14 Jul 1912 20 Oct 1968 1 Aug 1980 Oldest Women Discus Throw 39 Marathon 38 Discus Throw 36 Long Jump 35 4x100m Relay 35 Shot Put 34 Javelin Throw 34 1500 Metres 34 800 Metres 34 4x100m Relay 34 Ellina Zvereva BLR 27 Sep 2000 Constantina Tomescu-Diță ROU 17 Aug 2008 Lia Manoliu ROU 18 Oct 1968 Heike Drechsler GER 29 Sep 2000 Evelyn Ashford USA 8 Aug 1992 Ivanka Khristova BUL 31 Jul 1976 Trine Hattestad NOR 30 Sep 2000 Kelly Holmes GBR 28 Aug 2004 Kelly Holmes GBR 23 Aug 2004 Pauline Davis-Thompson BAH 30 Sep 2000 42 40 39 38 38 37 36 36 36 36 26 168 227 234 126 176 214 199 130 78 Pat McDonald USA John Flanagan USA Pat Ryan USA John Mikaelsson SWE Tommy Green GBR Carlos Lopes POR John Flanagan USA Matt McGrath USA Mamo Wolde ETH Miruts Yifter ETH 316 207 176 288 115 255 165 131 126 83 27 Jul 1952 4 Sep 1972 31 Jul 1928 18 Oct 1968 16 Oct 1964 20 Oct 1968 29 Sep 2000 21 Oct 1964 5 Aug 1928 17 Oct 1968 .

1972 1968. 1936 1928. 1968. 1992. 1988.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / M E D A L S A T T H R E E G A M E S MEDALS ACROSS THREE GAMES OR MORE Men 4 3 Ray Ewry USA Al Oerter USA Vladimir Golubnichniy UKR URS Viktor Saneyev URS Carl Lewis USA Jan Železný SVK/CZE TCH/CZE Myer Prinstein USA John Flanagan USA Martin Sheridan USA Ralph Rose USA George Bonhag USA Eric Lemming SWE Matt McGrath USA Paavo Nurmi FIN Vilho Tuulos FIN Edvin Wide SWE Ugo Frigerio ITA Morgan Taylor USA Phil Edwards CAN Frank Wykoff USA Alain Mimoun FRA Bob Richards USA John Ljunggren SWE Parry O’Brien USA Ralph Boston USA Gergely Kulcsár HUN Gyula Zsivótzky HUN Ludvík Danek TCH Mohamed Gammoudi TUN Jānis Lūsis LAT URS Don Quarrie JAM Yuriy Sedykh RUS URS Edwin Moses USA Maurizio Damilano ITA Patrik Sjöberg SWE Seppo Räty FIN Steve Backley GBR Michael Johnson USA Robert Korzeniowski POL Virgilijus Alekna LTU Chris Brown BAH Angelo Taylor USA Women 5 Merlene Ottey/Page JAM 4 Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska POL Jackie Joyner-Kersee USA Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM 3 Shirley Strickland AUS Nina Romashkova/Ponomaryova RUS URS Galina Zybina RUS URS Lia Manoliu ROU Nadezhda Chizhova RUS URS Lyudmila Maslakova RUS URS Sara Simeoni ITA Marlies Oelsner/Göhr GDR Evelyn Ashford USA Heike Drechsler GDR Jearl Miles Clark USA Derartu Tulu ETH Tatyana Lebedeva RUS Yelena Isinbaeva RUS Meseret Defar ETH Tirunesh Dibaba ETH Allyson Felix USA Sanya Richards Ross USA Sherone Simpson JAM Novlene Williams-Mills JAM 1900. 2000 1996 2000. 1972 1964. 2008 2004 2008. 1980 1976. 1980. 1988 1976. 1968. 1956 1948. 2000 1992. 1980. 1976 1968. 1924. 2000 1900. 1968 1960. 1908. 1964. 1968 1960. 2012 2004 2008. 1964. 1932 1924. 1968 1968. 1988 1980. 1992 1988. 1956 1948. 1976 1984. 1968 1964. 1904. 1984 1976. 1956. 1988. 1912 1908. 1932 1928. 1968. 1968 1960. 1968. 1996. 2004. 1904. 2012 2000 2008. 1928 1920. 1960. 1956. 1988. 1988 1984. 2000 1964. 2012 1980. 1992. 1972. 1952. 1964. 1980. 1906 1900. 1932. 1996. 1996 1992. 1976. 1956. 1956. 2004 2000 2004. 1960 1960. 1956 1952. 2000 1992 2000. 1996. 1924 1920. 1928 1920. 1980. 1984. 1972 1976. 2012 2004 2008. 1988 1984. 1924. 1908 1956. 1996 1988. 1924. 1932. 1964. 1988. 1928 1920. 1972. 1992. 1912 1906. 1964. 1992. 1936 1948. 2012 2004 2008. 1972 1964. 2004 2000 2004. 1912. 1908. 1996 2000. 1972. 1980 1984. 1928. 1984. 1952. 1976. 2012 2004 2008. 1996. 1992 1988. 1952. 1904. 1908 1904. 1992. 1908 1900. 2008 2000 2008. 1908. 2008 1948. 1906. 1968. 1924. 1904. 2012 2004 2008. 2012 2004 2008. 1960 1952. 1984 1976. 1964. 1912 1906. 1960 1952. 2000 1992. 1984. 1992. 2012 29 . 1964 1960. 1996.

but did not compete due to injury of Ottey MOST ROUNDS CONTESTED These are lists of the most rounds contested by a particular athlete.30 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / M O S T MOST GAMES CONTESTED Men 6 MOST FINALS CONTESTED Counting top eight only in direct finals João N’Tyamba ANG Jesús Ángel García ESP Dragutin Topić IOP/YUG/SCG/SRB Paul Martin SUI John Ljunggren SWE Janusz Sidlo POL Alex Oakley CAN Abdon Pamich ITA Igor Ter-Ovanesyan URS (RUS) Urs von Wartburg SUI Vladimir Golubnichniy URS (UKR) Pietro Mennea ITA Carlos Sala ESP Chris Maddocks GBR Giovanni De Benedictis ITA Mathias Ntawulikura RWA Jan Železný TCH/CZE Branko Zorko YUG/CRO Tim Berrett CAN Jefferson Pérez ECU Virgilijus Alekna LTU Toni Bernadó AND Aléxandros Papadimitríou GRE Aleksander Tammert EST Szymon Ziólkowski POL 1988-2008 1992-2012 1992-2012 1920-1936 1948-1964 1952-1968 1956-1976 1956-1972 1956-1972 1960-1976 1960-1976 1972-1988 1980-1996 1984-2000 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1992-2008 1992-2008 1996-2012 1996-2012 1996-2012 1996-2012 1996-2012 Women 7 Merlene Ottey/Page JAM/SLO 6 Lia Manoliu ROU Tessa Sanderson GBR Maria Mutola MOZ Nicoleta Grasu ROU USA 5 Olga Fikotová/Connolly Willye White USA Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska POL Pauline Davis BAH Sabine Braun FRG/GER Trine Solberg/Hattestad NOR Gail Devers USA Fiona May GBR/ITA Mary Onyali NGR Fernanda Ribeiro POR Sandie Richards JAM Letitia Vriesde SUR Laverne Eve BAH Ellina Zvereva URS/BLR Jackie Edwards BAH Susana Feitór POR Irina Yatchenko URS/BLR Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie BAH Lidia Șimon ROU Chandra Sturrup BAH María Vasco ESP 1980-2004 1952-1972 1976-1996 1988-2008 1992-2012 1956-1972 1956-1972 1964-1980 1984-2000 1984-2000 1984-2000 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2004 1988-2008 1988-2008 1992-2008 1992-2008 1992-2008 1996-2012 1996-2012 1996-2012 1996-2012 5 G A M E S . Pietro Mennea has contested a total of 32 different heats.R O U N D S Men 14 12 11 10 9 8 7 Eric Lemming Paavo Nurmi Martin Sheridan Ray Ewry Carl Lewis Elmer Niklander Ville Ritola Pietro Mennea Phil Edwards Meyer Prinstein George Bonhag Ralph Rose Women 14 Merlene Ottey/Page* 9 Shirley Strickland Raelene Boyle Veronica Campbell-Brown 8 Gwen Torrence Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie 7 Fanny Blankers-Koen Ingrid Becker/Mickler Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska Evelyn Ashford Grace Jackson* Jackie Joyner-Kersee Juliet Cuthbert* Sandie Richards Allyson Felix Sanya Richards-Ross SWE FIN USA USA USA FIN FIN ITA CAN USA USA USA JAM AUS AUS JAM USA BAH NED FRG POL USA JAM USA JAM JAM USA USA * Also qualified for a further final (the 1988 4x100m). quarter-finals. for instance. So. semi-finals and finals at the Olympic Games Men 32 29 27 26 25 Pietro Mennea Carl Lewis Don Quarrie Linford Christie Robson da Silva Women 53 Merlene Ottey/Page 33 Pauline Davis Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie 32 Mary Onyali 30 Raelene Boyle 29 Irena Kirszenstein/Szewińska 27 Gail Devers 26 Shirley Strickland Juliet Cuthbert Grace Jackson Chandra Sturrup 25 Veronica Campbell-Brown ITA USA JAM GBR BRA 1972-1988 1984-1996 1972-1984 1988-1996 1984-1996 JAM BAH BAH NGR AUS POL USA AUS JAM JAM BAH JAM 1980-2004 1984-2000 1996-2012 1988-2004 1968-1976 1964-1980 1988-2004 1948-1956 1984-1996 1984-1992 1996-2008 2000-2012 .F I N A L S .

45m 1912 383m 1920 389.33m 1900 500m (Grass track .000 Metres High Jump Decathlon 3000m Steeplechase 110 Metres Hurdles Shot Put 200 Metres 110 Metres Hurdles Shot Put Decathlon 200 Metres 110 Metres Hurdles 400 Metres Hurdles Discus Throw 20 Kilometres Walk 110 Metres Hurdles USA USA GBR USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA SWE GBR USA USA USA USA USA USA SWE USA FIN USA FIN USA USA FIN USA USA FIN FIN USA USA SWE USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA USA URS USA 1968 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 2004 2008 2012 Women 1952 1976 1980 2004 2008 & T R A C K C I R C U M F E R E N C E S 400 Metres Hurdles Shot Put Discus Throw 400 Metres Hammer Throw Hammer Throw 200 Metres 400 Metres Pole Vault Long Jump Hammer Throw 3000m Steeplechase Long Jump Hammer Throw 200 Metres 400 Metres 3000m Steeplechase 400 Metres 400 Metres Hurdles 200 Metres USA USA USA USA URS URS USA USA URS USA URS KEN USA EUN USA USA KEN USA USA JAM Discus Throw Pentathlon 800 Metres Pentathlon Long Jump 100 Metres URS GDR URS URS RUS JAM OLYMPIC TRACK CIRCUMFERENCES 1896 & 1906 333. 82 by men and six by women Men 1896 1900 1904 1906 1908 1912 (1912) 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1948 1952 1956 1960 High Jump Long Jump 4000m Steeplechase 110 Metres Hurdles Triple Jump Shot Put Hammer Throw Standing High Jump Standing Triple Jump 60 Metres 100 Metres 200 Metres 400 Metres 800 Metres 1500 Metres 110 Metres Hurdles 200 Metres Hurdles 400 Metres Hurdles Pole Vault Long Jump Triple Jump Shot Put Hammer Throw Standing High Jump Standing Long Jump Standing Triple Jump Standing Long Jump Javelin Throw 10 Miles Walk 110 Metres Hurdles Discus Throw 100 Metres 800 Metres 110 Metres Hurdles Pole Vault Triple Jump Shot Put Javelin Throw Both Arms 400 Metres Hurdles Javelin Throw Pole Vault Shot Put 3000m Steeplechase Pole Vault 200 Metres Javelin Throw 10.the only time this surface was used) 1904 536.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / M E D A L S W E E P S MEDAL “SWEEPS” Occasions where a single country has won all three medals in the same event.8m 1924 500m 1928 on 400m RUS/LTU/EST 31 RUS/RUS/UKR RUS/RUS/EST RUS/RUS/EST TJK/BLR/RUS RUS/RUS/GEO UKR/RUS/RUS UKR/RUS/RUS .45m (1/3 mile) 1908 536. In all 88 times.

78 2h6/11.27 1h2/3:23.92 4h8/20.34 Atlanta 1996 (7) Men/2 Dean Capobianco Daniel Plaza Women/5 Mary Slaney Nataliya Shekhodanova Sandra Farmer-Patrick Antonella Bevilacqua Iva Prandzheva Prandzheva Sydney 2000 (4) Men/2 Antonio Pettigrew Pettigrew Jerome Young United States Women/2 Marion Jones Jones Jones Jones* Jones* Svetlana Pospelova RUS 5qB/6. 1s1/22.61 1h9/45.10 58.52. 2016 neither the IAAF or IOC have announced any sanction Seoul 1988 (1) Men/1 Ben Johnson CAN 100m gold 9.68 6.17.58 75.42 8s2/13:30. Names shown in bold to 2008 are newly-concluded cases since this last edition of this book 1896-1972 & 1980 None Montreal 1976 (1) Women/1 Danuta Rosani Los Angeles 1984 (4) Men/3 Vésteinn Hafsteinnsson Gian Paolo Urlando Martti Vainio Vainio Women/1 Anna Verouli POL DT dns/final - 11q/57.76 1qA/78.39.76 USA USA USA USA USA 400m 4x400mR 4x400mR 4x400mR 100m 200m LJ 4x100mR 4x400mR 400m 7 gold gold gold gold gold bronze bronze gold 4h8 45.000m JT 7qB 4 dns/final silver 7qB 59.25 GRE * In January 2016.28).49 14.67 2h1/55.82 14.9. 5q2/11.48 6h3/28:19.96 27:51.77 6.40 AUS ESP USA RUS USA ITA BUL 200m 20km Walk 5000m 100mH 400mH HJ LJ TJ 7q2 11 7h2 7 5s2 4 7 4 21.79 3qA/6. 3s1/12.61 1qB/68.68. then bronze 19qB 83.24 1h3/3:03.79 1h8/10.35 10. Ria Stalman NED admitted on a Dutch TV programme that “In the last two and a half years of my career I used a light dosage of anabolic steroids” at the time she won the Discus Throw gold in Los Angeles Olympics with 65.62.06 19.92 42. 1s2/45.35 2:56.62 4qA/72.30 79. 1s2/11.75.16 70.84 6.00 2:35:39 16.10 1h3/45.34 13.43 3qB/18.78 ISL ITA FIN DT HT 5000m 10.55 =1qA/1. 2q2/22.62 1qA/14.36 (also 1qA 58.20 3:22. 2q2/45.19 21.42 2:56.43 2h5/13. 2q3/12. committed either at (IAAF rule 40. 3q1/10.93 1qB/6.03 1:22:05 15:41.62 53.57 .50. 1s2/10.35.85 21.83.80 54.37.73 1.40 2qB/6.24. Only closed cases are given in the main lists.67 1qA/19. formerly 40.99 6. admissions included. 1s1/2:58.30 12.59 3qA/20.50 1qB/80. 1q2/10.25.20.93 45.70 1h1/41.81 11.44 1qA/79.8) Games.03 Barcelona 1992 (4) Men/1 Jud Logan Women/3 Madina Biktagirova BLR/RUS Bonnie Dasse Nijolė Medvedeva USA EUN USA LTU HT Marathon SP LJ 4 4 8qB 4 79.71 6h1/13.32 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / D O P I N G V I O L A T I O N S DOPING VIOLATIONS AT OLYMPIC GAMES This list shows all Olympic athletes who have had their Olympic performances annulled by the IAAF due to doping violations. This meant that only Jones was disqualified from the medal-winning relay teams and the collective team result in each race was allowed to stand.78 * The Court of Aribtration for Sport ruled in 2010 that “at the time of the Sydney Olympic Games there was no specific IOC or IAAF Rule in force that clearly allowed the annullment of the relay team results if one team member was found to have committed a doping offence”. Athens 2004 (14) Men/7 Adrián Annus Yuriy Belonog Robert Fazekas Anton Galkin Aleksey Lesnichiy Duane Ross Ivan Tikhon* Women/7 Zhanna Block Block Crystal Cox€ Marion Jones Jones Irina Korzhanenko Svetlana Krivelyova* Olga Shchukina HUN UKR HUN RUS BLR USA BLR UKR UKR USA USA USA RUS RUS UZB HT SP DT 400m HJ 110mH HT 100m 4x100mR 4x400mR LJ 4x100mR SP SP SP gold gold gold 4s2 nh/q 5s1 silver 6s2 7h1 gold 5 dnf/Final gold 4th. As at June 10.78 1h6/11. 4q1/13.23 43.75 21.1) or before (rule 40.01 1h1/22.

1s3.02 Meliz Redif TUR 4x400m 8h2 3:34.90 Gay USA 4x100mR silver 37. 1s1/4:05.32 Zalina Marghieva MDA HT 8 74. Justin Gatlin.70. 1:59. the IOC have yet to publicly confirm the stripping or re-allocation of medals in these cases (Men’s 50km Walk.45). As at June 10. 2016 € . Jeffrey Demps. She had gone on to win silver medals at both 5000m (15:42. 2s1.82 1:27:54 1h4/3:32. 1:58.58 1h4/12. Investigations into these cases were continuing as at June 10.87.72 2h3/9:25.11 2qB/20. 20km Walk) The team of Ryan Bailey. 5h2 14:58. 1s2/3:37.36 Vladimir Kanaykin RUS 20km Walk dq Sergey Kirdyapkin RUS 50km Walk* gold 3:35:59 Andrei Mikhnevich BLR SP 8qB 19.70 2:06. 2016.67 Tyson Gay USA 100m 4 9. Darvis Patton were disqualified from the heats under IAAF rule 41.04 Hackett 200m 8 22. 2h6.80 1q1/10. Trell Kimmons.26 2h6/11.23 3h2/4:13.21 2h5/2:08. but as at June 10.57) and Yekaterina Poistogova (bronze.71 Tetyana Gamera-Shmyrko UKR Marathon 5 2:24:32 Yelizaveta Grechishnikova RUS 10. 2016 her case is still the subject of disciplinary investigations of the IAAF • Not included in this list are athletes who may have returned positive results after IOC re-testing of samples from 2008 as announced on May 17. Gay€ USA 4x100mR 1h2 37.71 Pınar Saka TUR 400m 4h4 52.17 3qB/63.19 Karin Melis Mey TUR LJ dns/final 2qA/6.08. Women’s 1500m. 2s1/4:05.76 Darya Pishchalnikova RUS DT silver 67.04 * The IOC have confirmed that these athletes have been stripped of their medals. 1:56.09 Liliya Shobukhova RUS Marathon dnf Binnaz Uslu TUR 3000SC 15h1 10:31.08. 6s2/4:02.74. Investigations into their cases were continuing as at June 10.76 52.56.45 4h2/9:29.40 11. 2s3/9.42 Igor Yerokhin RUS 50km Walk 5 3:37:54 By association with T.39. the Turkish Athletics Federation announced the suspension Elvan Abeylegesse following adverse findings after re-testing of her samples from the 2005 and 2007 World Championships. 2016 have yet to announce details of any re-allocations € Despite the disqualification of Cox.79) and 10.55 Hackett 4x100m dnf/final 2h1/42.19.48 • In April 2016. 2016 London 2012 (41) Men/12 Hussain Jamaan Al-Hamdah KSA 5000m 19h1 14:00. 2s3/12.97 Svitlana Shmidt UKR 3000mSC 12h3 10:01.94.000m 19 32:11. 2:01.06 5qB/72.05 6700 6.68 * At at June 10.40 2h2/3:39.58 Lyudmyla Yosypenko UKR Heptathlon 4 6618 Yuliya Zaripova RUS 3000mSC* gold 9:06.36 1qA/20. 2016 • Not included in this list are athletes who may have returned positive results after IOC re-testing of samples from 2012 as announced on May 17.38 Saka 4x400m 8h2 3:34.89 Mohamed Othman Shahween KSA 1500m 7s1 3:43.64.94 21. 2s2/1:58. 1:57.58 3h3/4:06.31 Olga Kaniskina RUS 20km Walk* silver 1:25:09 Natallia Kareiva BLR 1500m 7 4:11.04 Hassan Hirt FRA 5000m 11h1 13:35.39 1h2/3:39.32 Semoy Hackett TTO 100m 5s1 11.87 2h1/22. Investigations into these cases were continuing as at June 10. an independent commission set up by the World Anti-Doping Agency to investigate claims of Russian doping violations recommended life bans for Russian 800m medallists Mariya Savinova (gold. 3000mSC.01) Beijing 2008 (7) Men/2 Rashid Ramzi Andrei Mikhnevich Women/5 Lyudmila Blonska Blonska Alissa Kallinikou Tezdzhan Naimova Vanja Perišić Athanasía Tsoumeléka BRN BLR UKR UKR CYP BUL CRO GRE 1500m SP Heptathlon LJ 400m 100m 800m 20km Walk gold bronze silver 3qA 5h7 5h9 6h3 9th 3:32.000m (29:56.80 Anna Mishchenko UKR 1500m 11h3 4:13. the IOC decided in June 2013 not to disqualify the US team which went on to win gold in the 4x400m final (in 3:19.38 Women/29 Aslı Çakir Alptekin TUR 1500m* gold 4:10. 3s2/22.11 Yelena Arzhakova RUS 800m¶ 6 1:59. 2016.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / D O P I N G V I O L A T I O N S 33 (2004) Irina Yatchenko UKR DT bronze 66. 2:01.53.1 as Tyson Gay was part of their squad ¶ In November 2015.37 Ümmü Kiraz TUR Marathon 88 2:43:07 Yekaterina Kostetskaya RUS 1500m 9 4:12.09 Semiha Mutlu TUR 20km Walk 47 1:35:33 Nadezhda Ostapchuk BLR SP gold 21.71 Anzhela Shevchenko UKR 1500m 13h1 4:12.81.56 2qA/65. 1h2.90 4h3/4:06. 2016.00 Wang Jiali CHN Marathon 58 2:35:46 Nevin Yanıt TUR 100mH 5 12.34) in Beijing.43 Sergey Bakulin RUS 50km Walk 6 3:38:55 Valeriy Borchin RUS 20km Walk dnf Abderrahime Bouramdane MAR Marathon dnf Hamza Driouch QAT 1500m 11s1 3:49.63 Ghofrane Mohammad SYR 400mH 8h2 58.89.13 Yolanda Caballero COL Marathon dnf Bahar Doğan TUR Marathon 62 2:36:35 Marta Domínguez ESP 3000mSC 12 9:36.

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one less than the 952+2. with eight points for first place down to one for eighth. 2016) is reflected in separate medal-only tables shown where relevant from page 62. points are awarded for the first eight placings in each event.9 880. The top eight tables here present all the upgrades.7 107 91 87 79 68 . These events are the 2000 women’s 100m. This is because teams of mixed nationalities won medals in the 1900 5000m Team Race (GBR/AUS) and the 1904 Four Miles Team Race (USA/FRA).8 214 116 91 64. COUNTRY 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th OVERALL MEN & WOMEN USA 330+2= 246.8 261 205.6 793.8 3208.5 789 781 774 741.5 points for each country. The total shown below is 952 plus two ties.8+7 93 GER1 (FRG/GDR) 70 GBR2.2+1= AUS4 21. These tables show all logical upgrades of places after those athletes disqualified for doping offences are removed from results. 9 56. so that for instance equal second place by two athletes is worth 6.2 169 160 149 147 145 139 133.8 2260. but that includes two additional gold medal placings awarded to Jim Thorpe as detailed in the footnotes. 2004 Women’s Shot Put and four events from 2012: Men’s 50 Kilometres Walk.5 122.5 1299 1212 954. the IOC have not yet publicly confirmed that all those behind the disqualified offenders will be upgraded where medals are on offer.5 393. In seven cases. For ties.2 25 RUS 24 25 KEN 24 31 POL 23 16+2= ITA 19 15 JAM 17 28+2= CAN 14 15 HUN 11 14+1= CUB 10 14 ETH 21 8 GRE 8 12+1= JPN5 7 7 ROU 11 14 TCH6 11 8 RSA7 6 12 NOR 7 5 CHN 6 6 BUL 5 7 NED 6 3 ESP 2 4 NZL4 10 2 UKR 2 3 BRA 4 3 BLR 4 5 BEL 3 6+1= MAR 6 5 NGR 2 3 TTO 2 5 BAH 4 2 CZE6 (BOH) 5 2 MEX 3 5 SUI 6 AUT 1 2 DEN 3 POR 4 2 IRL2 4 2 ARG 2 3 YUG8 2 ALG 4 1 195+5= 98 62+1= 75+2= 31+1= 42+3= 24+2= 27+1= 26 25 12+1= 26 19 24+2= 18 16 16 12+3= 9 9+1= 5 6 8 10 6 6 6 8 12 7 9 2 8 8 7 4 5 2 2 4 3 4 1 2 175+5= 99+2= 72 67 39 40+4= 34+1= 17 17 17 16 24+1= 21+1= 25+2= 18+1= 18 16 9 16 5 9 9 11+1= 12 8 4 8 6 10 10 9 5 2 3 3 6 3 2 2 2 5 2 5 3 1 - 143+5= 102+3= 81+1= 51 25+1= 40+1= 33+4= 23+3= 19+2= 18 27 20 19 25 22+1= 13 6 14+2= 17 8+1= 8 8 14+1= 12 6+1= 14+1= 12 5 9 9 4 6 1 5 2 2 5 9 7 5 2 2 6 1 124+6= 88+4= 56+3= 37+2= 32+2= 33+5= 26+1= 38+2= 22 13 36+1= 27+1= 18 22+4= 11+3= 18 11 11+2= 16+3= 13 11+1= 13 3+1= 5 12 11 11+1= 4 1+1= 5 5 9 3 4 8 7 5+1= 7 8 8+2= 4 3 2 6 7 1 82+3= 74+4= 43+4= 34+2= 26+1= 35+3= 40+3= 21+1= 10 14 37+1= 27 18 12 22 6 5 12+1= 12+2= 13 8+1= 5 8 6 6 9 15+1= 8 8 6 6 10 5 12 6 8 8 6 3+1= 5 3 2 2 4 6 4 81+7 62+1= 54+3= 45 20 38+1= 37 20 17 6 23 21 7 17+1= 17 11+1= 4 6 9 14 10+1= 7+2= 16+2= 12 12 10 7 3 6 7 5 3+1= 5 4 5 2 5 5 2 3+1= 5+2= 6 4 1 3 2 MEDALS POINTS 785. France and the USA appear with fractions in the first two columns.5 215 214 183.3 107. Women’s 1500m.5 245 241 223 221.6 493. 2004 men’s Hammer Throw. then adding the one event where there was a tie (the 1908 men’s pole vault) gives 951. Points are only awarded for athletes who finished in the final.5 718. because of that controversial 2000 women’s 100m where the medal was withdrawn and not re-allocated. Great Britain & Ireland. Australia.2 74.2 297 252.2 2437. no points are given to athletes who did not finish or were disqualified.8 385 312 302 300. The total number of events where medals have been issued is 951. The IOC’s perspective on medal reallocation (as at June 10.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 35 PLACING TABLES Here.2 75 80 54 60 66 55 44 40 45 36 23 35 24 24 20 22 18 15 12 20 17 14 18 12 19 13 14 10 12 10 8 7 6 10 7 5 2 7 7745. The actual number of golds awarded is 953. 3000m Steeplechase and 20 Kilometres Walk. Subtracting those from 952 gives 950. points are divided between the countries tying.7 581.3 471 417.8 83+3= URS3 (EUN) 71 64+2= FIN 49 35 SWE 21 25 FRA 15 22. so for instance Greece is shown with first in place from that 2000 women’s 100m even though the athlete in question was not awarded a gold medal.

5 15 15 15 15 14 13.R I O 36 COUNTRY 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th EST 2 LAT LTU 3 TUR 1 SLO 1 TUN 2 KAZ 2 UGA 2 NAM ISL IND9 PAN 1 SEN KOR5 1 ECU 1 MOZ 1 BAR DOM 2 CHI QAT TPE BRN TAN ERI PHI CMR 2 BDI 1 BOT BWI10 CIV CRO 1 SUD VEN GHA SRI SRB8 (SCG/IOP) GRN 1 LUX 1 COL ZIM SVK PUR BER HAI ISR SYR 1 SKN GUA IRI KSA ZAM DJI AHO ARM SLE PRK MRI SOM UZB CAY MAD OMA RWA Totals 952+2= 1 4 1 3 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 940+20= 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1+1= 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 927+23= 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 917+18= 2 1 1+1= 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 889+28= 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1+1= 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 848+47 4 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 745+28= 5 3 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2+1= 1 3 1 1 2 1 2 1+1= 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 703+25= MEDALS POINTS 6 5 5 5 4 5 3 3 4 2 0 3 1 2 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2864 63 57 56 46 45 38 36 35 33 30 29 28 28 27.3 13 13 13 12 12 11 11 9 9 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 33190 .5 27 27 25 23 21 21 20 20 19 18 17 16 16 16 16 15.

Germany was not invited to take part in the Olympic Games. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings 1924-1988. CZE 9 7 4 8 5 10+1= 7.5 SVK 2 1 1 1 3 1 0. and those countries competed at the Games from 1996.75 1 2 1 1. South Africa South Africa did not become a republic until 1961. This country was later to become the part of the Czech part of Czechoslovakia (TCH).5 4 4+1= 5 4 14. For the purpose of the tables. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings Until 1912.5 KAZ 0.75 AZE 0. the two German nations participated with separate teams.7 GDR 38 36 35 36 30+1= 19+1= 18 12 109 1177 FRG 12 14 17 15 19+1= 16 18+1= 11 43 546. Use these tables to see the placings achieved by athletes from the constituent republics of the USSR (and the Unified Team) up to 1992. Czech (CZE) and Slovak (SVK). Japan and Korea In 1932 and 1936.5 467. Breakdown of USSR (-1988) and Unified Team (1992) placings with relay points divided by four After the division of USSR (URS) in 1991.R I O COUNTRY 1st 2 0 1 6 2nd ★ 3rd F A C T S 4th & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 5th 6th 7th T A B L E S 8th 37 MEDALS POINTS 1.75 7 42. the FRG and GDR competed as a combined East and West German team under one flag. GDR – 1956-1988.25 9+1= 9. Bohemia (BOH). then a part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire.5 36. Those points are listed under Japan.75+1= 9+1= 20 261.25 BLR 1.5 0. and were joined by The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MKD) in 1996. From 1956 to 1964.5 5 8.5 1 1 3 1 1= 3 42.5 Totals 70 93 98 99+2= 102+3= 88+4= 74+4= 62+1= 261 3208. Bohemian placings (1900-1912) have been appended to those of the Czech Republic above and below is how the points were distributed between Czech and Slovak athletes in the Czechoslovakian era. 1 1 1 10 5. Athletes from the remaining Yugoslavia competed in 1992 as “Individual Olympic Participants” (IOP). All placings by athletes from EUN are counted together with URS. have had no placings in the top eight as an independent country but Georgian athletes – most notably Viktor Saneyev – have won several Olympic medals. Croatia (CRO). a single German team again competed in the Games.2 Totals 56.25 1.6 IRL (-1920) 4 6+1= 1 2 2 1 1 12 108 GBR (1924-) 36 60+2= 46+1= 60 68+1= 49+3= 38+4= 45+2= 145 1865. GER 20 43 46 48+2= 53+1= 53+3= 38+3= 39+1= 109 1484.25 2 1.25 20 14.25 75 EST 2 1 4 2 1 1 1 7 65 LTU 4 1 1 1 3 1 5 50 LAT 3 1.5 1 1 4 36. In 1993. 6.75+1= 35 31. Yugoslavia (YUG) in 1996 & 2000 and Serbia & Montenegro (SCG) in 2004. GBR (-1920) 16. . From 1968 to 1988. Czechoslovakia divided into two separate republics.75 25. Breakdown of Britain & Ireland placings In the years 1896-1920.25 1 5. thereafter all placings are attributed to Serbia After the division of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.8 3.8 83+3= 62+1= 72 81+1= 56+3= 43+4= 54+3= 205.25 1 4 50. a “Unified Team” (EUN) consisting of athletes from the Commonwealth of Independent States competed in the 1992 Games. competed as a separate team. some Korean athletes represented Japan.8 17 15 10 11 6 2 4+1= 48. Germany (GER) divided into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR).75+1= 16 7. FRG – 1952-1988. RUS 37. Breakdown of German placings After World War II. All points achieved by these former Yugoslav affiliations have been Serbian so are now listed under that country code (SRB).5 Totals 11 8 5 9 8 11+1= 8+1= 10+1= 24 312 7. Slovenia (SLO) and Bosnia-Herzegovina (BIH) sent separate teams from 1992.8 2437.2 2.25 3 0.75 1. From 1924. At the end of each table. achieving sixth place in the 1932 marathon and gold and bronze at the same event in 1936. The Baltic republics (EST. Georgia.25+1= 29 120 1251.25 8. From 1996. the new republics from the former USSR competed independently.5 0. a breakdown of German points are given after the following principles: GER – 1896-1936 & 1992 onward. Australasia Australia and New Zealand competed together as Australasia in 1908 & 1912 but in 1908 all top eight placings of that team (bronze and a fifth as shown below) were by New Zealand and are listed for that country only.8 464. In 1948 (as in 1920 and 1924).75 44 KGZ 1. Athletes from Montenegro (MNE) have not yet achieved a placing on the first eight.5 GEO 4 2.5 4. placings are combined with those from Great Britain & Northern Ireland (GBR).25 TJK 1 1 8 MDA 1 0 5 UZB 1 1 0 4 Totals 71 64+2= 75+2= 67 51 37+2= 34+2= 45 214 2260. LAT and LTU) entered separate teams that year. Irish athletes competed with Great Britain.25 1 2 9.75 186. for example. Following German unification in 1990.25 UKR 20 7. but for simplicity the abbreviation RSA is used throughout. 8.75+2= 42. Ireland (IRL) competed independently.75 13. which competed in the Games from 1920 to 1992.

5 749. In these tables he is shown as British but several historians feel he represented India.8 156.5 485.2 31 25 18 27 23 15 17 20 17 11 13 10 15 14 15 8 9 7 6 5 5 7 5 5 4 6511. and Trinidad & Tobago competed as the British West Indies. However.8 GER2 28 FIN 48 37 URS3 (EUN) SWE 19 FRA 9 KEN 22 ITA 16 CAN 12 HUN 8 POL 16 AUS4 8.7 82 80 77 76 74 .2 JAM 10 GRE 4 JPN5 5 ETH 12 CUB 6 NOR 6 RSA6 5 RUS 5 TCH7 8 ESP 2 BRA 3 BEL 2 NZL4 7 TTO 2 MAR 5 SUI MEX 3 BLR NED DEN UKR 3 CZE7 (BOH) NGR 1 CHN 2 ARG 2 211. 9 46. He was reinstated. Jamaica.8 129 113 116 85 52. 10.5 294.9 632 601 512.75 1 1.5 Totals 2 1 2 16 Jim Thorpe (USA) After winning the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon.5 209. Thorpe was disqualified for having infringed his amateur status.2 229.2 156 144 141 125. Norman Pritchard (GBR) Opinion is divided about the affiliation of this athlete who won two silver medals in 1900.8 282 271. in which case two silvers and 14 points should be subtracted from the British totals and added to those of India. JAM 1.5 203 193 156. in these two events two golds.1 1661. and points achieved in 1960 for this team are listed under “BWI”.1 348 318.5 214.3 249.25 0. Breakdown of British West Indies placings in 1960 In 1960.8+7 64+1= 48 33 36+1= 25 21. OVERALL MEN COUNTRY 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th USA 278+2= GBR1. posthumously.R I O 38 COUNTRY SRB SLO CRO BIH Totals 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th - 2 2 - 1 1 1 4 1 6 3 1 3 7 5 1 6 1 1 1 3 MEDALS POINTS 2 0 0 0 2 37 22 19 1 79 9. Therefore.5 450.25 1.5 1141.6 461.5 BAR 0.2 1238 1226. a team of athletes from Barbados.4 1816.75 14.2+1= 22 8 10 13+1= 8+1= 13 15 7+1= 5 5 8 2 7 5 6 4 3 5+1= 2 5 4 6 4 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 169+4= 44+1= 53 31+1= 40+2= 39+2= 20+1= 22 22 16+2= 16 4+1= 14+1= 6 10+3= 8 10 9 7 5 10 3 5 7 2 6 7 6 2 2 4 5 2 4 2 3 2 - 147+5= 52 56+2= 35 34 38+4= 25+1= 11 19+1= 19+1= 14+1= 11 8 10 8 11 8 11 10+1= 8 3 5 7 8 5 4 3 2 2 2 5 5 4 1 1 5 3 114+4= 62+1= 57 25+1= 26 38+1= 25+4= 15 16 17 19+1= 13 13+2= 8 12+2= 11 3 6 12+1= 6 8+1= 6 10 9 5 3 1 8 3 3 7 3 4 4 2 2 98+6= 39+1= 51+2= 30+2= 21+2= 31+4= 21 9 19+1= 14+3= 9+3= 23+1= 24 7 11+2= 16+3= 10 7 3+1= 10 6 6+1= 8 5 7 2 7 3 7 7 1 5 4 1 5 3 1 5 59+2= 26+2= 35+3= 21+1= 24+1= 33+3= 32+3= 12 23 8 17 25+1= 10+1= 11 9+1= 6+2= 3 4 7 5 5 5+1= 12 4 9 5 5 5 3+1= 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 1 3 54+5= 35+1= 36+1= 17 30 37+1= 26 4 18 10 12 14 12 2 5 7 3 5+1= 15+2= 6+1= 1 7 6 7 3+1= 2 5 4 1 5 4 5 4+2= 2 4 2 3 - MEDALS POINTS 671.5 122 95 95 92. one silver and one bronze medals have been counted for the purpose of the various tables on these pages. all points scored were by Jamaicans with the exception one Barbadian on the men’s bronze-winning 4x400m relay team. in 1983 and declared the co-winner of those events along with the men who were promoted after his disqualification: Ferdinand Bie (NOR) and Hugo Wieslander (SWE).2 66 46 40 38 30 36.

5 10.8 17 15 IRL (-1920) 4 6+1= 1 GBR (1924-) 26 41 28+1= Totals 46.8 73 63 63 60 52 50 47 45 43 40 35 33.8 12 96 156. Breakdown of Britain & Ireland placings GBR (-1920) 16.R I O COUNTRY 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 4 2 2 1 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 668+2= 1 2 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 659+14= 1 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1+1= 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 648+19= 4 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 636+16= 2 2 1 4 3 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 611+18= 1 3 2 2 6 1 5 3+2= 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1= 1 1 2 1 1 577+35 1 3 2 2 3 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 497+22= 3 3 5 1 3 2 2 6 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1+1= 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 470+16= 1.3 10 10 9 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 5 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 23081 464.6 108 1243.1 33 30 28 28 27 27 25 23 22 21 21 19 18 18 17 16 15 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 10.8 64+1= 44+1= 10 2 40 52 11 2 49+1= 62+1= 6 1 32+1= 39+1= 2 24+2= 26+2= 4+1= 1 30 35+1= IRL1 POR EST BAH ROU YUG8 LAT ALG BUL LTU UGA AUT NAM TUN PAN SEN ECU KOR5 BAR DOM SLO TUR QAT TAN ISL ERI PHI BWI10 VEN CHI BDI GRN IND9 TPE KAZ ZIM LUX SUD PUR BER CIV SRB8 (SCG/IOP) BOT GHA HAI SVK SKN GUA IRI KSA SRI ZAM DJI BRN ISR AHO ARM MRI SOM MAD OMA RWA UZB Totals 39 MEDALS POINTS 6 6 6 5 2 2 5 5 2 4 3 0 4 4 3 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 48.5 1816.1 .

in which case two silvers and 14 points should be subtracted from the British totals and attributed to India.25 1 1 LAT 2 1.R I O 40 COUNTRY 1st 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 2. Breakdown of German placings GER 10 26 GDR 14 14 FRG 4 8 Totals 28 48 27 14 12 53 30+2= 14 12 56+2= 31 15 11 57 31+2= 11 9 51+2= 20+2= 7 8+1= 35+3= 23+1= 6 7 36+1= 3.25 30.25 16.4 1034 621.5 26. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings CZE 8 6 3 SVK Totals 8 7 3 5 5 3 3 6 5+1= 1 7+1= 4.75 1.25 126 62 46.25 Totals 2 OVERALL WOMEN GER1 (FRG/GDR) 42 - 1 1 - - - 45 45 43 45+3= 37+2= 39+1= 26 COUNTRY 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th USA URS2 (EUN) GBR RUS AUS JAM ROU POL CUB CHN 52 34 10 19 13 7 11 7 4 4 35 28+1= 19+2= 20 12 13+2= 13 8+1= 6 5 26+1= 35 18 16 13 13 8+1= 8 7 8 28 33 20 14 9 11+1= 3 5 7 7 29+1= 25 19 11+1= 10+1= 11 4+1= 14 7 10 26 16 17+2= 16 14+2= 11 11 13 11 4 23+1= 10+1= 17+2= 5 11 7 11 12 2 5 27+2= 15 19+2= 16 8 5 11 9 6 9 1.25 11 10. Those points are listed under Japan.75 1 TJK 1 UZB Totals 37 36+1= 40+2= 34 26 21+2= 24+1= MEDALS POINTS 15 6 4 1 1 1 1 1 30 63 42 24 129 869.25 1 1.2 51.5 393.7 579 430. South Africa South Africa did not become a republic until 1961.5 222 221 .25+1= 7 3. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings 1924-1988. Japan and Korea In 1932 and 1936.25 KAZ 0.75+1= 0. Breakdown of British West Indies placings in 1960 JAM 1.25 UKR 12.25 4.5 7 5.75 BLR 1 6.5 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 2 35 8 6 1 50 9.75 0.25 6+1= 7. Australasia Australia and New Zealand competed together as Australasia in 1908 & 1912 but in 1908 all top eight placings of that team (below) were by New Zealand and are listed for that country only. achieving sixth place in the 1932 marathon and gold and bronze at the same event in 1936.25 2 132 14. some Korean athletes represented Japan.75+1= 19.75 BAR 0. thereafter all placings are attributed to Serbia SRB 2 1 4 2 SLO 2 CRO 2 BIH Totals 2 3 6 2 7 7 17 0 18 194 15.5 12.5 1 1 2 1 1= LTU 2 2 AZE 0.5 333 319. 7. but for simplicity the abbreviation RSA is used throughout. 6.5 5 4 1 2+1= 3 EST 2 1 4 2 1 GEO 4 1.5 1.75 278.5 3 2 2 0.25 1.75 1 0 116 580.5 4.2 477 315 1661.5 4.5 19 10.25 8 1 1226. Breakdown of USSR (-1988) and Unified Team (1992) placings with relay points divided by four RUS 13.5 1 KGZ 0.5 16 1547 MEDALS POINTS 114 98 49 55 38 35 33 24 17 17 1234.5+1= 19 16.25 6+1= 8. In these tables he is shown as British but several historians feel he represented India. Norman Pritchard (GBR) Opinion is divided about the affiliation of this athlete who won two silver medals in 1900.75 8. 10.75 30.5 221.5 0. 1 1 1 10 5.75 33.

5 99 99 96 89.5 206.5 10109 .5 70.2 87 83 72.R I O COUNTRY ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 4 7 2 5 6 1 9 3 3 7 2 9 6 2 2 2 4 2 3 2 4 5 2 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 5 2 3 2 1 2 1 3 2 MAR 1 1 BEL 1 1 MOZ 1 TUR 1 2 KAZ 2 ALG 2 SLO 1 BRA 1 IRL 1 MEX 1 CMR 2 LTU 1 IND CRO 1 1 DEN BRN 1 COL 1 ARG 1 ISL LAT SYR 1 TUN 1 TPE SUI CHI 1 SRI 1 BOT CIV GHA TTO SLE SUD PRK SVK BDI ISR SRB4 (SCG) LUX UZB CAY KOR Totals 284 281+6= 1. Breakdown of German placings 5 8 4+1= 6 4 3 1 8 5 2 2 1 2 4 1 5 1 3+1= 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 279+4= 8 6+1= 9 8 5 6 4 6 4 4 1 5 4 1 4 2 1 2 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 281+2= 6+1= 8 8 3 4 3 7+1= 5 1 2 2 6 3 4 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 1 2 1 2 1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 278+10= 7 8+1= 5+1= 1 8 4 6 1= 4 5 2 5 5 1 3 2+1= 2 1= 2 3 3+1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 271+12= 2 4 8 2 4 2 4 3 3 3 3 6 5 3 5 6 2 3 5 5 1 2 3+1= 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 248+6= 6 7+1= 11 1 3 2 5 4 1 3+1= 1 2 5 1+1= 1 2 1+1= 1 1 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1= 233+9= BUL CAN FRA ETH ITA KEN NED UKR BLR TCH3 GRE JPN HUN AUT BAH NGR RSA SWE NZL CZE FIN NOR POR ESP YUG4 1st 2 0 1 6 41 MEDALS POINTS 16 15 12 18 14 14 9 12 11 7 11 5 6 7 5 8 7 6 5 5 3 5 4 1 0 4 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 0 2 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 854 209.2 205 189 173 157 150 139.5 67 65 61 51 44 38 29 28 27 27 25 24 23 23 22 18 17 16 16 16 15 15 14 13 13 12 10 8 8 8 8 7 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 1 0.5 119 102.

25 16 15 9 4+1= UKR 7.25 20+1= 23.25 KAZ 1 MDA 1 EST 1 UZB 1 Totals 34 28+1= 35 33 25 16 10+1= 3.R I O 42 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S COUNTRY 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th GER GDR FRG Totals 24 10 8 42 22 15 6 43 22 16 5 43 22 16 3 41 17+1= 17+1= 8+1= 42+3= 9+1= 19 7 35+1= 13+1= 15 10 38+1= 10 12 4 26 2.25 1 AZE 1 1 1 KGZ 1 1 LAT 1 0. Breakdown of USSR (-1988) and Unified Team (1992) placings with relay points divided by four RUS 24.25 15 12 10.25 0.25 1 0 0 0 98 726.25 2 4. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings 1924-1988.5 189 60.5 31 28.5 531 231.25 3 4 1 1 1.5 9 4 3 2 BLR 0.5 0 0 0 0 14 9 6 29 .5 1489 670.75 6 5 3 3 1034 6 1 7 87.5 3 2 2 LTU 2 1 1 1 1 GEO 1 3 0.5 16 2. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings CZE 3 2 1 SVK 1 Totals 3 2 2 3 1 4 2 2 4 1 5 3 3 14 1 15 2+1= 1 3+1= 4.5 3 5.5 15 102. thereafter all placings are now attributed to Serbia SLO 2 1 1 CRO 1 1 SRB 3 Totals 1 3 1 4 1 1 MEDALS POINTS 68 41 19 128 68.

2 175.6 1 0 11 1= 1 10.6 2 20 1 16 1 11 1 10 0 9 1.1+1= 18 66. Breakdown of combined Great Britain & Ireland team placings: IRL 1 GBR 2 1 5 1 1 1 Totals 2 1 5 1 2 1 0 8 8 3 61 64 Jim Thorpe (USA) After winning the 1912 Pentathlon and Decathlon. Ferdinand Bie (NOR) and Hugo Wieslander (SWE).2 CUB Totals 24 24 23 London 1908 8thMedals Points 23 221.4 82. Breakdown of combined Great Britain & Ireland team placings: GBR 1 2 1 1 1 1 IRL 2 3 Totals 3 5 1 1 1 1 - 4 5 9 39 37 76 Athens 1896 Gold Silver Bronze USA 9 4+2= 1 GRE 1 3 4+2= GER 1 HUN 1 2 GBR 1 1 AUS 2 FRA 1 1 DEN SWE Totals 12 11+2= 9+2= 4th 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 9 5th 4 2 6 6th 2 2 7th 2 2 8thMedals Points 16 124 2 10 102 1 25 3 24 2 18 2 16 2 13 0 5 0 5 2 36 332 7th 2 1 1 1 1 6 8thMedals Points 1 39 332 7 90 . one silver and one bronze medals have been counted here Antwerp 1920 USA SWE Gold Silver Bronze 9 12 8 1 3 10 4th 10 5 5th 8 7 6th 7th 7 7 4 3+1= 8th Medals Points 6 29 327 3 14 164.4 0 5 2 71 738 Athens 1906 Gold Silver Bronze USA 11 4+2= 5+1= SWE 2 4 5 GRE 1 2 3+1= GBR1 3 5 1 HUN 1 3 1 FIN 1 1 FRA 1 AUS 2 CAN 1 1 NOR BEL 1= GER 1 RSA 1 4th 5 5 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5th 4 3 5+2= 1 2+1= 1+1= 2 1= - 6th 5 2+1= 2 1 2 1+1= - 7th 1 1 3+1= 1 1 1 1 1= - 4th 5th 6th 8 4+3= 6+3= 5 6 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 1+1= 2 1 2 1 1 2= 1 1 21 16+5= 14+4= 7th 8th Medals Points 2 4+1= 34 343.8 658.1+1= Teams 7 6+1= 3 5 6 1 .2 2 6 70 2 2 5 47 3 35 2 2 1 32 3 1 2 24 2 20 1= 3 19. Breakdown of combined Great Britain & Ireland team placings IRL 1 1 1 GBR 3.5 1 11 2 1 10. in 1983 and declared the co-winner of those events along with the men who were promoted after his disqualification. He was re-instated.5 1 6 Stockholm 1912 Gold Silver Bronze USA 16 12+2= 11 SWE 4 5 5 FIN 6 4 3 GBR 1 2 1 5 CAN 1 2 1 NOR 1 GER 2 RSA 1 1 FRA 2 GRE 1 1 HUN 1 ITA 1 DEN AUT TUR Totals 32 29+2= 28 4th 5th 6th 9+5= 11+1= 4+2= 4+2= 4+1= 5 4 1 3 1 2 2+1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24+8= 22+2= 17+2= 7th 8th Medals Points 6 3+3= 41 437.R I O 1896 Gold Silver Bronze 4th 5th ★ 2 0 1 6 6th 7th F A C T S 8th Medals & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G Points 1904 Gold Silver Bronze 4th BOH ITA Totals 21 20+3= 19+2= PLACING TABLES BY GAMES T A B L E S 5th 6th 43 7th 1 1 1 19 19+5= 14+2= 10+2= 8th Medals Points 7 0 0 65 5 4 709 1. posthumously.2+1= FIN 1 HUN 1= 1 RSA 1 1 NOR 1 2 FRA 1= 1 GER 1 1 NZL 2 1 ITA 1 DEN BEL Totals25+2=22+5= 22+3= 3 14 17 26 149.2 12 11+6= 79 820 1.8 82.5 2 33 2 20 3.5 11 121.5 1 7 99 9 76 1 5 51 2 25 2 1 23 2 23 2 17 1 0 15. in these two events two golds. Therefore.5 .2 1 10 1 7 1= 0 3.1+1= 17 175.2 19.8 Norman Pritchard (GBR) Opinion is divided about the affiliation about this athlete who won two silver medals in 1900. Breakdown of combined Great Britain & Ireland team placings IRL 1 1+1= 1 1 GBR 6 5 3 5 5 1 .2+1= GRE .2 . Australasian team but all these places achieved by New Zealanders 2 8.5 7 6 14 179. Thorpe was disqualified for having infringed his amateur status.8 4 1 Totals 3.8 10. In these tables he is shown as British but several historians feel he represented India.2 1 2 19 1 1= 2 15.2 8.2 3 GER 1= DEN 1 NOR 1 1= GRE 1 BOH 1 AUT Totals 23 23 22 16+6= 5th 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 10 6th 3 1 2 2 1 9 1.2 2.10.4 2+1= 1 33.2 1= 0 0.8 5 2 1 SWE 1 1+2= HUN 1 1 1+1= CAN 1 1 AUS 0.5 1 1 13 130 1 8 64 1 4 47 2 1 1 30 2 2 24 1 2 21 1 2 15 2 14 1 1 11 1 10 0 9 0 4 1 0 2 18 17+3= 91 998 1.5 1 10 0 9 1 7 0 7 4+2= 68 665 Paris 1900 Gold Silver Bronze 4th USA 16 13 10 7 FRA 1 4 2 5+1= GBR1 3.8 5 2 1 - 5th 13 2 1 1 17 6th 14 1 15 7th 4 1 5 8thMedals Points 2 64.8 21 GBR 1 1 GER 1 CAN 1 GRE 1 HUN FRA 1.4 St Louis 1904 4th 20 1 1 1 23 Gold Silver Bronze USA 14+2= 9+1= 7+1= GBR 1 7 6+1= 3 CAN 1 1 3+1= SWE 2 . in which case two silvers and 14 points should be subtracted from the British totals and added to those of India Gold Silver Bronze USA 22 21.

8 2 14 130 7 76 2 5 68 2 5 62 4 43 1 3 41.5 1 2 22 1 22 1 17 1 1 14 0 14 0 12 1 0 8 1 7 1 1 7 1 6 1 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 2 17 87 1010 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 11 10 5 FIN 3 4 4 GBR 2 4 1 4th 7 1 2 5th 6 1 2 6th 5 1 1 8th Medals Points 6 26 276 11 90 7 75 7th 4 1 2 .8 1 16 1 1 12 2 1 9 1 8 1 1 8 0 8 1 7 0 7 0 5 0 5 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 14 66 768 5th 1 1 1 1 4 6th 1 1 1 1 4 8th Medals Points 1 4 39 4 38 2 35 2 12 1 11 2 1 10 1 7 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 3 3 15 167 7th 1 2 3 0 81 Los Angeles 1932 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 16 13 6 GER 2 3 FIN 3 4 4 GBR 2 4 2 JPN 1 1 2 CAN 1 3 5 ITA 1 2 SWE 1 POL 2 1 IRL 2 RSA 1 ARG 1 FRA 1 NED NZL HUN LAT 1 TCH 1 PHI 1 BRA MEX AUS GRE Totals 29 29 29 4th 8 7 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 29 5th 7 3 1 4 5 2 2 2 1 1 1 29 6th 7th 8 4 4 1 1 1 1 2 4 1+1= 1 1 1 2 1 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 28 18+2= 8th Medals Points 6 35 361 1 5 94 11 90 8 89 3 4 70.5 1 27.1+1= 1 11.5 2 34. Breakdown of combined Great Britain & Ireland team placings: GBR 4 4 4 3 5 5 1 2 IRL 1 Totals 4 4 4 3 6 5 1 2 12 0 12 138 4 142 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 8 6 7 FIN 5 5 4 GER 2 5 SWE 1 2 2 GBR 2 2 1 CAN 2 1 1 FRA 1 1 1 JPN 1 RSA 1 NOR 1 HUN 1 IRL 1 CHI 1 ITA HAI 1 SUI PHI NED ARG AUT LAT NZL EST TCH Totals 22 22 22 4th 6 1 2 4 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 22 WomenGold Silver Bronze USA 1 2 1 CAN 2 1 1 GER 1 1 SWE 2 NED 1 POL 1 JPN 1 FRA RSA AUT ITA Totals 5 5 5 4th 1 1 2 1 5 Paris 1924 Gold Silver Bronze USA 12 10 10 FIN 10 5 2 GBR 3 3 5 SWE 3 2 FRA 3 ITA 1 1 SUI 2 RSA 1 1 HUN 1 CAN NOR 1 AUS 1 ARG 1 NED 1 EST 1 NZL 1 DEN CHI JPN BEL Totals 27 27 27 4th 6 9 3 1 2 1 1 2 1 26 5th 9 2 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 24 6th 7 2 6 2 1 1 1 1 21 7th 8thMedals Points 5 3 32 326 3 3 17 195 11 116 2 5 5 61 4 1 3 53 3 1 2 30 2 21 1= 2 17.5 41 37 22 17 16 15 13 9 7 5 3 2 1016 TCH Totals 27 27 27 27 26 1.5 1 9 68 1 3 34 1 33 3 28.8 1 20 1 16 1 1 12 0 11 2 1 10 2 1 9 1 8 1 1 8 1 7 0 7 0 5 0 5 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 7th 8th Medals Points 25 17+4= 1 17 1 935 5th 7 2 3 1 4 1 1 2 1 22 6th 7th 3 4+1= 4 2 2 2 2 1 1 3 2= 3 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 14+4= 8th Medals Points 1 21 224.5 1 8 1 7 1 1 7 1 6 1 6 0 5 0 3 0 3 1 0 2 18 16+2= 81 909 Amsterdam 1928 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 9 8 8 FIN 5 5 4 GER 1 2 6 CAN 4 2 2 SWE 1 2 4 GBR 2 2 1 FRA 1 1 1 JPN 1 1 RSA 1 NED 1 NOR 1 ITA POL 1 HUN 1 IRL 1 CHI 1 HAI 1 SUI PHI AUT ARG LAT NZL EST - 4th 7 1 4 3 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 - 5th 7 2 4 2 1 4 1 3 1 1 - 6th 7th 4 5+1= 4 2 3 4 2 1 1 3 2= 3 1= 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 8thMedals Points 2 25 263.R I O 44 1920 2 0 1 6 ★ 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th FIN 9 GBR 4 FRA 1 ITA 2 RSA 1 DEN NOR 1 BEL EST CAN 1 NZL AUS TCH LUX NED Totals 29 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 29 3 4 1 2 1 29 2 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 29 1 5 2 1 1 2 1 1 29 3 2 4 1 2 1= 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 28 20+2= F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 8th Medals Points 1928 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 19 16 12 4 4 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 87 147 135 55.5 1 16 1 0 15 .8 2 14 130 9 111 8 81 2 7 80 2 5 62 1 3 46.

2 1 8 1= 0 5.5 2 8 93 1 6 67 6 61 1 3 55.5 1 1 16 2 14.5 8 7 7 6 4 4 3 2 2 803 ARG NOR NZL 1 LAT TCH HUN AUS PHI GRE BRA RSA FRA EST AUT Totals 23 3 4 6 3 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 69 8thMedals Points 9 85 1 2 33 3 23 2 17 1 14 2 0 13 1 10 0 10 0 2 3 18 207 Silver Bronze 4th 23 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 22+2= WomenGold Silver Bronze GER 2 2 3 USA 2 POL 2 1 ITA 1 GBR 2 NED JPN CAN 2 HUN 1 AUT FRA SWE AUS Totals 6 6 6 4th 1 2 1 1 1 6 T A B L E S 5th 45 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1 1 1= .1 804 5th 1+1= 2+1= 2 1= 5+3= 6th 3 1 4 7th 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 69 8th Medals Points 7 62 1+2= 2 26.5 1 4 54 1 2 48.1+1= NOR 1 4 HUN 2 1 1 AUT 1 1 ARG 1 1 2 TCH 1 1 1 CAN 1 1+1= DEN 1 1 SUI 1 1 BEL 1 1 YUG 1 PAN 2 RSA 1 POL 2 SRI 1 TUR 1 BRA GRE ESP Totals 33 33 33 32+2= Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 12 7 4 FIN 3 5 2 GER 3 2 4 JPN 2 2 3 GBR 2 3 CAN 1 1 SWE 2 ITA 2 2 NED 2 SUI 1 POL - 7th 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 11 5 9 SWE 5 3 4 GBR 2 1 FRA 3 1 FIN 1 1 AUS 1 2 NOR 1 JAM 1 2 ITA 1 1 1 HUN 1 1 ARG 1 - 4th 5 4 2+1= 2 1 1 2 1= 1 1 5th 6 2 2 1 2 4 1 1 1 6th 5 1+1= 1+1= 1+3= 1+1= 2+1= 2+1= 1= 1 1 1= 8thMedals Points 4 23 239 10 103.5 2 1 33 3 31 1 2 31 1 2 30 1 2 30 1 26.4 3 20 1 18 1= 2 14.5 1 1 17 1 1 1 15.4 3 1 16 158 10 103.5 4th 6 1 2 1 2 4 1 1 2 5th 2 7 4 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 31 6th 5 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 1 2 32 7th 2 3+1= 3+1= 2 2 2+1= 1 1 1 1= 2 1 20+4= 8th Medals Points 2 27 255 1 13 141.2 1 0 14 0 13 1= 2 12.3 1 6 0 6 0 4 1 0 4 2 0 2 16 16+5= 87 1008 Overall Gold Silver Bronze 4th USA 12 5 10 7 SWE 5 3 5 1 GBR 6 1 3 FRA 2 3 3 3 NED 4 2 1 AUS 1 3 2 1 FIN 1 2 2 ITA 1 3 1 JAM 1 2 .5 1 1 2 33 1 3 31.0 2 1 2 40.5 45 34 33 22 17 14 12 12 11.5 1 9 96 7 68.7 1 5 51.5 1 2 37.5 5 55.5 1= 0 6.5 2 14 1 14 2 12 0 11 0 10 1 7 1 6 1 0 5 0 2 1 0 1 20 99 1148 5th 2 7 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 6th 7th 5 2 3 2+1= 2 3+1= 3 2 3 2+1= 1 1 1 1 1 - 8th Medals Points 2 25 236 1 12 133.2 0 5 0 3 0 3 2+5= 18 204 London 1948 Berlin 1936 Overall Gold Silver Bronze 4th 5th 6th USA 14 7 4 5 7+1= 5 GER 5 4 7 3+1= 2 4+1= FIN 3 5 2 4 2 1+1= JPN 2 2 3 3 3 1+3= GBR 2 5 1 2 1+1= CAN 1 3 1 4 2+1= ITA 1 2 2 2+1= 1= SWE 2 2 1 3+1= NED 2 .0 2 19 1 17 11.5 3 35 2 1 33 3 30 1 3 27 2 23 1 22 .5 2 3 57.5 7 81.5 1 5 41 3 40.1+2= 2 1 1 2= 22 20+15= 1 1 1 1 14 1 1 1 3 2 14 10 9 8 8 7.3+1= 1 POL 2 1 1 1 1= SUI 1 1 1 HUN 1 .5 4 7 99.1 7 6 6 4 4 3 2 1.7 1= 4 52.R I O 1932 Gold GER JPN 1 CAN 1 ITA 1 SWE IRL 2 ARG 1 FRA NZL RSA POL 1 HUN LAT TCH PHI NED BRA AUS GRE MEX Totals 23 Silver Bronze 4th 1 1 1 1 1 23 ★ 2 0 1 6 5th 6th 3 4 1= 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 .5 1 1= 7 69.1+2= AUS 1 1= ARG 1 1 NOR 1 1 NZL 1 LAT 1 FRA 1 TCH 1 1= AUT 1 2= PHI 1 GRE 2 BRA 1 RSA 1 EST Totals 29 29 29 28+2= 27+3= 24+15= 7th 8thMedals Points 2 5+2 25 265.5 7.1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 22 15+2= 2 2 4 2 1 1 1 23 5 1 2 1 1 2 1 23 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 23 Women Gold Silver Bronze USA 5 3 1 GER 1 1 CAN 2 1 POL 1 1 GBR 1 JPN RSA 1 NED MEX Totals 6 6 6 4th 1 2 1 2 6 5th 1 1 2 1 1 6 6th 3 1 1 1 6 7th 7th 1 1 1 3 F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 8th Medals Points 1936 Gold 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14 61 57.1 1 1 10 1 0 10 0 9 1 8 1 1 8 3 0 8 1 0 7.5 4 33.5 2 40.

5 1 10 0 9 1 8 1 1 8 1 8 1 7 0 5 0 3 0 2 5 27 312 Helsinki 1952 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 15 10 6 URS1 2 8 7 GBR 1 4 GER 3 5 AUS 3 1 SWE 1 2 TCH CZE 4 1 JAM 2 3 HUN 1 4 FRA 2 FIN 1 BRA 1 1 ITA 1 1 RSA 1 1 NZL 1 1 ARG 1 NED 1 JPN DEN ROU LUX 1 NOR SUI 1 AUT VEN 1 YUGSRB CAN KOR POL Totals 33 33 33 4th 3 9 6 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 33 5th 3 8 4 2 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 33 6th 7th 2 3 6 3+1= 1 1+1= 5 3 2 5 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 32 21+2= 8thMedals Points 31 253 2 17 198.5 0 0 1 0.5 20 7 6 5.5 4 5.75 105 8th Medals Points 11 93.25 0.5 14 12 12 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 2 1 1 836 GEO BLR EST KGZ Totals 0.25 0.0.25 1 Totals 4 2 6 3 5 3 WomenGold Silver Bronze URS1 2 4 5 GER 2 1 AUS 3 1 GBR 1 2 RSA 1 1 NED 1 USA 1 TCH CZE 1 NZL 1 AUT JPN DEN ROU ARG POL YUG SRB FIN HUN Totals 9 9 9 2.25 93.5 21.0.5 Melbourne 1956 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 16 10 5 URS1 5 6+1= 9+1= AUS 4 2 6 4th 8 6 1 5th 1 6 2 6th 7th 2 1+1= 5 2 4 2+1= 8th Medals Points 1 31 282.5 1 5 1= 1 UKR .25 17 Points 1 1 2 4.R I O 46 1948 Gold TCH 1 NED SUI BEL 1 YUG PAN RSA SRI CAN TUR DEN POL BRA GRE AUT ESP Totals 24 Silver Bronze 4th 1 1 1 1 24 ★ 2 0 1 6 5th 6th 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 23 15+4= 2 1 1 2 1 24 1 1 1 1 24 1 1 23 Women Gold Silver Bronze NED 4 GBR 4 FRA 2 2 AUT 1 1 AUS 1 2 CAN 1 USA 1 1 ITA 2 JAM DEN 1 TCH HUN 1 ARG 1 SWE 1 FIN 1 POL RSA YUG Totals 9 9 9 4th 1 1 2 1 1+1= 1 1= 1 8+2= 5th 2 1 2 1 1 1 8 6th 2 1 2 2 1 1 9 7th 7th 1 1 1 1 1 5 F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 8th Medals Points 1952 Gold Silver Bronze 4th 1 1 1 1 1 15 21 15 14.25 1 9 1 3 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 14 10 6 URS1 4 2 GBR 2 GER 1 4 SWE 1 2 JAM 2 3 HUN 1 4 TCH CZE 3 1 FRA 2 FIN 1 BRA 1 1 ITA 1 1 ARG 1 AUS LUX 1 NOR SUI 1 NZL 1 VEN 1 JPN ROU CAN DEN KOR YUG SRB Totals 24 24 24 4th 3 6 5 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 24 5th 3 7 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 1 1 24 6th 7th 8th Medals 1 1 6 3+1= 6th 1 5 1 4 2 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 24 7th 2 3 1 5 2 1 1 1 1 17 2 4th 3 2 2 1 1 9 5th 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 6th 7th 1 1= 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 4+2= 17 7 6 5.25 UKR .2.5 2 19 2 14 0 10. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 3.0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 7.5 8th Medals Points 30 240 2 6 105 1 2 71 2 5 54 4 3 53 5 45 5 40 4 39 1 2 33 2 1 30 2 21 2 2 20 1 13 0 13 1 8 2 0 8 1 7 1 6 1 6 0 6 1 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 17 72 843 1.25 8 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 8thMedals Points 1 4 52 2 4 42 1 4 39 2 30 3 26 1 19.5 3 8 100 1 4 58 4 3 53 5 51 5 45 1 5 41 1 2 33 3 1 31 2 21 2 2 20 2 18 2 17 1 15 1 14 0 11 0 9 1 0 9 1 8 2 0 8 1 7 0 7 1 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 2 21 99 1152 1.25 1.25 1 GEO .25 2 T A B L E S 5th 2 1 7 0.75 3.5 0 141. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 4 3 2.5 .5 1 3 1 4 UKR 2 1 1 1 BLR 1 1 EST 1 KGZ .5 1 3 46 1 4 45 3 29.75 198.25 0 1 0.5 1 5 100.25 6 62.25 1 1 1 1 13.5 2 18 1 14 1 13 1 12 1 11 0 7 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 4 27 309 1.25 Totals 2 4 5 3 1 1= - 9 2 0 11 79 13.5 2 22 223 2 12 114.5 1 1= GEO 2 0.

25 1 KGZ .25 2 22 2.5 5 5 69 1 3 54 1 5 52.R I O 1956 Gold Silver Bronze 4th GER 5 2 GBR 1 3+1= 2 HUN 2 POL 1 1 SWE 1 TCH CZE 1 1 ITA FIN .5 1 1 LAT 1 GEO 1 UKR .25 AZE 1 BLR .25 28.5 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1152 BEL KEN DEN TPE Totals 24 137.5 1 3 21 1 16 0 16 1 1 15 1 11 1 10 1 10 1 8 0 8 0 8 0 8 1 7 1 1 7 1 0 7 0 5 0 4 T A B L E S Silver Bronze 4th 24 23+2= 23 47 5th 6th 7th 24 1 1 23 16+2= 8th Medals Points 1 1 16 2 2 1 1 840 0 0 0 0 73 1.25 1 0.5 4+2= 27 312 1.25 0.5 2 7 80.75 11 10 7 1.0.25 14 2.25+1= 2 4 2 1 UKR 2 .0.25 Totals 5 6+1= 9+1= 6 6 5 2 2 13.25 1 1 EST 1 1 BLR 1 1 LTU 1 AZE .5 2 24 2 18 3 1 16 2 16 1 12 1 11 1 10 0 10 1 1 8 .5 2 37 1 25 1 1 24 3 21.0.3.25 .25 8 7 6 6.25 Totals 2 2+1= 3 3 2 1 - - 6 1 1 0 0 0 8 55 8 6 5.25+1= 6+1= 3.25 Totals 3 4 6+1= 3 4 4 2 2 2 7.75 142.25 3.5 1 11 0 9 0 8 0 8 1 7 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1= 0 0.25 80. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SRB 1 SLO CRO BIH Totals 1 - 1 1 2 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 15 9 4 URS1 3 4 6+1= GBR 1 2 2 GER 2 1 AUS 2 3 HUN 2 POL 1 SWE 1 FIN .1.5 21 18 16 14 11 8.25 1 1 1 EST 1 1 BLR 1 .75 223 7 5 3 1 16 8thMedals Points 28 247.5 39 36 33 32.25 1 1 1 1 1 .5 Rome 1960 Overall Gold Silver Bronze URS1 11 5 5 USA 12 8 6 GER 2 8 3 GBR 1 2+1= 4 POL 2 1+1= 3 ITA 1 2 AUS 1 2 1 NZL 2 1 SWE 1 HUN 1 2 FIN 1 FRA 1 1 ROU 1 1 TCH CZE 1 BWI 2 2 BEL 1 RSA 1 ETH 1 SUI MAR 1 - 4th 10 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5th 6 2 3 3 4 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 - 6th 7th 3+1= 2 7 2 4 2+1= 2+1= 1 2 2 2 2 1+1= 2+1= 1+1= 1 1= 1 1 2 1= 1 2 - 8th Medals Points 5 21 247.5 24 21.25 5 1.25 1 1 1 0.2+1= NOR 1 2 NZL 1 YUG2 1 FRA 1 BRA 1 RSA IRL 1 TRI CAN CHI 1 ISL 1 GRE 1 JPN KOR NGR ROU ARG AUT BEL KEN DEN TPE Totals 33 32+2= 31+2= 5 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 1 32 2 0 1 6 ★ 7th F A C T S 5th 6th 8th Medals 2 6 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 33 3 1 1 2 1 5 1 2 4 1 1 2 1 1+1= 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 32 21+2= 20+2= 7 7 2 2 1 2 0 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 1.75 1. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 2+1= 2 1.5 7 4 3 1 15 8th Medals Points 8 80.1.5 2 26 228 3 13 167 2 8 81.75 1.0.5 1 7 62 4 38 1 3 35 2 20.0.0.5 3 39 4 37 3 35 1 31 3 26 1 1 24.5 2 14 142. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SRB 1 SLO CRO BIH Totals 1 - 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 WomenGold Silver Bronze URS1 2 2+1= 3 AUS 4 3 GER 3 1 USA 1 1 1 GBR .25 1 LAT 1 LTU 1 GEO 1 AZE .25 .2+1= NOR 1 2 TCH CZE 1 ITA YUG2 1 BRA 1 FRA 1 NZL 1 IRL 1 TRI CAN RSA ISL 1 GRE 1 JPN KOR NGR - 4th 6 3 1 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 - 5th 1 4 5 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 6th 1 4 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 - 7th 1+1= 2 1 1 2+1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 - 1 0 0 0 1 & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G Points 1956 Gold 92 89.25 34 11 11. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 14.0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 3.1+1= TCH CZE1 POL 1 SWE ITA NZL CHI 1 FRA ROU ARG AUT HUN YUG SLO RSA Totals 9 8+2= 8 4th 3 1 1 2 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 - 5th 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 9 6th 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 9 7th 1 2 1 1 5 82.5 5 3 1 UKR 2 0.0.25 KGZ .5 1+1= 1 16.

3.25 .25 8 6 5.5 4 18 207 5 10 133.75 139. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 7 3.25 1.5 1 BLR .25 UKR 2 .25 1 GEO 1 KAZ .25 13.25 .25 4 3.5 6 12 126 2 8 90 1 6 62 4 54 4 40 2 3 35 3 2 33 2 2 32 2 24 1 3 20 0 20 2 17 1 1 16 1 1 14.25 3 1 1 UKR 1 0.25 LTU 1 AZE 1 Totals 6 1 1 4 5 1 1 2 2 6 1 0 1 0 8 72.1+1= BLR .25 2 150 52.25 3.25 2 Points 1.0.3.75 1 - 1.25 17.1+1= 1 ROU 1 1 TCH CZE 1 ITA 1 AUS 1 NZL FRA HUN NED SWE Totals 10 9+2= 9 4th 4 3 1 1 1 10 5th 5 1 2 1 1 10 6th 1 2 2+1= 1 1 1+1= 1= 8+3= 7th 1 1 1 1 1 5 8th Medals - 0.75 1 BAR .75 BLR 1 1 1 EST 1 1 - 2 1 - 12 2 1 1 135.5 14. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 4 1 7 2. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 2 4 2 1 1 1 UKR 2 0.25 Totals 2 1 - Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 9 8 5 URS1 5 4 4 GER 2 5 POL 2 2 GBR 1 3 NZL 2 1 SWE 1 ITA 1 1 AUS 1 1 1 FIN 1 HUN 1 2 FRA 1 1 BWI2 2 BEL 1 RSA 1 ETH 1 SUI MAR 1 TPE 1 IND NED CUB IRL PUR ISL NOR ROU VEN CAN DEN KEN YUG CRO TCH CZE Totals 24 24 24 4th 1 6 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 - 5th 6th 7th 2 6 1 1 2+1= 1 2 2 2+1= 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 1+1= 1 2 1 2 1= 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 24 22+2= 14+3= F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 8th Medals 1.75 23.0.0.5 2 7 102 1 4 52 2 4 40 3 30 1 29 2 26 3 25 1 1 24.5 2 14 1 1 13 1 13 1 12 0 5 0 4 0 2 0 2 0 2 5 30 345 1.2+1= 1 USA 3 1 POL .0.1.0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 5 1 .25 Totals 11 5 5 10 6 3+1= 2 - & 1.25 4 2 2 UKR 3 0.1.1.5 - - - Silver Bronze 4th - T A B L E S 5th 6th 7th 0. Breakdown of British West Indies placings: JAM .75 1.25 GEO 1 LTU 1 AZE .5 1.25 14. Breakdown of British West Indies placings: JAM .25 AZE .0.0.5 2.5 4 35 1 3 28.5 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 36 108 1296 1.75 8 1.1.25 3 .5 2 3.25 5 21 2.5 16 8th Medals Points 2 8 108 1 6 65 4 41.5 1 1+1= BLR 1 .75 0.25 .R I O 48 1960 Gold Silver Bronze 4th NED TPE 1 IND CUB IRL PUR ISL NOR VEN CAN DEN KEN YUG CRO Totals 34 33+2= 33 1 1 1 1 34 5th 2 0 1 6 6th ★ 7th 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 34 30+5= 19+3= F A C T S Points 1960 Gold 1 20 8 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 1182 BAR Totals 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 102 5 14.75 247.5 1 13 1 13 2 1 12 1 11 1 10 0 10 0 8 1 7 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 2.5 16 8thMedals Points 2 22 193 3 13 139.2.0.75 6.5 14 10 .5 11.5 3 24 2 20 2 16 1 12 1 11 1 10 0 10 1 1 8 1 7 1 0 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 2 0 3 15 72 837 1.25 Totals 5 4 4 6 1 2+1= 1 3 3 8 2.75 1.25 1 1 1 .25 0.25 1 0.25 1 KAZ .75 14.25 13 76 38.25 6 4 108 Tokyo 1964 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 14 7 3 URS1 5 2 11 GER 2 5 3 GBR 4 7 1 POL 2 4 2 AUS 1 1 4 HUN 3 1 NZL 2 2 ROU 2 1 FRA 1 1 ITA 1 1 CAN 1 1 TRI 1 2 JAM TCH CZE 2 JPN 1 SWE 1 ETH 1 FIN 1 BEL 1 CUB 1 KEN 1 BUL YUG 2 TUN 1 BRA NGR POR NED IND SUI TPE ESP VEN CIV GHA BAH NOR Totals 36 36 36 4th 4 4 3 5 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 36 5th 6th 5 4+1= 10 3 5 4+1= 2 6 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 36 34+4= 7th 3 7 5 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 34 8th Medals Points 4 24 243.25 2 - 1 - - WomenGold Silver Bronze URS1 6 1 1 GER 3 3 GBR .1.

75 3 1 AZE 1 LTU 1 BLR 1 EST 1 LAT .25 Totals 2 2 6 1 6 1 7 Women Gold Silver Bronze URS1 3 5 GER 1 2 GBR 2 2 1 POL 1 3 1 USA 2 2 AUS 1 1 3 ROU 2 1 HUN 1 NZL 1 FRA 1 BUL YUG2 CAN - 4th 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 - 5th 4 3 1 1 1 6th 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 - 7th 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 F A C T S 8th Medals 1 4 - 0 1 1 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 & Points 1964 Gold 8 7.5 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 24 72 864 2 1 1 4 5 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 63.25 .R I O 1964 Gold LTU LAT AZE GEO KGZ KAZ Totals 5 Silver Bronze 4th 2 1 1 11 1 0. Combined German placings: 3 7 4 7 7 14 213 10 4 11 .75 6 5 4 3 1.5 1 13 1 13 2 1 12 1 10 1 1 10 1 7 1 7 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 2.25 10 3 1 7 2.25 Totals 3 5 3 4 2 - - 7 1 0 0 0 0 8 Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SLO SRB Totals - - 0 0 0 12 12 1 1 12 1 1 - 1 1 2 71.0.0.0.5 3 7 77 2 3 47 2 2 32 3 32 3 29 1 1 24 1 1 23 1 3 20 2 18 2 17 0 15 1 1 14.5 4 10 116 2 7 82. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SLO SRB Totals Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 12 5 3 URS1 2 2 6 GER 1 3 3 GBR 2 5 POL 1 1 1 ITA 1 1 HUN 2 1 NZL 2 1 FRA 1 AUS 1 TRI 1 2 CAN 1 1 TCH CZE 2 JAM SWE 1 ETH 1 FIN 1 BEL 1 KEN 1 JPN 1 CUB 1 TUN 1 NGR POR IND ROU SUI TPE ESP VEN CIV BUL GHA BAH NOR Totals 24 24 24 2 0 1 6 1 1 - 1 1 2 5th 6th 5 4+1= 6 1 2 3+1= 1 4 1 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 24 22+4= 7th 2 7 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 1 3 1 3.5 1 3.5 17.25 6 4 4 1 207 JPN BRA JAM NED CUB Totals 12 6 2 8 8thMedals Points 2 20 204.5 10 7 6 4 4 3 1 116 8thMedals Points 8 91 3 3 51 3 5 49 5 43 2 4 39 5 39 2 3 31 1 22 1 11 2 1 9 0 8 0 8 0 6 Silver Bronze 4th T A B L E S 49 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1 1 12 1 12 1 1 12 12 0 0 0 0 0 36 6 5 5 5 4 432 Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 3 4 1.75 BLR 1 1 EST 1 LAT 1 GEO 1 KGZ 1 LTU 1 KAZ .25 UKR 2 . Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 6 3 3 2 1 UKR 1 2 1 1 BLR 1 1 GEO 1 LAT 1 EST 1 KGZ 1 Totals 3 2 8 4 6 3 1 1 1 7 3 1 1 1 0 0 13 79 29 11 8 8 4 3 142 2.25 91 6 2 8 Mexico City 1968 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 15 6 7 URS1 3 2 8 GDR2 2 3 1 FRG2 1 4 3 AUS 2 3 1 HUN 2 1 4 KEN 3 4 1 GBR 1 2 1 POL 1 1 FRA 1 1 ROU 2 2 TCH 3 1 1 ETH 1 1 CUB 2 ITA 2 MEX 1 TUN 1 1 AUT 1 1 JAM 1 NED 1 JPN 1 SWE TRI FIN 1 TPE 1 BRA 1 NZL 1 SEN BUL GRE TUR CAN YUG SLO NOR BEL SUI DEN MAD UGA Totals 36 36 36 4th 6 4 5 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 36 5th 6 6 7 3 2 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 36 6th 9 3 1 3 4 1 2 1 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 36 7th 2 1 6 5 1 1 3 6 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 36 8th Medals Points 28 289 1 13 142 1 6 112 6 8 101 1 6 76 7 61 8 60 1 4 60 2 2 52 4 2 39 4 30 1 2 27 2 2 26 1 2 24 1 2 23 1 1 18 2 14 1 2 14 1 14 2 1 13 1 12 2 0 12 1 0 9 1 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 6 1 0 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 3 1 0 3 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 36 108 1296 1.25 4 4th 3 1 2 4 2 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 24 ★ 5th 6th 7th 1 1 0.1.

25 8.5 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 36 114 1366 9 2. Combined German placings: 1 5 4 5 6 2 5 4 10 136 3.25 378 71. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 1 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5th 4 5 4 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 24 6th 5 3 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 24 7th 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 3 5 2 1 1 1 24 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 5 2 1 3 1 1 - 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 7 38 23 11 8 8 4 3 95 2.75 34 9 10.0.5 2 24 1 2 21 2 2 19 2 17 2 12 1 1 11 1 10 0 10 0 10 1 9 2 0 8. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 4 1 1 1 UKR 1 Totals 1 5 1 1 1 5 1 6 41 6 47 2.5 4 64 6 59 3 3 55 1 4 47 1 4 40 2 2 29 1 2 29 2 26 3 0 24.25 EST 1 GEO 1 KAZ 1 AZE . Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: UKR 5 3. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 1 SVK Totals 1 1 - 1 1 - - 1 0 1 13 3 16 Munich 1972 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 6 8 8 GDR1 8 7 5 FRG1 6 3 2 URS2 9 7 1 GBR 1 1 2 KEN 2 2 2 POL 1 2 FIN 3 1 BUL 2 2 TCH 3 1 1 AUS 2 ROU 2 HUN BEL 2 FRA 1 1 ITA 2 CUB 2 ETH 2 JAM 1 SWE 1 GHA YUG 4 AUT 1 CAN UGA 1 TUN 1 NZL 1 NOR BRA 1 ESP JPN NED SEN SUI GRE DEN MEX TRI Totals 38 38 38 4th 5th 6th 9 6 1 6 6+1= 5 5 5+1= 4 4 3 1= 1 3 4 2 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1+1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 38 37+2= 35+4= 1.25 2 1 1.75 8 8 7 6.0.25 1 1= LAT .25 1 - 3 31 3 5 - 8.5 11 153. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 - - 1 1 1 0 1 7 4 11 6th 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 7th 1 3 3 1 1 1 - Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 12 5 7 URS1 3 1 3 GDR2 1 2 1 FRG2 3 3 KEN 3 4 1 AUS 1 1 HUN 1 1 2 GBR 1 1 ETH 1 1 FRA 1 POL ITA 2 MEX 1 TUN 1 1 JAM 1 CUB 1 JPN 1 SWE TCH3 1 TRI BRA 1 FIN 1 NZL 1 SEN GRE TUR BUL BEL CAN DEN MAD NOR SUI UGA Totals 24 24 24 4th 4 3 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1. Combined German placings: 2 2 2 YUG SLO CAN NOR FIN SUI Totals 12 Silver Bronze 4th T A B L E S 12 12 12 4 2 6 3 4 77 3.25 1 1 RUS 2 1 2 LTU 1 1 BLR .25 1.R I O 50 1968 Gold Silver Bronze 4th 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S 5th 6th 7th 3.5 8 17 173. Combined German placings: 14 10 7 11 11+2= 9 7th 1 3 6 2 4 5 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 36 8th Medals Points 2 22 228 3 20 224. Breakdown of USSR placings: RUS 2 UKR 1 1 BLR 1 GEO 1 LAT 1 EST KGZ Totals 3 1 3 Women Gold Silver Bronze USA 3 1 URS1 1 5 GDR2 1 1 AUS 1 2 1 FRG2 1 1 ROU 2 2 HUN 1 2 GBR 2 POL 1 1 TCH3 1 FRA 1 AUT 1 1 NED 1 CUB 1 TPE 1 BUL - 4th 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 - 5th 2 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 - 8th Medals & 1 1 2 0 2 Points 20 7 27 8thMedals Points 24 226 7 95 1 4 69 3 6 67 8 60 1 2 36 4 31 1 2 31 2 2 26 2 1 25 2 0 25 1 2 23 1 1 18 2 14 1 14 1 12 1 12 2 0 12 1 1 11 1 0 9 1 7 1 7 1 6 1 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 24 72 864 8thMedals Points 4 63 1 6 47 2 43 4 40 3 2 34 4 30 3 30 2 29 2 27 1 16 2 1 14 1 2 14 2 1 13 1 1 12 1 8 0 3 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 1968 Gold 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 12 1 12 1 1 12 1 1 12 0 0 0 0 0 36 3 2 2 1 1 432 1.1.5 1 8 1 1 8 1 1 7 1 0 7 1 6 0 5 1 0 5 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2.75 .25 1 1 1 0.

75 5 2 2 119.5 2 7 86 4 84 6 59 1 4 45 3 39 1 2 38 2 24 1 0 22.5 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 22 72 862 3 2 5 7.25 1.25 1 KGZ 1 LTU 1 RUS Totals 6 6 1 2 1 1= 1 6 & 61.5 7 69. Combined German placings: 4 4 3 7 2 11 Women Gold Silver Bronze GDR1 6 4 3 FRG1 4 2 1 URS2 3 1 BUL 2 2 USA 1 2 AUS 2 GBR 1 ROU 2 CUB 2 POL 1 4th 4 2 2 2 1 1 1 - 7 5 5th 2+1= 3+1= 2 1 2 1 6th 2 1 3 1 1 7th 3 1 1 1 2 2 1 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G Points 1.5 1 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 1 0 5 0 3 0 2.5 1 1 2 1 1 2 22 7 29 - 0 0 0 0 4 4 2 10 AUT ITA TCH 3 YUG 4 FRA GHA NED SUI FIN CAN HUN JAM Totals 14 8thMedals Points 2 19 193 5 13 119.0.1.25 EST 1 GEO 1 KAZ 1 AZE .5 3 4 54 1 4 40 3 35 1 2 29 1 25 2 21 2 17 2 1 17 T A B L E S Silver Bronze 4th 51 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 2 1 14 13+2= 1 1 1 1 1 13 1 1 1 14 1 2 2 1 14 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 9 9 9 8 5 5 3 3 2 2 2 1 504 2 4 1 20 208 2. Combined German placings: 10 6 4 4 5+2= 1 1 2 Montreal 1976 Overall Gold Silver Bronze GDR1 11 7 9 USA 6 8 8 URS2 4 4 10 FRG1 1 4 4 POL 3 2 FIN 2 2 BUL 1 2 1 GBR 1 CUB 2 1 BEL 2 1 ITA 1 CAN 1 JAM 1 1 NZL 1 1 FRA 1 AUS SWE 1 ROU 1 TCH 3 1 BRA 1 HUN 1 MEX 1 TRI 1 POR 1 YUG 4 IRL PAN ESP ISR IND NOR DEN JPN Totals 37 37 37 4th 8 5 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 37 5th 6 6 4 4 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 37 6th 3 6 4 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 37 7th 4 3 6 2 1 2 6 3 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 37 1. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings CRO SLO Totals - - - - 0 0 0 4 4 8 14 1 1 1 14 1.25 8.R I O 1972 Gold ★ F A C T S 5th 6th 7th 3 1= 2 8 3.25 1 1 1 0. Combined German placings: 12 11 13 10 10 4 6 8th Medals Points 1 27 273 4 22 229 3 18 178 2 9 95 1 5 66 1 4 55 2 4 41 3 1 41 3 38 3 30 4 1 28 2 1 25 2 24 2 23 1 1 23 1 0 20 2 1 19 4 1 19 1 14 1 14 1 1 13 1 12 1 1 12 1 1 12 0 6 0 5 0 4 1 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 37 111 1332 3 36 368 .5 1 1 20 1 2 16 2 12 1 10 1 10 2 1 10 1 8 1 1 8 1 1 7 1 0 7 0 6. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 1 2 UKR 1 1 LTU 1 MDA 1 Totals 3 1 2 2 1 3 3 2 1 1 0 4 32 10 7 5 54 3. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: CRO SLO SRB Totals - - 1 1 5th 6th 5 1 1 1= 4 3 2 4 1 1 3 1 4 1 2 1 2 3 1+1= 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1= 24 22+4= 7th 1 5 2 4 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 KGZ MDA Totals 9 Silver Bronze 4th 2 0 1 6 7 1 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 6 7 6 URS1 6 6 1 GDR2 2 3 2 FRG2 2 1 1 KEN 2 2 2 FIN 3 1 GBR 1 2 POL 1 1 BEL 2 HUN TCH CZE 1 FRA 1 1 ETH 2 JAM 1 SWE 1 ITA 1 UGA 1 TUN 1 NZL 1 NOR CAN BRA 1 ESP GHA ROU JPN SEN GRE DEN YUG SRB MEX TRI Totals 24 24 24 1 1 4 4th 7 2 2 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1 1 2 8th Medals 1972 Gold 0 0 17 5 5 173.75 8 8 7 6.25 1 BLR .5 170 8thMedals Points 1 13 138.25 0 0 0 13 2.25 1.75 10. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: SVK 1 CZE Totals 1 - - 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 7 2 9 4.25 1 1= LAT . Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 1 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 1 1 - 2 2 4.0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: UKR 4 3.

Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: CRO SRB Totals Women Gold Silver Bronze GDR1 9 4 6 URS2 2 2 4 FRG1 1 3 1 USA 2 1 BUL 1 2 1 AUS TCH3 1 POL 1 - 4th 6 2 1 2 1 - 5 3 2 - 1 1 2 - 5th 3 3 2 3 1 1 6th 1 3 2 1 1 - 7th 2 1 2 2 1 - 108.25 0.R I O 52 1976 Gold Silver Bronze 4th 5th 2 0 1 6 6th ★ 7th F A C T S 8th Medals & Points 2.5 90 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 1976 Gold 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1 1 14 1 14 1 1 1 1 1 1 14 1 1 2 1 1 14 1 1 3 1 1 1 14 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 11 10 9 8 5 5 3 3 2 2 1 504 1.3.5 15 7 1.75 2 194.75 1 1 1 1 0.25 1 3 GEO 1 BLR 1 LAT . Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 7.3.75 7. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 2 3.75 9+1= 4 4 3 1 1 UKR 3.5 0 0.25 1 1 LAT 1 LTU 0.5 43.25 Totals 2 2 6 1 1 1 5 1 1 2 4.5 Totals 4 4 10 3 4 4 6 1 11.5 1 1 1 BLR 1 1 LAT .25 1 1 1 1 UKR 0.0. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 - 1 1 - - 1 0 1 9 5 14 4.5 3 18 3. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 3 4 4.25 8 3.5 1 1 2 UKR . Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 - - 1 0 1 ITA FIN CAN ROU HUN GBR ISR JAM CUB SWE FRA Totals 14 Silver Bronze 4th T A B L E S 1 14 14 1 1 - 64.25 1 .2.5 .5 1 3 2 1 2 BLR 1 2 1 1 KGZ 1.5 1 1 16 1 0 16 2 15 2 14 0 12 0 10 0 10 1 0 8 1 7 0 7 1 0 7 0 6 0 6 0 2 35 114 1365 135 3 3 6 8thMedals Points 1 19 186 1 8 88 5 47 3 3 45 1 4 37 0 16 1 14 1 12 1.25 1 1 0.5 73 30 20 20 14 12 8 4 3 378.5 5 10 101 2 7 95.5 14 8 4 178 - 0 0 0 44 28.75 2 2 1 3 UKR .25 10 2. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 2 - - 1 1.5 3.25 Totals 2 2 4 2 3 3 1 1 1 7.0.3.5 88 9 5 14 Moscow 1980 Overall Gold Silver Bronze URS1 15 13+1= 12 GDR 11 8 10 GBR 4 2 4 POL 2 3+1= 1 BUL 1 1 ITA 3 1 CUB 1 2 1 ETH 2 2 FIN 1 1 FRA 1 ESP 1 TCH 2 2 ROU AUS 1 BRA 1 HUN JAM 2 TAN 2 AUT SWE SUI YUG 3 NED 1 IRL TRI BEL MEX NGR Totals 38 37+2= 37 4th 8 11 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 38 5th 6th 5 6 9 5+1= 2 2 3 5 2 4 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1= 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 38 37+2= 7th 2 4 1 6 4 1 1 1 4 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 37 8th Medals Points 7 41 378. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 1 2 1.5 8 7 2.5 4 29 324.5 20. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: CRO SRB Totals - - 1 1 2 - - 0 0 0 3 3 6 5th 3 1 3 2 2 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 23 6th 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 23 7th 1 5 2 1 1 2 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 23 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 6 6 7 URS1 2 2 6 GDR2 2 3 3 POL 2 2 FRG2 1 3 FIN 2 2 CUB 2 1 GBR 1 BEL 2 1 NZL 1 1 FRA 1 JAM 1 1 SWE 1 ITA CAN 1 BRA 1 MEX 1 TRI 1 POR 1 ROU 1 HUN 1 YUG3 IRL PAN AUS BUL ESP IND NOR DEN JPN Totals 23 23 23 4th 5 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 23 8thMedals Points 1 19 184 2 10 90 8 87 1 4 54 2 4 48 1 4 45 3 36 2 1 36 3 30 2 23 1 22 2 21 2 1 17 3 0 17 1 1 16 1 14 1 12 1 1 12 1 1 12 1 1 11 1 8 0 6 0 5 0 4 1 0 4 1 0 4 1 0 4 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 23 69 828 1. Combined German placings: 10 7 7 6 5 1 4 1 24 233 2.75 .5 3 3 .25 0 7 41 2.25 1 UZB 1 Totals 15 13+1= 12 8 5 6 2 2 21.25 1 2 2 1 1.5 5 2 51 2 4 46 1 4 43 4 35 2 34 1 1 33 1 27 2 24 2 0 19 2 1 17.0.75 1 1 2 3 BLR 1 1 1 GEO 1 LAT 0. Combined German placings: 2 4 6 4 2 12 3.25 1 1 EST 1 1 1 GEO 2 KAZ 0.

Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 3.5 5 9 87 7 77 1 5 73 2 41 1 3 36.5 4.25 2 - 1 0 1 10. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 4.1.5 24 AUS BEL FIN Totals 14 0 0 0 0 4 3 1 8 8thMedals Points 6 23 218. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SLO SRB CRO Totals - 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 0 0 0 0 4 3 1 8 5th 5 2 1 2 1 2 1 - 6th 2+1= 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 - 7th 2 2 1 2 2 1 - Women Gold Silver Bronze GDR 5 5 5 URS1 7 6 5 POL 1 1 BUL 1 GBR 2 ITA 1 ROU TCH CZE 1 JAM 1 CUB 1 HUN FRA SWE - 4th 7 2 1 1 1 1 1 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 108.5 8thMedals Points 2 15 174.5 2 1 1 1 KGZ 1 1 GEO 1 KAZ 1 UZB 1 LTU 1 Totals 7 6 5 2 2 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 42 10.25 2 - 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 5th 3 4 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 24 6th 3 3 3 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 2 2 1 24 7th 2 1 5 1 1 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 24 & Points 1980 Gold 0 2 3.5 3 34 5 2 30 1 3 28 3 23 1 21 1 1 18 1 18 1 16 1 2 15 1 1 14 1 1 14 .25 1 KAZ 0.25 4+1= 2 3 3 BLR 1 2 1 1 UKR 1 1 1 1 1 EST 1 1 1 LAT 1 GEO 1 KGZ 0.5 3.75 0.25 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 .5 1 18 160 1 2 31 2 1 29 3 2 25 1 1 14 2 0 14 1 10 1 9 1 8 0 8 0 6 0 5 Silver Bronze 4th 14 14 14 T A B L E S 5th 53 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1= 14 13+2= 1 1 1 13 12 4.5 2 14 150 2 8 76 1 5 64.R I O 1980 Gold SVK Totals - Silver Bronze 4th 2 - - 3. Breakdown of Yugoslavian placings: SLO SRB CRO Totals Men Gold URS1 8 GDR 6 GBR 4 POL 2 ETH 2 CUB ITA 2 FIN ESP FRA BUL BRA TAN TCH2 AUS AUT SUI HUN YUG3 NED IRL TRI JAM MEX SWE ROU BEL NGR Totals 24 Silver Bronze 7+1= 7 3 5 2 2 2+1= 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 23+2= 23 4th 6 4 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals - 1 2 0.25 Totals 8 7+1= 7 6 3 3 - 1 11.5 5 2 1 1 1 UKR 2. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 SVK Totals 1 - 1 1 1.25 .25 1 LTU 0.25 1 0.5 14 3.5 4 35 1 3 35 1 3 32 2 32 1 27 1 1 27 3 1 22 1 1 16 2 14 1 14 2 1 13 0 12 0 10 1 0 8 1 0 8 1 7 0 7 1 0 7 1 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 2 23 72 863 1.25 6 23 2.5 30 29 20 8 7 8 6 2 218.5 2 2 502 1.5 1 1 1 0 0 18 86 44 12 7 6 3 2 160 Los Angeles 1984 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 16 15 7+2= GBR 3 7 6 FRG 4 2 5 ITA 3 1 3 ROU 3 3 4 CAN 2 3 FRA 1 1 2= FIN 2 1 1 AUS 1 1 1 KEN 1 1 JAM 1 2 SWE 2 1 POR 1 2 CHN 1 MEX 2 1 NOR 1 SUI 1 ESP 1 MAR 2 BRA 1 NGR 1 JPN NED 1 IRL 1 CIV 1 IND BAH NZL SEN BAR ISL TAN BEL TRI UGA DJI KOR SUD Totals 41 41 39+4= 4th 9 4 3 4 3 2 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 39 5th 8 6 5 4 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 41 6th 7 3 5 2 2 4 1 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 41 7th 5 6 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 41 8th Medals Points 5 40 399 6 16 180 11 132 1 7 96 1 10 70 7 5 68 2 4 58 4 53 1 3 53 1 2 42 2 3 36 1 3 32 1 3 24 1 1 24 3 23 1 1 22 1 20 1 18 2 16 1 1 14 1 1 14 0 13 1 1 11 1 1 8 1 7 0 7 1 0 7 1 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 39 125 1474 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 9 8 6+1= GBR 2 5 2 FRG 2 2 3 ITA 2 3 KEN 1 1 FRA 1 1 1= FIN 2 1 CAN 2 SWE 2 1 MEX 2 1 AUS 1 CHN 1 ESP 1 SUI 1 POR 1 1 BRA 1 NGR 1 4th 5 1 2 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 - 5th 6 2 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 6th 5 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 7th 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 2 8th Medals Points 24 241.0.

3.5 4 26 271 3 27 243 1+1= 8 117. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 2 3 1 1 2 4 52 .5 36 18 14 6 2 1 276. Combined German placings: 6 12 13 9 8 3+1= 6 31 308 2 2 1 1 - 2 0 2 27 4 31 6th 2 1 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 23 7th 1 1+1= 1+1= 2 3 1+1= 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 23+3= 4 3.5 3 4 65 3 7 59 2 3 46 3 4 44.5 1 19 1 16 1 10 1 9 1 8 0 7 0 6 0 4 0 4 0 4 1 0 4 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 16 52 611 Seoul 1988 Overall Gold Silver Bronze URS1 10 6 9+1= USA 13 7 6 GDR2 6 11 10 GBR 6 2 FRG2 1 3 KEN 4 2 1 ITA 1 1 1 BUL 2 1 1 JAM 2 FRA 1 AUS 1 1 TCH3 1 1 CAN 1 BRA 1 1 ROU 1 1 ESP FIN 1 1 MAR 1 1 CHN 1 POR 1 HUN SWE 1= SEN 1 POL DJI 1 SUI 1 MEX - F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 4th 5th 11 4 4 9 6 2 5 3 3 2 2 1 1 1+1= 3 2 1 2+2= 1 2 2 2 1 1= 1 2 1 1 1 6th 7th 4 4+1= 6 2 5 1 6 3+1= 3 2+1= 2 1 3 1 2 2 5 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 8thMedals Points 3 26 276.5 2 44 2 1 44 2 2 40 2 31 2 1 26 2 20 2 18.25 2 1.25 8 .5 1 9 85 5 77 3 7 59 1 3 42 2 3 39 2 1 34 2 28 1 21 2 20 1 17 1 0 16 2 14 2 14 0 13 1 0 11 2 1 10 1 1 8.5 1 7 93 1 10 70 4 55 2 3 38 1 2 32 2 2 26 2 23 1 1 21.25 2 4 6 1 2 2 UKR 5 . Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 1 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 2 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 7 5 5 URS1 5 4 3+1= GDR2 3 3 3 GBR 4 1 KEN 4 2 1 ITA 1 1 1 FRG2 1 2 FRA 1 TCH 3 1 1 JAM 1 BRA 1 1 CAN 1 AUS FIN 1 1 MAR 1 1 ESP HUN BUL 1 SWE 1= SEN 1 DJI 1 SUI 1 MEX NGR JPN POR BEL BER NED CHI NOR TAN TRI POL IRL OMA Totals 24 24 23+2= 4th 5th 3 5 4 1 3 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1+2= 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 23+2= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 40 41+3= 37+2= Points 8th Medals Points 1 17 165 2 13 123.5 1 0 0 3 26 119 80.5 1 1 EST 1 GEO 1 KGZ 1= Totals 10 6 9+1= 11 4 4 4+1= 3 10.5 1 7 2 0 7 1 6 1 6 0 6 Silver Bronze 4th 42 41+2= T A B L E S 5th 1 1 1 1 1 41 40+4= 6th 7th 8th Medals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 127 6 5 5 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 4.5 1509 1.5 1 7 1 6 1 6 0 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 1 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 22 73 863 1.25 2 1 1 1 1 1 LTU 2 1 KAZ 0.5 0 15 2 14 2 14 2 1 14 1 13 1 0 11 1 1 8.R I O 54 1984 Gold JPN JAM MAR 1 CIV IRL NOR SEN BAH BAR ISL TAN BEL UGA DJI KOR NED NZL SUD Totals 24 Silver Bronze 4th ★ 2 0 1 6 F A C T S & 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1988 Gold 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 13 10 8 7 7 6 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 863 NGR JPN YUG CRO BEL BER NED CHI LUX NOR TAN TRI IRL OMA KOR Totals 42 1 1 1 24 23+2= 1 1 23 1 1 24 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 1 1 24 Women Gold Silver Bronze USA 7 7 1+1= GBR 1 2 4 ROU 3 3 4 FRG 2 2 CAN 2 1 AUS 1 1 JAM 2 ITA 1 1 FRA 1= FIN 1 NOR 1 NED 1 POR 1 MAR 1 IND CHN NZL SUI SWE BAH TRI IRL KEN Totals 17 17 16+2= 4th 4 3 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 16 5th 2 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 17 6th 2 3 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 17 7th 1 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 17 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 73 8thMedals Points 5 16 157.5 2.2+1= 4 1 BLR 0.

5 18 15+2= 54 646 2 2.1+1= MEX 1 BRA - 4th 3 8 2 3 1 1 2 3 2 1 2 3 2 1 3 5th 6 4 5 2 1 2 4 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 - 6th 2 3 7 6 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 - 7th 7 5 4 2 1 3 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 - F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 8thMedals Points 3+1= 30 273.3 4 7 77 1 8 72 4 54 2 4 54 1= 4 49.5 1 3 34.5 BLR KAZ 0.3 10 21 236 1 10 119 3+1= 7 86. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 1 1 1 SVK 1 Totals 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 UKR 2.3 1 1 1542.3 1 32 1 4 30 2 23 1 1 21 2 20 2 20 1 20 2 1 17 1 1 17 2 15 0 15 1 0 15 2 14 1 11 0 11 1 9 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 7 1 7 2 0 6 1 1 6 0 5 0 5 .0.0 1.R I O 1988 Gold ★ F A C T S 5th 6th 7th 1 4 1 1 1 1= 1+1= 2 2. Breakdown of Unified Team (EUN) placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 5.25 0 1 UZB 1 0 1 Totals 7 11 3 8 4 3 5 10 21 236 2.25 1 1 1 1 LTU 1 1 GEO 1 Totals 5 2 6 7 3 3 3 3 19 184 1 1 6.75 2 1 7 14.25 1 0 13 67 55 18 11 2 153 Barcelona 1992 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 12 8 9+1= EUN1 7 11 3 GER 4 1 5 CUB 2 1 4 GBR 2 4 KEN 2 4 2 CHN 1 1 2 JAM 3 1 CAN 1 1 1 ITA 1 ESP 2 1 1 JPN 2 BUL 1 1 NGR 1 1 FIN 1 ROU 1 FRA 1 MAR 1 1 ETH 1 2 TCH2 2 AUS . Breakdown of German placings: 3 4 5 4 1 4 1+1= 3.3 4 6 79 1 8 72 2 4 53 4 44 3 35 1 34 1 4 33 2 2 31 1 2 29 1 2 29 1 28 1 25 1 24 2 23 3 23 2 20 2 2 18 1 1 17 0 15 Silver Bronze 4th 2 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 43 42+3= 2 1 1 1 42 T A B L E S 55 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 42 1 1 1 1 1 43 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 42 38+3= 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 131 Points 15 14 14 13 11 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2.5 6 3 4 3.5 154 UKR 0. Breakdown of USSR placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2.5 1.5 3 12 124 - 2 0 2 24 4 28 HUN NAM SWE ALG 1 GRE 1 POL AUT KOR 1 LTU 1 NED 1 BAH QAT IRL RSA TRI COL NZL SUI BER EST ISL MOZ NOR PRK POR IOP SRB CIV ISR Totals 43 7th 8thMedals Points 1 2 18 158 3 1 13 153 1 3 9 106 2 1+1= 3 40.25 4.5 18 14 7 6 1 123.5 1 2 1 14 3 0 10 2 0 9 1 8 0 5 1 0 5 1 0 4 0 3 1 0 2 1 0 2 1= 0 0. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 2 SVK 1 Totals 2 1 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 8 5 6+1= EUN1 3 2 2 KEN 2 4 2 GER 1 1 2 GBR 1 3 CUB 1 1 2 ITA 1 ESP 2 1 1 MAR 1 1 NGR 1 TCH 2 2 CAN 1 1 FIN 1 JPN 1 MEX 1 ETH 2 BRA HUN NAM 2 SWE 1 FRA JAM 1 KOR 1 LTU 1 BAH 1 QAT 1 TRI POL 1= CHN AUS 1= ROU SUI - 4th 1 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 5th 3 1 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 - - - 6th 1 5 4 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 - 7th 3 3 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 - - 2 0 2 16 4 20 8th Medals Points 2+1= 20 165.25 4 3 1 1 1 UKR 2.5 1 1 0 13 25. Combined German placings: 3 8 8 5 3 6th 3 3 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 17 4 8th Medals & Points 1992 Gold 3.5 LTU EST KGZ Totals 5 Silver Bronze 4th 2 0 1 6 1 1 4 1= 1 1 1 3+1= Women Gold Silver Bronze GDR1 3 8 7 URS2 5 2 6 USA 6 2 1 GBR 2 1 BUL 1 1 1 FRG1 1 AUS 1 1 JAM 1 ROU 1 1 CHN 1 FRA CAN POR 1 YUG CRO POL ITA TCH CZE ESP LUX KOR Totals 18 18 18 4th 5th 3 2 7 3 1 4 1 1 1 1+1= 2 1 1 2 1 1= 1 1 1 1 18 17+2= 1.5 3 2 1 2 2 3.5 2 1.5 2 4 1 BLR 0.5 44 BLR 2 2 2 2 28 TJK 1 1 8 KAZ .5 1 1 1 26 2 1 2 24 1 1 23 2 18.

1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 44 43+3= 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 43 1 3 1 5 1 2 1 1 1 3 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 42 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 39 6th 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 - 7th 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 - 4th 5 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 - 5th 4 3 4 2 2 2 1 1 - 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 2 3 2 3 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 132 Points 51 48 43 42 41 41 39 38 30 27 24 24 24 22 21 20 20 19 19 18 18 15 14 13 13 13 12 12 10 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 6 6 6 6 5 5 6 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1577 8th Medals Points 4 16 175 7 75 4 61 5 47 3 37 1 2 29 2 27 1 1 22 2 20 2 20 1 2 19 1 19 2 2 18 2 16 2 16 2 15 0 15 2 14 .25 0 1 UZB 1 0 1 Totals 3 2 2 2 1 1 3 4 7 77 2.0.0 UKR 1 BLR ITA FRA 3 CHN 1 CUB NGR 1 AUS POL 1 ETH 2 CAN 2 CZE 1 ESP BAH JPN NOR 1 FIN 1 GRE ROU SWE 1 MAR RSA 1 NAM BDI 1 POR 1 MEX HUN 1 TRI BUL 1 SLO BRA ALG 1 ECU 1 SYR 1 KOR LTU ZAM AUT MOZ UGA KAZ BAR SEN YUG SRB ARM SLE LAT BER EST SOM BEL NED NZL RWA TUN UZB Totals 44 1.R I O 56 1992 Gold AUT ALG BER EST ISL GRE IRL IOP SRB CIV ISR Totals 24 Silver Bronze 4th 24 23+3= 23 ★ 2 0 1 6 F A C T S 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals 1 1 1 23 1 1 1 24 1 2 1 1 1= 1 1 24 21+3= 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74 & Points 1996 Gold 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 2.5 5 1 2 3 2 5 9.5 UKR 0.3 1 1 862. Breakdown of Czechoslovakian placings: CZE 2 SVK 1 Totals 2 1 Women Gold Silver Bronze EUN 4 9 1 USA 4 3 3 GER 3 3 CHN 1 1 2 CUB 1 2 JAM 2 1 BUL 1 1 GBR 1 1 ROU 1 CAN 1 JPN 1 FRA 1 AUS 1 ALG 1 ETH 1 GRE 1 NED 1 NGR 1 FIN RSA 1 COL 1 NZL 1 IRL AUT MOZ NOR ESP PRK SWE POL POR ITA Totals 19 19 19 4th 6 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 19 5th 3 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 - - 6th 2 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 7th 2 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 18 - 2 0 2 16 4 20 8thMedals Points 6 14 159 1 10 108 1 6 65 4 47 3 3 37 3 35 1 2 29 2 2 25 1 20 1 15 1 14 1 13 1 1 12 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 6 1 6 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 1 0 3 1 0 3 0 2 17 57 680 Breakdown of Unified Team (EUN) placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 3.5 3 2 1 1 3. Breakdown of Unified Team (EUN) placings with relay points divided by four: RUS 2 1 2 2 0.5 BLR 1 2 1 1 Totals 4 9 1 6 3 2 2 6 14 102 38 19 159 Atlanta 1996 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 13 5 5 RUS 3 6 1 GER 3 1 3 KEN 1 4 3 JAM 1 3 2 GBR 4 2 4th 7 2 4 2 2 3 5th 6 6+1= 5+1= 3 1 3 6th 2 5 4 3 2 - 7th 3 2 3 4 - F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 8thMedals Points 6 23 246 1 10 129 3 7 113 1 8 86 6 69 1 6 68 Silver Bronze 4th 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 44 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 44 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 10 4 2 KEN 1 3 3 GER 1 1 2 GBR 4 1 RUS 3 BLR 1 1 UKR 2 CUB 1 ESP 1 1 JAM 1 1 POL 1 1 ITA 1 MAR 2 CAN 2 CZE 1 1 RSA 1 1 AUS NAM 2 - T A B L E S 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals 3 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 .75 1 2 5 52 BLR 1 1 1 9 TJK 1 1 8 UKR 1 1 1 0 6 KAZ .

R I O 1996 Gold BDI 1 FRA 1 NOR 1 MEX TRI FIN SWE BRA ALG 1 ECU 1 ETH 1 HUN 1 KOR ZAM UGA KAZ BAR SEN YUG SRB LTU ARM JPN BER EST GRE LAT NGR SLO SOM BAH BEL BUL NED RWA TUN UZB Totals 24 Silver Bronze 4th 1 1 24 1 2 1 1 1 24 Women Gold Silver Bronze RUS 3 3 1 USA 3 1 3 GER 2 1 JAM 1 2 1 CHN 1 2 1 NGR 1 1 2 FRA 2 1 UKR 1 1 ITA 2 1 AUS 2 GBR 1 BAH 1 ETH 1 1 BLR 1 1 CUB 1 ROU 1 JPN 1 GRE 1 POR 1 KEN 1 POL FIN 1 BUL 1 SWE 1 SYR 1 CZE 1 CAN SLO 1 NOR 1 AUT 1 MOZ 1 ESP SLE HUN LTU LAT NZL Totals 20 20 20 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & 5th 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 1 1 1 1 1 23 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 13 13 13 13 12 10 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 6 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 858 4th 5th 2 4+1= 2 2 2 1+1= 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 20 19+3= 6th 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 7th 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 19 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 8thMedals Points 1 7 92 2 7 71 3 3 52 4 49 1 4 41 4 36 1 3 29 1 2 24 3 24 1 2 23 1 1 21 1 20 2 19 1 2 19 1 19 1 1 19 1 17 1 16 1 13 1 1 11 1 0 11 1 10 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 1 7 1 6 1 6 0 4 0 4 1 0 4 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 19 60 719 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 2000 1st Silver Bronze 4th T A B L E S 5th 6th 57 7th 8th Top 3 Points Sydney 2000 See also IOC Medal tables Overall 1st Silver Bronze USA 7 4 5 RUS 3 4 6 GER 2 1 2 GBR 2 2 2 ETH 4 1 3 CUB 2 2 2 KEN 2 3 2 JAM 6 3 POL 4 AUS 1 2 BLR 2 3 ROU 1 2 1+1= GRE 2 2 UKR 2 BAH 2 1 RSA 1 2 MAR 1 3 ALG 1 1 2 CZE 1 1 ITA 2 ESP 1 FRA NGR 1 1 MEX 1 1 BRA 1 NOR 1 1 JPN 1 SWE 1= FIN 1 TTO 1 1 KAZ 1 CHN 1 BAR 1 IRL 1 CAN BUL 1 EST 1 LTU 1 MOZ 1 AUT 1 DEN 1 ISL 1 KSA 1 LAT 1 SRI 1 POR 1 ECU SLO HUN ISR SUI BOT HAI SKN PRK Totals 46 46 45+2= 4th 5th 6th 3 3 3 4 3 3 6 4 5 4 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 1 2 1 3 3 .5 4 41 1 2 41 3 39 1 3 35 1 4 33 4 31 2 2 31 1 2 31 1 1 29 1 0 25 2 24 2 23 1 19 2 15 1 15 1 1 14 1 1 13 2 13 1 11 1 1 11 1 11 1 10 9.3+2= 3 2 1 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 45 45+2= 44+2= 7th 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 45 8th Top 3 Points 4 16 153 5 13 135 7 5 101 2 6 96 8 83 2 6 83 7 79 1 9 73 2 4 62 2 3 56 5 49 5 42.5 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 1 8 1 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 6 0 5 0 5 1 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 40 139 1650 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 5 4 3 KEN 2 3 1 GBR 1 2 ETH 3 2 RUS 1 4 GER 1 1 CUB 2 2 1 POL 3 MAR 1 2 RSA 2 AUS 1 ESP - 4th 3 2 3 1 2 1 1 1 7th 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 8th Medals Points 2 12 119 6 61 1 3 60 5 47 5 46 5 2 45 1 5 44 2 3 36 3 26 2 24 1 1 23 1 0 23 5th 3 2 4 2 2 1 2= 1 6th 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 3 .

5 1 1 39 3 36 1 3 36 2 4 34 2 33 1 2 33 4 31 3 30 1 26 1 23 1 18 1 16 2 15 1 12 1 12 1 0 12 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 11 1 10 1 10 0 10 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 7 1 1 7 1 6 1 6 1 5.2+1= 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 45+4= 43+2= 8th Top 3 Points 3 25 235.5 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 6 0 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5 1 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 40 138 1650 Men Gold USA 7 KEN 1 RUS 1 2nd 9 2 1 3rd 3 2 3 4th 3 1 1 5th 1 1 8th Top 3 Points 2 19 159 5 53 5 49 6th 1 2 1 7th 1 2 2 .5 8.5 5 19 186 1 5 78 7 72 4 69.5 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 5 5 4 4 3 2 2 2 1 860 4th 3 1 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 5th 2 0 1 6 5th 2 4 2 1 3 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 22 6th 1 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 7th 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 8th Top 3 Points 5 8 89 2 3 56 1 7 53 5 42.5 1 3 35 4 2 33 2 3 33 1 3 29 2 29 3 27 1 3 26 3 24 1 2 24 2 2 23.5 1 2 18 1 17 2 15 1 15 2 14 2 13 1 1 13 0 13 1 0 12 1 10 1 1 10 0 9.R I O 58 2000 Gold JAM CZE 1 ALG BRA ITA BLR UKR MEX FRA TTO FIN 1 GRE 1 BAR CAN SWE EST 1 LTU 1 NGR 1 DEN KSA LAT BAH ECU JPN ISR SUI HUN BOT HAI SKN AUT Totals 24 Silver Bronze 4th 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 Women 1st Silver Bronze RUS 2 4 2 GER 1 2 JAM 5 2 ROU 1 2 1+1= CUB 1 ETH 1 1 1 GBR 1 2 USA 2 2 BAH 2 AUS 1 1 BLR 2 2 GRE 1 2 POL 1 UKR 1 KEN 1 NGR 1 NOR 1 1 ALG 1 ITA 1 CZE KAZ 1 CHN 1 RSA 1 JPN 1 IRL 1 FRA BUL 1 MOZ 1 ISL 1 MEX AUT 1 SRI 1 MAR 1 ESP 1 POR 1 SWE 1= SLO HUN DEN FIN PRK Totals 22 22 21+2= ★ F A C T S & 6th 7th 8th Medals Points 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1+1= 1 1= 1 1 1 1 24 23+2= 22+2= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 20 19 19 19 19 18 18 15 15 13 12 11 11 9.5 2 39 1 3 37.5 0 5 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 20 67 790 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 2004 Gold 2nd 3rd 4th T A B L E S 5th 6th 7th 8th Top 3 Points Athens 2004 See also IOC Medal tables Overall Gold USA 9 RUS 6 JAM 2 ETH 2 GBR 3 KEN 1 CUB 2 BLR 1 POL 1 GER GRE 2 UKR JPN 2 ESP AUS CHN 2 ROU MAR 2 BAH 1 ITA 2 CZE 1 SWE 3 RSA FRA POR HUN LTU 1 LAT NGR DEN BRA BUL NED SLO EST CAN CMR 1 DOM 1 NOR 1 TUR ERI MEX KAZ IND BEL ECU GRN MOZ NAM QAT UGA SUD ALG NZL ISL PAN GHA MRI SCG SKN SVK BAR TTO BOT FIN ISR Totals 46 2nd 11 7 1 3 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 3rd 5 6 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 4th 7 4 4 3 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 5th 6th 7th 1 3 2+1= 3 4 2 4 2 2 3 2 1= 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 4 3 2 2 2 6 1 1 3 1= 2 1 1 3 1= 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1= 4 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 .5 7 67 2 5 53 1 3 52 2 48 2 2 47 1 5 42 3 3 40.

5 2 2 43 4 40 1 2 39 1 2 37 2 0 31.5 3 3 2 2 2 1 788 Women Gold Silver RUS 5 6 USA 2 2 JAM 2 GRE 2 2 CUB 2 1 ETH 1 1 GBR 2 UKR 1 BLR 1 GER 2 POL BAH 1 ROU 1 CHN 1 AUS JPN 1 KEN 2 BUL CZE FRA - 3rd 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4th 3 4 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5th 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 - 6th 7th 3 2 1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1= 1 3 1 3 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 2 0 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 8th Top 3 Points 5 14 137 1 6 76.5 2 24 1 1 23 2 22 1 21 2 20 2 19 2 19 2 18 1 18 1 1 17 2 17 2 16 2 15 1 14 2 14 1 12 1 11 0 10 0 10 1 1 9 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 1 7 1 6 1 0 6 1 0 6 0 5 0 5 .R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G T A B L E S 2004 Gold 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th Top 3 Points 2004 Gold Silver 3rd 4th 5th 7th 8th Top 3 Points ETH 1 GBR 1 ESP JAM JPN 1 ITA 2 MAR 2 BLR POL 1 AUS POR GER RSA SWE 2 CHN 1 CZE 1 HUN CUB FRA DEN LAT BRA NGR EST DOM 1 LTU 1 NOR 1 ROU ERI UKR NED TUR KAZ ECU GRN NAM QAT UGA CAN PAN SLO BAH GHA GRE MRI SKN SVK ALG BAR TTO BOT FIN ISR SUD Totals 24 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 24 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 24 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1 1 5 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 35 34 34 29 25 22 22 21 20 20 18 18 17 16 16 15 15 14 14 13 13 13 12 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 862 CMR 1 SWE 1 LTU MAR MEX RSA SLO IND BEL MOZ ITA NZL CAN ISL NED SUD ESP ALG SCG HUN LAT NGR TUR Totals 22 1 1 1 1 22 1 22 1 22 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 .5 2 31 1 2 29 1 28 2 26 1 2 25 4 1 17 1 15 1 14 2 14 0 13 1 11 1 9.5 4 49 1 5 39 1 4 39 4 37 3 35.5 6th 59 Beijing 2008 Overall Gold Silver Bronze USA 7 9 7 RUS 6 5 7 KEN 6 4 4 JAM 6 1+2= 2 ETH 4 1 2 GBR 1 2 1 CUB 1 2 2 BLR 1 3 2 UKR 1 1 3 GER 1 POL 1 1 AUS 1 2 1 CHN 2 FRA 1 1 ESP CAN 2 CZE 1 BAH 1 1 BRA 1 ITA 1 1 BEL 1 1 NOR 1 1 TTO 2 FIN 1 ROU 1 MAR 1 1 TUR 2 NZL 1 1 RSA 1 NGR 2 JPN 1 SLO 1 ZIM BRN POR 1 CMR 1 EST 1 PAN 1 CRO 1 ECU 1 LAT 1 SUD 1 GRE 1 LTU 1 HUN SWE AHO KAZ - 4th 4 6 3 2 2 4 2 3 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 5th 3 3 3 2 1 2 2 2 4 3 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 - 6th 7th 2 2 8 4 1 3 5 3 2 2 3 2 3 1 2 2 2+1= 2 4 4 1 1 2 2+1= 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 8th Medals Points 5 23 208 2 18 201 14 136 1 11 120 1 7 76 3 4 72 5 61 1 6 60 1 5 51 5 1 43.5 4 4 4 3.5 3 3 32.1+1= 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 21+4= 19+2= 1 18 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 66 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 5 4.

5 10 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 4 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 822 5 2 4 3 2 2 1 3 2 0 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69 London 2012 See also IOC Medal tables Overall 1st USA 9 RUS 6 KEN 2 JAM 4 GER 1 ETH 3 GBR 4 CHN 1 FRA 1 UKR TTO 1 AUS 2 CZE 1 CUB POL 1 CAN BAH 1 BEL RSA ITA JPN DOM 1 NED ESP BOT MAR LTU BRA BRN FIN TUR 1 SLO - 2nd 12 3 4 4 4 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3rd 7 6 6 4 3 2 1= 3 1 2 2 1 2 1= 1 1 1 1 - 4th 9 2 3 2 2 5 3 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 - 5th 6th 8 4 3+1= 2 3 1 1 1 4 4+1= 3 2 2+1= 1+1= 3 1 2 3 3 1 .5 25 16 16 15 14 14 13 13 12.5 7 82 3 3 43 3 38 4 36 1 3 29 1 2 29 1 3 26 2 24 1 1 24 1 19 0 19 3 1 17 1 1 17 1 16 2 15 0 15 0 13 1 12 1 11 1 0 11 1 0 11 1 10 1 10 1 1 9 1 9 .R I O 60 2008 Gold Silver Bronze 4th UGA ERI MEX MOZ NED SEN SKN SUI ALG IRL QAT SVK BOT CAY Totals 47 46+2= 2 0 1 6 ★ 5th 6th 7th 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 43+2= F A C T S & 8th Medals Points 2008 Gold 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 43 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 1 1680 KEN 2 3 GBR 1 UKR 1 1 BLR 1 1 CHN CUB 2 GER ETH 2 TUR 2 POL BEL 1 1 CZE 1 NGR BRA 1 ROU 1 ESP CAN CMR 1 NZL 1 ITA AUS 1 CRO 1 NOR 1 GRE MAR KAZ FRA BRN MOZ BAH SLO IRL BOT CAY NED POR SVK Totals 23 22+2= 46 1 47 1 1 47 Men Gold Silver Bronze USA 4 5 5 KEN 4 1 4 RUS 2 1 3 ETH 2 1 1 JAM 3 AUS 1 1 1 CUB 1 2 FRA 1 1 GBR 2 POL 1 1 BLR 2 1 ESP TTO 2 BAH 1 1 FIN 1 GER RSA 1 CAN 1 UKR 1 ITA 1 NOR 1 JPN 1 MAR 1 ZIM CZE EST 1 PAN 1 POR 1 SLO 1 BRA ECU 1 LAT 1 NZL 1 SUD 1 LTU 1 HUN SWE BRN AHO CHN UGA ERI MEX BEL ROU SEN SKN SUI ALG NED QAT GRE IRL SVK Totals 24 24 24 4th 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 5th 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 6th 1 1 2 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 24 7th 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 8th Top 3 Points 1 14 106 9 76 6 57 4 51 1 3 44 3 33 3 32 2 32 2 2 30 1 2 27 1 3 26 1 0 19 2 18 2 18 1 18 2 0 18 1 14 1 14 1 1 13 1 12 1 12 1 12 1 11 0 10 1 0 9 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 6 1 0 6 1 0 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 1 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 1 0 3 1 0 3 3 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 22 72 858 Women 1st RUS 4 USA 3 JAM 3 4th 5 3 1 5th 2 3 1 6th 7 1 3 7th 2 2 1 8thMedals Points 2 12 144 4 9 102 8 76 2nd 4 4 1+2= 3rd 4 2 2 F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 141 Silver Bronze 4th 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 2 3 1 2 3 1 1 1 23 T A B L E S 5th 6th 7th 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2+1= 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1= 1 2 1 1 22 21+2= 8th Medals Points 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 60 42 38 34 34 29 25.1+1= 2 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7th 3 1 2 3 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 8th Top 3 Points 3 28 296 4 15 142.5 12 114 1 12 108 2 8 98 1 7 94 4 6 85.

R I O 2012 1st NGR ALG 1 CRO 1 GRN 1 HUN 1 KAZ 1 NZL 1 TUN 1 UGA 1 COL GUA IRI LAT NOR SVK EST IRL PUR SWE CIV ERI BLR QAT BAR IND MEX POR GRE ARG BDI AUT ECU SRB SUD UZB VEN ZIM Totals 47 Men 1st USA 3 KEN 2 JAM 3 GBR 3 GER 1 TTO 1 CHN 1 ETH FRA 1 RUS 1 AUS 1 BAH 1 POL 1 UKR JPN DOM 1 BEL CAN ITA NED MAR FIN CUB CZE ALG 1 GRN 1 HUN 1 UGA 1 BOT GUA IRI SLO NOR BRA EST IRL PUR - 2nd 3rd 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 47 46+3= 2nd 8 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 3rd 3 4 2 1= 1 2 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4th 5th 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & F I G U R E S / P L A C I N G 6th 7th 8th Top 3 Points 2012 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46 45+2= 45+3= 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 45 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 38 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1682 ESP LTU SWE ERI RSA QAT BAR SVK MEX GRE ARG ECU NGR SRB SUD VEN ZIM BLR IND TUR Totals 24 4th 5th 7 2 3 3 1= 1 2 2 1 2+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 - 6th 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - 7th 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 - 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 143 8thMedals Points 2 14 151 7 61 7 54 1 4 51.5 1 2 21 1 19 1 17 1 16 1 16 2 15 0 15 1 1 14 1 1 12 0 12 1 11 1 10 1 1 10 1 0 9 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 0 7 1 0 7 1 6 1 6 1 6 1st Women 1st USA 6 RUS 5 ETH 3 GER JAM 1 KEN CHN GBR 1 UKR CZE 1 CUB FRA RSA BRN CAN AUS 1 CRO 1 KAZ 1 NZL 1 TUN 1 TUR 1 COL POL ESP LAT NGR LTU BOT CIV ITA BEL POR BLR BRA BDI IND NED SVK TTO AUT SLO UZB SWE Totals 23 2nd 3rd 1= 24 23+3= 2nd 4 3 1 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 3rd 4 6 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 23 4th T A B L E S 61 5th 6th 7th 8th Top 3 Points 1 1 1 1 1 23 22+2= 1 1 1 23 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 3 1 1 1 1 21 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74 6 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 859 5th 6th 6 2 1 2 3 3 2+1= 1 1 1 3 1 2 1= 1= 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 22+3= 7th 2 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 22 4th 2 1 3 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 8th Medals Points 1 14 145 3 14 117 5 64 4 58 1 5 54 5 53 4 51 3 2 34 2 22 2 20 2 16 2 0 15 1 12 1 10 0 10 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 0 7 2 0 7 2 0 7 1 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 1 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 17 69 823 .5 2 4 40 4 33 3 31 1 2 30 1 3 28 1 1 25.

medals won by confirmed doping offenders have not been reallocated by the IOC.2+1= 15 15 16+2= 7 14+1= 14 13+1= 14 9 12 7 4 2 5 5 7 3 5 3 3 5 3 6+1= Bronze 195+5= 98 75+2= 62+1= 31+1= 42+3= 24 27+1= 25 19 24+2= 26 24+2= 12+1= 17 18 16 12+3= 9+1= 5 6 9 11 8 8 8 6 12 7 6 7 7 8 2 Medals 785. 2016 2. Overall Men & Women IOC Perspective 2000 Women’s 100m gold won by Marion Jones USA withdrawn and not reallocated (though additional silver awarded) 2004 Men’s Hammer Throw silver won by Ivan Tikhon BLR withdrawn and pending 2004 Women’s Shot Put bronze won by Svetlana Krivelyova RUS withdrawn and pending 2012 medals won by confirmed doping offenders. If Norman Pritchard is regarded as Indian then subtract two silvers from GBR and show India with: IND 0 2 0 2 . Not reflected on this table is the news that Zaripova’s gold medal was presented to Habiba Ghribi (TUN) in a special ceremony in Radès on June 4. or their reallocation process is ongoing as at June 10. but full reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Men’s 50 Kilometres Walk gold originally won by Sergey Kirkyapkin RUS 2012 Women’s 1500 Metres gold originally won by Aslı Çakır Alptekin TUR 2012 Women’s 3000 Metres Steeplechase gold originally won by Yuliya Zaripova RUS[1] 2012 Women’s 20 Kilometres Walk silver originally won by Olga Kaniskina RUS Overall Gold USA 330+2= GER 70 URS (EUN) 71 GBR[2] 56.8 FIN 49 SWE 21 KEN 24 AUS 20. 2016: RUS[1] 2 1 0 3 TUR 1 0 0 1 Totals 952+2= 941+20= 927+23= 2865 1.8+7 93 64+2= 83+3= 35 25 31 26 25 28+2= 22. 2016.2 74 66 64. 2016.2 60 55 54 45 44 40 36 35 25 24 23 21 20 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 14 13 12 Overall M E D A L Gold T A B L E S Silver Bronze Medals ESP 2 4 6 12 CZE 5 1 5 11 BAH 4 2 4 10 POR 4 2 4 10 MEX 3 5 2 10 SUI 0 6 2 8 ALG 4 1 2 7 AUT 1 2 4 7 IRL 4 2 0 6 EST 2 1 3 6 DEN 0 3 3 6 LTU 3 1 1 5 ARG 2 3 0 5 TUN[1] 1 3 1 5 LAT 0 4 1 5 TUR 0 3 2 5 SLO 1 2 1 4 NAM 0 4 0 4 DOM 2 1 0 3 KAZ 2 0 1 3 UGA 2 0 1 3 PAN 1 0 2 3 CMR 2 0 0 2 CRO 1 1 0 2 ECU 1 1 0 2 KOR 1 1 0 2 MOZ 1 0 1 2 CHI 0 2 0 2 SRI 0 2 0 2 TAN 0 2 0 2 YUG 0 2 0 2 COL 0 1 1 2 ISL 0 1 1 2 TPE 0 1 1 2 QAT 0 0 1+1= 2 BWI 0 0 2 2 PHI 0 0 2 2 BDI 1 0 0 1 GRN 1 0 0 1 LUX 1 0 0 1 SYR 1 0 0 1 BOT 0 1 0 1 CIV 0 1 0 1 GUA 0 1 0 1 HAI 0 1 0 1 IRI 0 1 0 1 KSA 0 1 0 1 SEN 0 1 0 1 SUD 0 1 0 1 ZAM 0 1 0 1 BAR 0 0 1 1 BRN 0 0 1 1 DJI 0 0 1 1 ERI 0 0 1 1 PUR 0 0 1 1 VEN 0 0 1 1 Withdrawn 1 0 0 1 Pending 0 1 1 2 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10.8 116 91 79 74.8 261 214 205. In eight events.2 RUS 24 JAM 17 FRA 15 ITA 19 CAN 14 POL 23 ETH 21 HUN 11 CUB 10 GRE 7 ROU 11 TCH 11 RSA 6 JPN 7 CHN 6 NZL 10 NOR 7 MAR 6 BUL 5 UKR 2 BLR 4 NED 6 BRA 4 TTO 2 NGR 2 BEL 3 Silver 246.R I O 62 Overall Gold 2 0 1 6 Silver ★ F A C T S Bronze & F I G U R E S / I O C Medals IOC MEDAL TABLES These medal-only tables reflect the International Olympic Committee’s perspective as at June 10.

but reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Men’s 50 Kilometres Walk gold originally won by Sergey Kirkyapkin RUS Gold USA 278+2= GBR[1] 46.2 JAM 10 POL 16 ETH 12 GRE 4 CUB 6 RUS 5 TCH 8 JPN 5 RSA 5 NZL 7 NOR 6 MAR 5 TTO 2 BRA 3 ESP 2 BEL 2 MEX 3 SUI 0 CZE 3 POR 2 EST 2 BLR 0 NED 0 IRL 4 ALG 2 CHN 2 BAH 1 NGR 1 LAT 0 DEN 0 UKR 0 LTU 3 ARG 2 TUN 1 NAM 0 DOM 2 UGA 2 PAN 1 ECU 1 KOR 1 SLO 1 BUL 1 Silver 211.8 156.8+7 64+1= 48 36+1= 33 25 22 21.8 GER 28 URS (EUN) 37 FIN 48 SWE 19 KEN 22 FRA 9 ITA 16 CAN 12 HUN 8 AUS 7.8 129 116 113 85 66 52.2+1= 8 10 13+1= 14 15 8+1= 5 7+1= 8 5 7 5 7 2 2 4 5 3 4 5+1= 4 6 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 0 1 1 4 3 1 0 2 2 4 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 Bronze 169+4= 44+1= 53 40+2= 31+1= 39+2= 22 20+1= 22 16+2= 16 14+1= 6 4+1= 10 10+3= 9 10 3 8 5 6 7 6 7 7 5 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 5 0 2 3 3 3 1 2 4 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 Medals 671. If Norman Pritchard is regarded as Indian then subtract two silvers from GBR and show India with: IND 0 2 0 2 Overall Women IOC Perspective 2000 Women’s 100m gold won by Marion Jones USA withdrawn and not reallocated (though additional silver awarded) 2004 Women’s Shot Put bronze won by Svetlana Krivelyova RUS withdrawn and pending 2012 medals won by confirmed doping offenders.R I O Overall Gold 2 0 1 6 Silver ★ F A C T S Bronze & F I G U R E S / I O C Medals Overall Men IOC Perspective 2004 Men’s Hammer Throw silver won by Ivan Tikhon BLR withdrawn and pending 2012 medal won by confirmed doping offender. but reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Women’s 1500 Metres gold originally won by Aslı Çakır Alptekin TUR 2012 Women’s 3000 Metres Steeplechase gold originally won by Yuliya Zaripova RUS[1] 2012 Women’s 20 Kilometres Walk silver originally won by Olga Kaniskina RUS GER USA URS (EUN) RUS GBR AUS JAM ROU POL ETH Gold 42 52 34 19 10 13 7 11 7 9 Silver 45 35 28+1= 20 19+2= 12 13+2= 13 8+1= 2 Bronze 45 26+1= 35 15 18 13 13 8+1= 8 7 Medals 132 114 98 54 49 38 35 33 24 18 . 2016: RUS 1 0 0 1 Totals 668+2= 659+14= 648+19= 2010 1.2 46 40 38 36.2 31 30 27 25 23 20 18 18 17 15 15 15 14 13 11 10 9 8 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 Overall M E D A L Gold T A B L E S Silver 63 Bronze Medals TAN 0 2 0 2 YUG 0 2 0 2 ROU 0 1 1 2 QAT 0 0 1+1= 2 BWI 0 0 2 2 PHI 0 0 2 2 TUR 0 0 2 2 BDI 1 0 0 1 GRN 1 0 0 1 LUX 1 0 0 1 BOT 0 1 0 1 CHI 0 1 0 1 CIV 0 1 0 1 GUA 0 1 0 1 HAI 0 1 0 1 IRI 0 1 0 1 ISL 0 1 0 1 KSA 0 1 0 1 SEN 0 1 0 1 SRI 0 1 0 1 SUD 0 1 0 1 TPE 0 1 0 1 ZAM 0 1 0 1 BAR 0 0 1 1 DJI 0 0 1 1 ERI 0 0 1 1 KAZ 0 0 1 1 PUR 0 0 1 1 VEN 0 0 1 1 Pending 0 1 0 1 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10.

R I O 64 Overall Gold 2 0 1 6 Silver ★ F A C T S Bronze & F I G U R E S / I O C Medals CUB 4 6 7 17 BUL 4 7 5 16 CHN 4 4 8 16 CAN 2 5 8 15 ITA 3 7 4 14 KEN 2 9 2 13 FRA 6 1 4+1= 12 UKR 2 2 8 12 GRE 3 6 2 11 BLR 4 2 4 10 NED 6 2 1 9 NGR 1 2 5 8 TCH 3 2 2 7 RSA 1 5 1 7 AUT 1 2 4 7 HUN 3 1 2 6 SWE 2 0 3+1= 6 BAH 3 1 1 5 NZL 3 0 2 5 JPN 2 2 1 5 CZE 2 0 3 5 NOR 1 3 1 5 POR 2 0 2 4 MAR 1 1 2 4 FIN 1 2 0 3 TUR 0 3 0 3 ALG 2 0 0 2 CMR 2 0 0 2 KAZ 2 0 0 2 BEL 1 1 0 2 CRO 1 1 0 2 MOZ 1 0 1 2 COL 0 1 1 2 SLO 0 1 1 2 BRA 1 0 0 1 SYR 1 0 0 1 ARG 0 1 0 1 CHI 0 1 0 1 IRL 0 1 0 1 LTU 0 1 0 1 MEX 0 1 0 1 SRI 0 1 0 1 TUN[1] 0 1 0 1 BRN 0 0 1 1 DEN 0 0 1 1 ESP 0 0 1 1 ISL 0 0 1 1 TPE 0 0 1 1 Withdrawn 1 0 0 1 Pending 0 0 1 1 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10. 2016: RUS[1] 1 1 0 2 TUR 1 0 0 1 Totals 284 282+6= 279+4= 855 1. 2016 2000 Overall IOC Perspective Women’s 100m gold won by Marion Jones USA withdrawn and not reallocated (though additional silver awarded) USA Gold 7 Silver 4 Bronze 5 Medals 16 2000 RUS JAM ETH KEN CUB GBR GER BLR ROU POL GRE ALG MAR BAH AUS RSA CZE NGR NOR ITA MEX TTO UKR BUL CHN EST FIN JPN KAZ LTU MOZ AUT BRA DEN IRL KSA LAT SRI BAR ESP ISL POR SWE Withdrawn Totals M E D A L T A B L E S Gold Silver Bronze Medals 3 0 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 4 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 46 4 6 1 3 2 2 1 0 2 0 3 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 47 6 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 1+1= 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1= 0 45+2= 13 9 8 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 140 2000 Women IOC Perspective Women’s 100m gold won by Marion Jones USA withdrawn and not reallocated (though additional silver awarded) RUS JAM ROU BLR USA ETH GBR GER GRE BAH AUS NOR Gold 2 0 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 Silver 4 5 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 Bronze 2 2 1+1= 2 2 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 Medals 8 7 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 . Not reflected on this table is the news that Zaripova’s gold medal was presented to Habiba Ghribi (TUN) in a special ceremony in Radès on June 4.

R I O 2000 ALG BUL CHN JPN KAZ MOZ POL AUT IRL ITA NGR RSA SRI CUB ESP ISL KEN MAR POR SWE UKR Withdrawn Totals 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & Gold Silver Bronze Medals 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 0 21+2= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 68 F I G U R E S / I O C 2004 Overall IOC Perspective 2004 Men’s Hammer Throw silver won by Ivan Tikhon BLR withdrawn and pending 2004 Women’s Shot Put bronze won by Svetlana Krivelyova RUS withdrawn and pending USA RUS ETH KEN GRE CUB JAM GBR SWE MAR ITA CZE ROU AUS ESP UKR CHN JPN LTU BAH POL GER RSA DEN Pending POR FRA NGR BLR CMR DOM NOR HUN Gold 9 6 2 1 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 Silver 11 7 3 4 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Bronze 5 6 2 2 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 Medals 25 19 7 7 5 5 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2004 LAT MEX BRA ERI EST SLO TUR Totals M E D A L T A B L E S 65 Gold Silver Bronze Medals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 46 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 46 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 138 2004 Men IOC Perspective 2004 Men’s Hammer Throw silver won by Ivan Tikhon BLR withdrawn and pending USA KEN RUS ITA ETH ESP MAR SWE CZE AUS DEN POR NGR CHN DOM GBR JPN LTU NOR POL HUN JAM LAT ROU RSA BRA CUB ERI EST FRA KAZ TUR Pending Totals Gold 7 1 1 2 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 Silver 9 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 24 Bronze 3 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 24 Medals 19 5 5 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 72 2004 Women IOC Perspective 2004 Women’s Shot Put bronze won by Svetlana Krivelyova RUS withdrawn and pending RUS USA GRE CUB JAM ETH Gold 5 2 2 2 2 1 Silver 6 2 2 1 0 1 Bronze 3 2 1 1 2 2 Medals 14 6 5 4 4 4 .

2016: RUS 1 0 0 1 Totals 24 24 23+3= 74 . Not reflected on this table is the news that Zaripova’s gold medal was presented to Habiba Ghribi (TUN) in a special ceremony in Radès on June 4. but reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Men’s 50 Kilometres Walk gold originally won by Sergey Kirkyapkin RUS Gold Silver Bronze Medals USA 3 8 3 14 JAM 3 2 2 7 KEN 2 1 4 7 GBR 3 0 1= 4 GER 1 2 1 4 TTO 1 1 2 4 FRA 1 1 1 3 CHN 1 0 2 3 DOM 1 1 0 2 AUS 0 2 0 2 ETH 0 1 1 2 ALG 1 0 0 1 BAH 1 0 0 1 GRN 1 0 0 1 HUN 1 0 0 1 POL 1 0 0 1 RUS 1 0 0 1 UGA 1 0 0 1 BOT 0 1 0 1 GUA 0 1 0 1 IRI 0 1 0 1 SLO 0 1 0 1 UKR 0 1 0 1 CUB 0 0 1 1 EST 0 0 1 1 FIN 0 0 1 1 ITA 0 0 1 1 JPN 0 0 1 1 MAR 0 0 1 1 PUR 0 0 1 1 CAN 0 0 1= 1 QAT 0 0 1= 1 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10.R I O 66 2004 GBR UKR BAH GER KEN ROU BLR CHN CMR JPN SWE LTU MAR MEX RSA AUS CZE FRA POL SLO Pending Totals 2 0 1 6 ★ F A C T S & Gold Silver Bronze Medals 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 66 F I G U R E S / I O C 2012 M E D A L Gold T A B L E S Silver Bronze Medals IRI 0 1 0 1 RSA 0 1 0 1 SLO 0 1 0 1 TUN[1] 0 1 0 1 TUR 0 1 0 1 BRN 0 0 1 1 EST 0 0 1 1 FIN 0 0 1 1 ITA 0 0 1 1 JPN 0 0 1 1 MAR 0 0 1 1 PUR 0 0 1 1 CAN 0 0 1= 1 QAT 0 0 1= 1 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10. but reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Men’s 50 Kilometres Walk gold originally won by Sergey Kirkyapkin RUS 2012 Women’s 1500 Metres gold originally won by Aslı Çakır Alptekin TUR 2012 Women’s 3000 Metres Steeplechase gold originally won by Yuliya Zaripova RUS[1] 2012 Women’s 20 Kilometres Walk silver originally won by Olga Kaniskina RUS USA RUS JAM KEN GER ETH GBR CHN TTO AUS FRA CUB UKR DOM POL CZE ALG BAH CRO GRN HUN KAZ NZL UGA BOT COL GUA Gold 9 6 4 2 1 3 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 Silver 12 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 Bronze 7 5 4 5 3 3 1= 4 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Medals 28 14 12 11 8 7 6 6 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2012 medals won by confirmed doping offenders. 2016 2012 Men 2012 Overall IOC Perspective IOC Perspective 2012 medals won by confirmed doping offenders. 2016: RUS[1] 2 1 0 3 TUR 1 0 0 1 Totals 47 47 46+3= 143 1.

2016: RUS[1] 1 1 0 2 TUR 1 0 0 1 Totals 23 23 23 69 1. 2016 M E D A L T A B L E S 67 . but reallocation process ongoing: 2012 Women’s 1500 Metres gold originally won by Aslı Çakır Alptekin TUR 2012 Women’s 3000 Metres Steeplechase gold originally won by Yuliya Zaripova RUS[1] 2012 Women’s 20 Kilometres Walk silver originally won by Olga Kaniskina RUS Gold Silver Bronze Medals USA 6 4 4 14 RUS 5 3 5 13 ETH 3 0 2 5 JAM 1 2 2 5 KEN 0 3 1 4 GER 0 2 2 4 CHN 0 1 2 3 GBR 1 1 0 2 CZE 1 0 1 2 CUB 0 1 1 2 UKR 0 0 2 2 AUS 1 0 0 1 CRO 1 0 0 1 KAZ 1 0 0 1 NZL 1 0 0 1 COL 0 1 0 1 POL 0 1 0 1 RSA 0 1 0 1 TUN[1] 0 1 0 1 TUR 0 1 0 1 BRN 0 0 1 1 2012 Medal reallocation process ongoing as at June 10. Not reflected on this table is the news that Zaripova’s gold medal was presented to Habiba Ghribi (TUN) in a special ceremony in Radès on June 4.R I O 2012 Gold 2 0 1 6 Silver ★ F A C T S Bronze & F I G U R E S / I O C Medals 2012 Women IOC Perspective 2012 medals won by confirmed doping offenders.

.

0) and Jarvis (11. 170. but not officially until 1964. Francis Lane of Princeton won the first heat in 12. USA GER HUN USA GRE (4) (5) (2) (1) (3) Thomas Burke Fritz Hofmann Alajos Szokolyi Francis Lane Alexandros Halkokondilis 12. 3.8. and were level until 50m. Most Finals A list of the athletes having reached the most Olympic finals. 170. Burke and Hofmann were drawn next to each other in lanes 4 and 5.7 (relay baton exchanged outside of zone). results and boxed statistics about all 951 medalwinning events in Olympic Games athletics. This was the first competition in the Olympics since their denouement in 393 AD. Countries: 9.6 (relay baton not carried throughout race).6e (Alojz Szokol) (Competitors: 16. including the 1906 Games in Athens and the discontinued events. Yugoslavia (YUG) or Serbia & Montenegro (SCG). “adjusted” times are given.2). focusing on the 110m hurdles. MEN Estimates The letter “e” denotes estimated marks. Paris. Curtis. and registered in fifths for distances further than 1500m. Women’s 2004 Shot Put. Yugloslavian competitors in 1992 onwards competed variously under the name of “Independent Olympic Participants” (IOP). Points are shared in the case of ties. Lane. Rowley qualified by winning a repechage heat in 11. As all athletes involved were Serbian. . Finalists: 5) In front of 40. Regrettably for others it was not. their placings in 1992-2004 are allocated to that country code which is now confirmed as SRB. 162.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 0 0 m 69 OLYMPIC ATHLETICS FINALS These pages show reports. Thomas Curtis (12. Duffey.1e 11.7 (two false starts). when Burke drew away to win by about oneand-a-half metres. At some Games – such as Seoul 1988 – this information was made available in abundance. Finalists: 4) Six heats saw five wins of 11. Any opinions expressed are not necessarily the IAAF. the logical placings are shown along with notes explaining that these placings do yet not mean that the first three athletes have won gold.8) won the other heats.0 by inches from Indian-born Norman Pritchard. Rightful Finalists In laned events with eight finalists where one or more of the finalists had their results annulled for a doping violation.1 (doping violation during or in connection with current competition). For 1948. with the other heats won by Duffey (11.2) and Thomas Burke (11. In 1964 and 1968.5e. or placed in the first eight in the case of a one-round event. Countries The actual Republics for USSR athletes are given. Shown with their name is what would have been their qualifying performances. Most Appearances A list of the athletes having competed at the most Olympics in the relevant event. These are derived from the “tenth” electrical times. and the crowd totalled no more than 1000. note that Lane later placed fourth in the US Championships 100y in 10.000 people in the stadium.2.3 (running out of lane). after the placing. 10 Apr 1896 1. All three rounds (four for Rowley) were run on the same day. In these events. did not turn out for the final. 40. It is only the IOC who can allocate Olympic medals. with a count of the medals won and total points awarded from eight for first place down to one for eighth. 163. three yards behind the world’s number one Bernie Wefers. crippled by a pulled tendon. Countries: 9. 14 Jul 1900 1.4 plus Jarvis winning heat 3 in 10. Notes on Contents Entries/Countries/Finalists Given after each result are totals for the overall entry.2 (obstruction). the finest sprinter of his era. and thousands more looking on from the hills above. Placing Table A table showing every national placing in the first eight of the event. Pre-1972 electric timings are given in parantheses alongside the original “tenth” times.2e 12. These are the men’s 2004 Hammer Throw and 2012 50 Kilometres Walk. 170. Doping Violations Adjustments following doping disqualifications are included as far as possible based on the information available from the IAAF and IOC as at June 10.6e 12.0 12. and is given where the official result was missing or evidently wrong. Additional Data Where possible and relevant. six for third down to one for eighth. the electric times were rounded off to the nearest tenth. or throwing order Where known and where relevant this is given in the second column. Field Event Series These have been given. where known. as is the breakdown of German athletes from the FRG and GDR in 1960 and 1964 when they competed as a combined team. 2012 1500m. Electric Timing This was used at the Olympic Games as early as 1928. silver and bronze. additional timing data such as reaction times and intermediate times are given. the persons or teams who would otherwise have qualified for that final are listed.2e DNF (Competitors: 20. 100 Metres Athens. STATISTICS BOXES In each box you will find the following data The Best on Points A list of the best six or so individual point scorers where eight points are awarded for first place. 163. A head-on shot of the finish suggests that Lane may have beaten Szokolyi for third place. 3. seven second. though not in some cases where there is no corresponding rule currently in force. jumping. number of countries with entries.9 (doping violation prior to current competition). not necessarily in full but certainly including all the medal-winning peformances. The rules quoted are preceded by the letter “r” and include: 40. 2016.6e 12. In particular Barcelona 1992 where not even reaction times were published. was leading the final by a metre on the undulating grass surface when he fell to the ground at the halfway point. 2. This time was emulated by Tewksbury in round 2. 4. In six events. 2. Wind and track surface conditions were unhelpful. For the 2000 women’s 100m. the number of the relevant rule is given according to the current IAAF Competition rule book. it has been made clear that the Marion Jones’s gold medal has not been re-allocated. and the number of finalists.0 11. (6) (5) (4) Frank Jarvis Walter Tewksbury Stan Rowley Arthur Duffey USA USA AUS USA 11.11 (illegal declaration). 5. Disqualification rule numbers Where a disqualification occurred. The Tug-of-War competitions of 19001920 are not included. 3000m Steeplechase and 20 Kilometres Walk. the IOC have yet to publicy confirm if it will re-allocate Olympic medals to those who finished behind the guilty.

and he pattered away to a clear (60cm) win. raising his arms in triumph as he crossed the line one and a half metres clear. and Abrahams edged ahead just before halfway and won by 60cm from Scholz.9e 11.78m) Cartmell closed by half a metre in the last quarter of the race. 5. 2. a metre clear of Applegarth in heat 16. Patching was away quickest. Edward was placed third. He emerged internationally in 1919 when running 10. inches ahead of the others who finished almost in a tie. The only non-American competitors.9e 10.9e (Competitors: 69. with Patching perhaps unlucky not to have been ruled third. 4. but photos clearly show Scholz about 15cm ahead of the Briton less than 2m from the line.4e 11.8 under the rules at the time. but the favourite for the final was Howard Drew who had pulled a muscle winning his semi-final.6 to win the Inter-Allied 100 and 200m titles. officially fourth. may well have been edged by Robertson for that position. McAllister lost out on a medal after pulling a muscle 20m from the finish. Athens. McAllister and London then won the semi-finals (both with 10. Louis. 7 Jul 1912 1. 7 Jul 1924 1.8/21.8 10.8OR 10.1e 11.8 10. 22 Jul 1908 1. a metre behind. 2. Finalists: 6) Paddock appeared initially in 1916 when taking the California Schools 100 and 220y titles at the age of 15. 5. Amsterdam.6. 6.6=OR 10. Porritt finished fastest of all. 3 Sep 1904 1.7e/10. Scholz led at halfway by 60cm. . 5. The poor showing of the Americans was blamed by some on the heavy track. The slender (1. 16 Aug 1920 1. Walker. but the long journey by ship to Europe was a more likely culprit. Archie Hahn Nate Cartmell William Hogenson Fay Moulton Frederick Heckwolf Lawson Robertson USA USA USA USA USA USA 11. Béla de Mezo (HUN) and Robert Kerr (CAN). (Competitors: 42. Scholz and Paddock were the favourites. Finalists: 4) Rector was the fastest man in the 17 (!) first round heats.6. though caught and passed by Rector at 50m. responded strongly at the 60m mark to pull away to win by a metre in 10. with the enormous (1.6 in the second round. and repeated his time in round 2. drawn on the inside in the final.9e 11. and Murchison began to rise expecting the athletes to be recalled to the line. Paddock was instructed to move his fingers behind the line at the start. Of the finalists.8 10. 3.3e 11. 3. London & McAllister were drawn in lanes 3-5. having earlier won the 60m and 200m.9e 10.9e 11. only Ali-Khan and Kirksey had failed to run 10.8e 10. 5.7. with Paddock fourth.8e 10.73/75kg) Paddock closed quickly and edged Kirksey by 30cm. Countries: 34. He became the first European to win the Olympic 100m. 6. 6.4e (Competitors: 11.9e 10. Countries: 14. Countries: 23. Drew did not appear at the start of the final. 2. Craig then got into top gear. The powerful (1. (4) (2) (6) (5) (1) (3) Harold Abrahams Jackson Scholz Arthur Porritt Chester Bowman Charles Paddock Loren Murchison GBR USA NZL USA USA USA 10. 2.0e (Competitors: 77.0e 11. were both eliminated in the heats.5m behind the field at the start. Countries: 31. but Abrahams caused a stir when running the only 10. (3) (1) (6) (5) (4) (2) Charles Paddock Morris Kirksey Harry Edward Jackson Scholz Emile Ali-Khan Loren Murchison USA USA GBR USA FRA USA 10.9 10. The time was rounded up to 10. At the eighth time of asking (!). 4.68m) Hahn was the favourite.7. retained his title comfortably.0e 11. 30 Jul 1928 1. Countries: 3.75/57kg) Williams started best with McAllister. Lippincott was the fastest in the first round with 10.2e 11.6). (1) (3) (6) (2) (5) (4) Archie Hahn Fay Moulton Nigel Barker William Eaton Lawson Robertson Knut Lindberg USA USA AUS USA USA SWE 11. Finalists: 5) As in 1908 there were 17 heats. both wastefully raising their arms at the finish.8 10. Finalists: 6) Williams was unfancied before Amsterdam but ran the best time of the second round when he equalled the Olympic record of 10. Antwerp. 3. but his pick-up was better than the others.2 11. with two qualifying from each heat for the semi-final round. catching the Springbok at 60m and won going Paris. 2. Meyer was second. 6. and Murchison was left some 4m behind the field. 3. In the final the field got away at the first attempt.9e 10.8e 11. 5. Countries: 22. 4. moving from fifth to third in the last 25m. Stockholm.0 11. Countries: 17.8 in the preliminaries.0e (Competitors: 62. Instead. (1) (2) (4) (3) Reggie Walker James Rector Robert Kerr Nate Cartmell RSA USA CAN USA 10. but had been outclassed by Hahn. running from the inside lane.5e 11. Rector just edged Kerr for second. However.88/91kg) London edging Lammers by inches. started fastest and. Meyer and Craig all won their semi-finals in 10. London. In the semis Abrahams again ran 10. 4. 3. with Walker equalling him. Eaton. 4. 6.R I O 70 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C St.0e (Competitors: 87. equalling the Olympic record of 10.8. 4. Finalists: 6) The diminutive (1. 3. 2.5e 11. The taller (1.7e 10. Lippincott. He started superbly and had gained a winning advantage by the 20m mark.6. this time after being left 1.4e 11. 27 Apr 1906 1.2e (Competitors: 61. 3. Finalists: 6) Bowman. (2) (1) (4) (3) (5) Ralph Craig Alvah Meyer Donald Lippincott George Patching Frank Beloit USA USA USA RSA USA 10.8e F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 0 0 m away.9 10. 2. (3) (4) (2) (6) (1) (5) Percy Williams Jack London Georg Lammers Frank Wykoff Wilfred Legg Robert McAllister CAN GBR GER USA RSA USA 10. 5. 4. and for the final Williams. the gun was fired. Finalists: 6) Hahn.

R I O

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

Los Angeles, 1 Aug 1932
(Wind:
1, (7)
2, (4)
3, (6)
4, (5)
5, (3)
6, (2)

0.2 to 0.4)
Eddie Tolan
Ralph Metcalfe
Arthur Jonath
George Simpson
Daniel Joubert
Takayoshi Yoshioka

USA
USA
GER
USA
RSA
JPN

10.3=WR
10.3=WR
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7

(10.38)
(10.38)
(10.50)
(10.53)
(10.59)
(10.78)

(Competitors: 34; Countries: 17; Finalists: 6)

With a mild assisting wind and 30°C weather, the Olympic final was
run in ideal conditions, and ended with a controversial result. Ralph
Metcalfe was the hot favourite, having won the NCAA title with an
unratified world record of 10.2 and the US Olympic Trials ahead of
Tolan. Despite the use of the Kirby camera device, which showed both
the order of finish and the “hundredth” times of the athletes, some
bizarre results occurred in the preliminaries. None more so than the
first semi-final which clearly showed Tolan just edging reigning champion Williams for the last qualifying place, only to have the American
announced as winner of the race ahead of Joubert (the real winner) and
Yoshioka. The Nippon athlete, one of the greatest starters of all-time,
took a metre lead in the first 10m of the final, but was caught by Tolan
at 40m, with the others a metre back.
Metcalfe surged to within 30cm of Tolan at 60m, and caught him at
80m. They ran together to the finish where Metcalfe dipped to reach the
line with Tolan. The rule of the day stated that the winner was the athlete crossing the line first. After two hours it was determined from film
of the race that Tolan was the winner. Under current rules (the athlete
who reaches the line first) Metcalfe would have been the victor.

Berlin, 3 Aug 1936
(2.7)
1, (2)
2, (7)
3, (5)
4, (6)
5, (4)
6, (3)

Jesse Owens
Ralph Metcalfe
Martinus Osendarp
Frank Wykoff
Erich Borchmeyer
Lennart Strandberg

USA
USA
NED
USA
GER
SWE

10.3w
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7
10.9

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

Helsinki, 21 Jul 1952
(Wind
1, (4)
2, (3)
3, (6)
4, (5)
5, (2)
6, (7)

not known)
Lindy Remigino
Herb McKenley
McDonald Bailey TTO
Dean Smith
Vladimir Sukharev RUS
John Treloar

London, 31 Jul 1948
Adjusted

USA
USA
PAN
GBR
USA
GBR

10.3=OR
10.4
10.6

Electrics

USA
JAM
GBR
USA
URS
AUS

10.4
10.4
10.4
10.4
10.5
10.5

(10.79)
(10.80)
(10.83)
(10.84)
(10.88)
(10.91)

(Competitors: 72; Countries: 33; Finalists: 6)

With the top American Jim Golliday injured and not qualifying for the
US team, and his dauphin Art Bragg pulling a muscle in winning his
first round heat, the event was left wide open. Semi-final winners were
Bailey and McKenley. The Briton, transplanted from Trinidad, was
slight favourite, but Dean Smith and then Remigino got away fastest in
the final. By halfway, Remigino led by more than 50cm, but McKenley
began to close, rushing past Bailey and Smith with 20m to go and
catching Remigino at the line. Remigino was given the verdict, having
got home by about an inch (3cm).

Melbourne, 24 Nov 1956

After six world records in one afternoon in 1935, and an undefeated
season in 1936, Jesse Owens was the athlete the Berlin crowd most
wanted to see. In the 12th and final heat, Owens equalled the Olympic
record, and then ran a barely windy 10.2 (2.3) in round 2. All the other
qualifiers had runs of 10.5 prior to the final, with Metcalfe winning the
second semi-final in 10.5 after Owens had run 10.4 in the first race.
In the final Owens started fastest and flowed effortlessly to a 2m
margin by halfway. Metcalfe closed to just over a metre by the finish,
but no final had ever been so dominated against such quality opposition. Wykoff repeated his fourth place from Amsterdam.

Harrison Dillard
“Barney” Ewell
Lloyd LaBeach
Alastair McCorquodale
Mel Patton
McDonald Bailey TTO

71

Dillard had been inspired as a 14 year-old when he met Owens after his
Berlin triumphs, and had become the best hurdler in the world.
Unfortunately, he fell in the hurdles at the US Trials. However, he did
qualify for the Olympic team in his second event, the 100m, behind the
100m and 100y world record holders, Ewell and Patton.
In the Olympic final Dillard, in the outside lane, got a superb start
and was never headed. In lane 1, Ewell – who had been world class
since 1937 – failed to see Dillard and crossed the line thinking he was
the winner. LaBeach just held off the surprising cricket specialist
McCorquodale, while Patton was a victim of the nerves which prevented him from ever running in a US championship. Timing shown is official for the top three, and “adjusted” is the “tenth” electrical time as
conveyed by timekeeper Harry Hathway to ATFS president Bob
Sparks, with estimated times for all positions based on photo-finish differentials. Dillard’s 10.5 could be anything between 10.41 and 10.50.

(Competitors: 62; Countries: 30; Finalists: 6)

(1.6)
1, (7)
2, (3)
3, (4)
4, (5)
5, (2)
6, (6)

1 0 0 m

10.5
10.6
10.6
10.7
10.7

(-5.0)
1, (6)
2, (5)
3, (8)
4, (3)
5, (7)
6, (4)

Electrics

Bobby Morrow
Thane Baker
Hector Hogan
Ira Murchison
Manfred Germar
Michael Agostini

USA
USA
AUS
USA
GER/FRG
TTO

10.5
10.5
10.6
10.6
10.7
10.7

(10.62)
(10.77)
(10.77)
(10.79)
(10.86)
(10.88)

(Competitors: 65; Countries: 32; Finalists: 6)

The USA was able to leave two men who had run 10.1 off their team.
Morrow had won the NCAA, AAU and Olympic Trials meetings and,
after a lapse in form in October, duly won the final after producing the
fastest preliminary time (10.47 in his first round heat).
The wind blew against the runners, building up to a headwind of 5m
per second for the final. Hogan, who was to die four years later of
leukaemia, was quickest away, and was only caught at halfway by
Morrow. The Texan powered away to win by 1.5m, with Baker just
gaining second place with a prodigious lean at the finish. The hand timing was clearly in error with Baker officially timed in 10.5. In windless
conditions Morrow’s time would have been in the region of 10.25

10.9

(Competitors: 65; Countries: 33; Finalists: 6)

Dillard
Ewell
LaBeach
McCorquodale
Patton
Bailey

Differentials
0.00
0.06 behind
0.09
0.11
0.17
0.31

Rome, 1 Sep 1960
(0.0)
1, (6) Armin Hary
2, (1) Dave Sime
3, (5) Peter Radford

Electrics

GER/FRG
USA
GBR

10.2=OR
10.2
10.3

(10.32)
(10.35)
(10.42)

R I O

72
4,
5,
6,

(4)
(2)
(3)

Enrique Figuerola
Frank Budd
Ray Norton

CUB
USA
USA

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

10.3
10.3
10.4

(10.44)
(10.46)
(10.50)

(Competitors: 61; Countries: 45; Finalists: 6)

Norton, the world’s best in 1959, was the favourite together with Hary
and Canada’s Harry Jerome. Hary set an Olympic record of 10.2
(10.32) in his quarter-final. Jerome, who, like Hary, had run 10.0 earlier
in the season, was leading his semi-final at 50m when he pulled up with
a leg injury. Hary won the other semi-final.
Hary, known in his own country as “the thief of starts”, was called
back for a false start in the final. Once the race started, he took a metre
lead in the first 10 with his technically superb start, and held off veteran
Dave Sime, who had been last after 25m. Radford closed quickly to
edge the surprising Figuerola for the bronze medal, with the favoured
two Americans performing below par. Hary, the first German to win
Olympic gold in a track event, was later found to be able to react in
three thousandths of a second – rather quicker than the current allowable limit of 10 thousandths.

Tokyo, 15 Oct 1964
(1.1)
1, (1)
2, (3)
3, (5)
4, (6)
5, (2)
=6, (4)
(8)

8,

(7)

Electrics

Bob Hayes
USA
Enrique Figuerola
CUB
Harry Jerome
CAN
Wiesław Maniak
POL
Heinz Schumann GER/FRG
Gaoussou Koné
CIV
Mel Pender
USA
Tom Robinson
BAH

10.0WR
10.2
10.2
10.4
10.4
10.4
10.4
10.5

(10.27)
(10.42)
(10.46)
(10.47)
(10.47)
(10.57)

Mexico City, 14 Oct 1968
Electrics

USA
JAM
USA
CUB
FRA
USA
CAN
MAD

09.9WR
10.0
10.0
10.1
10.1
10.1
10.1
10.2

Munich, 1 Sep 1972
(-0.3)
1, (2)
2, (4)
3, (5)
4, (6)
5, (8)
6, (7)
7, (1)
(3)

Valeriy Borzov UKR
Robert Taylor
Lennox Miller
Aleksandr Kornelyuk
Michael Fray
Jobst Hirscht
Zenon Nowosz
Hasely Crawford

URS
USA
JAM
AZE URS
JAM
FRG
POL
TTO

10.14
10.24
10.33
10.36
10.40
10.40
10.46
DNF

(Competitors: 85; Countries: 55; Finalists: 8)

(10.25)

Hary’s auto-timed Olympic best was equalled by Jerome in the second
round, and then beaten by Figuerola’s 10.31 in the next race.
Championship favourite Bob Hayes opened up in the semis, running an
awesome 9.91, aided by a wind of 5.3. Ten minutes later the wind was
-1.2 for Jerome’s 10.37. Hayes drew the chopped up inside lane for the
final, with Figuerola in 3, and Jerome in lane 5. These three quickly
drew clear in the final, with the burly (1.82/86kg) Hayes exhibiting
enormous power in drawing away at the 30m mark to win by 2m from
two superb sprinters. It was the most dominant piece of 100 metre running in Olympic history.
A measure of Hayes’s quality as a 100m man was that by the end of
1964 his tally of legal 9.3 100 yard or 10.2 100m clockings totalled 29,
more than the total of his principal rivals Jerome (15) and Figuerola (13),
despite them starting their international careers before him.

Jim Hines
Lennox Miller
Charlie Greene
Pablo Montes
Roger Bambuck
Mel Pender
Harry Jerome
Jean-Louis Ravelomanantsoa

1 0 0 m

In the final the tiny power-packed Pender (1.65/72kg) exploded out
to an early lead, but was caught by Hines at halfway. Hines was a metre
clear by 70m, at which point Greene aggravated his injury when
attempting his usual late race surge. Miller slipped by Greene with 10m
to go, and Hines finished with the first ever legal sub-10 mark on electric timing.
On television pictures, the photo-cell time shown at the finish was
9.89. That is because the timer mechanism was adjusted with a delay
of 0.05 according to IAAF policy in 1964-1970. So the actual cell time
would have been 9.94, which was adjusted to 9.95 when the photograph was examined.

(10.06)

(Competitors: 72; Countries: 48; Finalists: 8)

(0.3)
1, (3)
2, (4)
3, (1)
4, (2)
5, (6)
6, (5)
7, (7)
8, (8)

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

(9.95)
(10.04)
(10.07)
(10.14)

The event was marred by the failure of Eddie Hart and Rey Robinson
to appear for the second round due to a schedule misunderstanding by
US management. The pre-Games favourite was Borzov, who had beaten the top Americans in the USA in 1971. In the second round he set a
European record of 10.07 ahead of Robert Taylor, the sole surviving
American, and Hasely Crawford (10.18). Borzov (10.21) and Taylor
(10.30) won the semis, which saw the excellent Greek,
Papageorgopoulos (10.24 heat), unable to start.
Kornelyuk, the little Soviet star, started fastest in the final, but was
quickly caught by Borzov, whose powerful but relaxed style carried
him more than a metre clear by 60m. Easing in the last 5m, and lifting
his arms in triumph, Borzov finished a metre ahead of the valiant
Taylor, with Lennox Miller gaining a second medal a further metre
back. Speculation was rife as to whether Hart would have beaten
Borzov. The answer will never be known – but as a possible guide
Taylor finished 0.05 seconds behind Hart when the latter won the US
Trials in a hand timed 9.9.

Montreal, 24 Jul 1976
(0.0)
1, (1)
2, (4)
3, (3)
4, (5)
5, (8)
6, (6)
7, (7)
8, (2)

Hasely Crawford
Don Quarrie
Valeriy Borzov UKR
Harvey Glance
Guy Abrahams
Johnny Jones
Klaus-Dieter Kurrat
Petar Petrov

TTO
JAM
URS
USA
PAN
USA
GDR
BUL

10.06
10.07
10.14
10.19
10.25
10.27
10.31
10.35

(Competitors: 63; Countries: 40; Finalists: 8)

(10.15)
(10.17)
(10.20)
(10.27)

(Competitors: 64; Countries: 42; Finalists: 8)

The effects of altitude and improved synthetic track surfaces meant that
24 marks of under 10.20 were recorded in Mexico City (in 1964 there
were three such times). Hines and Greene had been the first to record
legal 9.9 clockings earlier in the year, and Greene ran the fastest ever
preliminary race (10.02) in the second round. Hines won the first semifinal (10.08) from Bambuck (10.11) and Jerome (10.17), while Greene
suffered a hamstring strain in taking the other semi-final in 10.13 from
Miller (10.15) and the surprising Montes (10.19).

The favourites were Borzov – attempting to retain his title (the first to
try this since Percy Williams) – Quarrie, Crawford and the three
Americans. Only Glance and Crawford managed more than one run
below 10.30 before the final, with Crawford and Quarrie trying to psyche each other out in their semi-final.
In the final Glance and Crawford started fastest, then Glance was
caught by Quarrie and Borzov before halfway. Quarrie edged away, but
could not see Crawford (lane 1) who was half a metre clear at the 80m
mark. Quarrie’s official time was 10.08, but a later re-read of the photo
showed that the correct time was 10.07. Crawford, the biggest of all
100m winners at 1.90/87kg, never again ran quicker than 10.19. He
won his country’s first ever gold medal and a jet airliner there was
named after him.

R I O

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

Moscow, 25 Jul 1980
(-1.1)
1, (8)
2, (1)
3, (5)
4, (2)
5, (7)
6, (3)
7, (4)
8, (6)

Reactions

Allan Wells
Silvio Leonard
Petar Petrov
Aleksandr Aksinin RUS
Osvaldo Lara
Vladimir Muravyov KAZ
Marian Woronin
Hermann Panzo

GBR
CUB
BUL
URS
CUB
URS
POL
FRA

10.25
10.25
10.39
10.42
10.43
10.44
10.46
10.49

0.193

(7)
(2)

0.131
0.155
0.161
0.163
0.130

Los Angeles, 4 Aug 1984
USA
USA
CAN
USA
GBR
JAM
GBR
CAN

09.99
10.19
10.22
10.26
10.27
10.29
10.33
10.35

0.177
0.156
0.149
0.145
0.161
0.187
0.147
0.147

(Competitors: 82; Countries: 59; Finalists: 8)

Carl Lewis was the hot favourite; he had won the inaugural world title
in 1983 and destroyed the opposition in the US Trials (10.06 into a 2.2
wind). Jamaica’s Ray Stewart was the fastest heat winner with 10.24,
but Lewis laid his cards on the table with 10.04 in the second round.
Lewis was again the fastest semi-finalist (10.14), with Stewart (10.26)
edging Graddy in the other heat.
Graddy and Ben Johnson started fastest in the final, Graddy’s pickup taking him 30cm clear of Johnson at halfway, with Lewis a metre
back. Lewis was still behind at 80m, but his finish was irresistible, as
he took nearly 3m out of the field in the last 20 – with a huge grin on
his face.
It is questionable why Johnson is still regarded at the bronze medallist, given that it was revealed he had been doping since 1981.

Seoul, 24 Sep 1988
Reactions

Carl Lewis
Linford Christie
Calvin Smith
Dennis Mitchell
Robson da Silva

USA
GBR
USA
USA
BRA

09.92WR
09.97
09.99
10.04
10.11

73

Desai Williams
Ray Stewart
Ben Johnson

CAN
JAM
CAN

10.11
12.26
DQ (r40.1) (9.79)

Attila Kovács

HUN

(4s2, 10.31)

(6)
Rightful finalist (in place of Johnson):

0.149
0.159
0.132

(Competitors: 102; Countries: 69; Finalists: 8)

Ben Johnson had won the 1987 world title in a world record 9.83 from
Lewis (9.93), but five weeks before Seoul Lewis had defeated Johnson
in Zurich, 9.93 to 10.00. Lewis was the fastest in each preliminary
round, with times of 10.14, 9.99 and 9.97, though Johnson won his
semi-final in 10.03 into a headwind.
In the final, Johnson (0.132) and Lewis (0.136) reacted quickest, but
the Canadian blasted clear by 10m, with Desai Williams in second
place. By halfway Johnson (5.52) led by a metre from Williams (5.61)
with Lewis (5.65) third. Johnson held the margin over Lewis to the finish, with Christie the next strongest finisher (5.69/4.28), holding off
Calvin Smith. The winning time improved Johnson’s old world record
by 0.04.
Three days later Johnson was stripped of his title, found guilty of
taking stanozolol, an anabolic steroid. He was retrospectively disqualified from the 1987 World Championship as well, leaving Lewis with
two global titles, plus a new world record.

Barcelona, 1 Aug 1992
(0.5)
1, (5)
2, (3)
3, (4)
4, (1)
5, (6)
6, (8)
7, (2)
8, (7)

0.136
0.138

Linford Christie
Frankie Fredericks
Dennis Mitchell
Bruny Surin
Leroy Burrell
Olapade Adeniken
Ray Stewart
Davidson Ezinwa

GBR
NAM
USA
CAN
USA
NGR
JAM
NGR

09.96
10.02
10.04
10.09
10.10
10.12
10.22
10.26

(Competitors: 81; Countries: 66; Finalists: 8)

Reactions

Carl Lewis
Sam Graddy
Ben Johnson
Ron Brown
Mike McFarlane
Ray Stewart
Donovan Reid
Tony Sharpe

1 0 0 m

0.145

This event was seriously depleted because of the “western” boycott.
Silvio Leonard, who had been the world’s number one six years earlier
when aged 18, was the favourite, with Woronin, Wells and Eugen Ray
as strong outsiders. Wells was the fastest in the first two rounds, with
10.11, ahead of the surprising Petrov (10.13), eliminating Crawford
(fifth in 10.28) from further action. Leonard won his heat in 10.16.
Petrov edged Leonard (10.39-10.40) in the first semi-final, with Wells
winning the other race in 10.27, the wind now blowing at 45° against
the runners.
In the final, Leonard was drawn in lane 1, with Wells out in lane 8.
Aksinin and the Cuban number two, Lara, started best, with Leonard
catching them at 30m and Wells about 30cm behind. Wells, who had
been compelled by the rules to use starting blocks, caught Leonard at
80m and the two hit the line as one. On replay it was seen that Wells
had won with a better lean. Wells later estimated that with better, but
legal, wind conditions the time would have been 10.05, and the published wind reading of +1.11 was clearly incorrect. In his first race after
the Games, Wells ran against the leading American, Stanley Floyd,
winning 10.19 to 10.21.

(1.1)
1, (3)
2, (4)
3, (5)
4, (8)
5, (1)

6,
7,

0.151

(Competitors: 65; Countries: 40; Finalists: 8)

(0.2)
1, (7)
2, (5)
3, (4)
4, (1)
5, (2)
6, (8)
7, (6)
8, (3)

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

Prior to 1992 Allan Wells had been the oldest winner of the Olympic
100m, aged 28. Linford Christie, a superbly built athlete who had only
seriously concentrated on the event from the age of 26, made Wells
seem juvenile, as he triumphed at the age of 32 to become the oldest
ever Olympic Champion at 100m. In the first two rounds Christie
(10.08), Burrell (10.07) and Fredericks (10.13) were the most impressive, and in the semi-finals Burrell looked even better, running 9.97
into a 1.3 wind ahead of Christie (10.00) and Mitchell (10.10).
In the final Bruny Surin (0.124) had the fastest reaction time with
Burrell (0.165) the slowest of the medal contenders. Surin led to 50m
where he was caught by Fredericks and Christie. The Briton was clear
by 60m (6.48), and extended his margin to half a metre by the finish.
Fredericks Held off Mitchell for second, with Burrell a disappointing
fifth. Stewart, in seventh place, became the first man ever to finish
three Olympic 100m finals.

Atlanta, 27 Jul 1996
(0.7)
1, (6)
2, (5)
3, (3)
4, (4)
5, (1)
6, (7)
7, (8)
(2)

Reactions

Donovan Bailey
Frankie Fredericks
Ato Boldon
Dennis Mitchell
Michael Marsh
Davidson Ezinwa
Michael Green
Linford Christie

CAN
NAM
TTO
USA
USA
NGR
JAM
GBR

09.84WR
09.89
09.90
09.99
10.00
10.14
10.16
DQ (r162.7)

0.174
0.143
0.164
0.145
0.147
0.157
0.169
0.089

(Competitors: 106; Countries: 75; Finalists: 8)

0.176
0.186
0.155

Reigning Champion Christie, together with World Champion Bailey,
US Champion and three-time Olympian Dennis Mitchell, NCAA

R I O

74

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

champion Boldon and Fredericks (twice under 9.90 in the month prior
to the Games) were all gold medal contenders. Davidson Ezinwa was
the fastest heat winner with 10.03, and Boldon ran the fastest quarterfinal ever (9.95) which lasted until Fredericks ran 9.93. Fredericks won
the first semi in 9.94, and Boldon won the second, also in 9.94, with
Bailey and Mitchell the runners-up, both in 10.00.
Christie and Boldon false-started in the final, before another false
start was called – with Christie the ejected culprit. Finally, the depleted
field got away at the fourth time of asking, with Fredericks quickest
(0.143) and Bailey last (0.174). Mitchell was the early leader, but
Boldon took over at 25m and held the lead until 15m from the finish.
At that point Bailey, who had started an astounding mid-race surge
measured at 42.85 kilometres per hour, swept by and won by half a
metre from Fredericks who just got by Boldon in the last 5m.

Sydney, 23 Sep 2000
(-0.3)
1, (5)
2, (8)
3, (4)
4, (3)
5, (6)
6, (1)
7, (7)
(2)

Reactions

Maurice Greene
Ato Boldon
Obadele Thompson
Dwain Chambers
Jon Drummond
Darren Campbell
Kim Collins
Aziz Zakari

USA
TTO
BAR
GBR
USA
GBR
SKN
GHA

19.87
19.99
10.04
10.08
10.09
10.13
10.17
DNF

0.197
0.136
0.216
0.174
0.147
0.193
0.210
0.180

(Competitors: 97; Countries 72; Finalists 8)

Greene – World Champion in 1997 and 1999 – was favourite ahead of
Boldon and Bruny Surin of Canada. Boldon was fastest in the opening
round, with 10.04, aided by the only wind reading in excess of 1.0 m/s.
Thompson duplicated Boldon’s time in round 2, but Greene impressed
with 10.10 into a headwind (-1.7). Chambers (10.14) and Greene
(10.06) were the semis winners, with Surin the major casualty, hobbled
by hamstring problems.
Greene and Chambers battled for the lead in the final until halfway,
when Greene powered away with Boldon in his slipstream. Chambers faltered short of the finish, and Thompson finished fast for the bronze. In
cool conditions with a slight headwind and a starting system which
affected the reaction times of the athletes, Greene’s time was outstanding.

Athens, 22 Aug 2004
(0.6)
1, (3)
2, (5)
3, (7)
4, (4)
5, (6)
6, (1)
7, (8)
(2)

Reactions

Justin Gatlin
Francis Obikwelu
Maurice Greene
Shawn Crawford
Asafa Powell
Kim Collins
Obadele Thompson
Aziz Zakari

USA
POR
USA
USA
JAM
SKN
BAR
GHA

09.85
09.86
09.87
09.89
09.94
10.00
10.10
DNF

0.188
0.163
0.151
0.161
0.166
0.175
0.164
0.178

(Competitors: 82; Countries: 64; Finalists: 8)

Only two of the first round heats were won in a time slower than 10.20,
with Crawford the fastest at 10.02. Crawford was again the quickest in
the next round, this time with 9.89, as Obikwelu (9.93), Gatlin (9.96)
and Greene (9.93) all won their heats in less than 10 seconds. The race
favourite Powell finished behind Greene in 9.99, but looked to be holding back. Crawford won the first semi, saying “C’mon boy” in encouragement to training partner Gatlin, with 20m to go. In the other heat
Powell (9.95) edged Obikwelu (9.97) and Greene (9.97).
In the final, Collins, Gatlin and Crawford had the best pick-ups, and
at 60m Gatlin edged into the lead. Crawford and, in particular, Powell
were not as relaxed as in earlier races. Obikwelu and Greene finished
fastest, with Obikwelu, the tallest-ever 100m medallist (at 1.95m),
leaning just ahead of the 2000 champion, and inches behind Gatlin.
No-one had ever finished as low as third under 9.90 before; here the
unfortunate Crawford ran 9.89 for fourth place.

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

1 0 0 m

Beijing, 16 Aug 2008
(0.0)
1, (4)
2, (5)
3, (6)
4, (9)
5, (7)
6, (2)
7, (8)
8, (3)

Reactions

Usain Bolt
Richard Thompson
Walter Dix
Churandy Martina
Asafa Powell
Michael Frater
Marc Burns
Darvis Patton

JAM
TTO
USA
AHO
JAM
JAM
TTO
USA

09.69WR
09.89
09.91
09.93
09.95
09.97
10.01
10.03

0.165
0.133
0.133
0.169
0.134
0.147
0.145
0.142

(Competitors: 80; Countries: 63; Finalists: 8)

The prospective gold medalists were Bolt, Powell and Tyson Gay
(USA), with Bolt, the new world record holder (9.72) the only uninjured
athlete of the three in 2008. The quarter-finals saw the first heated
action, with Martina setting a national record 9.99 in the first race. The
other heat winners Thompson (9.99), Burns (10.05), a coasting Bolt
(9.92), and Powell (10.05). Gay, who had injured himself after winning
the US Trials (in 9.68w) ran a straining 10.09 behind Thompson.
Bolt won the first semi-final in 9.85, still not showing full speed for the
whole race, while Dix emerged as a possible medallist with his 9.95,
which featured good mid-race acceleration. Kim Collins (SKN) missed
the final despite running 10.05. Powell (9.91) held off Thompson (9.93)
and Martina (9.94, another record) in the second race, while Patton
(10.03) beat the under-raced Gay (10.05) for the final qualifying spot.
For the first time in Olympic history a nation other than the USA had
three finalists in the 100. Thompson, Frater and Bolt were the first to
separate from the field, with a half-metre advantage by 40m. Bolt then
showed acceleration of a type previously unseen for such a tall man, as
he surged to a one-metre lead by the 60m mark, then doubled that
advantage by 80m. At this point he lowered his arms and eased across
the line celebrating, yet still set a new world record of 9.69 (actually
9.683). Behind this extraordinary display, Thompson just held off the
fast-charging Dix for the silver medal, while Martina closed from last
at halfway to fourth. Five of the first six all ran lifetime bests, with only
Powell – fifth as he was in Athens – unable to do so.

London, 5 Aug 2012
(1.5)
1, (7)
2, (5)
3, (6)
4, (8)
5, (9)
6, (2)
7, (3)
(4)

Reactions

Usain Bolt
Yohan Blake
Justin Gatlin
Ryan Bailey
Churandy Martina
Richard Thompson
Asafa Powell
Tyson Gay

JAM
JAM
USA
USA
NED
TTO
JAM
USA

09.63OR
09.75
09.79
09.88
09.94
09.98
11.99
DQ (r40.9) (9.80)

0.165
0.179
0.178
0.176
0.139
0.160
0.155
0.145

(Athletes: 78; Countries: 61, Finalists: 8)
Rightful finalist (in place of Gay):

Adam Gemili

GBR

(2s3, 10.06)

For the first time at an Olympic Games, there was a preliminary round
for athletes who had failed to reach the “B” entry standard of 10.24.
Those who advanced from that stage joined the pre-qualified performers in the first of three remaining rounds, though all who did were then
eliminated as the standard rose sharply. Bailey was the quickest in the
first round proper with 9.88. There were no shocks apart from the
scratching of former World Champion Kim Collins by the St. Kitts and
Nevis Olympic Committee. He would have made a record fifth appearance, but they said he had flouted team rules by leaving the athlete’s
village without permission.
Gatlin set a semi-final world record of 9.82 in the first race of that
round. The other two races were won by Bolt (9.87) and Blake (9.85).
Keston Bledman (TTO) became the first man to run as fast as 10.04 and
not qualify for a final, while 18 year-old Adam Gemili (GBR) also
came close with his 10.06. It transpired that Gemili was a rightful finalist because the man qualifying by place one position ahead of the
British junior (Tyson Gay) later admitted to a doping offence.

R I O

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

The start of the final was almost ruined when someone from the
crowd threw a plastic bottle onto the track behind the blocks as the runners were set. The man responsible (Ashley Gill-Webb) was removed
from the stadium and charged with a public order offence.
Powell was fastest into his running, and at 30m had just conceded a
slight advantage to Gatlin. Bolt and Thompson were perhaps 30cm
behind, but by 60m (6.35) the reigning champion had powered past the
field and had opened up a small, but ever-expanding lead. Aware of the
danger of Blake, Bolt kept up his attack, passing 80m in 7.96, and
drove through the tape almost 1½ metres clear in an Olympic record of
9.63, the second fastest ever. Behind him, Blake equalled his personal
best of 9.75, while Gatlin also needed a lifetime best of 9.79 to hold off
Gay. A record seven men broke 10 seconds in the same race, though
that total was cut to six when Gay’s disqualification was confirmed.
Powell – in his third Olympic final – would also have been sub-10 had
he not suffered an old groin injury in mid-race. Bolt’s reaction time of
0.165 was exactly the same as in the 2008 final.

The Best on Points
16
Archie Hahn USA
Carl Lewis USA
Dennis Mitchell USA
Usain Bolt JAM

1904-1,
1984-1,
1988-4,
2008-1,

Most Finals
3
Ray Stewart JAM
Linford Christie GBR
Mitchell
Asafa Powell JAM

1956-4h5, 1960-5s1, 1964-8, 1968dnf/h6
1972-dnf/final, 1976-1, 1980-5q1,
1984-4q1
1984-6, 1988-7, 1992-7, 1996-4q3
1992-4h3, 1996-3, 2000-2, 2004-4h6
1996-5q4, 2000-7, 2004-6, 2008-5s1
(Collins was also declared for h7 in
2012, but did not start)

Ray Stewart JAM
Ato Boldon TTO
Kim Collins SKN

S
14
2
4
1
2
2
2
1
28

B
8
3
1
3
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
28

Breakdown of GER placings:
GER
1
1
2
FRG
GDR
Totals
1
1
2

4
17
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
27

-

5
6
9 7+1=
1
2
3
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1=
26 23+2=

3
3

1
1

7
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
12

8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7

1
1

-

2 0 0 m

75

4

5

6

7

8

M Points

1
1
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

2
0
0
0
2

200 Metres

14
9
5
3
31

Athens, 1896

Not held

Paris, 22 Jul 1900
Walter Tewksbury
Norman Pritchard British India
Stan Rowley
William Holland

USA
GBR
AUS
USA

22.2
22.5e
22.6e
22.6e

(Competitors: 8; Countries: 7; Finalists: 4)

2004-5, 2008-5, 2012-8

Hasely Crawford TTO

Placing Table
G
USA
17
GBR
3
JAM
2
CAN
2
GER
1
TTO
1
URS
1
CUB
RSA
1
AUS
NAM
NED
PAN
POL
FRA
BAR
POR
BUL
NGR
HUN
NZL
SWE
AHO
SKN
BRA
GRE
JPN
CIV
BAH
MAD
Totals
28

1906-1
1988-1
1992-3, 1996-4
2012-1

1984-6, 1988-7, 1992-7
1988-2, 1992-1, 1996-dq

Most Appearances
4
Tommy Robinson BAH

Men’s 100 Metres, continued
G
S
B
Breakdown of URS placings:
UKR
1
1
RUS
AZE
KAZ
Totals
1
1

1,
2,
3,
4,

MEN’S 100 METRES

1 0 0 m ,

M Points
39
427.5
8
78
7
76
5
45
4
44
4
36
2
31
2
28
1
21
3
21
2
14
1
10
1
10
0
9
0
9
1
8
1
7
1
7
0
7
1
6
1
6
0
6
0
5
0
5
0
4
0
4
0
3
0
2.5
0
1
0
1
84
932

4
0
0
4

39
3
2
44

The heats eliminated just two athletes. Pritchard, who later became a
silent film star in the USA, was the early leader, but Tewksbury took
over just after the 100m mark and finished the tree-surrounded course
on the 500m track just over 2m ahead of the Briton with Rowley half a
metre back.
The country for which Pritchard competed is debatable. There is a
good case for him to be listed as Indian and indeed several Olympic
historians prefer this option. For the purposes of this book, the editor is
swayed by the research of the late Ian Buchanan published in the
Journal of Olympic History (Volume 8, number 1, January 2000).
Buchanan notes that Calcutta-born Pritchard was selected to represent
Great Britain after competing at the 1900 AAA Championships (in
London) and was shown as being affiliated to both England and
“British India” (Indes Anglais) in the 1900 Olympic Games programme. He concludes that “Pritchard was a British colonial, resident
in India”. The editor welcomes further advice and comment on this
subject.

St. Louis, 31 Aug 1904
1,
2,
3,
4,

Archie Hahn
Nate Cartmell
William Hogenson
Fay Moulton

USA
USA
USA
USA

21.6OR
21.9e
22.1e

(Competitors: 5; Countries: 2; Finalists: 4)

Hahn won the first heat in 22.2 from Cartmell (22.3), with Hogenson
taking the other in 22.8. Cartmell, Hogenson and Moulton all false
started, which caused them to be set back a yard at the start of the race;
it should have been two, but the clerk of the course ruled that there was
not enough room to do so. Hahn got his usual quick start, and was soon
five yards clear of the field. Cartmell, who began slothfully, passed
Hogenson and Moulton after halfway and closed to just over two yards
at the finish. Hahn’s time over the straight course was an Olympic
record.

Athens, 1906
Not held

London, 23 Jul 1908
1,

(3)

Robert Kerr

CAN

22.6

R I O

76
2,
3,
4,

(4)
(2)
(1)

Robert Cloughen
Nate Cartmell
George Hawkins

USA
USA
GBR

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

22.6e
22.7e
22.8e

(Competitors: 43; Countries: 15; Finalists: 4)

All of the four finalists won their second round races in 22.6 after Kerr
had been the fastest first round winner with 22.2. In the final, Kerr led
by a metre off the bend, which was a generous sweeping curve on the
587 yard track. Cloughen and Cartmell closed up on Kerr, who was visibly tiring in the last few metres but won by just over 20cm, with
Cartmell a further 30cm back.

Stockholm, 11 Jul 1912
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(4)
(6)
(1)
(5)
(2)
(3)

Ralph Craig
Donald Lippincott
Willie Applegarth
Richard Rau
Charles Reidpath
Donnell Young

USA
USA
GBR
GER
USA
USA

21.7
21.8
22.0
22.2e
22.2e
22.3e

(Competitors: 61 Countries: 19; Finalists: 6)

After George Patching (RSA) had been fastest in the heats (22.3), the
real racing began, with only the winners of the second round qualifying
for the final. Craig, Applegarth, and Young won the first three heats in
21.9. Lippincott then ran 21.8, an Olympic best for 200m on a full
curve.
Applegarth – despite the inside draw – led into the straight in the
final from Lippincott, with Craig and Reidpath equal fifth, 2m behind.
The Briton was soon caught by Craig, who gradually drew away from
the field. Lippincott closed well to take second, less than a metre
behind Craig. Applegarth was a clear third.

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

and Scholz started best and were fractionally ahead off the curve. The
rest were almost in a line, except 100m winner Abrahams who lagged
more than a metre behind. Paddock took a foot lead at the 120m mark,
and was only caught by his teammate with 20m to go. Scholz won by
40cm from Paddock’s leaping finish, with Liddell, who had closed
from fifth to third in the second half, 2m behind. This was the only
track event on the flat not won by athletes from either Finland or
Britain in 1924.

Amsterdam, 1 Aug 1928
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(1)

Percy Williams
Walter Rangeley
Helmut Körnig
Jackson Scholz
John Fitzpatrick
Jakob Schüller

(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(1)
(2)

Allen Woodring
Charles Paddock
Harry Edward
Loren Murchison
George Davidson
Jack Oosterlaak

USA
USA
GBR
USA
NZL
RSA

22.0
22.0e
22.2e
22.2e
22.4e
22.4e

(Competitors: 48; Countries: 22; Finalists: 6)

Edward was the fastest quarter-finalist with 22.0 after a desultory
round of heats which saw 22.6 as the quickest time. Murchison won the
first semi in 22.4 from Edward, now strapped up after damaging a hamstring. Woodring edged Paddock in the other semi-final.
Woodring, who had only made the team after George Massengale
withdrew at the last moment because of rheumatism, got a good draw
in the final, one lane inside Paddock, who was favoured to complete a
double. Paddock led from the gun, with Woodring second off the curve.
Woodring caught Paddock with 20m to go, and held off Paddock’s celebrated leap for the tape by 20cm. Edward finished third a similar distance ahead of Murchison.

Paris, 9 Jul 1924
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(4)
(6)
(5)
(1)
(3)
(2)

Jackson Scholz
Charles Paddock
Eric Liddell
George Hill
Bayes Norton
Harold Abrahams

USA
USA
GBR
USA
USA
GBR

21.6OR
21.7e
21.9e
22.0e
22.0e
22.3e

CAN
GBR
GER
USA
CAN
GER

21.8
21.9e
21.9e
21.9e
22.1e
22.2e

(Competitors: 59; Countries: 29; Finalists: 6)

Both Paddock and Scholz were attempting to reach their fifth individual finals, but after winning his first two races, Paddock was edged out
in the first semi-final. Scholz qualified comfortably behind Kornig in
the other semi, after the German had equalled the Olympic Record of
21.6 in the previous round.
Körnig was the early leader, but Williams and the surprising
Rangeley slipped by at the 150m mark. Williams swept away irresistibly to win by 60cm, with Rangeley leaning across the line 15cm
ahead of Körnig. Scholz was half a metre back, but inexplicably he was
initially bracketed with the German for third place. He declined to take
part in a run-off for the bronze medal and was placed fourth.

Los Angeles, 3 Aug 1932

Antwerp, 20 Aug 1920
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

2 0 0 m

Electric

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(1)
(3)
(2)
(6)
(4)
(5)

Eddie Tolan
George Simpson
Ralph Metcalfe
Arthur Jonath
Carlos Bianchi
William Walters

USA
USA
USA
GER
ARG
RSA

21.2OR
21.4
21.5
21.5
21.6
21.9

(Competitors: 25; Countries: 13; Finalists: 6)

The Olympic record fell in the quarter-finals as Metcalfe (21.59) and
Tolan (21.56) both ran 21.5, with unheralded Carlos Bianchi (21.9 in
1931) running 21.4 (21.46). Jonath then equalled this mark (21.48 on
the Kirby timer), and a fifth contender for the gold medal emerged at
the semi-final stage when George Simpson (21.54) finished inches
behind Metcalfe (21.52). Jonath (21.51) won the other semi.
In the final Bianchi was out quickest, but overtaken on the curve by
Simpson, who led by half a metre into the straight. Tolan quickly
caught Simpson and went away to win by 2m, with Simpson less than
a metre ahead of Metcalfe, and Jonath half a metre back. Metcalfe had
been unbeatable over 200m before the Games, so it was no surprise to
find that his lane measurement had been incorrect, with his starting
placement set back by about 1.5 metres. He may well not have beaten
Tolan, but he certainly would have taken second place. Offered a rerun, he declined because he did not wish to disturb a United States
clean sweep.

Berlin, 5 Aug 1936

(Competitors: 63; Countries: 32 Finalists: 6)

A time of 21.8 was run seven times before the final, with Jackson
Scholz the only man to do so more than once. The track had been deadened by a downpour in the morning of the final. Paddock (21.8 semi)

(21.12)

1,
2,
3,
4,

(3)
(4)
(1)
(5)

Jesse Owens
Mack Robinson
Martinus Osendarp
Paul Hänni

USA
USA
NED
SUI

20.7OR
21.1
21.3
21.6

R I O

5,
6,

Lee Orr
Wijnand van Beveren

(6)
(2)

CAN
NED

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

21.6
21.9

(Competitors: 44; Countries: 22; Finalists: 6)

Having been a comfortable winner of both the US Trials 200m and the
Olympic 100m, Owens was a solid favourite. Winning his first two preliminaries in an Olympic record 21.1 did nothing to dispel that view.
Mack Robinson equalled Owens’s new record in his semi, with Owens an
easy winner of the other race in 21.3. Owens flew around the bend in the
final, opening up a 2m lead on the field by halfway, which he smoothly
doubled by the finish in 20.7, easily the best 200m seen in major competition at that time. In better conditions after the Games, Robinson ran
20.8, which showed the exceptional quality of Owens’s run.

London, 3 Aug 1948
(Wind:
1, (2)
2, (4)
3, (3)
4, (1)
5, (5)
6, (6)

against)
Mel Patton
“Barney” Ewell
Lloyd LaBeach
Herb McKenley
Cliff Bourland
Leslie Laing

Adjusted

USA
USA
PAN
JAM
USA
JAM

21.1
21.1
21.2
21.3e
21.4e
21.9e

21.3
21.4

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(4)
(6)
(1)
(2)
(5)

2 0 0 m

Andy Stanfield
Thane Baker
Mike Agostini
Boris Tokarev RUS
José Telles da Conceição

77
USA
USA
TTO
URS
BRA

20.7
20.9
21.1
21.2
21.3

(20.97)
(21.05)
(21.35)
(21.42)
(21.56)

(Competitors: 67; Countries: 32; Finalists: 6)

No-one ducked under 21.1 until the final, and Stanfield looked the
smoothest of all in the heats. Morrow appeared to be favouring his
bandaged left hamstring, but was more worried about Stanfield’s form.
Baker was visibly upset at drawing lane 6 as he had in ’52, but ran a
good bend.
The three Americans were virtually abreast off the bend before
Morrow turned on the power and was soon 2m in front, an advantage
he held easily over Stanfield, who later asserted that the track was two
tenths slower than Helsinki. The time of 20.75 was nevertheless the
fastest automatic time on record up to that date. Morrow’s 1956 feat of
winning the sprint double at the NCAA, Olympic Trials and Olympic
Games, as well as the AAU 100, exactly duplicated the achievement of
Owens in 1936, and has not been matched by an American sprinter
since.

21.5
21.6
21.6

Rome, 3 Sep 1960

22.1

(Competitors: 52 Countries: 29; Finalists: 6)

Patton
Ewell
LaBeach
McKenley
Bourland
Laing

(0.0)
1, (5)
2, (7)
3, (3)
4, (2)
5, (4)
6, (6)

Differential
0.00
0.05 behind
0.20
0.24
0.27
0.72

SEN

Helsinki, 23 Jul 1952

20.5=WR
20.6
20.7
20.8
20.8
20.9

(20.62)
(20.69)
(20.83)
(20.90)
(20.93)
(21.09)

Berruti had been the one man to have beaten Norton in 1959 over
200m, but was not considered a gold medal possibility until equalling
the world record in winning his semi-final in 20.5 (20.65) ahead of
Norton – 20.7 (20.81). Third in this race was Stone Johnson (20.92)
ahead of Britain’s Peter Radford, whose 21.09 was appreciably quicker
than Les Carney’s 21.24 for third in the other semi.
Norton, who had equalled the world record when winning the US
Trials, was a metre behind the smooth Berruti at 100m in the final, and
faded – a victim of dysentery which destroyed his gold medal chances.
Carney, out in lane 7 (the inside lane was not used), was just behind
Norton at halfway, and held on against the charges of Seye and Foik for
the silver medal. The home crowd celebrated by setting fire to their
programmes, giving an erie light to the Italian night of victory.

Electrics

Andy Stanfield
Thane Baker
James Gathers
McDonald Bailey TTO
Leslie Laing
Gerardo Bönnhoff

USA
USA
USA
GBR
JAM
ARG

20.7
20.8
20.8
21.0
21.2
21.3

(20.97)
(21.08)
(21.14)
(21.45)
(21.59)

Andy Stanfield, the best sprinter on view in Helsinki, was the fastest
man in the heats, running 20.9 in the second round. Stanfield with an
injured right thigh, was the leader at halfway in the final, with the frenetic Baker just behind, a metre ahead of Bailey, and Gathers a further
metre back. Stanfield held form, while Baker tied up, as Gathers passed
Bailey 30m from the finish for third place.

Melbourne, 27 Nov 1956
Electrics

USA

20.6=WR

Tokyo, 17 Oct 1964

(20.81)

(Competitors: 71; Countries: 35; Finalists: 6)

(Legal)
1, (3) Bobby Morrow

ITA
USA
FRA
POL
USA
USA

(Competitors: 62; Countries: 48; Finalists: 6)

The schedule permitted one lap specialists as well as 100m sprinters to
contest the 200m, and World 400m record holder Herb McKenley and
former quarter-miler Cliff Bourland were the fastest men through the
three qualifying rounds, with 21.3 the quickest mark on the now heavy
track.
Patton, the NCAA and Olympic Trials winner, had been favoured to
win ahead of Ewell, but after his nervy fifth place in the 100m was
severely lectured by his coach, the venerable Dean Cromwell. Patton
started the final like a startled deer and led by 2m into the straight from
McKenley. He managed to hold off Ewell’s charge, while LaBeach
edged ahead of McKenley in the last 20m.

(1.0)
1, (3)
2, (7)
3, (6)
4, (4)
5, (5)
6, (2)

Electrics

Livio Berruti
Lester Carney
Abdoulaye Seye
Marian Foik
Stone Johnson
Ray Norton

(20.75)

(-0.7)
1, (7)
2, (5)
3, (8)
4, (3)
5, (1)
6, (4)
7, (6)
8, (2)

Electrics

Henry Carr
Paul Drayton
Edwin Roberts
Harry Jerome
Livio Berruti
Marian Foik
Richard Stebbins
Sergio Ottolina

USA
USA
TTO
CAN
ITA
POL
USA
ITA

20.3OR
20.5
20.6
20.7
20.8
20.8
20.8
20.9

(20.36)
(20.58)
(20.63)
(20.79)
(20.83)
(20.83)
(20.89)
(20.94)

(Competitors: 57 Countries: 43; Finalists: 8)

Drayton – 20.7 (20.70) – and Roberts – 20.8 (20.89) – were the fastest
in the first two rounds. Drayton opened up in the semi-final, equalling
the Olympic record with 20.5 (20.58, an electrically-timed Olympic
best). World record holder Carr won the other semi in 20.6 (20.69) with
Jerome just edging out France’s teenage star Roger Bambuck for the
last final place.
Carr showed his true quality in the final. After being level with
Drayton coming off the bend, he surged to a metre lead, and extended

R I O

78

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

it to 2½m by the finish in 20.36 – brilliant running into a headwind.
Drayton had to work hard to stay ahead of Roberts, with Jerome progressing from seventh to fourth just in front of Berruti.

Mexico City, 16 Oct 1968
(0.9)
1, (3)
2, (6)
3, (4)
4, (8)
5, (2)
6, (5)
7, (1)
8, (7)

Electrics

Tommie Smith
Peter Norman
John Carlos
Edwin Roberts
Roger Bambuck
Larry Questad
Michael Fray
Joachim Eigenherr

USA
AUS
USA
TTO
FRA
USA
JAM
FRG

19.8WR
20.0
20.0
20.3
20.5
20.6
20.6
20.6

(19.83)
(20.06)
(20.10)

(20.62)
(20.63)
(20.66)

Munich, 4 Sep 1972
URS
USA
ITA
USA
USA
GDR
FRG
GDR

(0.8)
1, (2)
2, (4)
3, (7)
4, (1)
5, (8)
6, (6)
7, (3)
8, (5)

Actual

Don Quarrie
Millard Hampton
Dwayne Evans
Pietro Mennea
Rui da Silva
Bogdan Grzejszczak
Colin Bradford
Hasely Crawford

JAM
USA
USA
ITA
BRA
POL
JAM
TTO

20.23
20.29
20.43
20.54
20.84
20.91
21.17
79.60

(20.22)

(Competitors: 45; Countries: 33; Finalists: 8)

(20.51)

Carlos was favoured on the strength of his unratified world record of
19.7 (19.92) in the US Trials, but Smith had won all their previous
championship meetings. Peter Norman, a good but unheralded Aussie,
was fastest in the first round with an Olympic record 20.2 (20.23), a
mark matched by Smith (20.29 on auto timing) in the next round.
Norman again ran 20.2 (20.22) in his semi, but was eclipsed by Carlos
who ran an astonishing 20.1 (20.12) from lane 1. Smith also won his
semi-final in 20.1 (20.13), but limped off with cramp. The benefit of
altitude meant that 20.49 was required just to make the final.
Smith appeared with his leg heavily strapped, but ran the curve well,
even if one and a half metres down on Carlos, who powered through
the first half in 10.4. Smith switched gears at 120m, zooming past
Carlos at 150m and leaving onlookers gaping in awe at his acceleration. He won by 2½m despite easing down in the last 15m and raising
his arms in triumph. Meanwhile, Carlos also throttled back, but was
overtaken in the last 5m by Norman, who destroyed his pre-Olympic
best by 0.5 with 20.0 (20.06).
A black power protest was made by Smith and Carlos at the medal
ceremony, eclipsing the race in news terms as the two American stars
were subsequently vilified for using the Olympic arena as a political
forum.

Valeriy Borzov UKR
Larry Black
Pietro Mennea
Larry Burton
Chuck Smith
Siegfried Schenke
Martin Jellinghaus
Hans-Joachim Zenk

2 0 0 m

Montreal, 26 Jul 1976

(20.34)

(Competitors: 50; Countries: 37; Finalists: 8)

(0.0)
1, (5)
2, (1)
3, (2)
4, (6)
5, (3)
6, (8)
7, (4)
8, (7)

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

20.00
20.19
20.30
20.37
20.55
20.56
20.65
21.05

(Competitors: 57; Countries: 42; Finalists: 8)

Larry Black and co-world record holder Don Quarrie of Jamaica were
the favourites, but Borzov’s 20.64 in the first round, in which he looked
round three times, convinced many viewers of his pedigree in the
longer sprint. In the second round Black dominated Quarrie (20.43)
with a 20.28.
In the first semi-final Borzov won in a strangely slow 20.74, while
Quarrie suffered a hamstring pull. Black won the other race ahead of
20 year-old Pietro Mennea. In the final Black was off fastest, but
Borzov caught him after 80m, and cruised away after 130m. Before the
finish he had more than 2m in hand and eased over the line, 0.19 ahead
of Black. Mennea tore past Burton with 25m to go to take the bronze.
Fourth-placed Burton, in his first year in athletics, was a football player
and later played with success in the NFL.
Some observers considered that Borzov would not have beaten
Black had the American not drawn the inside lane, but Black was the
best curve runner in the world, and would likely have run around 20.05
in one of the outer lanes; brilliant, but not enough to beat Borzov.

The top American, Steve Williams, had failed to make the United
States team because of injury, while the world’s number three man of
1975, James Gilkes of Guyana, missed out because his country joined
the African boycott. This left Don Quarrie as the favourite.
The Jamaican duly produced the fastest time of each preliminary
round, with 20.28 in the quarter-finals being his best mark. Seventeen
year-old Dwayne Evans was the only other sprinter able to duck under
20.60 prior to the final, clocking 20.56 in his second round race. These
two started fastest in the final, with Quarrie pulling away at the beginning of the straight just as US Trials winner Millard Hampton went past
Evans. Hampton could not close on Quarrie, whose winning time was
officially 20.23, but the photo-finish showed the more accurate 20.22.

Moscow, 28 Jul 1980
(0.9)
1, (8)
2, (7)
3, (4)
4, (1)
5, (3)
6, (5)
7, (2)
8, (6)

Pietro Mennea
Allan Wells
Don Quarrie
Silvio Leonard
Bernhard Hoff
Leszek Dunecki
Marian Woronin
Osvaldo Lara

ITA
GBR
JAM
CUB
GDR
POL
POL
CUB

20.19
20.21
20.29
20.30
20.50
20.68
20.81
21.19

(Competitors: 57; Countries: 37; Finalists: 8)

As in the boycott-affected event in 1976, little action was seen before
the final, with Wells (20.59) and Mennea (20.60) producing the fastest
times in the second round. Leonard won the first semi-final, with
Gilkes (20.87) missing out on the final, despite being quicker than Lara
(20.93), who was fourth in the other semi. Leonard suffered in the
draw, with the inside lane, while Mennea was on the outside.
Wells was the fastest starter in the final, making up 2m on the Italian
in the first 20m, and held that margin over Mennea and Quarrie into the
straight. Wells began to tighten up after 150m, while the Italian looked
like a man running downhill, as the burly Scotsman struggled. Mennea
went in front with 10m to go, Wells dived at the line to no avail as the
Italian got his revenge for defeat a year earlier in Turin in the European
Cup 200m (by the same .02 margin, 20.29w-20.31). Quarrie just edged
the unlucky Leonard for the bronze medal.

Los Angeles, 8 Aug 1984
(-0.9)
1, (7)
2, (3)
3, (4)
4, (8)
5, (6)
6, (2)
7, (5)
8, (1)

Halves

Carl Lewis
Kirk Baptiste
Thomas Jefferson
João Batista da Silva
Ralf Lübke
Jean-Jacques Boussemart
Pietro Mennea
Ade Mafe

USA
USA
USA
BRA
FRG
FRA
ITA
GBR

19.80OR
19.96
20.26
20.30
20.51
20.55
20.55
20.85

10.22/9.58
10.41/9.55
10.43/9.83
10.47/9.83
10.71/9.80
10.57/9.98
10.49/9.87
10.68/10.17

(Competitors: 76; Countries: 58; Finalists: 8)

Lewis and Baptiste were clearly the class of the field, each handily
winning their semi-finals, in 20.27 and 20.29 respectively. Mennea eas-

09 20. coming off the curve.86 10. Lewis won the first in 20. (2) 8.10 into a 1. (3) 7. with Johnson leading off the bend. (8) 2 0 0 m The pre-season favourites were reigning champion Michael Johnson. and was superb.43/9.48 10.45 20.30 in the quarter-finals.13. was the fastest ever legal time at low altitude. Finalists: 8) Five weeks before the Games. Expectations were high that the Pietro Mennea’s 1979 world record of 19.2) 1.04 20.34/9.58 10.67 20. (7) 8. (7) 8. 26 Aug 2004 (1.6 10.49 (Competitors: 68.7 10. Countries: 57. Finalists: 8) The pre-meet favourite had been world champion Michael Johnson.2/9. and Lewis were the favourites. (1) 7. By the time of the final Lewis had run four rounds of the 100m and taken a full series of jumps in defence of his long jump crown. 16 years after first being selected to run in the Olympics. (8) 5.55 20.32WR 19. The time was the slowest winning mark since 1980 (the last European win) and the first non-boycott Games for 72 years that the US did not win a medal. passing halfway in 10. Seoul. Johnson drew clear with his upright stance. finishing 6th in his semi-final in a pedestrian 20. (5) 2.58/9.24 20. and the final was decided. and edged away in the last 25m to win by half a metre from his friend and training partner. (3) 6. (7) 5.24/9. Countries: 43. went from seventh at halfway to claim the bronze from the inside lane ahead of the ’88 bronze medallist da Silva.27.18/9. (4) 2. Countries: 65. and the semi-finals confirmed this view.50 20. (2) 6. The battle for third was won by da Silva who outlasted Christie in the final stages.27/9.21 20. (5) 4. Former champion Pietro Mennea (36) made a token appearance in the heats. leaving the Sydney race wide open.84 10. (3) 3. from which he scratched.75 10.20.01. (8) 8. but the tension of the moment and a headwind put paid to that. Baptiste reacted quickest in the final (0.78. poor Johnson contracted a stomach virus a month before the Games while in Spain. (3) 2. while third place Boldon summed it up succinctly – “that was amazing. just ahead of Fredericks and Boldon. In the final the big three roared round the curve. (6) 3. but the 100m winner ran a superb curve. was a disappointing sixth. who had run 20.22. 28 Sep 2000 (-0. in early July.7 10.14 in the Briton’s heat. (2) 6. a record for the event.14 20. running 19.38 20.8 10. clocking 21.3/9. These were his fifth Olympic Games and that was his 33rd Olympic race. but Quarrie placed seventh (20.7 10. (8) 4. winner of the US Trials.1 wind.58/9.20 20.08 and an astonishing 19. with da Silva and Christie together a metre back.3/9. passing 100m in 10.28 20. Baptiste closed slightly on the leader.4 quicker than the opposition. (7) Halves Joe DeLoach Carl Lewis Robson da Silva Linford Christie Atlee Mahorn Gilles Quénéhervé Michael Rosswess Bruno Marie-Rose USA USA BRA GBR CAN FRA GBR FRA 19.66 to win the Olympic trials.73. the defending champion made the running in the final. particularly in view of the headwind.27 20.5/10. Countries 54. Nevertheless.35 20. Both men failed to finish in the US trials. Bates.153 to Lewis’s 0.7 10.06 nearly 3m clear of Christie.64 DNS (Competitors: 54. Capel got left at the start in the final (reaction time: 0.65/9. blasting out from the gun.79 20.80 20.69 10.313.78 10.” Majestically. Fredericks ran the number three mark of all-time but was overwhelmed.5/9.82 to 19. (4) Kostás Kentéris Darren Campbell Ato Boldon Obadele Thompson Christian Macolm Claudinei da Silva Coby Miller John Capel GRE GBR TTO BAR GBR BRA USA USA 20. easing down after passing 100m in 10. Finalists 8) Barcelona. (1) Halves Michael Johnson Frankie Fredericks Ato Boldon Obadele Thompson Jeff Williams Iván García Patrick Stevens Michael Marsh USA NAM TTO BAR USA CUB BEL USA 19.4/9. Finalists: 8) DeLoach.43/9.177). 6 Aug 1992 (-1. Johnson would say “I knew. who had beaten Marsh 19.55 10.77) in the second semi-final.14 20. (4) 4. with Jefferson and da Silva just behind. 20. Unfortunately.23 20. in an incredible 19.14 20. Finalists: 8) 10.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C ily qualified for his fourth Olympic final. DeLoach caught Lewis at 150m. (1) 7. while DeLoach zipped to a 20.20 20. (5) 3. some 2m ahead of Baptiste. to cross the line almost 4m in front.05. Marsh took the lead from Fredericks at halfway. while Fredericks won the other semi-final in 19.53/9. expecting a recall after almost falling off the blocks.09 20.28). (4) 7.348). but not enough to seriously dent Lewis’s advantage. Nine men ran under 20. (6) 2.1 . He was favourite.0) 1.85. who would later forge a career in the NFL.72 would be broken in the final. (1) 4.13 20.80 (Competitors: 79.3/9.6) 1.77 10.86 in the US Trials. Countries: 59.14/9.38.12/9.09 behind Marsh in the semi-final.79 to 19.03 20.17 20. (6) 4.35/9.21. 1 Aug 1996 (0. Regis. (4) 2.10 to qualify for round 2.40 20.95 (Competitors: 72. that I was running faster than I had ever run in my life. with Campbell and Capel the fastest at 20.75OR 19.4) 1. (1) (2) Halves Shawn Crawford Bernard Williams Justin Gatlin Frankie Fredericks Francis Obikwelu Stéphan Buckland Tobias Unger Asafa Powell USA USA USA NAM POR MRI GER JAM 19. Meanwhile. That missed the world record by 0.40/9.80 10. (8) 5.68 19. and was nearly 0. Capel was the fastest in the semis with 20. with Boldon winning his fourth Olympic medal just ahead of Thompson and Malcolm.51 20. (7) 7. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Michael Marsh Frankie Fredericks Michael Bates Robson da Silva Olapade Adeniken John Regis Oluyemi Kayode Marcus Adam USA NAM USA BRA NGR GBR NGR GBR 20. and led DeLoach by 30cm off the bend. The time of 19. (5) 5.01 20.39 20.” Sydney. Athens.34/9. (6) 5. 28 Sep 1988 (1. Later. Campbell led off the turn.80 beat Smith’s 16 year-old Olympic record. and Maurice Greene.48 10. and was a shadow of his normal self. and Kentéris setting a national record of 20. though had lost to Fredericks 19.23 from Robson da Silva (20.14 20. and was overtaken at 150m by Kentéris.98 ahead of Boldon’s 20.12. while Kentéris won the other heat in 20. (6) 6. Marsh had been establishing himself as the potential winner. (5) 3.79 20.86 10.54 10.7) 1.90 (Competitors: 78. (3) 3. (2) 6. and cruised to victory more than a metre clear of the Namibian. Johnson had finally erased the 1979 world record.01 20. Johnson won his semi in 20. 79 Atlanta.20 10.82 10.63/9.62 10. running the fastest time in each round: 20.

R I O

80

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

In the heats, Buckland and Williams each ran 20.29, the fastest time of
the first round. Crawford then raised the stakes with a 19.95 second
round, which featured a powerful drive at the halfway point, while
Gatlin showed his recovery from the 100m with a 20.03 clocking.
These two continued to be the front runners with semi-final wins.
Crawford pounded out a 20.05 win over Williams (20.18), before
Gatlin edged Obikwelu (20.36) and Buckland (20.37) in 20.35.
The final was delayed by a disgraceful protest by the Greek crowd
against the suspension of reigning champion Kentéris for having avoided a drugs test. Eventually the race got underway. Gatlin and Williams
were the early leaders, but Crawford blasted away from the opposition
after 90m and built up a lead of over 2m by the finish. Gatlin eased up
in the last few strides, and lost the silver medal to Williams by six inches. It was the first US clean sweep for 20 years and the sixth in Olympic
history.

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

2 0 0 m

History was made again by Bolt when he became the first man to retain
an Olympic 200m title, and the first athlete to complete the 100m/200m
double twice. He had been beaten by Blake at the 2012 Jamaican
Championships, and those two won their semi-finals. So did Martina,
who thus joined Bolt as a double Olympic sprint finalist in both Beijing
and London.
Bolt, aware of the fact that he was a better bend runner than Blake,
blasted the curve in the final, and reached halfway two metres clear in
10.00. The Jamaicans opened up a big gap on the field down the
straight, with Bolt – having felt some back twinges on the bend – slowing up perceptibly in the last 20m to finish in 19.32. Blake clocked the
fastest ever non-winning time of 19.44 to finish 0.12 behind, his same
losing margin as in the 2012 100m. His country claimed its first-ever
men’s clean sweep, with Weir holding off Spearmon’s late charge.
MEN’S 200 METRES

Beijing, 20 Aug 2008
(-0.9)
1, (5)
2, (4)
3, (8)
4, (6)
5, (3)
6, (2)

Halves

(7)

Usain Bolt
Shawn Crawford
Walter Dix
Brian Dzingai
Christian Malcolm
Kim Collins
Churandy Martina

JAM
USA
USA
ZIM
GBR
STK
AHO

(9)

Wallace Spearmon

USA

19.30WR
19.96
19.98
20.22
20.40
20.59
DQ (r163.3)

9.98/9.32
10.20/9.76
10.26/9.72
10.39/9.83
10.47/9.93
10.45/10.14
10.2/9.6

(19.82)

DQ (r163.3)

10.5/9.5

(19.95)
(Competitors: 63; Countries: 55; Finalists: 8)

After his 100m win, Bolt was a clear favourite. Asked just before the
race what would happen, the 1968 champion Tommie Smith responded
that Bolt would win by at least four metres, and that “he could surpass
that” – that being Michael Johnson’s world record of 19.32.
Off to a good start, Bolt raced away from the field, passing 100m in
9.96 with a full two metres advantage over Crawford and Martina. He
steadily increased his lead, not letting up and reached the line in 19.30
(19.296) to beat a record that was thought to be unapproachable. Bolt
himself said “I’m shocked ... it is a dream come true”. Behind him
Martina ran a splendid 19.82 while Spearmon caught Crawford on the
line, 19.95 to 19.96.
Sadly for Spearmon, he was seen to have stepped on the inner line of
his lane and was disqualified. When the US team examined the film of
this, it was noticed that Martina had made a similar transgression. The
Dutch Antillean was then also disqualified leaving Crawford as silver
medallist, the best title defence since Carl Lewis in 1988. He said
“that’s not the way I want to win a medal”, and less sombrely “everything I had in me I left on the track. You might find some of my skin
cells out there”. Later in August at Zurich’s Weltklasse, Crawford generously gave his silver medal to Martina along with a note: “Churandy
I know this can’t replace the moment, but I want you to have this
because I believe it’s rightfully yours!”

London, 9 Aug 2012
(0.4)
1, (7)
2, (4)
3, (8)
4, (6)
5, (5)
6, (2)
7, (3)
8, (9)

Halves

Usain Bolt
Yohan Blake
Warren Weir
Wallace Spearmon
Churandy Martina
Christoph Lemaitre
Alex Quiñónez
Anaso Jobodwana

JAM
JAM
JAM
USA
NED
FRA
ECU
RSA

19.32
19.44
19.84
19.90
20.00
20.19
20.57
20.69

(Competitors: 54; Countries: 42, Finalists: 8)

10.00/9.32
10.19/9.25
10.34/9.50
10.48/9.42
10.42/9.58
10.60/9.59
10.69/9.88
10.77/9.92

The Best on Points
21
Pietro Mennea ITA
19
Frankie Fredericks NAM
16
Usain Bolt JAM
Most
4
3
2

1972-3, 1976-4, 1980-1, 1984-7
1992-2, 1996-2, 2004-4
2008-1, 2012-1

Finals
Mennea
Fredericks
20 men

Most Appearances
5
Mennea
4

1972-3, 1976-4, 1980-1, 1984-7,
1988-dns/q2
1972-dnf/s1, 1976-1, 1980-3, 19847s2
1984-6s1, 1988-3, 1992-4, 1996-4q2
2000-5, 2004-7s2, 2008-5, 2012-3s3

Don Quarrie JAM
Róbson da Silva BRA
Christian Malcolm GBR

Placing Table
G
USA
17
GBR
JAM
3
GER
ITA
2
CAN
2
TTO
BRA
FRA
NAM
POL
AUS
NED
URS
1
BAR
CUB
GRE
1
RSA
ARG
PAN
NGR
SUI
ZIM
NZL
POR
MRI
SKN
BEL
ECU
Totals
26

4
7
3
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
26

5
6
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
23

6
3
2
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
23

7
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
12

8
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
11

of GER placings:
1
1

2
2

1
1
2

1
1
2

1
1
2

1
1
2

1
0
0
1

21
8
7
36

Breakdown of URS placings:
UKR
1
RUS
Totals
1
-

-

1
1

-

-

-

1
0
1

8
4
12

6

72

1

7

Breakdown
GER
GDR
FRG
Totals

S
18
4
1
2
1
26

B
11
3
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
26

If Norman Prichard is regarded as Indian replace GBR with:
GBR
3
3
3
2
2
1
2
And add:
IND
1
-

M Points
46
402
7
79
6
59
1
36
3
34
2
33
3
29
1
26
1
20
2
19
0
16
2
13
1
13
1
12
0
10
0
9
1
8
0
7
0
7
1
6
0
6
0
5
0
5
0
4
0
4
0
3
0
3
0
2
0
2
78
872

R I O

400 Metres
1,
2,
3,
4,

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

Athens, 6 Apr 1896

Thomas Burke
Herbert Jamison
Charles Gmelin
Fritz Hofmann

USA
USA
GBR
GER

54.2OR
56.1e
58.0e
-

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

4 0 0 m

had set the pace from Barker. Hillman tailed off early, when a knee
injury acquired on the boat trip to Europe flared up. This was the last
occasion when athletes in an Olympic Games ran races of more than
one lap in a clockwise direction.

London, 25 Jul 1908

(Competitors: 7; Countries: 4; Finalists: 4)

Jamison (56.8) and Burke were the heat winners on the 333.33m track
with bends so tight they necessitated sharp braking. Burke led from the
gun, and was chased to 250m by Hofmann, who then faded, leaving the
Boston University student to finish well clear of Jamison. Burke had
won the 1895 AAU with 49.6, but was clearly hindered by the tight
bends.

Paris, 15 Jul 1900
1,
2,
3,

Maxie Long
William Holland
Ernst Schultz

USA
USA
DEN

49.4OR
49.6e
52.4e

(Competitors: 15; Countries: 6; Finalists: 3)

Seven of the 15 entries were Americans, and they dominated proceedings, with five qualifiers being United States athletes. Heat winners
William Moloney (51.0) and Dixon Boardman (51.2) and Harry Lee all
declined to compete – the final being held on a Sunday, leaving Long,
the fastest qualifier (50.4) as favourite. Holland led until the last 20m,
when Long passed on the outside to win by a metre. Later that year
Long ran 47.8 over 440y, which was ratified as the first one-lap world
record of the IAAF era.

1,

Wyndham Halswelle

Harry Hillman
Frank Waller
Herman Groman
Joseph Fleming
Myer Prinstein
George Poage

USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA

49.2OR
49.9e
50.0e
50.5e
50.6e
51.0e

GBR

50.0

(Competitors: 37; Countries: 11; Finalists: 1)

The heats saw John Carpenter (USA) run 49.6 in the 14th of 16 races,
a time which was bettered by Halswelle in heat 15 with 49.4. Halswelle
then ran 48.4 in the third heat of the second round with William
Robbins (USA) the next fastest with 49.0. Carpenter (49.4) and John
Taylor (USA) were the other heat winners. The line-up for the final
from the inside was Carpenter, Halswelle, Robbins, and Taylor on the
outside. Robbins moved to the front at 50m and built up a solid lead.
Carpenter and Halswelle caught up on the final curve, and Carpenter
went past his teammate with Halswelle on his shoulder. As the two
went down the straight Carpenter moved out, preventing Halswelle
from passing.
The officials broke the finishing tape before any of the runners
reached the line – Carpenter and Halswelle on the outside, Robbins on
the inside of the track, while Taylor never did reach the line. Carpenter
crossed the line first (47.8 per US versions, a more likely 48.6 per UK
reports), and was disqualified, though officials should not have invaded
the track to do so. Robbins and Taylor refused to participate in the rerun, which Halswelle took in a solo run – surely the most bizarre win
in Olympic athletics history. Halswelle’s career ended a week later, and
he died in 1915, a victim of a sniper’s bullet on the French front.

St. Louis, 29 Aug 1904
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

81

Stockholm, 13 Jul 1912
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

(3)
(2)
(5)
(1)
(4)

Charles Reidpath
Hanns Braun
Edward Lindberg
Ted Meredith
Carroll Haff

USA
GER
USA
USA
USA

48.2OR
48.3
48.4
49.2e
49.5e

(Competitors: 49; Countries: 16; Finalists: 5)

(Competitors: 12; Countries: 3)

The race was run as a straight final. Groman was the early leader,
before being headed by Hillman as the bend began at 195m. Hillman
surged away from Waller and Groman in the final stages as Poage fell
back after being bumped by Waller and Fleming. Percy Molson was
initially placed fifth, but his position was subsequently amended. He
was a member of the Canadian family of beer fame, and died courageously in the first World War. The McGill University stadium in
Montreal bears his name.

Athens, 29 Apr 1906
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

Paul Pilgrim
Wyndham Halswelle
Nigel Barker
Harry Hillman
Charles Bacon
Fay Moulton
William Anderson
Marc Bellin du Coteau

USA
GBR
AUS
USA
USA
USA
GBR
FRA

The first two rounds were run without lane markings. An incident
between Braun and Donnell Young (USA) in the last semi-final resulted in disqualification of the American, and was more responsible for
the use of lanes in the final than the debacle of 1908. No-one broke 50
seconds in the 15 heats, but three ran under 49 in the semi-final round,
the fastest of whom was Reidpath with 48.7. Mel Sheppard, silver
medallist in the 800m, was edged out of the final by his nemesis Ted
Meredith, who beat him 48.8 – 48.9 in the third of the five qualifying
races. In the final, Meredith was the early leader, but Braun got clear of
the American in the third quarter of the race, only to be caught by
Reidpath just before the finish. Lindberg overtook the fading Meredith
in the last 50m.

53.2
53.8e
54.1e

(Competitors: 25; Countries: 11; Finalists: 8)

Antwerp, 20 Aug 1920
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(1)
(5)
(6)
(3)
(4)
(2)

Bevil Rudd
Guy Butler
Nils Engdahl
Frank Shea
John Ainsworth-Davis
Harry Dafel

RSA
GBR
SWE
USA
GBR
RSA

49.6
49.9e
50.0e
50.2e
50.4e
50.4e

(Competitors: 37; Countries: 16; Finalists: 6)

Barker was the fastest winner (53.0) from the six heats, but Hillman
and Halswelle were the favourites for the final. Anderson and du
Coteau qualified from a repechage heat. Pilgrim, a 400/800 type of runner who had only been added to the team at the last moment, used his
strength to move from third to first off the final bend, after Halswelle

Shea, winner of the US Trials in 49.0, and Engdahl, who had run 48.5
in 1919, were the favourites. They duly won their semi-finals – Shea in
50.0 after Engdahl had run 49.4 on the slow track. In the final Dafel got
a false start, then, at the second time of asking Shea and Engdahl took

R I O

82

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

the lead. Rudd surged past them at 250m and led by one and a half
metres into the finishing straight. First Shea, then Engdahl faded, and
Butler went past them to finish just over 2m behind Rudd. Very much
the amateur athlete, Rudd enjoyed a beer and cigarette after his not too
frequent training sessions.

Paris, 11 Jul 1924
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

(6)
(5)
(2)
(1)
(4)
(3)

Eric Liddell
Horatio Fitch
Guy Butler
David Johnson
John Taylor
Joseph Imbach

GBR
USA
GBR
CAN
USA
SUI

47.6WR
48.4e/48.2
48.6e/48.4
48.8e
67.0e
DNF

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

Eastman had set a world record of 46.4 for 440y around one curve early
in the year, but had then lost to Carr in the IC4A championships and the
US Trials. Carr won the first semi-final in 47.2 (47.25) ahead of Wilson
(47.8), Golding (48.0) and Godfrey Rampling (48.0), while Eastman
won the other race in 47.6 (47.60) ahead of Walters and Gordon (both
48.2). In the final, the lanky (1.85/70kg) Eastman quickly took the lead,
passing 100m in 10.8 (Carr 10.9) and halfway in 21.7 (Carr 22.1), with
Gordon second in 22.0. Eastman still led at 300m (33.7 – 33.8), but was
powerless to hold off the smooth stride of the smaller man (1.72m) in
the closing stages. Carr won by 2m, with a metric world record.

Berlin, 7 Aug 1936
Electrics

(Competitors: 60; Countries: 27; Finalists: 6)

Eric Liddell had won the Scottish and AAA title over 440y in 1924,
having decided to concentrate on that event (and the 200m) in late
1923. The Scottish international rugby winger set a personal best of
49.0 in winning his quarter-final, and then took his semi-final in 48.2
ahead of Imbach (48.7, following a 48.0 in his quarter-final). Fitch had
won the first semi in 47.8 in front of Butler (48.0e) and Johnson
(48.2e), with future IAAF President Adriaan Paulen eliminated in
48.6e.
In the final, held in very windy conditions, Liddell bolted from the
gun, passing through 200m in 22.2 with Butler second. Imbach fell
soon after, and into the straight Liddell’s lead was almost 10m. This
was cut back to 6m by the finish, and Fitch went past Butler in the last
few metres for the silver medal. Taylor, who ran with a bandaged ankle,
fell 10m from the line, and crawled across the finish, while Imbach was
placed sixth although he did not complete the race. The time, though
slower than Meredith’s 47.4 for the longer 440 yards, was nevertheless
ratified as a world record.

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(5)
(6)
(2)
(3)
(1)
(4)

Archie Williams
Godfrey Brown
James LuValle
Bill Roberts
William Fritz
John Loaring

(1)
(5)
(3)
(2)
(4)
(6)

Ray Barbuti
James Ball
Joachim Büchner
John Rinkel
Harry Storz
Hermon Phillips

USA
CAN
GER
GBR
GER
USA

47.8
47.9e/48.2
48.1e/48.4
48.4e
48.8e
49.0e

Los Angeles, 5 Aug 1932
Electrics
(2)
(3)
(1)
(5)
(6)

Bill Carr
Ben Eastman
Alex Wilson
William Walters
James Gordon
George Golding

USA
USA
CAN
RSA
USA
AUS

46.2WR
46.4
47.4
48.2
48.2
48.8

(Competitors: 27; Countries: 15; Finalists: 6)

(46.66)
(46.68)
(46.84)
(46.87)

London, 5 Aug 1948
Adjusted

The three Bs – Ball, Büchner and Barbuti – were the most impressive
in qualifying, the Canadian and German winning their semi-finals in
48.6, and Barbuti, the US Trials winner, running 48.8 in both the second round and semi-final. With a view of all the finalists at the start,
Barbuti went all out, with Phillips and Büchner attempting to stay with
him. By the start of the finishing straight, Barbuti had a lead of 5m, but
held only half a metre of that advantage by the finish. The official times
of 48.2/48.4 for second and third were clearly too conservative.
Barbuti’s win was the USA’s only individual track gold medal of 1928,
America’s worst-ever showing.

(4)

46.5
46.7
46.8
46.8
47.8
48.2

Williams had emerged from obscurity in 1935 to set a world record of
46.1 in the NCAA championships and carried the mantle of favourite.
Only Roberts and the Americans had ran under 48 before the semifinals. Williams won his semi in 47.2, then LuValle won the other in
47.1 (47.18) ahead of Brown – 47.3 (47.31) – and Fritz – 47.4 (47.32).
Rampling – 47.5 (47.61) – failed to qualify despite again being one of
the six quickest semi-finalists.
Williams went out fastest in the final, passing 200m in 22.0 ahead of
LuValle (22.1) with the Britons lagging. Roberts pushed from just
before 300m, but Brown began his big effort a little later, and caught
LuValle with 40m to go. Williams held on as Brown closed to within
10cm, with the electric times belying the official margin of 0.2.

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(Competitors: 50; Countries: 20; Finalists: 6)

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

USA
GBR
USA
GBR
CAN
CAN

(Competitors: 42; Countries: 25; Finalists: 6)

Amsterdam, 3 Aug 1928
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

4 0 0 m

(46.28)
(46.50)

(3)
(2)
(4)
(1)
(6)
(5)

Arthur Wint
Herb McKenley
Mal Whitfield
David Bolen
Morris Curotta
George Guida

JAM
JAM
USA
USA
AUS
USA

46.2=OR
46.4
46.9
47.2
47.9
50.2

46.3
46.6
47.0
47.2
48.1
50.8

(Competitors: 53; Countries: 28; Finalists: 6)

Wint
McKenley
Whitfield
Bolen
Curotta
Guida

Differential
0.00
0.23 behind
0.66
0.90
1.77
4.50

McKenley, setter of world records for 400m and 440y in 1948, was hot
favourite to win from US Trials winner Whitfield. Wint, silver medallist in the 800m behind Whitfield, was fastest in the first two rounds
with 47.7, and then shocked onlookers by improving his best by 0.7
with 46.3 in the semi-finals, superb running on the heavy track. Curotta
(47.2) and Whitfield (47.4) followed him home ahead of George
Rhoden (47.6).
McKenley, the other semi-final winner in a more sedate 47.3, set off
in the final as if it was a 200m race. He held a 7m advantage at halfway,
reached in 21.4, versus 22.2 for Wint. At the 300m point McKenley
began to sag, and Wint caught him with 20m to go. The taller man’s
giant strides carried him to a winning margin of 2m. After the Games
the two met three times, with McKenley always the winner.

Helsinki, 25 Jul 1952

R I O

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

Electrics

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(7)
(5)
(6)
(4)
(3)
(2)

George Rhoden
Herb McKenley
Ollie Matson
Karl-Friedrich Haas
Arthur Wint
Mal Whitfield

JAM
JAM
USA
GER/FRG
JAM
USA

45.9OR
45.9
46.8
47.0
47.0
47.1

(46.09)
(46.20)
(46.94)
(47.22)
(47.24)
(47.30)

(Competitors: 71; Countries: 35; Finalists: 6)

Rhoden was the favourite, and there was the possibility of a Jamaican
sweep of the medals. Wint’s winning time in the first semi was 46.3
(46.39) his best since his Olympic win; behind him were the surprising
Haas with 46.4 (46.56) and Whitfield (46.64). The other semi-final was
won by McKenley in 46.4 (46.53) ahead of Rhoden – 46.5 (46.61) –
and Matson – 46.7 (46.99). This was the first time all the finalists
ducked under 47 seconds in the semi-finals.
For once Wint went out quickly in the final, misjudging the pace, and
passing 200m in a lifetime best of 21.7. Rhoden was next in 22.2 and
McKenley, also adopting new tactics, trailed in 22.7. Rhoden caught
the slowing Wint just before 300m and into the straight had a 2m margin over Wint and a further two over McKenley. McKenley closed the
margin all the way to the finish but fell short by two thirds of a metre,
while the huge Matson (1.88/93kg) – later a star in the NFL – was an
isolated third, pulling away from Haas in the closing stages.

Melbourne, 29 Nov 1956
Electrics

1,
2,
=3,

(4)
(5)
(3)
(2)

5,
6,

(6)
(1)

Charles Jenkins
USA
Karl-Friedrich Haas GER/FRG
Voitto Hellsten
FIN
Ardalion Ignatyev RUS
URS
Lou Jones
USA
Malcolm Spence
RSA

46.7
46.8
47.0
47.0
48.1
48.3

(46.85)
(47.12)
(47.15)

300m
33.9
34.3
33.6
33.5
33.4
34.1

Davis
Kaufmann
Spence
Singh
Kinder
Young

Halves
22.2/24.5
22.7/24.1
22.3/24.7
22.0/25.0
21.8/26.3
22.0/26.3

Kevan Gosper, later a power in the Olympic movement, set an
Australian record of 46.2 in his semi-final, but failed to qualify, edged
out by Jenkins, Hellsten (both 46.1) and Haas. European champion
Ignatyev won the other semi in a more economic 46.8 ahead of Spence
(47.2) and prohibitive favourite Jones (47.3).
Jones had run 45.2 from the outside lane in the US Trials, and drew
the same lane for the final, starting quickly and leading by 2m at
halfway. By 300m Ignatyev had almost caught the American, and the
shock of seeing others close to him made Jones “freeze” for a moment;
it was enough to lose concentration and the race. Jenkins had paced
himself best, and he took the lead with 50m to go, winning by more
than 2m. The slow time was due to the windy conditions and to the
scheduling – this was the last occasion that the final was held on the
same day as the semi-finals.

83

21.8/23.1
21.8/23.1
21.2/24.3
21.8/23.8
22.1/23.8
22.0/23.8

Tokyo, 19 Oct 1964
Electrics

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(5)
(7)
(2)
(6)
(8)
(1)
(3)
(4)

Mike Larrabee
Wendell Mottley
Andrzej Badeński
Robbie Brightwell
Ulis Williams
Tim Graham
Peter Vassella
Edwin Skinner

USA
TTO
POL
GBR
USA
GBR
AUS
TTO

45.1
45.2
45.6
45.7
46.0
46.0
46.3
46.8

(45.15)
(45.24)
(45.64)
(45.75)
(46.01)
(46.08)
(46.32)
(-)

(Competitors: 50; Countries: 33; Finalists: 8)

(48.35)
(48.40)

32.6
33.3
33.1
33.4
33.5
33.1

4 0 0 m

Kinder and Spence were the fastest in the first round with clockings of
46.7, but Davis shocked in the second round when he equalled the
Olympic record with 45.9. He then moved into the role of favourite in
winning his semi in 45.5, featuring a burst of speed at the 250m mark.
Kaufmann won the other semi in 45.7 just ahead of Spence’s 45.8.
Spence was out quickest in the final, and built up a big lead by
halfway. Davis and Young accelerated just after 200m, with Davis covering his third 100m section in 10.8, looking even more spectacular as
Spence began to fade. Kaufmann then began to close. The New Yorkborn German dived at the tape, and the margin was so tight the photofinish was a necessity in determining the winner. Neither man was
expected to win prior to the Games, so the sight of each breaking the
world record was a glorious surprise for both athletes and the spectators.

(47.15)

(Competitors: 43; Countries: 24; Finalists: 6)
Splits
Jenkins
Haas
Hellsten
Ignatyev
Jones
Spence

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

Larrabee
Mottley
Badeński
Brightwell
Williams
Graham
Vassella
Skinner

300m
33.5
33.2
33.8
34.1
34.1
34.2
34.1
34.1

Halves
22.5/22.7
21.6/23.6
21.7/23.9
21.8/23.9
21.7/24.3
22.0/24.0
22.0/24.3
22.2/24.6

Larrabee and Williams had run 44.9 and 45.0 in the US Trials, but were
not clear favourites as Mottley, Brightwell and Badeński were all highly regarded. Mottley ran the fastest ever heat (45.9) and quarter-final
(45.8), before being edged 45.7 to 45.9 by Brightwell in the semis.
Larrabee won the other semi in 46.0.
The final, run the next day in wet conditions, saw Mottley starting
quickest, leading from Badeński at the 200m by a slim margin, with
Larrabee lagging well back. The US Champion pulled up to fifth at
300m and gained 4m on Mottley in the final 100m, catching the Yale
graduate with 10m to go.
Larrabee had emerged as a talent 10 years earlier, but had been injury
prone until 1964, when a weight training programme helped him
through his best season ever.

Mexico City, 18 Oct 1968
Rome, 6 Sep 1960
Electrics

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

(4)
(2)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(3)

Splits

Otis Davis
Carl Kaufmann
Malcolm Spence
Milkha Singh
Manfred Kinder
Earl Young

USA
GER/FRG
RSA
IND
GER/FRG
USA

44.9WR
44.9WR
45.5
45.6
45.9
45.9

(Competitors: 54; Countries: 42; Finalists: 6)
300m
Halves

(45.07)
(45.08)
(45.60)
(45.73)
(46.04)
(46.07)

Electrics

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(6)
(2)
(1)
(5)
(3)
(4)
(7)
(8)

Splits

Lee Evans
Larry James
Ron Freeman
Amadou Gakou
Martin Jellinghaus
Tegegne Bezabeh
Andrzej Badeński
Amos Omolo

USA
USA
USA
SEN
FRG
ETH
POL
UGA

43.8WR
43.9
44.4
45.0
45.3
45.4
45.4
47.6

(Competitors: 55; Countries: 36; Finalists: 8)
300m
Halves

(43.86)
(43.97)
(44.41)
(45.01)
(45.32)
(45.42)
(45.42)
(47.61)

R I O

84
Evans
James
Freeman
Gakou
Jellinghaus
Bezabeh
Badeński
Omolo

32.2
32.6
33.0
32.9
33.2
33.1
33.2
33.3

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

21.1/22.7
21.5/22.4
21.6/22.8
21.7/23.3
22.0/23.3
21.9/23.5
21.7/23.7
21.5/26.1

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

5,
6,
7,
8,

(7)
(6)
(5)
(1)

4 0 0 m

Maxie Parks
Rick Mitchell
David Jenkins
Jan Werner

USA
AUS
GBR
POL

Munich, 7 Sep 1972

Splits
Juantorena
Newhouse
Frazier
Brijdenbach
Parks
Mitchell
Jenkins
Werner

(3)
(5)
(8)
(7)
(4)
(1)
(6)

Vince Matthews
Wayne Collett
Julius Sang
Charles Asati
Horst-Rüdiger Schlöske
Markku Kukkoaho
Karl Honz
John Smith

USA
USA
KEN
KEN
FRG
FIN
FRG
USA

44.66
44.80
44.92
45.13
45.31
45.49
45.68
DNF

21.6/23.4
21.7/23.5
21.7/23.7
21.8/23.7
21.8/23.9

300m
32.3
32.5
32.7
32.9
33.0
33.0
33.2

Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(2)
(4)
(6)
(3)
(1)
(7)
(8)
(5)

Viktor Markin RUS
Rick Mitchell
Frank Schaffer
Alberto Juantorena
Alfons Brijdenbach
Michael Solomon
David Jenkins
Joseph Coombs

URS
AUS
GDR
CUB
BEL
TTO
GBR
TTO

44.60
44.84
44.87
45.09
45.10
45.55
45.56
46.33

Splits
Markin
Mitchell
Schaffer
Juantorena
Brijdenbach
Solomon
Jenkins
Coombs

(4)
(3)
(8)

21.8/23.1
21.2/23.7
21.5/23.6
21.1/24.0
21.4/24.2
21.2/24.4

300m
32.6
33.0
32.4
32.9
32.4
32.7
32.4
32.8

With no Americans the event was quite open, and Bert Cameron (JAM)
and Juantorena – recovering from injury – were the favourites. Before
the final only Brijdenbach (45.46) and Mitchell (45.47) from the first
semi, and Frank Schaffer (45.47 in the other semi-final) were able to
duck under 45.50. Brijdenbach and Jenkins were out fastest in the final,
with the Belgian up by a metre by halfway. Brijdenbach still led at
300m, with Schaffer, Markin and Juantorena in close attendance.
Markin, an unheralded Siberian who was a 25-1 outsider, powered
ahead of Schaffer with 80m to go and won by 2m from Mitchell, who
closed from fifth to second in the last 100m, passing the exhausted
Schaffer in the last 5m. Markin improved from 47.20 in 1979 and a preGames best of 45.33.

Los Angeles, 8 Aug 1984
Halves

Halves

Alberto Juantorena
Fred Newhouse
Herman Frazier
Alfons Brijdenbach

21.2/23.4

(Competitors: 50; Countries: 32; Finalists: 8)

Montreal, 29 Jul 1976
(2)

22.1/23.6

Moscow, 30 Jul 1980

21.4/23.4

The fastest times before the semis were in the first round where
Kenyans Asati (45.16) and Sang (45.24) seemed to be over-energetic.
Matthews showed his class in the semi-finals, winning easily in 44.94
ahead of European record holder Honz (45.32); Smith, heavily bandaged, nursed himself through in 45.46, just ahead of Asati (45.47), with
European champion David Jenkins (GBR) fading badly from second
place at 300m. Sang won the other, easier semi in 45.30.
The final was delayed by a day, after the death of the Israeli athletes
at the hands of terrorists. Matthews took the lead after 100m and
extended a half-metre lead at 200m to 2m by 300m, with Sang a further
2m back. Meanwhile, Smith pulled up injured. Matthews was never
threatened, holding off Collett by a metre, with Sang a further metre
back. The two Americans staged an impromptu lackadaisical protest on
the podium, resulting in them being disqualified from competing further in Munich, leaving the USA without a relay team.

1,
2,
3,
4,

21.9/23.7

Juantorena had been favoured to win even before his world record in
the 800m, so was the centre of attention in the 400m. The Cuban held
back until the semi-finals, blasting the second 100m and throttling back
down the straight, to run 45.10. Newhouse, the fastest in the preliminaries with 45.42 in round 1, ran 44.89 to win the other semi, with
Jenkins third fastest of the day with 45.20.
In the final Newhouse was out quickest, and led the Cuban by 3m at
halfway. Juantorena closed inexorably on Newhouse, ultimately passing him with 25m to go, and drawing away with his giant strides to run
the fastest ever automatically timed 400m at low altitude (Collett’s 44.1
in 1972 was roughly equivalent to Juantorena’s mark). Frazier held on
to finish third, just holding off the fast-finishing Brijdenbach.

21.3/23.4

(Competitors: 64; Countries: 49; Finalists: 8)
Splits
Matthews
Collett
Sang
Asati
Schlöske
Kukkuaho
Honz

22.2/23.2

300m
32.6
32.4
32.8
32.6
32.7
33.6
32.9
33.1

Halves
(2)

21.8/23.5

(Competitors: 44; Countries: 29; Finalists: 8)

With six of the 10 best one lap men in 1968, the USA was the dominant
force. Evans had won the US Trials in 44.0 ahead of James, and they
duly qualified for the final as the two fastest men, with Evans breaking
the Olympic record in 44.8 (44.82) ahead of James’s 44.9 (44.88).
Gakou was the surprising winner of the other semi-final in 45.1 –
improving from a pre-Games best of 46.7.
Evans wanted to withdraw from the final after the furore of the 200m
– which saw Smith and Carlos expelled from the athletes village – but
his San Jose State teammates convinced him to run. Evans started
remarkably quickly, passing 100m in an unprecedented 10.4, making
up the stagger on Omolo two lanes outside him by 200m, and continuing to drive to 300m. At this point he led by 4m from James, with
Freeman a further 4m behind. Evans tired and the graceful James
closed to within a metre at the finish, with Freeman an isolated third
4m back. The remarkable Gakou was fourth in an African record of
45.01.

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,

45.24
45.40
45.57
45.63

CUB
USA
USA
BEL

44.26
44.40
44.95
45.04

21.8/22.5
21.4/23.0
21.6/23.4
21.8/23.3

1,
2,
3,
4,

(4)
(7)
(1)
(5)

Alonzo Babers
Gabriel Tiacoh
Antonio McKay
Darren Clark

USA
CIV
USA
AUS

44.27
44.54
44.71
44.75

21.7/22.6
21.6/23.0
21.8/23.0
21.2/23.6

R I O

5,
6,
7,

(6)
(2)
(3)
(8)

Sunder Nix
Sunday Uti
Innocent Egbunike
Bert Cameron

USA
NGR
NGR
JAM

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

44.75
44.93
45.35
DNS

21.6/23.2

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

4 0 0 m

85

place.
Lewis’s winning time was a world junior record, and he remains the
last male junior athlete to win an Olympic title.

(Competitors: 80; Countries: 57; Finalists: 7)
Splits
Babers
Tiacoh
McKay
Clark
Nix

Barcelona, 5 Aug 1992

300m
32.5
32.4
32.7
32.3
32.5

Halves

Babers and McKay, co-favourite with Cameron, won their quarterfinals in 44.72 and 44.75, setting up speculation of faster races to come.
However, the first semi was won in 45.16 by Egbunike from Babers
(45.17). In the second Cameron got a hamstring injury after 130m and
hopped forwards for 40m before starting to run again. After a 22.6 first
half he ran his third 100 in 10.8 and qualified in 45.10. His injury was
too severe for him to run the next day, but convinced onlookers that
they were looking at the best 400m man in the world, despite an
African record of 44.64 by Tiacoh.
Clark, an 18 year-old from Sydney, was out quickest in the final and
still led into the straight, but was caught by Tiacoh and then Babers
with 60m to go. The US Air Force lieutenant flowed smoothly away to
win by over 2m with McKay closing up fast in the closing stages to
edge Clark for third. Six men ran quicker than 45 seconds in the same
race for the first time.

Seoul, 26 Sep 1988
Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(6)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(7)
(2)
(8)
(1)

Steve Lewis
Butch Reynolds
Danny Everett
Darren Clark
Innocent Egbunike
Bert Cameron
Ian Morris
Mohamed Al-Malky

USA
USA
USA
AUS
NGR
JAM
TTO
OMA

43.87
43.93
44.09
44.55
44.72
44.94
44.95
45.03

21.41/22.46
21.68/22.25
21.37/22.72
21.61/22.94
21.76/22.96
21.66/23.28
21.95/23.00
21.49/23.54

(Competitors: 75; Countries: 55; Finalists: 8)
Splits
Lewis
Reynolds
Everett
Clark
Egbunike
Cameron
Morris
Al-Malky

300m
32.08
32.53
32.13
32.51
32.69
32.62
32.72
32.43

Reynolds had set a world record of 43.29 – obliterating Evans’s 43.86
from 1968 – a month before the Games and was a clear favourite, with
Everett regarded as a good bet for silver. The standard was higher than
ever before, as Everett won the slowest quarter-final in 44.83, with
Lewis (44.41) and Reynolds (44.46) the most extravagant winners. In
the semi-finals both Susumu Takano (JPN) and World Champion
Thomas Schönlebe (GDR) ran 44.90 but failed to qualify. Lewis won
the first race in 44.35 from Everett (44.36), with Clark (44.38) and
Cameron (44.50) qualifying for their second finals. So did Egbunike
(44.74) in the second heat behind Reynolds (44.33), Morris (44.60) and
Al-Malky (44.69).
Everett took the lead from the gun in the final and passed 100m in
11.03, with Lewis (11.26) and Reynolds (11.29) slightly more conservative. Lewis flew the next 100 in 10.15 and had almost made up the
stagger on Clark. Lewis led by half a metre at 300m, with Reynolds
still losing ground. The teenager had led at this stage in the US Trials,
before fading to third. However, under the tutelage of 1972 finalist
John Smith, Lewis had matured, and held on against Reynolds’s
onslaught over the last 50m to win by a scant half metre. Everett was
just over a metre back, while Clark again missed the medals by one

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(4)
(7)
(5)
(6)
(2)
(3)
(1)
(8)

Quincy Watts
Steve Lewis
Samson Kitur
Ian Morris
Roberto Hernández
David Grindley
Ibrahim Ismail
Susumu Takano

USA
USA
KEN
TTO
CUB
GBR
QAT
JPN

43.50OR
44.21
44.24
44.25
44.52
44.75
45.10
45.18

20.8/22.7
21.1/23.2
21.5/22.8
21.7/22.6
21.2/23.4
21.3/23.5
21.4/23.7
21.9/23.3

(Competitors: 68; Countries: 52; Finalists: 8)
Splits
Watts
Lewis
Kitur
Morris
Hernández
Grindley
Ismail
Takano

300m
31.4
31.8
32.3
32.5
32.0
32.2
32.5
32.9

Fastest in round 1 was Derek Redmond (GBR) who clocked 45.03, but
would later be helped off the track by his father when attempting to
hobble through his semi-final with a hamstring injury. Another to suffer
in the semi-finals was 1988 bronze medallist Everett, who had won the
US Trials in 43.81 but, injured, was 13 seconds slower in Barcelona.
Overshadowing these unfortunates was Quincy Watts who won the second semi-final in an Olympic record 43.71 despite easing up. Behind
him Kitur (44.18), Morris (44.21) and Grindley (44.47) all ran national
records, leaving European champion Roger Black with the unwanted
record of the fastest ever non-qualifying run of 44.72. Reigning champion Lewis won the other semi in 44.50.
Watts and Lewis blasted out in the final with Watts taking over from
Lewis in the back straight, passing 200m in an apparently suicidal 20.8,
and speeding by 300m in 31.4, quicker than the world best of 31.48.
Only Lewis was anywhere near at this point, but Watts, in magisterial
fashion, powered away to win in 43.50, second fastest time ever, with
Lewis just holding on to second from the fast-finishing Kitur.

Atlanta, 29 Jul 1996
Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,

(4)
(3)
(2)
(1)
(8)
(5)
(6)
(7)

Michael Johnson
Roger Black
Davis Kamoga
Alvin Harrison
Iwan Thomas
Roxbert Martin
Davian Clarke
Ibrahim Ismail

USA
GBR
UGA
USA
GBR
JAM
JAM
QAT

43.49OR
44.41
44.53
44.62
44.70
44.83
44.99
DNF

21.22/22.27
21.36/23.05
21.76/22.77
21.41/23.21
21.30/23.40
21.40/23.43
21.37/23.62
21.65/23.62

(Competitors: 62; Countries: 42; Finalists: 8)
Splits
Johnson
Black
Kamoga
Harrison
Thomas
Martin
Clarke

300m
31.9
32.3
32.5
32.4
32.4
32.6
32.7

Johnson was the fastest in the quarter-finals (44.62) and semis (44.59),
with Black the second quickest in each race – one tenth slower in both
instances. Earlier, Harrison had run an unnecessarily quick heat of
44.69. Butch Reynolds had finished second to Johnson in the US Trials
but failed to finish his semi-final.
Johnson had persuaded the IAAF to change the timetable four

R I O

86

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

months before the Games to permit him to try for the 200/400m double.
Johnson scurried out of the blocks in the final and was just over a metre
up at 200m. His upright Chaplinesque style carried him to a 5m lead at
300m which continued to build until he crossed the line 8m clear. This
was the biggest victory margin since 1896, nipped Watts’s Olympic
record by 0.01 seconds, and was history’s fourth fastest (and Johnson’s
third best) ever. Johnson also became the first man to win the US Trials
and Olympic 400m since Evans in 1968. Behind him Black just held
off fast-finishing Kamoga for second place.

Sydney, 25 Sep 2000

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

4 0 0 m

the fastest times before the final were 44.87 by co-favourite Wariner in
winning the first semi-final, and 44.97 by Simpson in winning the second semi ahead of Harris (44.99).
Francique had been the most impressive runner on the international
circuit during the season, and he and Harris led the field at the 200m
mark in the final. Wariner and Brew were just behind, and Wariner
maintained the pressure on Harris to the 300m mark, reached by Harris
in 32.2. Wariner (32.2), Brew (32.4) and Francique (32.5) trailed.
Wariner decelerated least in the finishing straight and slowly built up a
lead of just over a meter to finish in 44.00, the slowest winning time
since 1984. He became the first American since Lee Evans in 1968 to
win the NCAA/US Olympic Trials/Olympic Games triple, and the third
gold medal winner in a row from Baylor University.

Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,

(6)
(4)
(8)
(2)
(1)
(7)
(3)
(5)

Michael Johnson
Alvin Harrison
Greg Haughton
Sanderlei Parrela
Robert Maćkowiak
Hendrik Moganyetsi
Danny McFarlane
Antonio Pettigrew

USA
USA
JAM
BRA
POL
RSA
JAM
USA

43.84
44.40
44.70
45.01
45.14
45.26
45.55
DQ (r40.9)

21.6/22.2

(45.42)

22.1/23.3

21.2/23.5
21.6/23.4
22.0/23.1
22.3/23.0
22.0/23.6

Rightful finalist (in place of Pettigrew):

Daniel Caines

GBR

(4s2, 45.55)

(Competitors: 68; Countries: 50; Finalists: 8)
Splits
Johnson
Harrison
Haughton
Parrela
Mackowiak
Mokganyetsi
McFarlane
Pettigrew

100m
11.4
11.5
10.9
11.5
11.7
11.8
11.5
11.7

200m
21.6
21.8
21.2
21.6
22.0
22.3
22.0
22.1

Beijing, 21 Aug 2008

21.8/22.6

300m
32.1
32.6
32.1
32.7
33.2
33.1
33.0
33.0

Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(4)
(7)
(9)
(5)
(6)
(8)
(2)
(3)

LaShawn Merritt
Jeremy Wariner
David Neville
Chris Brown
Leslie Djhone
Martin Rooney
Renny Quow
Johan Wissman

USA
USA
USA
BAH
FRA
GBR
TTO
SWE

43.75
44.74
44.80
44.84
45.11
45.12
45.22
45.39

21.1/22.7
20.9/23.8
21.1/23.7
21.3/23.5
21.5/23.6
21.5/23.6
21.7/23.5
21.4/24.0

(Competitors: 55; Countries: 41; Finalists: 8)

With 21 sub-44 clockings, Johnson was a prohibitive favourite, particularly as none of his opponents had ever run quicker than 44 seconds.
Alvin Harrison showed he was the most likely challenger, winning his
quarter-final in 44.25 and edging Johnson 44.53 to 44.65 in their semifinal. Haughton was out quickest in the final, passing 100m in 10.9,
half a second up on Johnson. The world record holder then blasted the
next 200 in 20.7 and caught the Jamaican at the 300m mark. From that
point on Johnson moved away from the field, winning by 5m from
Harrison.
Original seventh placer Pettigrew admitted in 2008 to taking EPO
between 1997 and 2003 and so all his results in that period were
annulled, meaning that eighth place of McFarlane was upgraded to seventh. Tragically Pettigrew committed suicide in 2010 at the age of 42.

Splits
Merritt
Wariner
Neville
Brown
Djhone
Rooney
Quow
Wissman

300m
31.7
31.6
31.7
31.9
32.2
32.1
32.6
32.3

Brown was the fastest in the heats, leading four men to sub 45 clockings with his 44.79. The Bahamanian improved to 44.59 in the semis,
but was outclassed by reigning champion Wariner, who coasted to a
44.15 win. The co-favourite, Merritt, ran 44.12 in the second semifinal, easily holding off Britain’s tall (1.98) Rooney.
Debate was torn between Wariner and Merritt, 2-2 in head-to-head
competition during the season, as to which athlete might win. Until the
300m point, the race was close, with Wariner holding a slight advantage over Merritt and Neville, but Meritt held form while Wariner surprisingly wilted. Merritt won by eight metres, with Wariner trotting in
ahead of Neville, who dived for the line to edge out Brown for the
bronze.

Athens, 23 Aug 2004

London, 6 Aug 2012

Halves

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(4)
(5)
(3)
(8)
(6)
(7)
(2)
(1)

Jeremy Wariner
Otis Harris
Derrick Brew
Alleyne Francique
Brandon Simpson
Davian Clarke
Leslie Djhone
Michael Blackwood

USA
USA
USA
GRN
JAM
JAM
FRA
JAM

44.00
44.16
44.42
44.66
44.76
44.83
44.94
45.55

Halves

21.5/22.5
21.4/22.8
21.5/22.9
21.4/23.3
21.6/23.1
21.7/23.1
21.6/23.3
21.6/24.0

(Competitors: 62; Countries: 49; Finalists: 8)

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,
8,

(5)
(7)
(4)
(6)
(9)
(2)
(8)
(3)

Kirani James
Luguelín Santos
Lalonde Gordon
Chris Brown
Kevin Borlée
Jonathan Borlée
Demetrius Pinder
Steven Solomon

GRN
DOM
TTO
BAH
BEL
BEL
BAH
AUS

43.94
44.46
44.52
44.79
44.81
44.83
44.98
45.14

21.3/22.6
21.4/23.1
21.6/22.9
21.5/23.3
21.9/22.9
21.6/23.2
21.4/23.6
21.9/23.2

(Competitors: 55; Countries: 41, Finalists: 8)
Splits
Wariner
Harris
Brew
Francique
Simpson
Clarke
Djhone
Blackwood

300m
32.2
32.1
32.4
32.5
32.4
32.7
32.7
32.7

For the first time since 1912 there were only two preliminary rounds.

Splits
James
Santos
Gordon
Brown
K Borlée
J Borlée
Pinder
Solomon

300m
32.0
32.2
32.5
32.4
32.8
32.6
32.3
32.9

Reigning Champion LaShawn Merritt had failed a doping test in 2010

R I O

2 0 1 6

★ O L Y M P I C

F I N A L S / M E N ’ S

and only appeared in London after successfully appealling against an
IOC law intended to ban from the Olympics those who have served
long suspensions for such offences. As it turned out, Merritt injured his
Achilles tendon just before London and failed to finish his heat. For the
first time, apart from Moscow 1980, there were no US athletes in the
final. Their other two men in London were below par in the semi-finals.
World Champion James became the man to beat, though Jonathan
Borlée, with a national record 44.43 showed an extravagant level of
speed in the first round. That Borlée twin dipped to 44.99 in his semi,
but that was just enough to qualify for the final where he was joined by
his brother Kevin. The fastest qualifiers were Gordon (44.58) and
James (44.59).
Pinder was the quickest starter in the final, leading by two metres at
100m (10.9), but was overtaken by James before halfway. The
Grenadian ran a strong second bend and led at 300m in 32.0, with a two
metre advantage over Santos. James doubled that lead in the last 100m
with his characteristic forward-leaning stride. Santos, officially a junior, held off Gordon for silver 44.46 to 44.52. Brown was fourth, his
fourth such placing in World/Olympic competition since 2005. The
first four finishers were all from the Caribbean.
Oscar Pistorius (RSA) became the first Paralympian to compete in
athletics at the Olympic Games. Racing with artificial limbs, he
reached the semi-finals.

4 0 0 m ,

800 Metres
1,
2,
3,

8 0 0 m

87

Athens, 9 Apr 1896

Edwin Flack
Nándor Dáni
Dimitrios Golemis

AUS
HUN
GRE

2:11.0OR
2:11.8e
2:28.0e

(Competitors: 9; Countries: 6; Finalists: 3)

Neither Edgar Bredin (GBR) nor Charles Kilpatrick (USA) – both sub1:56 men – was present, and the faster of the two heats was that won
by Flack in 2:10.0. The other was taken by Albin Lermusiaux (FRA) in
2:16.6. Even allowing for the quality of the track it was clear that the
best in the event were not present. In the final Flack led Dáni by a metre
at halfway in 65.5, with Golemis well behind. The Australian only got
clear of the Hungarian in the last 100m.

Paris, 16 Jul 1900
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

Alfred Tysoe
John Cregan
David Hall
Henri Deloge
Zoltán von Speidl
John Bray

GBR
USA
USA
FRA
HUN
USA

2:01.2
2:01.8e
2:05.0e

(Competitors: 18; Countries: 7; Finalists: 6)
MEN’S 400 METRES
The Best on Points
16
Michael Johnson USA
15
Wyndham Halswelle GBR
Steve Lewis USA
Jeremy Wariner USA

1996-1,
1906-2,
1988-1,
2004-1,

Hall became the first man to break two minutes in Olympic competition, winning heat 1 in 1:59.0 by three yards from Tysoe in 1:59.6e,
with Howard Hayes (USA) running 2:00.8e but missing the final. The
other heat winners were Deloge (2:00.6) and Cregan (2:03.0). Deloge
led for the first 550m in the final, but was then overtaken by Tysoe and
Cregan who battled to the line. The Briton won by 3m, with Hall passing Deloge in the last 50m. Tysoe reportedly ran the second half in 56.2
seconds, though this may be an over estimation of the Lancastrian’s
speed.

2000-1
1908-1
1992-2
2008-2

Most Finals
3
25 men
Most Appearances
4
Chris Brown BAH
3
22 men
Placing Table
G
USA
20
GBR
2
GER
JAM
2
AUS
RSA
1
TTO
CAN
CUB
1
KEN
BEL
URS (RUS) 1
GRN
1
POL
BAH
NGR
FIN
CIV
DOM
SWE
UGA
FRA
DEN
BRA
IND
SEN
ETH
QAT
JPN
OMA
Totals
28
Breakdown
GER
FRG
GDR
Totals

S
B
13
11
4
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1=
1
1=
1
1
1
1
1
27 26+2=

of GER placings:
3
1
1
3
2

2000-6q3, 2004-3s2, 2008-4, 2012-4

St. Louis, 1 Sep 1904
4
6
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
25

5
9
2
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
25

6
6
3
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
23

7
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
14

8
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
10

2
2

2
2
4

-

1
1

-

M Points
44
401
8
94
5
61
5
58
2
36
2
28
2
27
2
25
1
17
2
17
0
16
2
13.5
1
13
1
13
0
12
0
9
1
8.5
1
7
1
7
1
7
1
7
0
7
1
6
0
5
0
5
0
5
0
3
0
2
0
1
0
1
83
912

4
0
1
5

45
10
6
61

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,

James Lightbody
Howard Valentine
Emil Breitkreutz
George Underwood
Johannes Runge
Frank Verner

USA
USA
USA
USA
GER
USA

1:56.0OR
1:56.3e
1:56.4e
1:57.2e
1:57.9e

(Competitors: 13; Countries: 3)

Runge had won the first race of the Games – the 880y (sic) handicap
with a time of 1:58.3. The German took the lead at the halfway mark
in the 800m, reportedly in less than 57 seconds, followed by Canadians
John Peck and Peter Deer, the only other non-Americans in the race.
Lightbody had been last at 400m but sped around the field on the outside, catching the leaders – by now Breitkreutz and Valentine – with
30m to go. Lightbody pulled away with his long stride, with Valentine
passing Breitkreutz in the last few metres.

Athens, 30 Apr 1906
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,

Paul Pilgrim
James Lightbody
Wyndham Halswelle
Percy Crabbe
Kristian Hellström
Charles Bacon
Eli Parsons
Johannes Runge

USA
USA
GBR
GBR
SWE
USA
USA
GER

2:01.5
2:01.6e
2:03.0e

DNF

(Competitors: 23; Countries: 9; Finalists: 8)

The four heat winners – Lightbody 2:05.4, Hellström 2:05.8, Crabbe
2:07.6 and Pilgrim 2:06.6, together with Halswelle – were considered

6.7e 1:52. reached in 54.2 1:55. and the German faded badly in the last 20m.6 and 1:56. Sheppard led into the straight with Davenport challenging on the inside and Meredith on the outside. 7.5e 1:52. a British Guianan-born Canadian. 3.4 1:53. He finished nearly 7m clear of Byléhn. Mountain was a further 50cm in arrears. and the young French star Séra Martin (22) who ran a world record of 1:50. Stallard won his semi with 1:54. who at 13 years 225 days remains the youngest-ever competitor in Olympic athletics. but Sheppard passed him at 300m and went through halfway in 53. 5. just outside the world record of 1:53.4e 1:56.5e 1:53. 5.9e 1:53. Countries: 21.0 (Competitors: 40. 3.8e 1:56. and Watson is shown in his correct position of eighth.4 1:56. winner of the Eastern US Trials and the favourite. ran 1:52. In a desperate finish Lowe got home by half a metre with Enck passing the fading Stallard in the last 10m.7.4 1:53. 17 Aug 1920 Official 1. 2.4. Sheppard. Rudd surged into the lead with 300m to go. 8. building up pace from 550m. Fairbairn-Crawford set the pace in an attempt to help Just. passing 400m in 54. US Trials winner. 2. Finalists: 9) Rudd was the fastest of the first round winners (1:55.2y) was the fastest man in the field.2 in a close finish with Richardson and Martin (both 1:54. Hill remains the oldest man.4. 6. with fellow Briton Harry Houghton his closest pursuer until 500m. 5.4e 1:53. and still led with 70m to go when he hit a soft spot on the inside of the track.4y indoors. Lightbody led the slow race.8e 1:54. and Stallard the AAA Champion. to have won the Olympic 800m. but Hahn soon took over and led at the bell (55. went out from the gun in the final.6 1:54. pulling Engelhard with him.8 and 1:52. Together with Enck. 7. At 20 years 236 days. Antwerp.6. 1. Finalists: 8) Paris. with Mountain taking over just after the bell. but he was notably inconsistent and France and the USA seemed to provide the best candidates for gold. Stallard held the lead until 50m to go.2e 1:53.7e 1:53.0 1:52. and passed 400m in a swift 52.0. 8 Jul 1924 Lunghi was the fastest in the heats with 1:57. Finalists: 9) Between Paris and Amsterdam the best 800m man was Otto Peltzer (GER). Braun and Davenport on his heels. Meredith was the youngest ever Olympic 800m Champion. 21 Jul 1908 1. Douglas Lowe Erik Byléhn Hermann Engelhard Phil Edwards Lloyd Hahn Séra Martin Earl Fuller Jean Keller GBR SWE GER CAN USA FRA USA FRA 1:51.0. 6. London.6. wrenching his ankle. Lowe kicked sharply as the runners came off the last turn and effectively demolished the opposition. Rudd surged away and led by 4m with 120m left. who passed Rudd in the last few metres. though he was officially placed fourth. though Lunghi was a clear second behind Sheppard. in eighth place.6 two weeks before the Games.6. arms down and turning on full speed I caught him 20 yards out.2 1:55. bumping Eby slightly as he went (resulting in Eby murmuring an immediate gentlemanly apology). these three were the medal favourites.0e 1:56.0e 1:53.2.4 1:53. 2.4e DNF DNF F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 8 0 0 m Tom Campbell (USA) led for the first lap.8e 1:53. 8. Mel Sheppard Emilio Lunghi Hanns Braun Ödön Bodor Theodore Just John Halstead Clarke Beard Ian Fairbairn-Crawford USA ITA GER HUN GBR USA USA GBR 1:52. In the final Richardson (1:53. the stiffer his action became the more I forced myself to relax. went into the lead from the gun to control the final. Braun attempted to get by Davenport.0.2. 5.1e 1:53. Countries: 16.5e (Competitors: 49.8e 1:56. The 20 year-old Phil Edwards. 8.4. Sheppard continued to 880y. 3.0 and 600m in 1:21. with Davenport a further 25cm back.8e (Competitors: 51. and won his semi-final in 1:57. Last in his heat was Vahram Papazyan (TUR). 31 Jul 1928 1.9WR 1:52. 4. Lowe. 4.74/75kg) American but eventually had to give way. Times previously shown have been updated after reference to film of the race. won by the 20 year-old High School graduate Ted Meredith in 1:54.2e 1:54. 1:53.6 1:56. Finalists: 8) Percy Mann (GBR) was the fastest heat winner in 1:56.4) and Scott (1:57. who had been more cautious in the early rounds. 8. but was only sixth in the first semi-final. 6.4 1:52.2).7e (Competitors: 44. . 1:54.8e 1:53. Official times were 1:53. without success. 3. when Lowe and Martin surged past him.7e 1:53. Ted Meredith Mel Sheppard Ira Davenport Melville Brock David Caldwell Hanns Braun Clarence Edmundson Herbert Putnam USA USA USA CAN USA GER USA USA 1:51. Brock won the other semi in 1:55. 2.4. The English Champion.6e 1:55. 7. carrying a foot injury. both of whom ran 1:54.0e 1:53. clocking 1:54. 2. 3. Braun and Bodor passed Just in the finishing straight.R I O 88 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C gold medal possibilities. Countries: 17. but unable to take part in that event because of an ankle injury.0.0. Hill later described the closing stages “I was watching him [Rudd] closely. Amsterdam. before the Briton went on to win by one-anda-half metres from Eby. He managed to hold off Hill until the final 20m. just ahead of Braun and Sheppard.0 1:54.0). 4. Lloyd Hahn had run 1:51. with only the eight heat winners qualifying for rhe final. was the top pole vaulter in the world. Lunghi and Just tried to stay with the powerful (1. 4. 4.4). 6. Hahn was the fastest in both preliminary rounds – 1:56. but was caught by Pilgrim with 60m to go. with Meredith. as did Hill (1:56. 8 Jul 1912 1.7e 1:54.4e 1:58. at 31 years 149 days. who sped by Hahn and Edwards in the finishing straight. 1:54.” (Competitors: 38. 5. 7.0 1:52.0. Hoff. In the last 10m Meredith got past Sheppard to win by half a metre. Albert Hill Earl Eby Bevil Rudd Edgar Mountain Donald Scott Albert Sprott Adriaan Paulen Jean-Paul Esparbès GBR USA RSA GBR USA USA NED FRA 1:53.2) with Lowe and Edwards on his shoulder. Douglas Lowe Paul Martin Schuyler Enck “Henry” Stallard William Richardson Ray Dodge John Watters Charles Hoff GBR SUI USA GBR USA USA USA NOR 1:52.8WR 1:54. Countries: 10. With 8m between first and fifth these were clearly incorrect. Countries: 24.8 behind Hahn and ahead of Séra Martin.8OR 1:52.4. set the pace in the final. Finalists: 9) Stockholm.

and was 5m clear of Wint (in fifth place) with 200m to go. Countries: 24. winning the first heat in 1:50.0. 5. 7.8 Hansenne was the fastest man before the Games with 1:48. Mal Whitfield USA Arthur Wint JAM Heinz Ulzheimer GER/FRG Gunnar Nielsen DEN Albert Webster GBR Günther Steines GER/FRG Reginald Pearman USA Lars-Erik Wolfbrandt SWE 1:49. the favourites were Lanzi.4 ahead of Wilson (1:52. who ran 1:50.2 54. and by Barten (1:51.4 1:49. 3. In the final Edwards took out the pace and passed 200m in 24.6 54. 6.9/55.2 1:50. 1:51.1 1:52. 2.6 some 10m ahead of the field. 4 Aug 1936 USA ITA CAN POL USA USA ARG AUS 1:52.8WR 1:49.2/56.2 55.6/56. 2.28 behind 0. Chef d’Hôtel led for most of the first lap in the final.7/55.8/54.7 Electric 1:49. and failed to finish his semi-final. 3. 22 Jul 1952 Electrics 1.7e 1:49.0 54.6 1:55.6e 1:50.34) (1:49. 3.78 1. Helsinki.6e 1:49. From 1948 to 1954 Whitfield was invincible in two-lap championship competition.38) (Competitors: 51.5 Ulzheimer (1:51. ahead of Whitfield (1:50.1/57. 4. 7. Marcel Hansenne Herbert Barten Ingvar Bengtsson Robert Chambers Robert Chefdhôtel John Parlett 1:52.6 Whitfield Wint Ulzheimer Nielsen Webster Steines Pearman Wolfbrandt Halves 54.4 54. 4. 6.97 Halves 54.2 55. and the surprising Webster third (1:50. when Whitfield kicked and went past the Jamaican. and Helsinki found him at the height of his power to control a race. while Hansenne was the fastest qualifier with 1:50. The Italian moved through the field to be third into the finishing straight.8 1:54. while Lanzi foolishly lagged in eighth place. with Whitfield cruising to second (1:50.7 54.89 6.1 1:50.6 1:55.4 54.5 The three best times in the world prior to the Games belonged to Ben Eastman.4 1:50.1). Edwards was caught by Wilson.3 1:49.6 1:52. Countries: 11. both domestic and international. Wint went to the front in the final and stayed there until just over 200m to go. and Powell. 2 Aug 1932 Official 1.4/59. 8. The Canadian led at halfway.2OR 1:49. London.6/55.2 55. in 52. However.04 1. Nielsen was the quickest in the semis.6 55.5 Halves 54.84) (1:50. Woodruff took over just before halfway.3. after being the fastest first round heat winner (1:53. had increased the cadence of his giant stride and was untouchable.3 and went on to clock 1:50. but was passed by Whitfield just before the bell. Wilson.6/54.5 54. won the battle for third.4.70 John Woodruff Mario Lanzi Phil Edwards Kazimierz Kucharski Charles Hornbostel Harry Williamson Juan Carlos Anderson Gerald Backhouse 8 0 0 m 1:52. with Edwards one and a half metres behind Lanzi.0 in early June.2/55. Harris was injured in London. 6.8/55. Whitfield kicked hard at 500m.6 1:53.2/55. Countries: 33.5 89 FRA USA SWE USA FRA GBR 1:49.2 1:56. 8. and Woodruff the US Trials winner and fastest semi-finalist (1:52. but could only close to 2m against the smooth striding Whitfield. the best time in the world since the Harbig-Woodruff era.00 0. Finalists: 9) Hampson Wilson Edwards Genung Turner Hornbostel Powell Martin F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1:49.63) (1:49. Just one of the three heats yielded a sub-1:53 clocking – Hornbostel in 1:52. by 8m from Genung.9) the winners. Finalists: 9) Whitfield Wint Hansenne Barten Bengtsson Chambers Chefdhôtel Parlett Differential 0.2=OR 1:49.4 1:50. 6. Countries: 23. 5. 8.5 1:53. Wilson led until the last 20m. Hansenne. The other semis were taken by Bengtsson (1:51.2 55.7 1:50. 8. 5.7).9/54. who had won European silver in 1934 as a 19 year-old.4.0 Berlin. 1.7).9 52. 2 Aug 1948 Adjusted Mal Whitfield Arthur Wint USA JAM 1:49.78) (1:49. 7. only one preliminary round was needed.1 1:50.6) were the fastest heat winners. Hampson.1 54.7) and Ulzheimer (1:51.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Los Angeles.7 (Competitors: 21. Finalists: 9) (Competitors: 42. 2.2/55. later one of France’s finest sportswriters. Edwards again led for most of the first lap in the final. the fastest-ever non-qualifying time. 7.4/56.81) (1:52. the times have been adjusted after reviewing a newlydiscovered film of the race. With only 21 entrants.2). a fine one lap sprinter who would later win three IC4A 440y titles.0 54. 5.8 Edwards made his third successive final. 4. The Empire Champion focused all his energies on this one race in 1932 – his best mark outside Los Angeles was a mere 1:54.1 (1:49.47) (1:50. As for 1928. 2.9 55. The other semis were more pedestrian with Wint (1:52.4/56.4) and Pearman (1:51.56 2. and then Hampson in the back stretch.0/55. Edwards and Kucharski were just behind Woodruff. They were ahead of Boysen who had led at 400m in 52.0 1:53. The Jamaican battled valiantly.9 54.8e 1:50.5).7 1:49.8 1:50. ahead of Wint (1:52. 3.5 1:52. but he concentrated on the 400m in Los Angeles.2e 1:53.8e 1:52. heading Barten by 2m.82 4.4.7).1). By then Woodruff. Whitfield opened up a gap of 2m into the straight and held it as the order of the top four remained unchanged in the last 100m. He finished 2m clear of the stocky Italian. Yet Whitfield – the US number one – and Doug Harris (NZL) were more highly regarded.1/58.4 54. reached in 57.3 (Competitors: 41.4/58.4y. Finalists: 9) 1.7). so the way to 800m gold seemed wide open.2 1:54.9 1:51.1 1:53.1/54. 4. Following advice from Woodruff.3 1:53. the first man to do so in the 800m. when Hampson finally got past the US-based Canadian to clock the first sub-1:50 mark.0/57. Unfortunately.31) (1:52.0 54.8e 1:51. .6/57.9 1:53. but this time he held back the pace.5.9 1:52. Tommy Hampson Alex Wilson Phil Edwards Edwin Genung Edwin Turner Charles Hornbostel John Powell Séra Martin GBR CAN CAN USA USA USA GBR FRA 1:49.7). the slowest split time since 1906.6e 1:51.

5 1:46. 7. 6.1.8 1:18.6 1:48. Snell burst past Moens on the inside.7/52. with only Matuschewski out of contact.5 1:54.4. 4.0) ahead of a bunched field.6 53.7OR 1:47. were bracketed as the top candidates for the gold. 5. Countries: 32. Finalists: 8) Courtney Johnson Boysen Sowell Farrell Spurrier Leva Butchart Tokyo.7 52.79/80kg) Snell.8 52. but Bell suffered in Mexico from a stomach ailment known locally as “Montezuma’s revenge” and was eliminated in the first round. Kerr won the first semi final.2 24.2/54.7/53.8 1:45. 3. with Boysen also clocking 1:50. Snell’s 1:46.9 52.9 1:45. Around the last bend old rival Kerr stayed in touch. powered home to win by 4m from Crothers. a situation which seemed to favour the strong rather than the swift.8 Halves Courtney was generally regarded as the favourite. with the former winning in 1:53.0 each. 8.0 Halves 51.88/81kg) American edged away.0.6 1:45.2 25. 16 Oct 1964 Halves 53.75) (1:47.9).6 25.8/55.5/54.0 51. Countries: 32.3 1:51. 7. though the occasionally brilliant Sowell had his supporters. but the world record holder was regarded as favourite when he stepped onto the track for the heats.57) (1:45. This was the first time that so many races were required before the final.6/53. At 600m Wägli still led (1:19. Johnson leading for 30m. looking more like an “All-Black” than a Kiwi. Finalists: 6) Snell Moens Kerr Schmidt Wägli Halves 52.0 Kiprugut and Wade Bell (USA) were considered the pick of the pack. Mexico City. 2.9/54. The unheralded Walter Adams won the other semi in 1:46. Kiprugut set a brisk pace in the final.0 54.1 1:52.38) (1:51. Courtney led from the gun in the final. Kiprugut lost ground after bumping into Kerr.82) (1:48. but the powerful (1.3=WR 1:44.88) (1:48.5 400m 51. and at 550m accelerated sharply gaining 5m in 50 to take the lead at 600m. Peter Snell NZL Bill Crothers CAN Wilson Kiprugut KEN George Kerr JAM Tom Farrell USA Jerry Siebert USA Dieter Bogatzki GER/FRG Jacques Pennewaert BEL 1:45.3).5). won the other semi in 1:47.1 1:48. (Competitors: 38.5 1:45. Then.83) (1:45.3 Prior to Tokyo Snell had not run the event for more than six months. the surprise being the 1:47.1 52.4/56.5 54.9/56.30) (1:47. 2 Sep 1960 1.8 in the first heat by the unknown Kenyan Kiprugut. 26 Nov 1956 Electrics 1.2 1:49.41) (1:49. Moens looked round three times in the finishing straight. 15 Oct 1968 Electrics Peter Snell NZL Roger Moens BEL George Kerr BWI (JAM) Paul Schmidt GER/FRG Christian Wägli SUI Manfred Matuschewski GER/GDR 52. and Crothers (1:47. and Kerr.0/55.3/55.3 1:49.4) where Courtney challenged for the lead. 6.5/53.48) (1:46. 1. the NCAA winner.0 (1:46. Finalists: 8) Splits Doubell Kiprugut Farrell Adams Plachy Fromm Saisi Cayenne 200m 25. and led at halfway (52. He won his first race in an easy 1:49.8/52.2 Moens. As the field entered the home straight Moens kicked with Kerr threatening on the outside.0 1:18.9/54.7 51.40) (Competitors: 44.1 52.4/54.46) (1:45.3 51.5 51.25) (1:47.0/54. then was surprised by Doubell’s finishing kick in the semis which the Australian won by a tenth in 1:45. moving from last to first in the last 200m to clock 1:47.5 Electrics 1.9 52. Finalists: 8) Rome.3/53.8 51. Countries: 25. boxed in.2 1:18.3 52.25) (1:48. Courtney and Spurrier controlled the slow first semi. Kiprugut won the fastest heat (1:46. The two Americans battled around the final curve. a move which the Belgian could answer only with a look of anguish. Snell.0 24.2 1:18.3) and Germans Matuschewski (1:47.3 51.6 1:47.7/58.0/53. 5. In the other. Tom Courtney Derek Johnson Audun Boysen Arnold Sowell Mike Farrell Lonnie Spurrier Emile Leva Bill Butchart USA GBR NOR USA GBR USA BEL AUS 1:47. passing 200 in 25. Snell’s time of 1:45. 7.8 52.2 53. dropped back and moved out to lane 3.6 1:19.1 24. and continuing as the front-runner to 600m (1:20. 3.75) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 8 0 0 m Wägli led from the gun in the final. 5. Sowell eased through two laps of 55. 3.5 52.0/53. 2.3OR 1:46.4 1:45. Countries: 36. 4.5/54.8).2 51.9 1:46. Ralph Doubell Wilson Kiprugut Tom Farrell Walter Adams Josef Plachý SVK Dieter Fromm Thomas Saisi Benedict Cayenne AUS KEN USA FRG TCH GDR KEN TTO 1:44.8 1:52.1 1:47.99) (1:46. Before the race Courtney had been so nervous that he lay on the infield immobilised until he realised how foolish he would look laying there while the race started without him.0 in a tight finish which left Mike Rawson (GBR) eliminated despite running 1:50.4 1:18. who burst past Kerr at the start of the straight. but Sowell soon took over.1 was the second fastest mark of all-time.7/54. saw Kerr was beaten and relaxed.6 52.5 51. The semis were won by Snell (1:46. which Johnson nipped through.3 600m 1:18.2 from Moens.3/63.3 (1:44. undefeated in 1960. Snell.59) (1:54.19) (1:52. They both negotiated the three preliminary rounds comfortably.9 (Competitors: 46.6 52.5 51. 2.0 51.1 1:17. 5.2 1:47.6/52. 6. The Swiss held a 3m lead at halfway.R I O 90 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Melbourne.7 53.2 1:50.1.3/54.5 53.21) (Competitors: 51.5 (1:47. in one of the most dramatic moments in the history of 800m running.4) and Balke (1:47.0/55. 6. Kerr from Kiprugut as both set an Olympic record of 1:46.0 1:47.3 for fifth. who had set a surprising national record of 1:48.4. 4. 4.0/53.1.8 1:48. . 52. leading the field through 200m in 25.5 1:47. but still recovered to win Kenya’s first medal in the event.1OR 1:45. passing 200m in 24.8 24.29) (1:49.2/58. 3.7.6. 8.1). 2.3 was the third improvement of his lifetime best in three days.7 52. but so exhausted were the two men that the victory ceremony had to be delayed.3 25.2/57. After Johnson had been the fastest heat winner (1:50. Courtney and the Briton then had an epic struggle throughout the last 90m.9.40) (1:44.55) (1:47. before the powerful (1. 8.9 1:46.1) with Moens in second and Snell boxed in by Schmidt.8 52. The winning margin was less than a metre. and as they entered the finishing straight a gap opened between them. 52.1 in the first round.0 51. ahead of front runner Wägli (1:47.

12 1:45. exhibiting a strength previously unseen in the event.5 54. The American finally caught the European champion as the latter made a desperate lunge for the line.0 600m 1:17. Singh faded as Juantorena led Wohlhuter past 600m in 1:17.9 50. while Juantorena was the quickest in the semis.6 54. 2.1/53.7 25. 6. Juantorena had run 1:44. Steve Ovett Sebastian Coe Nikolay Kirov BLR Agberto Guimarães Andreas Busse Detlef Wagenknecht José Marajo Dave Warren GBR GBR URS BRA GDR GDR FRA GBR 1:45. 26 Jul 1980 (Competitors: 61. due to the boycott initiated by the United States.3 1:19.8 before slowing to 51. 3. denied many athletes the opportunity of striving for gold.55. Finalists: 8) Splits Juantorena Van Damme Wohlhuter Wülbeck Ovett Susanj Singh Grippo 200m 25. Coe 1:46.4 26.7 51.3 Moscow.26 1:45.26 1:49. 8.96 53. Arzhanov entered the finishing straight with 2m to spare over Boit and Ouko.7 600m 1:19.3.1 1:20. who had set an Asian record of 1:45.50WR 1:43.6/53.6/50. 6 Aug 1984 51.7 51.5 26. was 0. The paced slowed.91 1:47.3 24.8/54.5 1:21. 7. 5. not least Mike Boit.39 (Competitors: 42.7/55.4 1:19.6 26.4 51. as Wottle began to close. 8.83 1:44. Farrell outgunned Adams in the last 50m to win the bronze. Countries: 28.28 (Competitors: 69.20 1:46. 6.1 51. In the final the Kenyans adopted team tactics with Ouko setting the pace.0 51. 8. but then suffered a niggling knee injury.8 25.72 after an untidy over-physical race.85 after Wohlhuter went through 200m in 25.9 53.0 1:20.4/52.5/51.8 53.7 before being joined by Boit at 400m.3 54.4 52.71.6/52.4/56.5 54.8 51. running 1:45. but the slender Australian then began to close.2/51.55 1:47.9 1:19.1 52. Montreal.3 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 8 0 0 m The boycott by Black African nations of the Olympics.5 52.0/55.0 1:17.1/53.9/52.1 1. the most elegant half miler of his generation – and the fastest – would only ever triumph in a major 800m championship once – winning the 1986 European title.9 (Competitors: 41. World 880y record holder Wohlhuter was the fastest in the heats with 1:45. Only the top Americans (Don Paige and James Robinson) and James Maina of Kenya were missing from the final. 7.77 1:48.9 25. Kiprugut only gave way with 40m to go.9 1:20.0 400m 53.2 54.9 51.6/53.5 24.8 1:20. 2.3 52.00.2 1:19.86 1:44.7 1:19.85 1:45. Countries: 46. It was the first 800m world record in the Olympics since the Games were last held in North America – 1932 in Los Angeles.9/54. where Boit improved his best by more than a second to 1:45.86 in the heats.9/53.53. 4.0 24.5 26.8. 4.53 1:44.57) three weeks after the Games. that Wottle forgot to take his hat off at the playing of his national anthem during the victory ceremony.3 1:20. 5.3 26.4 54. 51.1/53. 7.5/54. and easily held off the American in the last 100m.88 ahead of Van Damme’s 1:46.0 26.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Kiprugut took the pace in the final. 8. The Kenyan still had a 0. though he did move from fourth to second in the finishing straight.8).6 51. 5.9 25.89 1:46.9 50. equalling Snell’s world record. 7. Munich.5 26.5/52.8 . and as they reached 700m Ovett struck.8 Los Angeles.3/54.4/54. passing 600m in 1:19.5 seconds behind the leader. reached in 1:17.5 52.3 400m 54.8 54. the final was eagerly awaited as the two top British middle distance runners – Coe and Ovett – had only once met each other before over 800m.4 26.4/27. 6.4 51.4 Halves 1.9 54. Joaquim Cruz Sebastian Coe Earl Jones Billy Konchellah Donato Sabia Edwin Koech Johnny Gray Steve Ovett BRA GBR USA KEN ITA KEN USA GBR 1:43. 2.8 600m 1:20.3 52.7 54. By 600m Ovett had moved to the shoulder of Kirov (1:19. Finalists: 8) Splits Wottle Arzhanov Boit Kemper Ouko Carter Kupczyk Fromm 200m 26.86 1:45.5 51. Fromm’s 1:46.3/52.2/26. 6. 2.4 Halves Wottle won the US Trials in a world record-equalling 1:44. Van Damme overtook Wohlhuter with 25m to go. Singh.4 54.5 51.10 1:47.89 1:52.6 54.1/26.40 1:45. Guimarães led the field through a cautious first lap of the final. 4.6 54.75 1:45.7 1:19.9 52. He had been briefly disqualified for cutting in from his lane 3m before the 100m breaking point.9 in the run-up to the Games in his sixth race at 800m. and went through 200m in 24.6 51.01 1:46.7 margin over Doubell at 600m. With 26.9 53.3/51.0 400m 50. 2 Sep 1972 Halves 1. Wottle.4 52. 3.2 the American’s 200m splits were remarkably uniform. who ran the second fastest time of all-time (1:43. and Doubell won by just over a metre. and attacked off the final bend.8 52. so that Yevgeniy Arzhanov was regarded as the likely winner.7/51. 4.2. So shocked was he by his win. 3.3 26.00OR 1:43.5 1:17.1 1:17.5 1:20.9/53.0 at halfway. 3.3 Despite very ordinary times in the semi-finals (Ovett 1:46. earlier than his usual point of attack. 25 Jul 1976 Halves 1. with Coe too far behind to make up the deficit.0. 5.9 in the first round was the only run quicker than 1:47 until the third semi-final. Countries: 55. and Arzhanov took over at 500m.1 52. Finalists: 8) Splits Ovett Coe Kirov Guimaraes Busse Wagenknecht Marajo Warren 200m 26.4/52.0 26.3 25.5/60.64 1:43.7 54.2 26. Kirov 1:46.7/53.7 25. because of a New Zealand rugby tour of South Africa. 52.5 51.0 91 50.86 1:47.5/52.50 1:46.8 1:18.94 1:46.9.3/53. Countries: 31. with Ovett buried in the field and Coe running wide.3/52.03 1:44. passing 200m in 24.3 1:17. led at halfway in the final in 50.81 1:46.4 26. Dave Wottle USA Yevgeniy Arzhanov UKR URS Mike Boit KEN Franz-Josef Kemper FRG Robert Ouko KEN Andy Carter GBR Andrzej Kupczyk POL Dieter Fromm GDR 1:45. in last place.6 1:19.5 1:20.5 54.0 1:17.0 52. Finalists: 8) 51. Alberto Juantorena Ivo Van Damme Rick Wohlhuter Willi Wülbeck Steve Ovett Luciano Sušanj CRO Sri Ram Singh Carlo Grippo CUB BEL USA FRG GBR YUG IND ITA 1:43. and held them off.8 51.61).6/52.44 1:45. Wohlhuter took the other race in 1:46.25 54.5 ahead of Juantorena (25.53 1:46.3 53. Coe.6 51.7).

27/53. and Aouita was the speediest quarter-finalist (1:45.3 24.91 600m 1:16.0 24.2 Saïd Aouita had the greatest range of any distance runner in history.3) and won the fastest ever preliminary in 1:43.9 51.90) just beating Rodal.0 51. a statuesque former 400m runner.58OR 1:42.3 1:18.55 51. Gray still led at 600m (1:17.73/54. The long striding Brazilian won in 1:43.24).1 24. 8.96 was the fastest of the time qualifiers. and caught the American at 700m. led the third heat at 400m (51.80 1:46.21 1:45. 4. but held off Jones by 2m for the silver medal. an outsider.07 200m 25.5 1:16.8 24.1 before the usual slowing in the second furlong. left waiting to see if his third place 1:45. who had been 8m back at 500m (1:04. with Kiptoo (1:43.39 1:48. The Briton edged Barbosa 1:45. Vebjørn Rodal Hezekiel Sepeng Fred Onyancha Norberto Téllez Nico Motchebon David Kiptoo Johnny Gray Benyounès Lahlou NOR RSA KEN CUB GER KEN USA MAR 1:42.11 49. Koech still led at 600m in 1:17.6).8 1.4 23. Gray.3 50. 7. Kiprotich was on Gray’s shoulder with Tanui on the outside.7 25. 4.3 24.66 49. 3. and place third in the Kenyan Olympic trials. disrupting his rhythm.23 1:45. Gray hung on for a merited bronze. The best 5000m runner in 1986.8 50.77/59.7) in the second race and was edged by 1/100th by Lahlou’s 1:43.4 24. As the American faded. and his strike was decisive. 2.79.0 1:18.8 50. with Aouita in third. 4. Coe was the fastest in round 1 with 1:45.07/52. 5.7 49.0 50.38 49.12 1:44. eager to improve a poor championship record. The first (of three) semi finals was won by Sepeng (1:45.75).8/53. in an effort to try and take the sting out of Aouita’s finish.4/57. William Tanui Nixon Kiprotich Johnny Gray José Luiz Barbosa Andrea Benvenuti Curtis Robb Réda Abdenouz Mark Everett KEN KEN USA BRA ITA GBR ALG USA 1:43.8 1:18.63 49. Finalists: 8) Splits Ereng Cruz Aouita Elliott Gray Barbosa Sabia Kiprotich 8 0 0 m Barcelona.6 51.07 49. Countries: 53. while Kiprotich led from the gun in the other semi and held off Aouita 1:44. 7. 5. running 45.4 50. just after Everett – the fastest 400m man in the field – stopped with a hamstring injury.99.7 50. At this point.1/55.32 in the swiftest of the three semis. with Cruz always in attendance no more than 0. Halves 1.33.58 would be quick enough. 8.45 1:43. 7. the Kenyan-born World Champion.44 DNF 50.91 1:44.3 51. Ereng had been a 400m runner.0 50.43/56. Cruz attacked with just under 100m to go. 31 Jul 1996 50. took out the pace in the final.5 24. winner of the Kenyan trials.4 51. and then Barbosa took over.9 24. Aouita was also top the world rankings in the 800m in 1988. Countries: 40. elegantly flowing away from the defending champion to win by almost 4m.7 1:19..99.03 1:49.6 in 1987.R I O 92 Splits Cruz Coe Jones Konchellah Sabia Koech Gray Ovett 200m 24. Only Barbosa was close at 400m.19 1:44. but did not compete as the Kenyan Olympic Committee refused to allow him to represent his adopted country of Denmark.6 1:17.91/55. Ereng showed he was a medal contender in winning the first semi-final in 1:44. 50.70 1:43.0 23.3) when Elliott led briefly. 26 Sep 1988 Halves Paul Ereng Joaquim Cruz Saïd Aouita Peter Elliott Johnny Gray José Luiz Barbosa Donato Sabia Nixon Kiprotich KEN BRA MAR GBR USA BRA ITA KEN 1:43.1 24. with the favourite.6 Halves Seoul.64 49. and reaching the bell in 49.3/54. the third fastest performance all-time.6 1:16. passing 200m in 24.08/52.0/54.5 1:16.6 24.16 in separate races.3 24.10). and by the beginning of the straight had weaved his way to fourth.6 1:19.1 51.7/53.5 Barbosa and Robb were fastest in the heats.89 Atlanta.7 25.1 23.23/53. would have been a hot favourite.61 (Competitors: 56.6 Wilson Kipketer.0 50.8 1:16.77 50.53 51.9 1:16.1 to Gray’s 1:03.8 24.8/57.74 1:42.8 600m 1:18. Gray sensibly set a fast pace (50. 1.78 50.9 1:18.5.71.6 23. each running 1:46. but Barbosa caught Gray’s heel accidentally at 650m.81 just ahead of Sudan’s Omer Khalifa (1:44. with Gray (1:45. only to be overtaken by Cruz.27 49.25 to 1:45. seventh at the bell was now moving up. and was the favourite for Seoul.2 24.16). [Cruz] is a supreme champion. 6.9 400m 50.71 to 1:44. Téllez.8. and crossed the line shrugging his shoulders as if to say (as he later did) “I have no complaints .52 49. with Onyancha 8m clear of fourth place with 1:44.4 1:17. while Koech was the quickest in the quarter-finals with a personal best of 1:44.1 behind.24 1:19. followed by Coe and Jones. whose 1:43. 5m back.2 24. Ereng.3 1:16.2 400m 49. .1 25.06 1:44. Coe could do nothing about Cruz’s widening lead.59) taking the other races.66) and Tanui (1:46.55 49.08 50. before moving up to win the NCAA title.53/56. 6.01 50.9/54. 6.71/53.78 (Competitors: 70.60 49. 5. was the fastest heat winner (1:46.4 49.55/54.79.11/52.32 49.1 49. Tanui.0) closed to 3m at the 600m mark.0 (Competitors: 59.47 400m 51.0 50.7 50.3 1:16.2 1:15.3 51. passing 200m in 24.” Running 1:43.5 24. In the final Kiprotich led for the first 300m in a suicidal 36.0 1:18.66 1:43.4 400m 51.35 50.02.2 51.60 50.82 from Koech’s 1:44.56 from the 1.0 1:18.3 1:16. Finalists: 8) Splits Tanui Kiprotich Gray Barbosa Benvenuti Robb Abdenouz Everett 200m 24.85 1:43. a more tactical affair.87 49.5 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C 600m 1:17.7 25. with Philip Kibitok.98 50.12.78/53.7 50.6 51. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 600m 1:16.0 1:18. in 1:45.83/54.0 50.74.8 24. and caught Cruz with 50m to go. four rounds were required to crown a new champion.06 1:45. He quickly passed the tiring Elliott and Aouita. Koech led from the gun in the final. Finalists: 8) Splits Rodal Sepeng Onyancha Téllez Motchebon Kiptoo Gray Lahlou 200m 24. 2.87) after an excessive effort which presaged his later collapse with respiratory problems.79 1:42.55 ahead of Cruz (1:44.51.0 1:18.6 1:16. reminiscent of Juantorena. 3. 3.7 51. Ereng.9 24. Coe won the other semi.97 1:45.98/52. Countries: 49..5 1:17.2 50.57 1:48. with new US talent Jones third ahead of Steve Ovett. Tanui.00 in his fourth race in just over three days was a superlative effort. Koech led through 400m in semi-final 1 in 49.1 24.86 51. Tanui won the battle of the Kenyans. 2. Barbosa led until 600m (1:16.3 25.87/54.6 25.90 1:44.3 1:16.1 51.0 1:16.0 1:17.6 1:19.88 tall Cruz. 5 Aug 1992 For only the second time. The defending champion clocked 1:44.

never letting anyone pass him.2/60.24 54.2/53.53 1:45. 5.8 53. 5.0 49.7/52.55.6 49.65 1:44. 7. though Reed (12.9 52. with Kenya’s Japeth Kimutai – a medal prospect – the principal nonqualifier.66) 53.53 1:42. 4. and Sepeng placed sixth in his third final.1 1:19. and Kipketer (1:44.9 50. The final turned into a dawdle at the 200m mark.6 .8/51.5 1:46.4 Splits Bungei Ismail Yego Reed Kamel López Madi Manseur 200m 25.70 1:44.3 London.6 54.3/51.1 before easing down to the halfway point (53. 5.1 DQ (r163. Then the inevitable surge came from the Russian.1 25.0 52. Finalists: 8) Splits Schumann Kipketer Saïd-Guerni Sepeng Bucher Borzakovskiy Dube Longo 200m 25.9 24.1/50.9 50.7 1:19. 2.2 52. 9 Aug 2012 (Competitors: 72. took the lead from the gun.4 51.16 1:45. until 120m to go.45 1:44. 7.3 54. Bungei then wound the pace up.65 1:45.4/53. 3.9 24.7 49. Wilfred Bungei Ahmed Ismail Alfred Kirwa Yego Gary Reed Youssef Saäd Kamel Yeiman López Nabil Madi Nadim Manseur 1:44. Bungei led from the gun in the final.82.4/52.8 400m 52.1 53. Finalists: 8) 49.1 1:18.6/51.95 1:45.23 (Competitors: 61.8 Veteran Bungei (1:44.1/52. and won a tactical first semi-final from which reigning champion Borzakovskiy was eliminated.2/52.5/53.7 1:19.9/52. Finalists: 8) Splits Borzakovskiy Mulaudzi Kipketer Chehibi Bungei Sepeng Saïd-Guerni Ismail 93 (Competitors: 58. 6.35).8 53. 4. 4.5 54. 2.0 53.3 1:45. 1. Borzakovskiy.43/52. Winners of the semi-finals were Algeria’s reigning World Champion Saïd-Guerni (1:45. with World Champion Yego edging Ismail (1:44.8 51. Bungei (1:44. the European champion had taken the first race in 1:44. Sydney.32 1:43.73 1:42. when 1:45.3 1:19.22 from Bucher.82 1:44. 3. Schumann. in his fourth straight final.3 and reaching the bell in 49.3 600m 1:19.63 49. with all but Lahlou and Sepeng close. Between them. son of former World champion Billy) was one of the possible winners picked by prognosticators. 8.1 52. 7. only the first two in each heat were guaranteed a place in the semi-finals.14 53.4 1:19.9/53. Longo kept the lead. covering the next 200 in 25. 28 Aug 2004 Halves Yuriy Borzakovskiy Mbulaeni Mulaudzi Wilson Kipketer Mohcine Chehibi Wilfred Bungei Hezekiel Sepeng Djabir Saïd-Guerni Ahmed Ismail RUS RSA DEN MAR KEN RSA ALG SUD 8 0 0 m Saäd Kamel (formerly Gregory Konchellah.9 1:19.62).6 1:45. 23 Aug 2008 Halves 1. the only sub 1:43 man in 2008 to qualify.35/51.7 53.35 53. 6. before finishing off with a 25. and his time was duplicated by world record holder Kipketer in the third race.3 1:19.5 1:45. the first round qualification was rigorous. Ismail and López were threatening Bungei with 100m to go.4 1:18. Youssef Halves 1. 52.84. Bungei went into the lead at 500m.1 25. 27 Sep 2000 Halves 1.18) ahead of Borzakovskiy (1:44. but wasn’t strategically placed to take advantage of his speed.4 25.7 53.19 53.6 25.82 1:42.8 53.7/51.6/51. 8.08 53.5 25. David Rudisha Nijel Amos Timothy Kitum Duane Solomon Nick Symmonds Mohammed Aman Abubaker Kaki Andrew Osagie KEN BOT KEN USA USA ETH SUD GBR 1:40.2 1:19.9 53.17 1:19. but the Cuban faded. Finalists: 8) A great race was in prospect after the semi-finals.2 1:20.3 52. Instead SaïdGuerni led at halfway in 51.61 1:44.7/52. and only Ismail could get close.8 Athens.6/51. The second semi-final was faster. with Schumann taking the lead on the inside with 50m to go.43 600m 1:20. Unheralded Manseur was a clear winner in of final semi in 1:45. 2.6 25. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 600m 1:18.29 53.6 25. 6. Saïd-Guerni won the second heat in 1:44.3 400m 53. Countries: 60. Gray still led at 600m (1:15. when Sepeng took over. Behind them Kirwa finished quickly to take the bronze medal. 8.84 52.9).49 52. as Gray began to fade. 3.2) (1:45.9/52.4 400m 53.7 52.31 1:45. 2. Nils Schumann Wilson Kipketer Djabir Saïd-Guerni Hezekiel Sepeng André Bucher Yuriy Borzakovskiy Glody Dube Andrea Longo GER DEN ALG RSA SUI RUS BOT ITA 1:45. 7.3 53.94.2 1:20.40 53.4). with all the finalists – except Borzakovskiy – bunched at halfway.94 1:44.6 53.6 1:19. pushing Bucher off the track in the process.3 25.9/51.4 51. He quickly had a 3m lead with Onyancha and Téllez the first to react.8/51.48 split.30 53. while Borzakovskiy lagged in fifth place. zipping past 200m in 25.3 1:20.3 54. With 120m to go Rodal kicked hard.1 53. Kipketer added a bronze to his 2000 silver.83 54.2 53.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C As expected.5/51.7/52. leaving Schumann as the slowest victor since Ovett in 1980.1 51.7 25.54.20 1:43.5 24.0 1:17.8 52.9 200m 25.28/51.6 26.9/53.1 53.90) was the fastest in the heats.0/52.6 24.94 was the slowest losing qualifying time. Countries: 44.2 1:18. the young South African eventually passed Onyancha with 5m to go. noted for his habit of hanging at the back of the field. with the field closely bunched.29).5 25.5 52.1/52. Gray. but he placed third in his heat in 1:46. Kipketer and Saïd-Guerni followed. 6.96 1:47.3 25.4/53.91WR 1:41.9 1:20. Kipketer had the fastest last 100m (12. Beijing.88 1:45.95 1:43. passing 200m in 24.5 24.1 With nine heats.7 25. and he took the lead with 20m to go and won pulling away.6 53.16 53.4 25.61 1:52. Countries: 42.95).7 53.0 1:19.6 24.5/52.77 (Competitors: 56. 3.1 last 100) was the fastest finisher of all. was given a let-off in the final when the pace was moderate as Bungei was unwilling to commit himself fully to pacemaking.8 1:45. when Kipketer flowed by with Mulaudzi in tow.5 1:20.76). but was never in with a chance of catching the flying Norwegian.5 1:45.9 1:19.2 KEN SUD KEN CAN BHR CUB ALG ALG 1:44.19. 5.5 49. Countries: 47.84/53. Sepeng had now closed but was still seventh with 100m to go. Finishing quickest.7 25. and led until 700m.91 for both men) and Kamel (1:44. 4.

1960-1. Lermusiaux set an uninspired pace around the tight bends for the first 300m (52.2).5e (2y behind 3rd) 4:11. All but Kaki set lifetime bests. Bennett. The venerable German writer Gustav Schwenk.2OR 4:34. passing 1100m in 3:25. continued Placing Table S B 4 G YUG (CRO) ARG IND NED TTO Totals 28 28 28 27 5 9 4 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 - 6 11 2 2 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 7 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 - 8 1 4 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 27 6 1 27 7 1 1 1 23 8 1 20 M Points 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 1 84 978 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 3 FRG GDR Totals 1 3 1 3 4 2 1 3 3 2 5 1 1 1 1 4 0 0 4 50 15 11 76 Breakdown UKR BLR Totals - - - - - 1 1 2 7 6 13 of URS placings: 1 1 1 1 1500 Metres 1. Athens. The Botswanan. half a century to the day after the New Zealander. 1928-4s3. 4. Amos broke clear of the pack and both he and Kitum beat Kaki’s world junior record in winning the minor medals. John Cregan and Alex Grant (both USA). 3 Sep 1904 1. 5.2e 4:10. 2012-5s2 4 5 4 1 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 5 0 0 m (Competitors: 8. The two duelled for most of the last lap.8e . Meanwhile. 5.R I O 94 ★ O L Y M P I C 2 0 1 6 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S For many. M Points 22 264 10 123 11 98 4 76 4 41 2 28 3 28 2 25 1 21 2 19 2 18 2 18 2 17 2 16 1 16 1 16 1 16 2 15 1 15 2 13 1 13 1 12 1 11 1 10 1 9 0 7 1 6 1 6 0 4 0 4 0 3 Paris. and each man recorded the best time ever for his position in the race. Charles Bennett Henri Deloge John Bray David Hall Christian Christensen Hermann Wraschtil Louis Segondi John Rimmer GBR FRA USA USA DEN AUT FRA GBR 4:06. 1924-1. Photographic evidence shows that the time of 4:06.4WR 4:06. 2004-1. 1980-1.2WR 4:07.2 for the first 500m lap. this was the defining moment of athletics at London 2012. 15 Jul 1900 1. Countries: 6) The best milers in Paris were George Orton (CAN). 19325h1. The Kenyan extended his lead slightly in the final 200m to snip one tenth from his own world record of 1:41. He won the second of three successively faster semi-finals in 1:44. James Lightbody Frank Verner Lacey Hearn David Munson Johannes Runge USA USA USA USA GER 4:05. who might have won in 2008 but for injury.6 for a mile (roughly equal to 1500m in 3:57). who had run 4:15. while Solomon was the slowest qualifier for the final on 1:44. 2. 5. The next five men were also sub-50. The pace slowed up to 2:56 at 1000m. The other victors were Kaki (1:44. set the pace.28.0e (20y behind 2nd) 4:10. 8.34).2 and held it until the last long finishing straight. 2. Rudisha. Lermusiaux took back the lead.73 to share third all-time with Sebastian Coe.6 generally credited to Deloge was too generous. the tall Kenyan passed 200m in a swift 23. where Flack and Blake got past the Frenchman. 6. 1992-4. 2000-4. but none was entered in the 1500m. 1984-8s2.30. A crushing. 2008-3s1. 1988-5.0e Most of the top men were not in Athens. the fastest-ever split in an 800m.0e 4:36. the AAA champion. 1924-2. self-paced victory resulting in a new world record. 7.0e (Competitors: 9. 1996-7 Most Appearances 5 Paul Martin SUI 4 1932-3.0e 4:39. clocked 1:41. unknown before 2012. 3. 1936-6h4 Gray José Luiz Barbosa BRA Yuriy Borzakovskiy RUS Placing Table G USA 9 GBR 6 KEN 4 GER 1 CAN BRA 1 RSA ITA FRA JAM AUS 2 DEN BEL NZL 2 CUB 1 HUN SWE NOR 1 SUI URS ALG MAR RUS 1 SUD BOT POL BWI (JAM) GRE BRN TCH (SVK) ETH - S 5 3 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - B 8 1 5 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - Men’s 800 Metres. 2004-6 1920-6h3. then eased off to reach the bell in a scintillating 49.01. attending his 16th summer Games.5.35. but they all lost touch when Rudisha speeded up to cover the third quarter of the race in 25. MEN’S 800 METRES The Best on Points 17 Phil Edwards CAN 16 Douglas Lowe GBR Mal Whitfield USA Peter Snell NZL 1928-4. with Flack leading the clockwise procession through 700m in 2:08.2. 1988-6. 2. 6. with Deloge on Bennett’s shoulder. 1996-8s2 2000-6. clocking 1:21. with Bennett only edging away in the final stages to win by five yards. Countries: 5) 1984-7. the most notable absentee being Thomas Conneff (USA). Louis. 3. 7 Apr 1896 Edwin Flack AUS Arthur Blake USA Albin Lermusiaux FRA Carl Galle GER Angelos Fetsis GRE Demetrios Golemis GRE Konstantinos Karakatsinis GRE Dimitrios Tomproff GRE 4:33.1) were six metres in arrears.0) and Amos (1:15.93. 3. 1936-3 1928-1 1952-1 1964-1 8 0 0 m . He strode elegantly past 600m in 1:14. Rudisha became only the second outright world record holder to win the Olympic title after Peter Snell. 4. St. Aman (1:15. 4.0. In the final. Most Finals 4 Johnny Gray USA 3 Edwards Steve Ovett GBR Hezekiel Sepeng RSA 1976-5. was the first to note that the Kenyan was born on December 17.51) and Aman (1:44. 1984-8 1996-2. Chairman of the 2012 Organising Committee Coe stated that “this was the outstanding performance of the Games”. was the existing world record holder and reigning World Champion. 1988. 1948-1. 1992-3.

Finalists: 11) Nurmi had run the event just twice in 1924 before the Games – 4:00. US Trials winner. the fourth Briton home. Countries: 3) Cohn set the pace. albeit the slowest of four.4) and the young Swede Zander (4:05. the former leading at 1000m in 2:39. whose time of 4:03.6e 4:06.63/52kg) Briton and won by one and a half metres.0e Kiviat had set a world record of 3:55. Albert Hill Philip Baker Lawrence Shields Václav Vohralík CZE Sven Lundgren André Audinet Arturo Porro Joie Ray GBR GBR USA TCH SWE FRA ITA USA 4:01.0) and veteran John Zander (4:08. and then Loney took over. Taber and Kiviat moved up.8) just edged out of the final. Countries: 21. 10 Jul 1924 1.3e (Competitors: 39. 2. 5. with the result that only the winners of eight heats would qualify. Arnaud led for the first two laps of the final (65. The rhythm was little changed after Hallows took the lead.0e Joie Ray.5 on May 24 as an opening foray. 3.2e (Competitors: 46. Hearn finished fast to beat Munson.6e 4:25. 30 Apr 1906 1. 2. this was the first great Olympic 1500m. later added his wife’s maiden name and became Philip NoelBaker. 5. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1959 for his work in international disarmament. and the latter ahead at 1200m in 3:09. Bonhag set the pace for three laps. 4.6) was the most economical of the victors.3e 4:06. tried to pass Baker but was repulsed. 8. 19 Aug 1920 1. with Deer and Verner his closest followers. just beating his countryman John Halstead (4:05.0e (Competitors: 29. for third. 7.4 was an Olympic record. Baker. and was in third place with a lap to go.6OR 3:55.6e 3:59. London.2e). 6. With 10m to go Jackson settled the race with a surge which left Kiviat and Taber half a metre back. The first two in each heat qualified for the final. who had been the world’s best in 1915-18. Peter Deer Howard Valentine Harvey Cohn 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 7.8e 4:07. Defending champion Sheppard (4:27. with Hellström beating Wheatley for third.6 on June 19. In the final. Countries: 15. with fellow Americans Taber and Jones also well regarded.0 3:55. 6. but the US 800m champion was too quick for the diminutive (1. was the favourite until he pulled a calf muscle 10 days before the Games. 8. Deakin. With five under four minutes for the first time and the winner always in doubt. and won easily. the Scottish Champion. 3.0e 4:06.0e 4:02.4e 4:03. Finalists: 8) A truly international field for the first time was made to run just one preliminary round.6e 4:04. the IC4A champion. Countries: 9.6 4:01. 5.4OR 4:03.1e 4:04. with Sheppard third. Finalists: 8) Heats were run for the first time.0 4:12. and he won comfortably by six yards. Fairbairn-Crawford set the pace for 500m. Hill remained the only Briton to have won the 800/1500m Olympic double until Kelly Holmes’s wins of 2004 where she ran the 1500m four seconds faster than Hill in Antwerp. he was able to win his heat. Zander.2 ahead of Hill (4:03. 7. 3. 3.6e 4:10. 2. Lightbody came up. but finished behind Hallows. Stockholm. Countries: 15.8) the winners.0e 3:58.8 in heat 3 – the second best time in the heats.4e 4:15. The 800m winner’s long stride took him past the field with 300m remaining. 2. Finalists: 13) 1. 4. Countries: 12.6 3:57.9e (Competitors: 44.4e 4:06. and only increased with 300m to go when Wilson made his big effort. Emilio Lunghi ran an excellent 4:03. leading to the bell. Into the finishing straight Wilson led from Hallows. 2.0e 4:26.9 3:57. and Kiviat (4:04. Paavo Nurmi Willy Schärer “Henry” Stallard Douglas Lowe Raymond Buker Lloyd Hahn Raymond Watson Frej Liewendahl FIN SUI GBR GBR USA USA USA FIN 3:53.0 in the preceding heat.R I O 6.0e 3:59. and Hill moved away from Baker in the finishing straight to win by 3m on the rainsoaked track. Sheppard had set an Olympic record of 4:05. The unfortunate Italian thus failed to qualify.4. Also: James Lightbody John McGough IRL Kristian Hellström Greg Wheatley James Sullivan George Bonhag Percy Crabbe Harvey Cohn USA GBR SWE AUS USA USA GBR USA 4:12. who had first emerged in 1907.2 for 5000m – both world records. Finalists: 14) (Competitors: 9.8 4:02. His countrymen Lundgren (4:07. 8. though McGough.8OR 3:56. As Deer fell back. Also: Mel Sheppard Harold Wilson Norman Hallows John Tait Ivo Fairbairn-Crawford IRL Joe Deakin James Sullivan Victor Loney USA GBR GBR CAN GBR GBR USA GBR 4:03. 8. Kiviat held the lead all the way to the finishing straight.7) with Sweden’s Edwin Wide (4:03. (Competitors: 20.4) and McGough (4:18. 5. with Lightbody (4:19. with Erwin von Sigel (GER) and Jones close behind. 4. was still running cross-country in his eighties. 3. Just behind these three were Jones and Wide. and then a 3:52. the same day that he later ran 14:28.9 3:56. 6. Paris.8 to win the US Eastern Trials and was favoured to win. 4. This was . in sixth place was dealing well with a foot bound in surgical tape because of a dislocated bone. However. Baker. 14 Jul 1908 Antwerp. CAN USA USA 1 5 0 0 m John Zander Henri Arnaud 95 SWE FRA 4:02. where the tall Jackson began to close on Kiviat and Taber. 7. but slowed the tempo down. 10 Jul 1912 1. 4. Arnold Jackson Abel Kiviat Norman Taber John Paul Jones Ernst Wide Philip Baker GBR USA USA USA SWE GBR 3:56. 6. Coming to the final straight Lightbody took the lead. The Swede had been 15m behind Kiviat at the bell.2 3:57.6e 4:07. Ray attempted to control the final.5) were the fastest heat winners. Shields. 6. another victim of the rigorous qualification procedures.9e 4:00. Vohralík won the quickest heat in 4:02.1) were the other heat winners. the pre-race favourite. 5. dropped out at the halfway point. 2:08). with no-one particularly keen to take that duty from him.2) and Audinet (4:03. moved from seventh at the bell to second. in 4:13. but could not respond when Hill and Baker kicked on the penultimate curve. Athens.6e 4:13.

passing 400m in 60.5 1200m 3:05. 3:59.40 behind 0.20) (Competitors: 25. Nurmi was 40m clear of Buker.4 3:53. 2. He won by 10m from Cornes. Beccali the reigning champion. The lead passed to Cunningham. then Edwards.8 3:50. Stallard and Lowe passed the Americans in the back straight. The Frenchman led until 20m from the finish. both of whom were beaten in the slowest heat won by Ray Conger (USA) in 4:02. timed at 1200m in 3:09.8 (Competitors: 36. Lovelock led for most of the first lap.8. 3. 4m back. His burst of speed. Lovelock’s time beat the world record of Bill Bonthron by a full second. Cunningham was on the inside with Lovelock next to him and Beccali 2m back in fourth place. with Lovelock (3:58.0e 3:57. The American pushed hard over the next 200m. Lovelock the Empire Champion. The principal victims were Edwin Wide (SWE) and world record holder Otto Peltzer (GER). Beccali’s time was the then third-fastest ever run. with 2 qualifying from each. Only Watson had dared to stay with the maestro. but Ladoumègue rushed into the lead with 250m to go. Countries: 22. lesser lights were the fastest qualifiers.8. After Edwards. Finalists: 12) Eriksson Strand Slijkhuis Čevona Bergkvist Nankeville Gehrmann Jörgensen Differential 0.4 3:50. Wooderson broke a bone in his ankle just before the Games. 4. 2.5 just ahead of Ny.6 – Nurmi lined up against the other 11 finalists with stopwatch in hand. 5.6 2:05.6) taking the other two races. Nurmi was 10m clear.7 Before the event there were five highly regarded possible winners – Cunningham and San Romani who had both run 3:49. and Cunningham passed 800m in 2:05.0. and he had to let go after 800m. just as the field was contemplating the finish.6 3:52.4e Splits Lovelock Cunningham Beccali (Competitors: 43. Countries: 19. but Ny slipped past him just before the bell (2:50. had taken an initial lead in the final.R I O 96 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C done to convince the selectors that he could deal with the Olympic schedule which had just one hour between the two finals. but could never regain any of the initial yardage obtained by the Kiwi.5. 2 Aug 1928 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 5 0 0 m his sprint with 150m to go and surged easily past Cunningham and Cornes. 4.5.2 3:52.4 3:05. Countries: 22. taking a 4m lead seemingly in 20m. the second quickest after Schärer’s 4:06. Cunningham powered through the last 300m himself.5) (3:51.8 3:53. as the pace slowed to 2:04.2 3:50. 7.5 with Lovelock on his shoulder. The Swiss eventually won the battle for silver from the exhausted Briton in the last few strides.0 3:50.8. began Adjusted 1.0) and Beccali (3:59.8e 3:56.2OR 3:53. while Cunningham was fourth. 6.2. All the heats were tactical affairs. 6. 6 Aug 1948 (3:51.4e 3:54. In the final Cunningham led through 400m in 61.9 in the US Trials.0. winner of the Finnish trials in 3:52. 7. 5. These two surged ahead of the field at 900m and led by 15m at the bell in 2:51. Purje still led after three laps in 3:09.4) (3:52.4) (3:50. but was untested at international level. Luigi Beccali Jerry Cornes Phil Edwards Glenn Cunningham Eric Ny Norwood Hallowell Jack Lovelock Frank Crowley ITA GBR CAN USA SWE USA NZL USA 3:51. after looking at his watch at the end of the first 500m lap (1:13. passing 800m in 2:04.4 and the bell in 2:52. Los Angeles. 2. and Purje – the Finnish number two with a best of 3:53.2). 3. Finalists: 11) Cunningham was fastest in the heats with 3:55. and was the first time the 1500m record had been broken officially in the Olympic Games.05 2.2 3:05. with Cornes in third ahead of Lovelock and Beccali.1e London.00 0.8WR 3:48.6. and Wooderson the AAA Champion.2).0 at 1000m.65 (3:50. 2. Jack Lovelock Glenn Cunningham Luigi Beccali Archie San Romani Phil Edwards Jerry Cornes Miklós Szabó Robert Goix NZL USA ITA USA CAN GBR HUN FRA 3:47. 8.0 and Erik Ny 3:54. Amsterdam.0e 4:00. Finalists: 12) Ladoumègue was the fastest entrant with the third best time ever of 3:52. easing off in the last 10m to win by 5m. throwing his timepiece onto the infield after glancing at it a second time. the 800m specialist. Harri Larva Jules Ladoumègue Eino Purje Hans Wichmann Cyril Ellis Paul Martin Helmuth Krause Adolf Kittel FIN FRA FIN GER GBR SUI GER TCH 3:53.6) (3:54. who caught Edwards as the Italian hit the tape. passing 1000m in 2:35.6. Lovelock struck. catching Edwards just as the Canadian was beginning to tire. 5.0 and 800m in 1:58. 400m 61. While the other four made the final without difficulty.51 4.1 in the same race – were next fastest. Hahn and the British duo. Indeed Lovelock extended his lead by 2m in the finishing straight.2OR 3:52. and only Larva could respond. Beccali. Finalists: 12) 1. fifth in 2:53. and then Larva edged away leaving Ladoumègue 3m behind at the finish. At the bell. 3. 4 Aug 1932 Electric 1.8.0) (3:50.5.5 61. He passed 400m in 58. Edwards drove clear of Cunningham with 300m to go (3:07.2 3:52.7) .4 3:51. The pace slowed in the second lap.0). 7.48 1.8e 3:57. with Purje then taking over.4e 3:56. 8.9 800m 2:05. 6 Aug 1936 1.4 3:51. having improved by more than 11 seconds in 1928.4 3:49. and Lowe faded in the finishing straight as Schärer came up to battle with Stallard. 3. with only one sub-4 clocking by Herbert Böcher (GER). with Goix running 3:54.2 with Ny just ahead of him. and clearly capable of running much quicker had it been required. 8. Larva. Berlin.6 (Competitors: 36. 8. Countries: 14. As in 1924 there were six heats.6. Henry Eriksson Lennart Strand Willem Slijkhuis Václav Čevona CZE Gösta Bergkvist Bill Nankeville Donald Gehrmann Erik Jörgensen SWE SWE NED TCH SWE GBR USA DEN 3:49. impressive in itself. After a routine win in his heat – 4:07. and held the lead till 100m to go.0 3:53.5.6.1) (3:52. 4. 4.7 61.37 2. and was a shadow of himself in his heat.6e 3:58.4e 3:59. He slowed to 2:32. Larva led for the first lap in the final in 61. 7.2 2:05.2.63 4.7) (3:54. With 300m to go. 5. was emphasised by the fatigue of those behind him. 6.6e 3:55. 6.8e 3:58.

8. 3.0 2:54.20) (3:46. gaining five yards on the field before the curve.5 2:56. Lueg moved ahead at 900m. 2.6WR 3:38. with the eighth 100m segment the slowest of the race at 15. but quick times were out of the question for the final.59) of Finland the quickest in the semi-finals. Bernard took the lead in the final.2.2 seconds.4 3:04.1 3:02. Bannister. his next two 100m segments of 13.9 The pre-meet favourites were Lueg. the other heats being won by Bernard – 3:42. with a world record here.18).0 (Competitors: 39.4 for both men was clearly incorrect when measured against the photo-finish equipment.0 3:46.5 58.4 2:01. but only Rózsavölgyi and Jazy could initially go with Elliott.0 3:03. 7. 6.6 (3:45. and the top two men of 1951.1 1 5 0 0 m 800m 2:01. run in a thunderstorm on an already sludgelike track. 5.4 at 800m. but after passing 400m in 57. New Zealander Murray Halberg set the pace in the final.8 1200m 2:54.0 3:46.5 2:01. 8. 6.2 (3:42.0 3:42.3 2:56.70) (Competitors: 52.30) (3:46.1 58. All the preliminary races were tactical affairs.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Strand was hot favourite to win.4 57. and even though he slowed slightly in the last 100m.0) Eriksson had only Strand for company. McMillen passed Lueg with 20m to go and finished 0.2 2:01.6 2:00. 7.8 58. The top eight plus Ken Wood (GBR) – 3:44. covered in 56.4 he went through the tape almost 20m clear of Jazy.2OR 3:45.8 he slowed to 2:01. later noted that “the greatest stimulator of my running was fear”.8 59. with Terence Sullivan (Rhodesia) the unluckiest in the heats.2 3:03. Piling on the pressure. The field began to bunch.2 3:40. By the end of the third lap.0 2:56. The official time of 3:50.2 1:59.35) (3:47.9 2:01.6.0 (Competitors: 37.6 58.3 and 400 in 58.8 3:43. unconvincingly.4 3:39.6 59. particularly in this race. Despite losing to Bergkvist in the Swedish Trials.02) (3:42.8 (3:42. and El Mabrouk. 6 Sep 1960 1200m 3:03.8 2:55. passing 200m in 28.4. Countries: 26.4 and 13. Finalists: 12) Splits Barthel McMillen Lueg Bannister El Mabrouk Lamers Åberg Ericsson 400m 58.3 and 400m in 58. and after reaching 800m in 2:02.0 97 1200m 3:02. The large entry meant that an extra round was needed to arrive at a 12-man final.9 3:03.8 3:40. 7.0 in the German championships. superseded his hero. 3. at 1200m. Hansenne had a brainstorm in the first lap running 58. Elliott then struck. though Sweden’s excellent Dan Waern missed the final by 0.96) in Elliott’s heat but placing a non-qualifying fourth.5 2:01.6 extended that to almost 15m.05 in the last heat.0 58.49) (3:42. Josy Barthel LUX Bob McMillen USA Werner Lueg GER/FRG Roger Bannister GBR Patrick El Mabrouk FRA Rolf Lamers GER/FRG Olle Åberg SWE Ingvar Ericsson SWE 3:45. Finalists: 12) (3:41. to move into fourth place.5 3:45.8 3:03. possibly helped by a stronger physique more suited to the difficult London conditions. the athletes mindful of the extra round. Barthel later broke down in tears of happiness on the victory stand after winning his country’s only major championship gold medal in athletics history (but also see the 1900 Marathon).6 3:03.4 2:02.6 59. Countries: 23.2 3:01.0 59.0 3:47.2 1:57.28) (3:45.75.8 59. 5.50).4 3:46.4 (3:41. 8.2OR 3:42.1 59. The Frenchman came back to the field in the second lap.2 59. 4.3. The order was the same at the end of a slower second 400m of 59.34) – and Waern – 3:43. 3. with the surprising Barthel in second. and saw two Olympic Champions (Barthel and 1968 marathon winner Wolde) and the world record holder (István Rózsavölgyi).4 3:01. passing 800m in 2:00.0 1:58. Lueg led by 3m as the athletes came off the final curve. He flew into second on the final bend and burst past Hewson at the beginning of the straight.2 800m 1:58.11 down on the Luxembourg star. with Åberg (3:51.2 58. 2.3 2:02. fail to qualify.6 58.2. Rózsavölgyi was third some 5m clear of Dan Waern.5 800m 2:02.0 The first heat was won by GDR star Richtzenhain in 3:46.0). The other heats could not rival this in terms of failure. Finalists: 9) Splits Elliott Jazy Rózsavölgyi Waern Vamoș Burleson Bernard 400m 58.5).2OR 3:45. 1 Dec 1956 Electrics 1. seemingly to help his compatriot Lueg. 5.55) (3:42.6 2:01. (3:47.6 3:42.4 58.0 2:00. 14. the Aussie had 3m on his pursuers. Helsinki. 4. with Delany and Landy lagging at the back of the field. and led by 2m at the bell (2:48.3 3:01.2 58. No-one had ever broken open the Olympic 1500m at such an early stage.1 2:01. with 7m covering the field at the bell (2:46.9 3:41.39) (3:45.03) (3:42.8 2:01.0 3:42. who was as surprised as the crowd by his win. the nervy world record holder appeared unbeatable.4 3:42. Ron Delany IRL Klaus Richtzenhain GER/GDR John Landy AUS László Tábori HUN Brian Hewson GBR Stanislav Jungwirth CZE TCH Neville Scott NZL Ian Boyd GBR 3:41. led by Eriksson.6 was passed shortly after by the three Swedes. but unlike previous encounters he was able to hold off the European Champion.9 (3:44. Elliott.4 Rome. Hewson attacked.80) (3:42. Melbourne.4 2:01. Elliott had been inspired four years earlier by the exploits of Vladimir Kuts in Melbourne and. and opening up a 6m gap on the field headed by Gehrmann.18) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Splits Delany Richtzenhain Landy Tábori Hewson Jungwirth Scott Boyd 400m 60. Bergkvist was the fastest in the heats.4 58.4 1:58.1 59. Boyd and Richtzenhain easily went with him. who had equalled the world record of 3:43.0 Elliott was the fastest qualifier with 3:41. Lamers set a fast pace in the final.87) (3:42. With 250m to go Delany began a startling kick. Lincoln took over at 700m. By the 1200m mark (3:05. 6. Strand only held on to silver after bumping Slijkhuis as the Dutchman zoomed through on the inside in the last 50m. clocking 3:42.7 1:58.1 3:03.8 2:54. running his next 100m in 13. with Richtzenhain just holding off the fast-finishing Landy for the silver medal. . Herb Elliott Michel Jazy István Rózsavölgyi Dan Waern Zoltán Vamoș Dyrol Burleson Michel Bernard Jim Grelle AUS FRA HUN SWE ROU USA FRA USA 3:35.5 3:02. He went on to win by 6m. 2.6 3:42.6 1:58.94) 1. with Waern and the surprising Vamoș following the Frenchman’s quick pace through 200m in 28. just ahead of McMillen on the inside and Bannister and El Mabrouk on the outside. 26 Jul 1952 Electrics 1.67) (3:46.14) the fastest in round 1 and Denis Johansson (3:49.3.1. Countries: 26.0 3:40. thought of as exhibiting a killer instinct. Barthel quickly moved away from the others and caught Lueg with just under 50m to go.3 2:02.75 – all beat the existing Olympic record. 4.9 3:02.8 3:47.8 60.69) (3:42.

assured of silver. Kip Keino Jim Ryun Bodo Tümmler Harald Norpoth John Whetton Jacques Boxberger Henryk Szordykowski Josef Odložil CZE KEN USA FRG FRG GBR FRA POL TCH 3:34.5 62. edging Davies and Simpson.5 1:56.0 1:57.6 In 1964.2 3:42.9 2:00. and Keino came up from eighth place after 400m to take the lead 200m later. This error was compounded by Ryun falling over after a collision with a Ghanaian runner.81 3:37. speeding up slightly from the 1000m point (2:30. and the field stretched out in single file.51 3:39.4 2:01. The Kiwi attacked with 250m to go and the race was effectively over. Finalists: 12) Splits Keino Ryun Tümmler Norpoth Whetton FIN KEN NZL KEN GBR BEL FRG URS 1200m 2:53.8 2:55.6 (3:34.8 2:01. despite consciously easing down.7 62.46 3:38. just ahead of Dixon.8 61.8.R I O 98 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Tokyo.6 3:39. 6. 3.5 2:01.33 3:39. The semi-finals began as tactical affairs. Britain’s Simpson was the fastest in the first round with 3:42. the fastest of the day. 2.6 by 2.0 before deciding to abandon the role of sacrificial rabbit. Like Elliott before him.5.91 ahead of Foster’s UK record of 3:38. Tümmler had maintained second place.6 2:01. 10m behind the flying Kenyan. 4. Keino had won the heat in 3:39.2 58.0 3:00. 3. 8. 5.1 58.2 58.9.5 56.97.8 3:46.80 (Competitors: 42.34) and Keino (3:41.5 3:43.05 3:40.4 seconds. and powered past with 50m to go. passing 400m in 58.5 2:01. Keino managed a slightly quicker third lap (58.2 Munich.24 (Competitors: 66. and his last 800m was clocked in 1:48. The race was set up for the kickers – Burleson and Snell.02 3:39. (Competitors: 43.2).8.5 seconds in 1967. Vasala’s final lap had taken 53.4 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 5 0 0 m 20m back (1:58. Ryun was fastest in both the heats (3:45. 8.1 2:00. Dixon and Vasala ran 3:37. 2. Vasala went to Keino’s shoulder as they came off the final bend. 7.5) waiting for the Kenyans to come back to him.0 58. He failed to make the semi-finals as an appeal was rejected.5 2:03.4 2:00. running the first 100m in 13. with laps of 62. Keino shortly moved ahead and reached 800m in 1:55.2 2:00. But the effects of altitude and a bout of glandular fever made him no more than co-favourite with Keino. but never had a chance of catching Keino. 5.9 3:01.3 3:00. Keino’s third lap was covered in 55. Whetton had to wait for the second race before making the final as the fastest loser.7 2:03.6 3:46. while another Briton – Whetton – became the first man to run under 3:40 without being an automatic qualifier.9 2:01. 20 Oct 1968 Electrics 1. who was fourth in the first heat. with Burleson clearly disconsolate at the superiority of Snell.5).64 3:40.5 lap.08 3:40. 3.90) 1.5 1200m 3:01. with Vasala right behind the Kenyan. 6. In the final. Countries: 37. Ryun got past Tümmler with 150m to go.3 2:57. Countries: 46.8 1:57.94 3:41.7 3:00.15) before Francesco Arese (ITA) set a sensibly quicker pace in the third race.2 62.3 3:41.8 3:39. 2.41 3:39.7 59. The major casualty of the semis was another American.1 61.0 3:40.6 3:39. 5. with Ryun now more than 1.5 2:57. Snell had won the only major 1500m championship in which he took part.69) Montreal.4 63.8 59. Pekka Vasala Kip Keino Rod Dixon Mike Boit Brendan Foster Herman Mignon Paul-Heinz Wellmann Vladimir Panteley UKR 400m 56.6 58.2 3:36. (3:46.0 800m 2:03. won by Snell in 3:38.7 before tailing off in the closing stages.4 3:01. Keino wound up the pace.0 3:42.8 2:59.57) (3:43.5 3:00. the 800m winner Dave Wottle. 21 Oct 1964 1. Finalists: 9) Splits Snell Odložil Davies Simpson Burleson Baran Bernard Whetton 400m 58.3 1:58. 7.91) (3:37. Burleson won a tight finish in 3:41.3 3:01.5 and continuing to 400m in 56. 31 Jul 1976 (Competitors: 54. Boit and Dixon moved past Foster with 300m to go.5 Keino and Ryun were placed in the same heat.4 57.0 with Keino in contact (56.65) (3:46. Bernard again led an Olympic final.4 2:56. and Jipcho set the pace in the final.6 3:48. which then became the standard for the event. He eased off in the last 50m.65 3:40.17 3:39.9 61. passing 400m in 57.1 3:39.8.7 2:01.7 . 8.6 58.20.3).0 2:55.8.0 2:59. Only the Kenyans believed a fast run could be achieved at altitude. and his Olympic record was the number two performance of all-time.8 3:02. 8. 4. 6. Peter Snell Josef Odložil CZE John Davies Alan Simpson Dyrol Burleson Witold Baran Michel Bernard John Whetton NZL TCH NZL GBR USA POL FRA GBR 3:38. which saw Wadoux just edge out new star Kipchoge Keino as both ran 3:41.9 1200m 2:56. 3.5 and 58. Ahead. 10 Sep 1972 Tokyo emulated Helsinki in having two preliminary rounds.7 2:56. In the meantime.6 2:03. with Dixon passing Boit and closing on Keino in the finishing straight.33 3:36. Finalists: 9) Splits Walker Van Damme Wellmann Coghlan Clement Wohlhuter 400m 62. 4.69) (3:48. 7.4 Splits Vasala Keino Dixon Boit Foster 800m 2:01. Jim Ryun had been an Olympic semi-finalist at the age of 17.2 800m 1:55.3 2:03. Foster led the field through a slow lap of 61.89) (3:39.4 2:55.1 2:57.0 3:01.6) and Ryun (58. a result of the seeding committee taking Ryun’s mile best of 3:52. The pace began to dawdle and Davies took over the lead. It was felt that he would likely have broken Ryun’s world record by more than a second at low altitude. and had gone on to break Elliott’s world record of 3:35. John Walker Ivo Van Damme Paul-Heinz Wellmann Eamonn Coghlan Frank Clement Rick Wohlhuter Dave Moorcroft Graham Crouch NZL BEL FRG IRL GBR USA GBR AUS 3:39.7) and the more tactical semi-finals (3:51. Countries: 33. 2. Placing fifth in the first semi.08) (3:42. with Norpoth and Whetton in close attendance.7 3:40.8 56. and Foster holding on in third place. Behind him Odložil won the sprint for silver.3 2:59. Countries: 28. 4. winning by 4m. 7.3.7 63. 5. which he almost doubled in the last 100m.27 3:39. as Keino continued to push the pace. Keino was running four seconds faster than was thought possible at altitude. with wins for Boit (3:41.2 2:03. 6.7 1200m 2:59.3. Finalists: 10) 400m 61.7 63. His next 200m took just 25 seconds and his margin into the straight was 6m.5.9OR 3:37.8 and accepting it as a 1500m time.1) while Ryun anxiously began to recoup a little of the deficit with a 57.4 800m 2:00. Mexico City.

4 circuit. and the kickers – Cram.20 59. Straub richly deserved his silver medal for making a great – if not world recordpaced – race.02 3:37.40 3:38.08 2:57. a tempo runner without a big kick. 7.30. followed by laps of 60. As Straub accelerated down the back straight only Coe and Ovett could stay with him.68) and semis (3:35. 3.3 at 800m. 4.0 3:00.. but his form was not quite good enough. 4.21 3:36. Seoul.13 39.96) out in the cold.1 2:54.07 3:36.2 2:05.08.53OR 3:33.8 With Coe. and the pace slowed to 2:00.3 Ovett recorded the fastest Olympic heat time ever – 3:36.0 and 12.24 3:36. 2.89) the next fastest. while Ovett’s defeat was his first loss over 1500m or Mile final for more than three years – a run of 41 victories.4 59. with Coghlan.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C The final should have been a battle between world record holder Filbert Bayi (TAN) and John Walker.08 3:37. reminiscent of Lasse Viren. Ovett was a further 2m back.48. Britain was in the unique position of fielding the Olympic and World Champions and the World record holder – all different athletes.40 3:34. Coe was just 0.76 in fifth in that race was the slowest qualifying time.9 61. Rono was the fastest (3:37. 6.69 2:56. Peter Rono Peter Elliott Jens-Peter Herold Steve Cram Steve Scott Han Kulker Kipkoech Cheruiyot Marcus O’Sullivan KEN GBR GDR GBR USA NED KEN IRL 3:35.19 39.1) led by 2m from Coe (2:39.82 2:57.3 2:55.11 (Competitors: 59.5 2:59.65. Scott took over shortly after and led to 900m. 4. and Walker reached the sanctuary of the tape under a metre clear of Van Damme. the pace was upped to 12.3).7. Countries: 29. All told. and became the only man in Olympic history to qualify for three finals in the event. both winners running 53 for their last laps.86 60.27 39. Finalists: 9) Last 300m Splits Coe Straub Ovett Busse Fontanella Plachý 400m 61.70 2:00.5.1 2:59.87.97 2:00.99 3:40. just ahead of Chesire.17 3:40. with Wellman finishing fast to edge Coghlan for the bronze medal.9 59. 7.6) and Ovett (2:39. His next 100m was covered in 12. Moscow. 5. 8.59 41. as Rono.61 2:00.86 60. with Britons Clement (3:37. He won by one and a half metres from Elliott.20) with 3:38. 1 Aug 1980 1. However. 11 Aug 1984 1.96 3:36.29 in the marginally slower of the two semis. . Coe ran his last three 100m in 13. with Busse and Fontanella just behind. Coe was the least likely to make the team after serious illness in 1983 and defeat by Peter Elliott at the AAA Championships.3 1:57.5 Splits Coe Cram Abascal Cheshire Spivey Wirz 1 5 0 0 m 800m 1:56. and at 1200m Walker.97 3:37.31 2:00. leaving Uwe Becker (3:37. Straub set the pace in the final.80 3:38. with Cram (2:39. Los Angeles. 6.6 61. World record holder Saïd Aouita did not start his semifinal. 6.86 39. but his form then picked up. Just after 800m the East German made a bold move.80 – in the first round. 3. The pace picked up in the third lap with a 56. 8.0 99 1200m 2:53. while Coghlan won the other semi in 3:38.04 60.7 61.15 3:36.4 800m 2:04. 2. The New Zealander won his first round heat in a startling 3:36.98 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 400m 59. Finalists: 12) 1.60 ahead of Wohlhuter (3:38. Countries: 40. and Khalifa’s 3:36.8 61. Sebastian Coe Steve Cram José Manuel Abascal Joseph Chesire Jim Spivey Peter Wirz Andrés Vera Omer Khalifa GBR GBR ESP KEN USA SUI ESP SUD 3:32. the other being won by Cheruiyot in 3:38. 3.7. From 800m Coghlan was in the lead.34. not quite as slow as in Montreal. like Lovelock before him.0 59.9 62.9 to cross the line 7m clear before shaking his fist in triumph and shouting words which included “who says I’m finished now?” .7 1200m 2:59.9 1:57.65 Sebastian Coe almost made his third successive team.9. due to a hamstring injury. To no avail. but here the pace slowed in the second lap. struck. succumbing to the breathing problems which had plagued him in Los Angeles.0 2:05. Khalifa led for the first lap in the final.48 3:41. Ovett dropped out shortly after.8) just behind.9 2:05. Cram and Ovett.77 1200m 2:56. leaving Walker a big favourite.09 ahead of Cram and Elliott.2 59. Wohlhuter and Crouch in the slipstream.33 39. when Abascal.7 3:00. Countries: 46.9 2:04.30 3:34. run in 12.7 1:58. with less than a metre separating second from fourth. 7. while Cram did gain a third Olympic selection. At 1100m Abascal (2:39. reached by Straub in 2:45. and his last 800m in 1:51. with Rono taking over the lead at 700m.39 39.08 60.66 3:41.79 59.79 40.35 2:57.6 2:53. took over and wound up the pace.3. The race started slowly with the first 400m in 62.9 2:04. Walker won his semi-final in 3:39.28) and Stefano Mei (3:37.1 1:57. O’Sullivan led at 400m in the final in a cautious 59.2.53) and Steve Ovett (3:37. Cram attempted to pass Coe with 200m to go. The field was frightened of Walker – and seemed to be aiming for silver rather than trying to win the final.67 and 58.70). Sebastian Coe Jürgen Straub Steve Ovett Andreas Busse Vittorio Fontanella Josef Plachý CZE José Marajo Steve Cram GBR GDR GBR GDR ITA TCH FRA GBR 3:38.9 seconds. Cram won the slower semi-final in 3:36.37 3:40. 25 clockings of sub-3:40 were achieved in the preliminary rounds (1972 had six similar marks).05 2:57.2 2:54. the Mile record holder.2 3:01. 13.52 3:36. Abascal was the fastest in both the heats (3:37.3 seconds in arrears.39 2:00. and followed Scott (3:38.04 (Competitors: 59.93 2:01.0. but the reigning champion smoothly accelerated and surged past Abascal. and 800m silver medallist Van Damme moved from fifth to second.71).3 2:53. 5.94 3:38.3 58.65) in the heats.13 2:57. Walker’s last 400m was completed in 52.65 800m 2:00. 8. Coe reacted quickest and at the bell. All three medallists were called Peter.71 59. 2.. as Ovett gave up in the last 10m. the anti-apartheid boycott took care of that. The last 100m was the survival of the strongest. Finalists: 12) Splits Rono Elliott Herold Cram Scott Kulker Cheruiyot O’Sullivan 400m 60.2 for the next 100m. Elliott and Herold – gathered.29 2:57. winning the race and silencing his critics in the British press. 5. There were no other races under 3:40 and the final shaped up as a return duel following Ovett’s 800m win. Coe zipped by Straub as they came into the straight and his last 100m.99 3:37. refused to let anyone past throughout a last lap of 52. Coe’s last 800m was a fine 1:49.39 2:00. 1 Oct 1988 (Competitors: 40. and Coe won the second semi-final in 3:39.1 was too strong for the other two.6 1:57.

The final was again a dawdling affair. Ngeny’s wife gave birth to a daughter who was named Marian Sydney Ngeny. 5.9 51.87. No-one wanted to take the pace in the final.5 28.4 in the third lap. 8 Aug 1992 1. He didn’t react when Cacho made his move.18 3:34. The heats saw the elimination of the top American.74 Noah Ngeny Hicham El Guerrouj Bernard Lagat Mehdi Baala Kevin Sullivan Daniel Zegeye Andrés Diaz Juan Higuero 400m 62. Lagat.32. 7. and 12.19 40.7 2:01.84.40 3:36.44 3:34.91. when he attacked.91 (Competitors: 41. 8.8. and leaving Kader Chekhémani (FRA) out of the final despite running 3:34. passing the bell in 2:49.5 2:56.29) with Morceli last after a collision.2 2:55.2 2:02.2 2:56. and was overtaken for second with 500m to go by El Guerrouj. Finalists: 12) Splits Morceli Cacho Kipkorir Rotich Tanui Bile Koers Hakimi 400m 61. causing havoc behind as runners leapt to avoid him.14.0 Rotich opened the event with the then fastest ever first round heat – 3:35. Last 300m 1. and was expected to claim the gold medal he richly deserved.8 2:01.3 55.9 51.57 and proceeded to win his semi-final in 3:37.84. and took the lead. with laps of 61. Hicham El Guerrouj Bernard Lagat Rui Silva Timothy Kiptanui Ivan Heshko Michael East Reyes Estévez Gert-Jan Liefers MAR KEN POR KEN UKR GBR ESP NED 3:34. Finalists: 12) (Competitors: 51. Finalists: 12) Splits Chesire KEN MAR KEN FRA CAN ETH ESP ESP 1200m 3:02.4 2:56. Meanwhile Morceli recovered and accelerated away.14 3:35.99 41.30 3:34.R I O 100 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 5 0 0 m Barcelona.3 61.9 1:55.8 3:32. allowing the Kenyans and Baala to stay in touch. he slowed to 1:54.5 2:02. 7.9 26. 6. Finalists: 12) Splits El Guerrouj Lagat Silva Kiptanui Geshko East Estévez Liefers 400m 60. El Guerrouj then took the third lap lead. His last lap was a scintillating 50.0 last lap.8 53. 4.7 2:55.6 Twenty men ran quicker than 3:40 in the first round as only one heat saw a race slower than that level.77 – the fastest preliminary race ever – ahead of Cacho.2 2:57. not fully recovered from an early season injury.7-13.80 (despite losing a shoe) and 3:35. Countries: 27. 3 Aug 1996 Splits Ngeny El Guerrouj Lagat Baala 400m 54. so Chesire found himself in the lead.95.8 2:56. the Ethiopian teenager.12 42. 3.9 2:57. while Chesire won the slow race – 3:44.1 1:55.4 60.62 3:40.3 Atlanta.12). leading by 10m with 300m to go.5 2:55.39 3:37. Again. Morceli.1 400m 54. El Guerrouj . The man who had beaten him two weeks before in Zurich. but after running 54.4 400m 51.0m At 900m Morceli moved out of the pack mindful of his tactical errors in 1992.7 61.27 3:41. ahead of Cacho (3:33. 6.70 3:41.33 3:36. 8.12 3:41.5-13. Countries: 37.27 3:38. with reigning champion Morceli surprisingly returning from injury to record 3:38.82 3:36. The Moroccan began his push with 800m to go. running 56. El Guerrouj had impressively won his heat in 3:37. buried in the pack.9 2:51.8 61. Noureddine Morceli Fermín Cacho Stephen Kipkorir Laban Rotich William Tanui Abdi Bile Marko Koers Ali Hakimi ALG ESP KEN KEN KEN SOM NED TUN 3:35.67 2:52. with Kipkorir winning the battle of the Kenyans. and a tactical semi-final in 3:40. and 400m went by in 60. 8. The previous year in a dominating win at the World Championships the Moroccan had run 54. Three days after his Olympic win.9 Since Sydney. as compared with 13. As they approached the bell El Guerrouj’s knee grazed Morceli’s right foot and while Morceli stumbled.1 25. Fermín Cacho Rachid El Basir Mohamed Suleiman Joseph Chesire Jonah Birir Jens-Peter Herold Noureddine Morceli Jim Spivey ESP MAR QAT KEN KEN GER ALG USA Sydney. and Heshko.88. 2.8.03) was the fastest heat winner. Ngeny last 100m was 12. With 250m to go a gap opened on the inside and Cacho darted through it and was never headed.17 (Competitors: 38.2 26.9 60.79 1200m 2:55.2 800m 2:01.8 53. Countries: 40.2 54.2 2:56.75 1.7 26. Ngeny won the other race (3:39. 2.0 2:57.9 2:56.5 Athens.7 2:02. 5. while Morceli won the slowest race in 3:41.3 800m 2:04. won the first semi in 3:39.4 60.2 800m 1:55. 3.1 Last 200m 26. 29 Sep 2000 1. 3:34. El Guerrouj won his heat in 3:38.3 2:56. 2. the Morroccan fell.03 3:38.6 2:02.0 and 60.7 27.7 Having fallen in Atlanta at the bell. the big favourite.8 2:01.7 55.68 3:35.2 2:01. 5.4-13. the fastest ever semi-final. eased through his races in 3:39. trailed by Lagat.60. 6.42 before the pace slowed. 8.5 54.1 for El Guerrouj. Leading Chesire by a metre off the final bend he eventually won by 4m despite looking round six times. 2. 24 Aug 2004 40.9 for Lagat.79 39.3 60. Ngeny stayed behind El Guerrouj until the finishing straight. Cacho was third. Wondimu.2 2:02. 7.3 26. 4. Alan Webb and French star Mehdi Baala.4 26.77.22 with a 53. Youssef Baba (MAR) set the pace in the final to help his team-mate.2 1200m 2:51. The world indoor champion El Guerrouj won the second semi-final in 3:35.22 (Competitors: 57.3 1200m 2:55.06. Kibet was the fastest heat winner – 3:36.69 3:41.1 2:55.72 3:37. 7.88.3 54. 4. Even though he attributed this loss to an attack of asthma.18 3:38.50 3:36.63 3:37.9 2:02. finally getting clear with 25m to go. Countries: 25. El Guerrouj had continued as the world’s best but had slumped to eighth place in Rome on July 2. 3.2. Morceli retained 5m of that advantage from the reigning champion. 3. 6.78 3:37.86. El Guerrouj got up to finish last in 3:40.61 3:35. no-one wanted to set the pace in the final.12 3:40.4 53.3 54.66 40.9 2:02. At 600m Estévez led with El Guerrouj moving to his shoulder.09 40. 3:40. many felt that he might be destined never to win Olympic gold.53 3:41.0 1:54.9 800m 2:01. while Suleiman won the other heat in a startling 3:34.32 3:32. 4.78 3:36. Morceli quickened up in the semi-finals.41 behind the Kenyan.1 2:02.4 27.5 2:02. The pace in the penultimate lap was 14.2 61.0 2:52. Cacho followed the Algerian. and took the field though three laps.1 2:03. his first defeat in four years.3 52.42 3:38. and Morceli. Ngeny (3:38.29.4 27.2 52. winning the first race in 3:32. El Guerrouj had lost just one race over 1500m/Mile in the intervening four years.07OR 3:32.7.50 41.4 Last 200m 26. 5.

6 58.5 1:56.1 1:59.5 Asbel Kiprop was set to retain his title.3 57. Finalists: 12) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Splits Makhloufi Manzano Iguider Centrowitz Ingebrigtsen Gebremehdin Kiplagat Özbilen 400m 58. 7.8 53. with Choge on his shoulder.0 1:59.8.4 was duly disqualified from further events in London by the referee who considered that “he had not provided a bona fide effort”. but then slipped back. Victory instead went to the unheralded Makhloufi. The Algerian won his heat and semi-final.8 The heats saw wins by Baala (3:35.2 56.8 54.08 3:34. as both men covered their last 100s in 13.16 3:34.79 3:35. 1988-11. and the bell in 2:40. Taoufik Makhloufi ALG Leonel Manzano USA Abdelaati Iguider MAR Matthew Centrowitz USA Henrik Ingebrigtsen NOR Mekonnen Gebremehdin ETH Silas Kiplagat KEN İlham Tanui Özbilen TUR 3:34. Moroccan-born Ramzi became the first athlete from Bahrain ever to place in the top eight of an Olympic event.8 52. only Lagat was in tow.21 3:34.8 26.5 2:55.5 100m around the final bend. 1996-9s1. with Kiplagat leading at 1200m.7 (El G and Lagat) and 1:46. 1992-8s2.0 Last 200m 400m 25. 2000-2.28) and van Deventer (3:36.9 2:54.0 57.23 3:35. but lost too much ground in the previous 100m.04) and Ramzi (3:37.5 28. 4. but then sustained a hamstring injury and ended up last in the final. 6. holding off the graceful Kiprop by just over a metre in 3:32. Ali (58.3 400m 52. 2004-1 Most Appearances 5 Branko Zorko YUG/IOP/CRO 4 Marcus O’Sullivan IRL 3 25 men Placing Table G USA 3 GBR 5 KEN 4 GER FRA NZL 3 SWE 1 ESP 1 MAR 1 FIN 3 AUS 2 TCH (CZE) CAN ITA 1 ALG 2 IRL 1 SUI HUN NED BEL GRE LUX 1 POR QAT ETH DEN POL - S 7 6 2 2 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 - B 4 3 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 4 6 4 5 4 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 - 1906-1 1984-1 1972-2 1996-2 2004-1 1988-9h1.89. Kiprop (3:37.03. 1992-1.0 1:56.4 54. 5.13 3:35. the fastest section of the race.7 26. 3.6 1:59. 3.44 3:34. until in 2009 a re-test of Ramzi’s doping sample revealed traces of CERA. 4. missing out by 0.0 26.8 56.6 2:55.6 28. 2004-10h3 1984-9s2.87). By now.2 2:55. Finalists: 12) Splits Kiprop Willis Baala Higuero Iguider van Deventer Ali Baddeley Ramzi 400m 56.4 1 5 0 0 m 800m 1:59. 2.72 (Competitors: 43.5 26.6 1:56.88 two weeks earlier.9 2:54. It was reported that Makhloufi’s training regime had meant he had not seen his family for seven months prior to the Games. Finishing quicker than anyone was Manzano. but ominously he uncorked a penutimate 100m of 12. the others upgraded and Kirop – who did not receive the gold medal until 2011 – became the youngest-ever 1500m champion. Countries: 30.9 56.1.8 1200m 2:54. The 28 year-old Bahrainian swooped into the lead with 270m to go.7 2:55.6 57.3 53. 1968-1.8 52.63) set a moderate pace while everyone stayed in contention.6). Behind them Silva finished fastest of all.8 1:58. 8.2 to clock 3:32.5 55.7 25. He had set a personal best of 3:28. 1984-2.9 27. Countries: 30.2.32). Chepseba and Gebremehdin gave chase. with Sydney and Athens medallist Bernard Lagat the most notable non-qualifier. who passed eight men in the last lap to snatch the silver from Iguider.5 53.8 54. 1992-4 1996-12. Lagat almost drew even with 40m to go.66 3:34. 1980-1.7 2:55. Beijing.94.3 27.3 59. The two Kenyans continued to lead. Kiprop set the pace in the final.2 59. A third lap of 56. Asbel Kiprop Nick Willis Mehdi Baala Juan Carlos Higuero Abdelaati Iguider Juan van Deventer Belal Mansoor Ali Andy Baddeley KEN NZL FRA ESP MAR RSA BRN GBR 3:33.1 2:54.11 3:34. 1988-8.4 1200m 2:54.3 27. just holding off the fast-finishing Baala.9 101 Last 200m 26.1 1:56. a new generation of the endurance-enhancing hormone EPO. MEN’S 1500 METRES The Best on Points 16 James Lightbody USA Sebastian Coe GBR 15 Kip Keino KEN Fermín Cacho ESP Hicham El Guerrouj MAR 1904-1. and covered the last 300m in 38.8 52. 5. with splits of 12.8 26.2.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C cranked the pace up further.4 2:53. 19 Aug 2008 1. It was his first 1500m of the year.5 57.8 59. Kiprop (3:41.9 and 12. 19966h4 5 5 6 2 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 1 - 6 5 5 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 7 3 1 2 2 3 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 5 4 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - M Points 14 173 14 165 8 95 6 72 5 56 6 47 3 47 3 33 4 32 4 31 3 28 1 25 1 22 2 20 2 18 1 14 1 13 1 13 1 12 1 10 0 10 1 8 1 6 1 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 . but then turned out for an 800m heat the day before the 1500m final. The last 800 for the three men had taken 1:46. 7.0 2:54.1 58. The Bahraini was disqualified.30) and Nixon Chepseba (1:58. it was clearly executed incorrectly. at 19 years 50 days became the youngest ever medallist in this event. and Heshko was third with Silva beginning to close up. Morocco’s only medallist in London. London.1 59. Lagat stayed on El Guerrouj’s shoulder as the two battled over the last 200m. passing 400 in 56. 1988-4 1984-4.4 27. El Guerrouj had finally triumphed.09 upped the tempo. 2.2 53. who was almost a non-starter. The Algerian then showed no sign of a sore knee to bolt into the lead. he was given clearance to compete in the 1500m final.0 800m 1:56.44 3:36.3 (Silva).06. On appeal.9 26.2 2:53. but fell back as the Algerian flew clear with a 12. which included medical reasons given for his violation (a knee problem). while Kiprop.8 53.8 1:59.9 (with his 14th stretch of 100m in 12.3 1:56. 1992-7s1.4 2:54. covered in 26. The Kenyan was quicker than Ramzi in the homestraight (13.2).43 3:35. Or so we thought. passing 800 in 1:56.19 3:36.6 59.4 2:54.9 52.2 2:55. 2000-12h1. 6.8 1:56. The race was won by the 2005 double World Champion Rashid Ramzi (BRN).5.3 25.8 1:57.1 to 13.11) won slowly-paced semi-finals. Most Finals 3 Steve Cram GBR Joseph Chesire KEN El Guerrouj 1980-8.17 3:35. Willis won the battle for bronze. He dropped out of that race and under IAAF rule 142. 2000-2.6 53. before Augustine Choge (KEN) provided a substantially quicker pace in heat four.3 53.8 2:54. 8.3 1:56.1 57.4 1:58.0 1:59.77 3:35. the fastest-ever time in a heat. In his third final. If the intention had been to burn off Ramzi.1 55.37 (Competitors: 48.6 27. making up seven places in the last lap. 7 Aug 2012 1.

8:46 (3000m) and an unofficial world’s best of 14:07.6. passing 500m in 1:19. but by 2000m Nurmi had caught up.6.0. 5. Countries: 21. Ritola ran away from Nurmi on the . and he was an habitual cigarette smoker. and led until the last lap. 8. 6. with Blewitt running 15:19. Paris.0e (Competitors: 36.2 seconds. 6. Ritola led at 3000 in 8:42. Countries: 16.0e 14:59.9e 15:33.0e 15:17. Paavo Nurmi Ville Ritola Edvin Wide John Romig Eino Seppälä Charles Clibbon Lucien Dolquès Axel Eriksson FIN FIN SWE USA FIN GBR FRA SWE 14:31. 3. Reportedly.6 and 1000m in 2:46. The final started at 15:15 in the presence of King Albert I.4. see discontinued events 1. who closed from 2m back on the last bend. Countries: 17. Smith dropped back shortly after. Antwerp. and cut loose with 200m to go.0e (Competitors: 38. Nurmi took the lead after 1000m. 8.0 14:41. Finalists: 16) The heats were won by Eino Rastas (FIN) 15:22. 3. Four Finns qualified for the final.0 in his heat – less than four seconds slower than the best on record for the event. Nurmi ran 15:33 in the third heat behind Speroni (15:27. Bouin had run 15:05. Finalists: 12) Athens 1896 to London 1908: Not held. 2. eventually finishing 10th.2OR 14:31. Guillemot left Nurmi 25m behind. passing 3000m in 8:43 on the way. Nurmi’s last 500m lap was covered in 1:24. winning all of them and dominating the ’24 Games in a way that no-one has ever fully matched. Guillemot stayed close behind Nurmi. 42 minutes after the 1500m.0e 14:41. Finalists: 12) First place times in the three heats ranged from 15:02. 7. but Eino Purje. Amsterdam.2 at 3 miles. All told Nurmi had seven races in six days in Paris. and a 5000m heat in 15:34. Finalists: 11) Kolehmainen had run three races in three days prior to the 5000m final – a heat and final over 10. Joseph Guillemot Paavo Nurmi Eric Backman Teodor Koskenniemi Joe Blewitt William Seagrove Carlo Speroni Alfred Nichols 5 0 0 0 m Rudolf Falk (SWE). Wide and Lermond.8 15:12.0. 7. 4.8 for Dolques. with Kinnunen and Magnusson beginning to struggle to keep pace.8 as the next fastest winner. 1 5 0 0 m . and with a brief interruption from Bonhag. 3 Aug 1928 1. In touch with the two Finns at 3000m.000m.8. bronze medallist in the 1500m the day before. The excellent Finnish book “Olympialaiset” gives 15:29.2. Bouin was never more than 4m ahead of the Finn. to finally overtake the valiant Frenchman with 20m to go.4 15:01. who would finish 11th in the final.2 with the final 400m in 66.6WR 14:36. while Romig finished fast to win a tough battle with Seppälä for fourth.6 to 15:07. 8. 10 Jul 1924 1. before slowing to 5:43.2e 14:50. Wide set a stiff pace. also in 15:33.3e 15:28. 8. and noted later that “I was carried in triumph by the Finns on their shoulders. 10 Jul 1912 Hannes Kolehmainen Jean Bouin George Hutson George Bonhag Tell Berna Mauritz Karlsson Henry Scott Alex Decoteau FIN FRA GBR USA USA SWE USA CAN 14:36.6. as Nurmi turned to see where the Frenchman was placed. and he repulsed Ritola’s attack in the home straight with ease. Nurmi was suffering hip pains after falling in the water jump during the steeplechase heats two days earlier. 5. winning by barely half a metre.8 15:10. reached in 11:38.8 by Nurmi. 6.0e 15:21. A 5000m team race was held in 1900.0 15:13. were Macauley Smith (USA). while Guillemot won the final heat. 6.6). 7. The time of 14:36. 2. 4.” The Frenchman was remarkable for two things – his heart was on the right hand side of his body. 2.6 was not only the first mark under 15 minutes over 5000m. Nurmi was passed by Ritola. Wide was an isolated third. Bouin then took over and with Kolehmainen lurking on his shoulder. but the question was whether Nurmi could double up and win his second gold medal of the afternoon. French journalists timed the leaders in 4:17 at 1500m.6 (Competitors: 31.3e 15:18. and Wide began to fall back. despite the official margin of 0.7 15:07.0 15:18. and 1500m in 4:17. reached in 8:43.4. 5. 7.6 and Romig 15:14. 5. Countries: 10. 17 Aug 1920 1.6 15:00. with a gap to Dolques and Seppälä of 15 seconds.5. confident in his ability to outsprint the Finn. 2. 5:47 (2000m). 3. At halfway the time was 7:14. led to 1500m. continued Placing Table S B 4 G NOR ROU UKR AUT RSA SOM BRN SUD TUN TUR URS (UKR) Totals 28 28 28 28 ★ O L Y M P I C 5 1 1 1 28 6 1 1 1 28 7 1 25 8 1 1 1 1 25 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S M Points 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 84 999 Breakdown of GBR placings: GBR 5 5 3 IRL 1 Totals 5 6 3 4 4 5 1 6 5 5 1 1 4 4 13 1 14 154 11 165 Breakdown GER FRG GDR Totals 2 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 - 2 2 2 6 35 19 18 72 of GER placings: 1 1 2 1 1 2 4 5000 Metres Stockholm.6 15:09.4. Nurmi led through two laps in 2:20. After reaching 2000m in 5:46. was never a factor due to a knee injury. Nurmi 15:28. Lermond being the fastest winner. 3. The gap was five seconds at 3500m and 14 seconds with a kilometre to go.R I O 102 2 0 1 6 Men’s 1500 Metres.6. FRA FIN SWE FIN GBR GBR ITA GBR 14:55. while Ritola and Nurmi pulled away from Wide with 600m to go.0.0. Ville Ritola Paavo Nurmi Edvin Wide Leo Lermond Ragnar Magnusson Armas Kinnunen Staņislavs Petkevičs Herbert Johnston FIN FIN SWE USA SWE FIN LAT GBR 14:38. drew away from the rest of the field.0e 15:19.0e (Competitors: 38.6 at 2000m. 4. Ritola was the only one initially to follow Wide’s pace.0e 15:38. but the inaugural accepted world record. Kolehmainen went to the front from the gun.6e 15:02. 7:17 (2500m). more than 10 seconds faster than Alfred Shrubb’s world record of 14:17. was the fastest heat winner in 15:17. 4.

4.7 14:59. . passing 1000m in 2:47 and 2000m in 5:37. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Gaston Reiff Emil Zátopek CZE Willem Slijkhuis Erik Ahldén Bertil Albertsson Curtis Stone Väinö Koskela Väinö Mäkelä BEL TCH NED SWE SWE USA FIN FIN 14:17. Pirie.8 (Competitors: 41. and film of the race seems to confirm this view. 5 0 0 0 m 103 London. Virtanen and Lehtinen set the pace in the final.2) – the ’46 European silver and bronze medallists – won the other heats. 7.4 14:41.6 14:39. Chataway and Mimoun were in the leading pack. with Virtanen passing 800m in 2:12 and 1000m in 2:47.8) and Nyberg (14:58. ” Reiff later said.0 14:30.6 14:24.2) were the only men to have run quicker than 14:20 in 1948. Finalists: 14) 1.0 ahead of Murakoso (14:56.00 0. a result which would seem ironic three days later. but I think he still had [enough] reserves left that he would have won in any case”. The crowd booed heartily. and desperately quickened his pace.0 (14:06. and leading through 3000m in 8:30. 6.6 with just his countrymen. along with reigning champion Lehtinen (14:31.6OR 14:17.8 14:29. caught by Pirie on the line. Finalists: 12) Reiff Zátopek Differential 0. The unusually fatigued Nurmi looked round half a dozen times in the finishing straight to ensure that he could stay ahead of Wide.0OR 14:30. 2 Aug 1948 1. 7. just ahead of Lehtinen (14:59.0).8 with Zátopek interposing himself at the front during the sixth and ninth laps. Only Lehtinen was able to react.5. and Lehtinen was a solid second. which widened to 30m with a lap to go. 7 Aug 1936 Gunnar Höckert Lauri Lehtinen Henry Jonsson (Kälarne) Kohei Murakoso Józef Noji Ilmari Salminen Umberto Cerati Louis Zamperini FIN FIN SWE JPN POL FIN ITA USA 14:22.4 14:39.” The following day Lehtinen made amends with the crowd by trying to pull Hill up onto the top place on the victory podium and then pinning a small Finnish flag on Hill’s shirt. it was also the first ever gold medal in athletics for Belgium. Helsinki.80) (14:18. Coming into the finishing straight Hill moved up to overtake the Finn on the outside.0 14:39. 5.0. 3.0 14:33. won by Aleksandr Anufriyev (URS – 14:23. Chataway led for the first lap (65. 8. 7. Chataway picked himself up and finished in fifth place. and at the bell (13:20.91) Hill won the first heat in 14:59. 5 Aug 1932 Electrics 1.0 15:04. but the situation changed in the ninth lap as Reiff took the lead. Lehtinen ran a formidable 63 for the first lap. At this point only Reiff.4 14:08.0 14:18.8) was just behind Lehtinen. who had finished 1-2 in the Finnish trials with 14:30. quickly passing Slijkhuis. after Mimoun won the first in 14:19. Zátopek responded by sprinting like a maniac.6 14:18.0 14:23. and opened up a gap of 5m at 4000m (11:25). but Reiff then dropped out.8). passing 1000m in 2:49.8). 2.8 14:26.58) (14:08. Lauri Lehtinen Ralph Hill Lauri Virtanen John Savidan Jean-Gunnar Lindgren Max Syring Alec Burns Daniel Dean FIN USA FIN NZL SWE GER GBR USA 14:30. 6. before slowing to 5:46 at 2000m – with a brief interruption by Don Lash (USA). while Slijkhuis (15:06. were favourites. 24 Jul 1952 Electrics 1. 6.4e 15:08.0 14:44. Salminen fell with two laps to go and Höckert made a break. 4. but shortly afterwards Chataway went to the front. Virtanen passed 2000m (5:45) with Savidan. (14:29. with the field following in single file.72) (14:07. Berlin. while Lehtinen led at 1500m in 4:15. with the drama heightened further by Chataway falling on the curb at the same instant. 8. passing his rivals on the outside halfway round the final curve. but Lehtinen moved across and the two crossed the line with Hill hemmed in and 30cm behind. Zátopek won by 5m with the fastest last lap of his career – 57. 8. Los Angeles. 5. 4.4.4 in the second heat.8) in the final. with Virtanen dropping back shortly after. with Nurmi powerless to counteract his great rival’s finish. Ahldén duly won the quickest heat in 14:34.8 14:28.0).6OR 14:07. 2.6.4 and 4000m in 11:24. looking capable of running under 14:20 if necessary. Ahldén (14:13. and the occasional foray by Salminen and Lehtinen. Finalists: 15) Höckert and Salminen.16) (Competitors: 45. 2. but had to give way with 300m to go. 8. Lindgren and Hill the closest pursuers. The youngest (26) of the three Finns won easily. Finalists: 15) Schade set an Olympic record of 14:15. Countries: 11. with Jonsson beating Murakoso for third. with Schade third.8. Hill himself said “Lehtinen did get in my way. At this point Reiff. then took over. with Schade and Mimoun in hot pursuit. Jonsson was the fastest in the heats with 14:54. passing 4000m in 11:36.31) (14:18. Zátopek led at the bell. 4.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C last bend and won by 15m.0. Countries: 20. until the announcer Bill Henry. Burns took the slower heat in 15:25. 3.26 behind Zátopek (14:10.0 in the final heat. As the pace increased Pirie had to give way. With 300m remaining Zátopek bolted after Reiff. 5. please remember these people are our guests. “The finishing straight was the hardest of my sporting career. 3. reached in 11:37. just reaching the tape ahead of Zátopek after a last lap in 69.4 14:46. Murakoso passed 3000m in 8:40 and was overtaken by Höckert shortly before the 4000m point.8 14:26.2) and Reiff (14:14.6. Countries: 23.98) (Competitors: 18. Ahldén and Slijkhuis were in touch. Zátopek took the lead from the gun in the final. 5. the world record holder.0e 14:43. but Lehtinen veered out. Reiff looked back with 30m to go as the Czech closed in. 2. Murakoso was the principal pacemaker.5e (14:29. 6. Hill stayed in contact.8 by 8m from Paul Rekers (USA) 15:27. Countries: 24. and Virtanen led at 3000m in 8:39. plus Murakoso and Jonsson for company.9 three weeks before the Games). and Hill then moved to the inside. Syring.9.2 ahead of Zátopek.38) (14:23. running through puddles to 3000m in 8:33 (after kilometre splits of 2:48 and 5:38). from his great rival and friend Mimoun. 7. and then Schade went to the front. Emil Zátopek CZE Alain Mimoun Herbert Schade Gordon Pirie Chris Chataway Les Perry Ernö Béres Åke Andersson TCH FRA GER/FRG GBR GBR AUS HUN SWE 14:06. with the Czech adding to his popularity with the crowd by chatting with the other qualifiers making it clear that they should not exert themselves too much. stated with dignity “Ladies and gentlemen. Halfway was reached in 7:14. 3. Lehtinen.8 14:44. Zátopek finished third in 14:26.6 14:54.0e (Competitors: 33. and narrowed the gap rapidly.0 14:49.2OR 14:25.

6 lap.01) (14:05. 4. 7.0 14:05. Nikolay Dutov Thor Helland 5 0 0 0 m (13:39.0) and was succeeded by Clarke. Gammoudi led for the first lap (72. he remains the only Tunisian ever to have won an Olympic athletics medal. 6. 8. 5. 2.7. 5. Gammoudi had started running in 1959 and won the Mediterranean Games 5000m & 10. Countries: 25. Chataway fell back in the ninth lap. while Puttemans and Stewart were struggling to maintain contact.6 and 8:20.9 to edge Zimny. The pace was jerky.6OR 13:50. but it then shrunk by 5m in the next 200. Vladimir Kuts RUS Gordon Pirie Derek Ibbotson Miklós Szabó Albie Thomas László Tábori Nyandika Maiyoro Thyge Thøgersen URS GBR GBR HUN AUS HUN KEN DEN 13:39.8 13:49. Halberg. and Thomas 14:14. Rome. 18 Oct 1964 1. Murray Halberg NZL Hans Grodotzki GER/GDR Kazimierz Zimny POL Friedrich Janke GER/GDR Dave Power AUS Nyandika Maiyoro KEN Michel Bernard FRA Horst Flosbach GER/FRG 13:43.0 and 26.45) (14:17. 7. Bob Schul Harald Norpoth Bill Dellinger Michel Jazy Kip Keino Bill Baillie USA GER/FRG USA FRA KEN NZL 13:48.6 opening lap showed.2 14:06. 7.03) (14:09.86) (13:50.2 and 2:49.6 14:18.8. Prefontaine took over and the race was on. the favourite.67. 4. 17 Oct 1968 Electrics 1. with the Finn taking over just before the bell.6. 5:32. Dave Power then took over. and Kuts scoured through 4000m in 10:57.98) (Competitors: 38. Finalists: 13) Electrics 1. Zimny was the leader through the first eight laps of the final. showed his cards immediately in the final. 6. with the leader’s time at the bell being 12:39. soon slowed. tailing off the pace.8 14:19. the Ukrainian-born Russian. Finalists: 12) Heat winners Grodotzki (14:01.6 13:44. No-one wanted the lead in the final. Grodotzki tried to reduce the margin.000m titles in 1963 before graduating to the world stage in Tokyo.01) (13:45. Viren held off Gammoudi down the back straight and was 7m .4).42OR 13:27. but it was still slow to 3000m.3.2 and 8:11. 2:46. Sviridov picked up the pace. Dellinger moved past Clarke with 600m to go. Tulloh and Salvat all failed to qualify. Kuts’s winning margin was nearly three times the previous largest victory (Guillemot – 4. Countries: 13. 8.38) (14:05.8 14:12.82 13:32. 2. After kilometres of 2:50. Laps of 62.2 and 8:19. After the gap reached 12m. Lasse Viren Mohamed Gammoudi Ian Stewart Steve Prefontaine Emiel Puttemans Harald Norpoth Per Halle Nikolay Sviridov RUS FIN TUN GBR USA BEL FRG NOR URS 13:26. with a 40m gap to Thomas.2). Al Lawrence (AUS) 14:14. 5:28.4 14:10. 6. 10 Sep 1972 1. Mexico City.99) (14:21.2.99) (14:18. Countries: 31. 2 Sep 1960 For the first time since 1948. who had won his heat in 13:51. 3.6. 6. maintained the lead for another lap (64.68) (14:07.8 14:04. Both Temu and then Keino tried to pass. 61. 6. then 2000m in 5:44.61 13:28. 2. Finalists: 14) The heats saw three wins for English speaking athletes – Pirie 14:25.8). Halberg held on with a last lap of 64. The race.8) until 3800m.78) (13:54.58 13:34.4 with a 10m lead over Ibbotson and Pirie. The altitude had its effect in the heats with Jean Wadoux (FRA) the only man to break 14:20 (14:19.5 lap opening up a gap. who at last won an Olympic medal. 5. as a 69.2. and then wasted the lead with a 70. 5:26. Gammoudi went to the front just after 4000m. a victim of stomach cramps.2.0 (Competitors: 48.8 13:50. 2.8. where Clarke took over until 4000m (11:30.8 13:46. Halberg then struck.03) (Competitors: 48. 3. and held the lead from then on.8 (last 300 in 38. 5.6 13:54. At 3400m. Mohamed Gammoudi Kip Keino Naftali Temu Juan Martínez Ron Clarke Wohib Masresha Nikolay Sviridov RUS Fikru Deguefu TUN KEN KEN MEX AUS ETH URS ETH 14:05. but were repulsed every time by the Tunisian lowlander. Finalists: 12) Electrics 1.0.38 13:39.25 13:30. Keino.6 seconds in 1920).4 13:51.69.2 brought him home 65m clear of Pirie. while Clarke finished ninth in 13:58.16) (14:06.70) (14:18.7).33 13:27.4 13:44. He rushed through 200m in 30.2.0 URS NOR RUS 13:53.6 14:09.2 and 4000m in 11:15. silver medallist in Tokyo. Countries: 35.1). 3.4) and Janke (14:04. 3. the last to finish in the Mexico final. but instead it kept widening – to nearly 20m after a lap covered in 61. Jazy was edged out of a medal spot by veteran Dellinger. 4. the final was run in a heavy storm.81) (Competitors: 23. Schul then started to sprint and zipped past the Frenchman off the final curve and won by 6m after a last lap of 54. the fastest finisher. then led for 600m slowing the pace.0). and passed 3600m in 10:00.8 13:51.0 and 60.60) (14:03. By the bell he was 45m ahead and a last lap of 62.1.0.8 13:49.0 14:21.76) (13:45.1 while Grodotzki ran 62. and built up a 10m lead on the backstraight. Flosbach (14:08.38) (13:53.0 Puttemans.8. with Ron Clarke trying to disrupt the others.4 lost all but Gammoudi and Viren.40) (14:18.7.09) (13:47. and none of the others believed the break was serious. 8. The remaining heat was won by Power (14:03.6 13:49. Countries: 29. 5. 4. 28 Nov 1956 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 7.4 14:03.4 14:04. 8.41) (14:10.2 14:06. with Thomas making brief forays into the lead. with kilometre splits of 2:41. a dramatic figure clad in the black of New Zealand and with a partially withered left arm from a rugby accident.31 (Competitors: 61.4 14:19.8 13:57.4. and remains as the most dominant piece of 5000m running in Olympic history. By this time only the three Britons were in contact. with his last three 200m segments increasingly quicker: 32.0 (14:05. 4.2.6. who took the field through 1000m in 2:53. Clarke kicked in a 62.76) (14:12. continuing on to kilometre splits of 2:40. was the fastest heat winner with an Olympic record 13:31.R I O 104 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Melbourne. with Sviridov leading past 3000m (8:38.6 (13:43. and then Jazy sped past just after the bell. Finalists: 13) Tokyo.0. 8. 7. Unexpectedly. 2.14) (13:52. 3.8.8). 400m in 62.8 13:52. had dropped out with stomach problems.41.4) showed that the Germans were ready for Rome – in comparison the highly regarded British trio of Pirie. Clarke passed 3000m in 8:22. nearly 10 seconds slower than his heat time (13:48.1.4 14:17. 28. which started quickly. with Halberg’s 4000m split being 11:01.1. by less than a metre. Kuts.25) (14:04. Munich. with only Mike Wiggs (GBR). By then Norpoth.

the favourite. with Baumann the fastest heat winner in 13:20. ahead of world record holder Moorcroft (13:28. where Lasse Orimus (FIN) ran a fine 13:23. Viren took over with laps of 62. 1500m) all failed to qualify.52 13:27. and his last mile in 4:03. 3. as Yifter later said. Viren’s last 400m was covered in 56. and Viren then moved to the front and slowed up the pace.1) the Ethiopians took turns to lead. 7.59OR 13:07. 8. and 1978 European medallists Martti Vainio (FIN. 1 Oct 1988 1.54). Maaninka passed Coghlan in the home straight.64.76 13:25.69 13:23.46 (Competitors: 56. . Seoul. For the second successive Games (in 1976 it was at 1500m). Coghlan made the first break with 300m to go. with a last lap of 55. 6. Aleksandr Fedotkin (URS. Ngugi broke open the final in the third lap going from last to first after 950m. 7.03 13:13.9 and 63. 5. 6. Ryffel. 2.99 13:27. Lasse Viren Dick Quax Klaus Hildenbrand Rod Dixon Brendan Foster Willy Polleunis Ian Stewart Aniceto Simoes FIN NZL FRG NZL GBR BEL GBR POR 13:24.19 13:26.09 13:23. but looked to his right and was passed on the inside by Yifter with 250m remaining.56 13:24. Viren became the only man ever to win a double-double. 8. Treacy led the finalists through 1000m (2:38. and the Moroccan went past with 250m left. 5. 4.38 (Competitors: 36. 3. 4. the 5000m & 10. Castro was in second 20m ahead of the pack.17 13:26. leaving the courageous Portuguese runner in tears. and his last 2km in 5:06. 8 Aug 1992 1.0.1. 3. The New Zealanders both made statements afterwards to the effect that Viren had won because of “blood doping”.74 13:23. 6. 7.40 13:18.9.20) in tight finishes which saw Italy’s excellent Salvatore Antibo eliminated despite clocking 13:25. 3.62 13:24.80 (Competitors: 56. the biggest finishers in the race. running his last 400m in 55.0. it seemed incomprehensible that Viren could hold off the field.1 lost all but Aouita and Ryffel.73 13:16.91 13:21. Barcelona.3.50 13:23. Viren’s enigmatic response to such statements was “how can you confirm that?” F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 5 0 0 0 m 105 Los Angeles. was uncatchable. Leitão’s penultimate lap of 60.0 with a pack of seven following him through the bell.70 13:15. 5. 3. Aouita’s time was the third-fastest ever run.50 13:14. 2. Finalists: 14) Foster set an Olympic record of 13:20. Yifter. and he streaked home with a last lap of 54. The three heats were won in the 13:42-45 range.2. 1 Aug 1980 1.5 for the first two kilometres in the final. 2. 11 Aug 1984 1. the Irishman finished the race in fourth place. Countries: 23. 6. Countries: 22. 6.60 13:22. After a further 800m. Foster ran 2:41. Finalists: 14) Fastest in the two preliminary rounds was Aouita. Hutchings and the two Kenyans were still in contention.3 and 10:38. 2. Finalists: 16) For the first time since 1976 there was only one round before the final. 8.34 in the final heat. In the final. By 2000m the Kenyan led by 50m after a second kilometre in 2:32.39. 8.40) and Mohammed Kedir (13:28. 4.5 and 5:26. Montreal. and the semis were taken by Ethiopians Yohannes Mohammed (13:39. 8. caught him in the last 40m.25 13:23. Countries: 41.5). Quax led at 3000m (8:15.9 (last 200 in 27.50 13:26. Other than a brief interruption by Maaninka at 4000m (10:51. with Yifter. 7. Baumann was considered the man with the best finish.00 13:22. Miruts Yifter Suleiman Nyambui Kaarlo Maaninka Eamonn Coghlan Markus Ryffel Dietmar Millonig John Treacy Aleksandr Fedotkin ETH TAN FIN IRL SUI AUT IRL URS 13:20. 10.52 13:12.03 13:23.52 13:15.000m).8. 7:59. 5.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C clear by the finish. Ngugi still had a 30m lead four-fifths of the way through the race after kilometres of 2:41.48). 4. the latter passing 2000m in 5:22.76 13:27.71 13:13. 5.20 13:11. and the Kenyans set out to deprive him of his strength in the final.44) and Mei (13:24. Dieter Baumann Paul Bitok Fita Bayissa Brahim Boutayeb Yobes Ondieki Worku Bikila Rob Denmark Abel Antón GER KEN ETH MAR KEN ETH GBR ESP 13:12. whose age was thought to be 36 at the time of the ’80 Olympics.000m golds in successive Olympics. Countries: 40. Finalists: 15) Moscow. Ezequiel Canario (POR) led through 1000m in 2:37. 7. Countries: 39. Finalists: 12) Despite there being fewer athletes than in 1976.41 13:23. with the result that Baumann and Kunze.44) and converted 1500m champion John Walker (13:28. With much faster finishers like Quax and Dixon trailing the Finn. Behind him Stewart finished powerfully to pass the stumbling Prefontaine 20m from the finish and just failed to catch Gammoudi. but he did.4).0. and running his lap from the kilometre mark (2:42. Of possible medal winners. then Kedir taking over.27 13:17. who coasted through a semi-final win in 13:28. “running a team race until the last lap”. 2. Ahead of this drama Ngugi had finished a trouble-free last lap in 60. The semi-finals were won by Castro (13:22. Among the also-rans were the two Eamonns. 30 Jul 1976 1.4.41 (Competitors: 56.43 in seventh place – seven seconds faster than the winner of the next fastest heat – but didn’t make the final. faster than the Finnish record for the event.8) in 58.1.85 13:26.16 13:25.2 to take a 30m lead. Only Aouita.10 BLR (Competitors: 35. Saïd Aouita Markus Ryffel Antonio Leitão Tim Hutchings Paul Kipkoech Charles Cheruiyot Doug Padilla John Walker MAR SUI POR GBR KEN KEN USA NZL 13:05. but exhausted himself trying to catch Ngugi. John Ngugi Dieter Baumann Hansjörg Kunze Domingos Castro Sydney Maree Jack Buckner Stefano Mei Evgeni Ignatov KEN FRG GDR POR USA GBR ITA BUL 13:11.3 to take the gold. Martin (GBR) and ’83 World Champion Coghlan. an extra round was run. with Leitão taking over as part of a team plan.2) to win by 6m from Nyambui. and got clear of Ryffel on the final curve.65 13:29. 5000m) and Dave Moorcroft (GBR. 4.1 and 2:40.54 13:09. Leitão led through kilometre splits of 5:17.38 13:25.8. only Thomas Wessinghage (FRG) and Wilson Waigwa (KEN) were missing because of the boycott.9 and 3000m in 8:08.82.

and Niyongabo.79. Bayissa and Boutayeb accelerated sharply with just under 200m to go and Baumann shot past Ondieki.70 (Competitors: 36. and passed the bell in 12:13. with 69. Atlanta. Countries: 25. As in the Athens 1500m.36. 30 Sep 2000 1.96 13:08.31 13:25. and in a concertina effect Baumann was finishing fastest of all. and he put in a 61.8 last 100. 5.5. 28 Aug 2004 1. 7.91 13:13.80 13:06.2. only five were in contention – Bekele. but he ended up ninth.16 13:08. who had a 3:30.29 13:12.48 (Competitors: 39. 2. Finalists: 15) Fourteen of the 15 qualifiers ran quicker than 13:30 in the heats. winning by just over a metre. the final 200m in 24. 6.98 13:42. With 130m to go his lead began to shrink. In the 30°C heat. with Boulami a similar distance behind. The pace in the final was slow to start with 68.5 for the next 200m.0 lap. 8. 7. 2. Behind him Boulami was gaining on the Kenyan.4.96 lap. Hicham El Guerrouj MAR Kenenisa Bekele ETH Eliud Kipchoge KEN Gebre-egziabher Gebremariam ETH Dejene Berhanu ETH John Kibowen KEN Zersenay Tadese ERI Craig Mottram AUS 13:14.46 was the time at the kilometre mark.84 and 60. 2. Kenenisa Bekele Eliud Kipchoge Edwin Soi Moses Kipsiro Abreham Cherkos Tariku Bekele Juan Luis Barrios James Kwalia ETH KEN KEN UGA ETH ETH MEX QAT 12:57.1. 3. Despite this.87 to register the first sub-13 clocking in Olympic history. Baumann moved past Bayissa on the inside as the Ethiopian strayed into lane 2 and then the German weaved to the outside and sped by Bitok to win. The field caught Arndt at 1600m.09 time for 1500m to his credit. though not in one afternoon as the Finn did. Chebii was the first to crack. 5. Only one major name – Craig Mottram (AUS) – was eliminated.80 13:38. Dominic Kirui (KEN) put in laps of 61. 4.7. and 2:58. and the 2003 World Champion (Kipchoge). The finalists included Baumann and Bitok. covering the last 400m in 53. at which point Niyongabo moved to the front. This dominant piece of running left observers feeling that they were watching the greatest distance runner of all-time.70. By 3000m there were six men 25m clear – Ondieki. the former passing through the first three kilometres in 2:45.7. and instead of putting more pressure on El Guerrouj. Bekele took off on the last lap.1. 66. The Burundian got home one and a half metres ahead of Bitok.90.89.5 fourth lap.7 and 65. with laps of 63.9. 60. The final saw Alemu take the lead. a strong runner with no big kick.66 13:41. 2.46 13:19.56 13:16. Athens. passing 3000m in a sedate 8:21.2 served to lose only Bikila. Beijing.1. including a final mile of 3:58. Laps of only 65.84). although Arndt’s pace (2:45. 6. Gebremariam and Berhanu.35 13:16. more impressively.81 13:12. 7.36 at 1000m) was nothing special.22 13:10. 3.26 (Competitors: 37. Wolde threw in a lap of 62. In so doing El Guerrouj became the first man since Nurmi in 1924 to win the 1500m/5000m double.57 (Competitors: 36.2. No-one followed.54). 3.10 13:15. with Lahlafi the fastest at 13:22. Countries: 22.36 .50 and Tom Nyariki in a slow 14:03. The three Ethiopians gradually wound up the pace. 3 Aug 1996 1. the leaders eased off slightly – with the fourth kilo taking 2:37.13 13:37. and.4 at 1000m) and 63.7 and 8:00. The Ethiopian zipped by in the home straight easily outpacing the Algerian with his 13. Bekele and Kipchoge then moved to the front. Further circuits of 61. Sydney. 5. Mohamed Farah Dejen Gebremeskel Thomas Longosiwa GBR ETH KEN 13:41. 8. Bitok. and the latter leading at 4000m in 10:40. featuring the winners of the Athens 1500m and 5000m. 4. 5:20. 6. 2. 65. Saïdi Sief led through differing laps of 64. Million Wolde Ali Saïdi-Sief Brahim Lahlafi Fita Bayissa David Chelule Dagne Alemu Sergiy Lebid Jirka Arndt ETH ALG MAR ETH KEN ETH UKR GER 13:35.35 13:12. 8. before 10. Finalists: 15) The first round eliminated just eight athletes in three heats with winning times which ranged from 13:50.61 to 14:02.1 after a 60. Countries: 23.82OR 13:02. with Alemu again in front at 2000m (5:39. In fourth place with 80m to go.39 13:14. Lahlafi briefly held the lead at 4000m (11:09.71. a time beaten by 14 of the 15 runners in the first semifinal.06 13:19. 5.21.59 13:15. getting rid of everyone except Wolde. The 3000m point was passed in 8:10. Kipchoge.36. Kororia and Nyariki took over the pacemaking duties.6 (2:36. four other Africans and Baumann.17 13:37.4. 3. This appeared to play into the hands of reigning World Champion Bernard Lagat.85. and continued to dawdle until 2800m. 11 Aug 2012 1.98 the slowest qualifying time. the big finishers in 1992. All negotiated the heats safely with 13:24. and Bitok started to close in.1. He ran the last lap of 56. Finalists: 15) Here was the setting for a great race. The miler from Burundi went 10m clear along the final back straight. no-one wanted the pace-setting duty. no-one was willing to take on the pace at the start.2 and 55. with Arndt bursting ahead of the field after 200m. only Kipchoge.24 13:24. and at the bell Bitok and Bayissa led with Baumann third. with Matt Tegenkamp (USA) being the fastest qualifier with 13:37.03 13:37. 4.0 for the first lap. Lahlafi then ran 28. El Guerrouj. 8. In the back straight the German was boxed in with Ondieki ahead of him and Boutayeb outside. 3. 4. Soi and Kipsiro were able to keep up.0 sufficing for the lead for the first lap. London. Finalists: 15) None of the heats were quick.4 and 60. passing 3000m in 8:00. 62. The two champions sprinted down the finishing straight and El Guerrouj powered past Bekele with 40m remaining.R I O 106 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C After 400m in 64.000m winner Kenenisa Bekele stamped his authority with a 59. Kennedy.49 13:36.5.2 but slowed up to 65.79 13:23.47 13:37. Baumann slowed up in the last 40m when he realised a medal was out of range. realising that the majority of the field was still with him. took over with two laps to go and led until 500m remained. 7. 23 Aug 2008 1. The semi-finals were won by Kenyans Shem Kororia in 13:27. Vénuste Niyongabo Paul Bitok Khalid Boulami Dieter Baumann Tom Nyariki Bob Kennedy Enrique Molina Brahim Lahlafi BDI KEN MAR GER KEN USA ESP MAR 13:07. with race favourite F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 5 0 0 0 m Saïdi Sief (a 3:30 man over 1500) taking the lead without imposing himself.37 13:08. a surging type without a big finish.20 13:36. Niyongabo was the first ever Olympic medal winner from Burundi. Countries: 24.92 13:18. but the leaders again let the pace lapse.0. but had slightly mistimed his kick.73 compared with the previous one of 2:34. 6. Bekele went past Kipchoge with 250m to go and El Guerrouj went by the Kenyan with 120m left. As the leaders approached the bell.84 meant that only Kipchoge and a struggling Soi were in touch at the bell.

1928-2 1988-2. No-one was willing to risk themselves in a fast pace. Kolehmainen took the lead at the end of the first lap. The Ethiopians then inserted two laps of 60. Countries: 13. Finalists: 15) The winners of the three heats were Wilson (33:40. 1996-10. 2000-4 1968-12. The Frenchman claimed that he had expected to run the final later than the actual scheduled time and was still digesting his lunch.83 13:44.8 just ahead of Tewanima (32:31. 8 Jul 1912 1920-2. 2008-5h3. but then lost their nerve and slowed to 62.R I O 4.0e 32:05. 5. 1972-6 1964-dns. 1972-2 Most Appearances 4 Emiel Puttemans BEL 3 5 23 Stockholm.4). which was supplanted shortly after by Leonard Richardson (RSA) who clocked 32:30. 5. 1972-5.2. Farah was threatened by Koech. Countries: 27. while three laps later Karlsson began to fade. 6. and both men failed to finish.19 13:45. Kolehmainen’s older brother Tatu won the third heat in 32:47. 6 of the 11 starters failed to finish. 1964-2.0e 32:26.8 ahead of William Scott (GBR) 32:55.6 32:21. The pace was brutal in the warm and sunny conditions. 4. In all. ★ O L Y M P I C 2 0 1 6 Bernard Lagat Isiah Koech Adbelaati Iguider Galen Rupp Juan Luis Barrios USA KEN MAR USA MEX F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 13:42. 1500m bronze medalist Iguider.000 fans ensured that a sense of fervour vibrated in the stadium for the length of the race. Countries: 17. 7. 201216h2 25 men S 4 4 2 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - B 2 4 1 3 1 3 4 2 1 1 1 - 4 1 2 2 5 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 1 23 8 1 1 1 1 23 M Points 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 69 828 - 1 1 2 - 2 2 4 2 1 7 43 16 6 65 Breakdown of URS placings: RUS 1 BLR Totals 1 - - - - 2 2 1 1 2 1 0 1 13 1 14 10. 0 0 0 m 5 1 6 2 3 2 3 3 1 1 1 - 6 2 3 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 7 1 1 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 8 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - M Points 13 114 9 95 6 75 5 72 3 68 7 65 4 46 4 37 3 31 2 29 0 16 2 15 2 15 1 15 1 14 1 12 1 11 1 10 0 10 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 7 0 7 1 6 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 Kolehmainen set the initial Olympic record with 33:49. 1996-4 1972-1. 1976-1 Most Finals 3 Nurmi Harald Norpoth GER/FRG Mohamed Gammoudi TUN Baumann Fita Bayissa ETH 107 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 2 1 FRG 1 1 GDR 1 Totals 1 3 3 MEN’S 5000 METRES The Best on Points 22 Paavo Nurmi FIN 20 Dieter Baumann FRG/GER 16 Lasse Virén FIN 1 0 . Farah went ahead with 700m left and held off all challenges at the bell. according to the distorted print ultimately produced by one of the photo-finish cameras which were mounted on a stadium wall. 1992-1.8 31:51. 1968-1. at which point the dangerous Gebremeskel got hopelessly boxed by eight men.8OR 32:06. The Briton rebuffed all challenges with his 52. 5.2. By 2000m Scott began to fall back. 8. were the early leaders in the final. so the first 3000m was covered in only 8:42. 6.8 32:36. 1924-1. 1968-dnf. The final mile was covered by Farah in 4:00. then Wilson and Guillemot. 4. The final was run the next day (!) and four of the 15 qualifiers did not start.2 33:31.95 (14:32 tempo). Paavo Nurmi Joseph Guillemot James Wilson Augusto Maccario James Hatton Jean Manhès Heikki Liimatainen Fred Faller FIN FRA GBR ITA GBR FRA FIN USA 31:45. 2.5.0e 32:38. 20 Aug 1920 1.94 final lap to produce the only Olympic 5000m win on home soil. but the prospect of a home win for Farah in front of 80.0e 31:56. Throughout the final lap. 2.0e 32:28. who moved clear of Stenroos in the final kilometre.0e 32:02. Men’s 5000 Metres. Guillemot (32:41.0 in the first heat. Tatu Kolehmainen dropped out at 6000m while in sixth place and Richardson suffered a similar fate shortly after when lapped by the leader.2 (Competitors: 30.2).4. That assertion appeared to be discredited by the stadium clock.6) and Liimatainen (32:08.99 13:43. Kolehmainen passing 1500m in 4:13 (28:07 pace). 1976-dnf/h1. Literally so at the finish. Kolehmainen’s time at 3000m was 8:52 and he passed halfway in 15:11. which showed a time of 16:45 halfway through the race. 8. Finalists: 11) Craig Mottram AUS Placing Table G FIN 7 KEN 1 ETH 3 GBR 1 USA 1 GER 1 SWE MAR 2 FRA 1 NZL 1 AUS TCH (CZE) 1 TUN 1 BEL 1 URS 1 POR SUI POL HUN BDI 1 MEX ALG TAN IRL NED ITA JPN UGA AUT ESP NOR ERI LAT - 6 23 2 2 1. . 19808s1 2000-8h2.000 Metres Athens 1896 to London 1908: Not held Hannes Kolehmainen Lewis Tewanima Albin Stenroos Joseph Keeper Alfonso Orlando FIN USA FIN CAN ITA 31:20.2 some 60m ahead of Nurmi).5.0e (Competitors: 35. and Scott and Mauritz Karlsson (SWE) tried to stay with him. Finalists: 15) The slowest winning time since 1968 would suggest a far from exciting race. Antwerp. 3. 3. while Kolehmainen won by half a lap from Tewanima.30 (Competitors: 42. Nurmi. continued Placing Table S B 4 G UKR BUL CAN DEN QAT Totals 23 23 23 23 1992-3. and finally Gebremeskel. 5 0 0 0 m .04 13:45. 7. 2004-8.

4 (Competitors: 30. Nurmi. with Guillemot jogging in and then vomiting just past the finishing line.2 31:22. Ritola led at every kilometre marker from 2000m to 9000m.6. Algerian-born Alain . Paris. As the pace slowed. and he and Guillemot dropped Wilson. 6. with Józef Noji the last to lose touch. 6. as the Finns scored the only medals sweep in the history of the event. The Finns then took turns with Murakoso to lead.6. increasing crowd sympathy for the Japanese. 2.0e 31:35.6 31:05. 5. with 30:41.6. 8. and the laps ranged from 71 to 76 seconds.8 31:08. However.4 was followed by one of 3:00 and Wide had to give way. Nurmi and Wide were 100m clear of Lindgren. but the Finnish authorities felt his programme (1500m. The wet conditions were of no assistance and Ritola’s time would have been close to 30 minutes with the track in better condition. Emil Zátopek CZE Alain Mimoun Bertil Albertsson Martin Stokken Severt Dennolf Abdallah Ben Said Stan Cox Jim Peters TCH FRA SWE NOR SWE FRA GBR GBR 29:59. then Maccario rejoined the leaders and these four stayed together until 8000m when Guillemot forced the pace and the Italian dropped back. Janusz Kusociński Volmari Iso-Hollo POL FIN 30:11. some 14 seconds ahead of world record pace. passing 1000m in 2:55. some 18 seconds ahead of Lindgren (15:37). 7. 3. 4. 7. The two principals stayed together until 200m to go when Kusociński sped away and led by 20m halfway down the finishing straight when he began to slow up. and by 5000m the margin was almost half a minute.8e 31:37. By halfway (15:11. 2. Askola led until 150m to go when Salminen attacked and Iso-Hollo fell back.0e (Competitors: 16. becoming the first man to regain a 10. Nurmi took over just before the bell. Changes to the estimated times for Guillemot. 4.2 30:25. and after Paris he broke Ritola’s new record by 17 seconds. Salminen could not get away and Askola came up on the outside.6 30:20. but this time the margin was barely a metre. Ritola and Wide soon left the others behind. 2.8.000m title. Heino was the early leader.6 30:58. 0 0 0 m Lauri Virtanen John Savidan Max Syring Jean-Gunnar Lindgren Juan Morales Clifford Bricker Iso-Hollo ran the first 400m in 65 and led through 1000m in 2:53. 30 Jul 1948 1. Ritola built up the tempo.0 31:29. with kilometre splits of 18:06.4 30:53. He nevertheless won by 8m after a last lap of 62 seconds.42) The favourites were the world record holder Viljo Heino (FIN). 2 Aug 1936 The largest field ever (officially 43.4 31:00. 2.0 six weeks before the Games in his second race at the distance. Ville Ritola Edvin Wide Eero Berg Väinö Sipilä Ernie Harper Halland Britton Guillaume Tell Earle Johnson FIN SWE FIN FIN GBR GBR FRA USA 30:23.4 30:15. 15m clear of the field.0 30:58. with teammates Heinström and Könönen.0 31:50. 8. 6. continuing with 11:52. was the fastest man of 1936 before the Games.4OR 30:12.0) Ritola.5. With him were the three Finns. 1 0 . Countries: 12) Walter Beavers (GBR) raced into the lead.0e (Competitors: 24. Four of the 15 finalists failed to finish. only Iso-Hollo and Virtanen were in tow. 11:56 and 15:01. more likely 33) for a track final assembled. 5. Virtanen lost contact shortly afterwards and was 80m behind by 8000m.8 31:26. the times for Kusociński and IsoHollo were the second and third fastest of all-time.2 31:58.R I O 108 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Nurmi fell 20m behind the two leaders. Countries: 18) Murakoso. Gradually the stocky Japanese burnt off the opposition. first Nurmi. London. Ilmari Salminen Arvo Askola Volmari Iso-Hollo Kohei Murakoso Alec Burns Juan Carlos Zabala Max Gebhardt Donald Lash FIN FIN FIN JPN GBR ARG GER USA 30:15. including 5000m bronze medallist Eric Backman.2WR 30:55. 21:12.0 31:07. and a group of five (Ritola. and Zátopek.0e 31:16. 29 Jul 1928 Paavo Nurmi Ville Ritola Edvin Wide Jean-Gunnar Lindgren Arthur Muggridge Ragnar Magnusson Toivo Loukola Kalle Matilainen FIN FIN SWE SWE GBR SWE FIN FIN 30:35.0e 32:12. 6. passing the kilometre points in 2:46. The Finns accelerated at the bell.0e 31:45. Countries: 11) (Competitors: up to 33. Wilson and Hatton come from archive film.8OR 30:19. other than the Finns. The Frenchman passed Nurmi on the backstretch but Nurmi attacked at the beginning of the home straight and won convincingly. 5:45. Beavers and Muggridge. 5:45. Nurmi had hoped to defend his title. with Ray leading at 1000m in 2:52 before Ritola took over. 5.0e F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 3.4.6 and 15:00. reached by the Pole in 14:56. Before the Games Nurmi ran a time trial in 29:58. Wide began to lose ground and was 60m behind by 8000m.2 and 8:47. 6. and Wide led through kilometre splits of 2:47. to win by 3m after a last lap of 64. Beavers. the little Japanese star led for most of the first half. but was not considered to be a great danger to the Finns.0 31:09.6.0e 31:31. 3000m team race & Cross country) was full enough. 3. before Kusociński took over the pace. 31 Jul 1932 Electric 1. Salminen had won the European title from Askola two years earlier by 4m. He fell back constantly. and the nearest pursuers – Savidan and Syring were 100m behind. A sixth kilometre of 3:05. 6 Jul 1924 1. Countries: 15) 1.2. 7. 1.6OR 30:47. Ritola closed out his second world record of the year with kilometres of 3:08. 27:29 and Askola leading from 8000m onwards. 7. A lap of 74 followed.2e 31:39. 5. Noji of Poland. and Murakoso could not respond. 24:19. 8. By halfway. 5. 7. and passed 400m in 62 seconds. 3:05. 3. 4. but Nurmi burst past Ritola with 80m to go. frequently jostling the smaller man. 4.4 and 3:03. 8.6 (30:11. before Ritola took over. Potts and Eaton of Britain and Syring of Germany. 8:53. 3.0e 32:03.0e 31:37. Amsterdam. 2. Berlin. 4. who had run 29:37. 5000m. and set off at 19:05.6 31:39. just failing to get past in the finishing straight. The pace slowed imperceptibly in the second half. Countries: 15) Los Angeles. until the final lap. FIN NZL GER SWE MEX CAN 30:18.0e 32:06.7.0e 32:17. Wide and Joie Ray (USA)) broke away. There was much confusion about the order after sixth place. but the above version is generally considered the most accurate.0e (Competitors: 27.2 31:43. 8.

8 Sep 1960 Electrics 1. Both Bolotnikov and Halberg. Suddenly Mills appeared on the outside and sped past Clarke and Gammoudi with 50m to go. 3. but only Bolotnikov was fresh for the 10.8 (0.6. The pre-race favourites had been Halberg. By 20 laps Kuts was desperate and almost stopped. Clarke gave up the fight and Gammoudi took silver 3m behind Mills.000m had been a miserable 16th place in Melbourne nearly two minutes behind Kuts.6 29:31.0 29:21. Zátopek was recovering from a hernia operation and chose to run only the Marathon.22) (28:37.41) (Competitors: 25.2OR 28:37. and Pirie eventually staggered across the line in eighth place.4) only Mimoun. winning a silver medal in the 4x10km relay in 1952.18) (28:37. and Clarke led from Mills and Gammoudi at the bell. Kuts kept making bursts of varying lengths to try and break Pirie.4 28:53. Kuts’ time at halfway was 14:06. Tokyo. 3. as world record holder Ron Clarke did most of the work with surges every second lap. and went through 9000m in 25:42. In lap 14 Kuts tried to wave Pirie to the front. . with a 40m gap to the two Aussies and Chernyavskiy. For Zátopek it was the 30th win in 30 races at the distance. Zátopek moved up in the fourth kilometre and took the lead for three laps. Heinström.75) (28:52.72) (28:49.11) (28:50.6.000m. With seven laps to go the Commonwealth champion Dave Power began to push the pace. but Zátopek went back to the front in the 14th lap. some 20 seconds faster than any previous Olympic final. Here. Running the straights steadily and accelerating on each curve Zátopek quickly made it painful for the rest. and built up an unassailable lead by the bell.0) the pace eased. and he staggered off the track just over a lap behind the winner as Zátopek finished.8 29:54. Anufriyev.8 (Competitors: 38.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Mimoun-O-Kacha. running the eighth and ninth kilometres in 2:50. then a gap slowly built up. 8. seven 16ths Sioux Indian.6 29:49.8.8 29:48. 0 0 0 m 109 the 1952 final. Mills. 7. Billy Mills Mohamed Gammoudi Ron Clarke Mamo Wolde Leonid Ivanov KGZ Kokichi Tsuburaya Murray Halberg Tony Cook USA TUN AUS ETH URS JPN NZL AUS 28:24. and only Pirie. and Kuts ran by leaving Pirie broken. Five men were in the leading peloton at the 5000m. 5.2 29:51. 4.4 & 2:53. He eventually won 38 in a row.5) only Pirie was in touch. and when he had no response pushed the next lap in 66.8 28:25. Mills went into the lead on the back straight. With a final lap of 66.8 29:15. Although Bolotnikov had won three USSR titles by the time of Rome.6 1 0 . Sando and Posti were in contact.7 lap to pass 2000m in 5:31. had fallen away from the pace by halfway. 7. stepping off the track exhausted. Kuts set out his stall with a first lap of 61.2 28:52. but was superseded by Zátopek at 2400m. who had been the last (other than Mimoun) to break in More than half the field was able to stay in contact at the 5000m mark (14:22.0 28:38.000m.34) (28:52. he won by more than 250m from Mimoun. 3. Zátopek’s winning margin of 47. 6.4 broke Kuts’s Olympic record by more than 13 seconds. 4.8 30:04.8 28:53.2 28:39. 14 Oct 1964 1. but it was not enough to worry Bolotnikov who attacked with 700m to go. 7. Melbourne. Mills and Gammoudi – each took turns in the lead. The Briton was virtually a ghost at this point. Countries: 21) 1.0OR 29:32. By 4000m (11:16.2 seconds. 2.4 28:52. and Albertsson in close attendance. 6.65) (28:39.4 29:51. After three slower laps Kuts piled in a 64. as did the teenage American sensation Gerry Lindgren. A lap later Kovács was second. Helsinki. Bolotnikov and Pirie. and held off Clarke in the finishing straight.4 29:10.000m. Mimoun was a clear second.36) (28:53. Power.59) (28:52. Krzyszkowiak. 2.8.8 with Clarke just ahead. Emil Zátopek CZE Alain Mimoun Aleksandr Anufriyev RUS Hannu Posti Frank Sando Valter Nyström Gordon Pirie Fred Norris TCH FRA URS FIN GBR SWE GBR GBR 29:17. 5. but the leaders still passed halfway in 14:04. 8.2 slower than Zátopek’s Olympic record!). Stunned. The second-string Finn.8 (after 2:56. Pirie. The Frenchman stayed with Zátopek until 8km. Clarke. 5. Sando did well to take fifth after losing a shoe on the third lap. 2.6OR 28:52. who had run his last lap in 59. By halfway (14:43. Only Bolotnikov. 6. and his supporting cast – Wolde. gained 60m on Kuts in the last five laps and beat the surprising Lawrence by 8m for second. and the Czech was in front for good.8 28:31. but marathon specialist Tsuburaya lost touch with the leaders in the sixth kilometre.1 for the preceding two kilometres). 7. and by 6km only Mimoun was in touch. 5. Rome. 6. as early season world record setter Sándor Iharos (HUN) did not make it to Melbourne. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S (28:45.6 29:05. After two more circuits the Czech pushed the pace. had been leading the chase until three laps to go when the heat got to him. Desyatchikov and Grodotzki could stay with the Australian. but was knocked off stride by Clarke when a lapped runner got in the way.4OR 28:24.8 Anufriyev led the pack for two kilometres (5:51). fancied for medals before the Games.2) with no-one attempting a serious break. 4. “Track and Field News” summed it up with the headline “Kuts murders Pirie”. Fourth placer Stokken competed in the next two Olympics – in Nordic skiing. won the USA’s first ever gold medal in the 10. At this point Gammoudi sprinted through between them. 4.59) (29:05. and Heino was broken. Pyotr Bolotnikov RUS URS Hans Grodotzki GER/GDR Dave Power AUS Aleksey Desyatchikov RUS URS Murray Halberg NZL Max Truex USA Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak POL John Merriman GBR 28:32. but still finished 50m behind the Soviet. who had run a careful race. his only major championship outing over 10.89) (Competitors: 33. Lawrence and the two other Soviets could stay in contact.2 29:49. passing 4000m in 11:52.6. and Anufriyev came through from seventh place in the last 2km to take third. and Dave Stephens (AUS) was recuperating from hepatitis. Zátopek’s fastest kilometre of the race was his last (2:49).2 30:09. 20 Jul 1952 1. 8. and he finished off with a lap of 64 to take his second Olympic title. 23 Nov 1956 Electrics Vladimir Kuts RUS URS József Kovács HUN Allan Lawrence AUS Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak POL Ken Norris GBR Ivan Chernyavskiy UKR URS Dave Power AUS Gordon Pirie GBR 28:45. his last lap of 57. Kovács. and finished his career in 1957 with 53 wins in 61 races over 10. With three laps to go Zátopek led by 200m.8 seconds was the greatest in Olympic history. Countries: 15) Kuts and Pirie were the favourites. Wolde lost contact with two laps to go. forcing Pirie into the lead. 2.5 28:50.6 (28:32. 3. in which his popularity soared as he patted ben Saïd on the shoulder in thanks as the Frenchman moved aside on being lapped.1 and 2:51. 8. Heino regained the lead just before halfway (14:57).6 28:48.2 28:59. Countries: 17) After a fast first kilometre (2:42. Countries: 21) (Competitors: 33.

No wonder. and with Clarke and Gammoudi there were only four in contention. but looked cumbersome in comparison. 4.72 (Competitors: 40. while Gammoudi ran his lifetime best of 27:54. Ahead Wolde dashed into the lead just before the bell.38 27:45. 2:47.21 28:09.4. and was 15 seconds quicker than anyone else in 1968. In the 12th lap Viren bumped into Puttemans.91 28:13. the latter leading at 5000m in 15:00. Viren briefly led in the seventh kilometre.80 28:17. Yifter.01 28:27. To the delight of the crowd. 6 Aug 1984 1. Gammoudi also fell over. 2.9. opening a 20m gap.46 28:06. 26 Jul 1976 1. Miruts Yifter Kaarlo Maaninka Mohammed Kedir Tolossa Kotu Lasse Viren Jörg Peter Werner Schildhauer Enn Sellik EST ETH FIN ETH ETH FIN GDR GDR URS 27:42. and he and Kedir led until 300m to go. back in the GDR with a “bad cold”.69 in the next heat. Clarke gave way with 600m to go.78 (Competitors: 41. The penultimate lap was covered in 60.44 28:15. Countries: 33.46 28:05. passing 5000m in 14:08. 0 0 0 m Mexico City. Wolde moved ahead just before 8400m and then put in a lap of 67. Naftali Temu Mamo Wolde Mohamed Gammoudi Juan Martínez Nikolay Sviridov RUS Ron Clarke Ron Hill Wohib Masresha KEN ETH TUN MEX URS AUS GBR ETH 29:27. 4. and only Puttemans was close. 5:18. 8:06.0.81. who had almost missed the start with an attack of diarrhoea. 7.0. 8. and was more than two minutes quicker on the pre-Games list of performers than Cova. Of the lowlanders.9 with 10 men in the main group. 5. 8.22 28:06. who had been playing a waiting game. after a last lap of 57. 6. and held the lead to the last 50m. 7. 5. With each kilometre slower than the last. which only Viren and Maaninka could close. and now only Foster and Viren were in touch. was dropped as Viren began to apply the pressure. and Puttemans was the fastest in heat 1 with 27:53.1. ran the first lap of the final in 59.8 29:53. 2. After another quick kilometre (2:43.32 28:05.5. However.47 27:50. accelerating smoothly and powerfully.14 27:51. Five men broke 28 minutes. Bedford led through halfway in 13:44. now comprised of five. heats were run. with Yifter 10m back. Countries: 26. Temu overtook Wolde with 900m to go.28 28:02. Finalists: 16) (Competitors: 37. began to fade.75) Montreal.26 27:59.9. 3.53 28:10. 2.06 28:28. 7. when first Shorter. with a final 300m in 38.2. Los Angeles.54 28:06. slower than Ritola in 1924.64 27:46. Yifter won the final preliminary in 28:18. Lasse Viren Emiel Puttemans Miruts Yifter Mariano Haro Frank Shorter Dave Bedford Dane Korica SRB Abdelkader Zaddem FIN BEL ETH ESP USA GBR YUG TUN 27:38.2 29:44. and continued at world record pace through kilometre splits of 2:36. 7. Lasse Viren Carlos Lopes Brendan Foster Tony Simmons Ilie Floroiu Mariano Haro Marc Smet Bernie Ford FIN POR GBR GBR ROU ESP BEL GBR 27:40. and led to 7600m.9. 6.2 29:35. 3. At the end of the 13th lap the Ethiopians sprinted briefly. 2. The altitude ensured a slow race. Moscow. 6. leaving race favourite Viren with an easier task than would otherwise have been the case. Finalists: 15) For the first time since 1920. Keino. the race’s first under 70 seconds. with 2:53 for the first kilometre and a number of different leaders.4. 3.0 29:43. Countries: 23) Ron Clarke improved his own world record by more than half a minute in 1965. 3. but while Viren was up after three seconds and quickly caught the pack. 4.5.4 and 10:55.92 27:56.4 29:28. Viren continued to follow. 4.0. 5. when the Ethiopians Fikru Duguefu and Masresha took over. 4. and they stayed together until 9400m. suddenly staggered off the track with stomach cramps. 2.38 almost 15 seconds faster than anyone else in the first round. 3.4 and 2:44. and remarkable considering Viren’s fall. 8. Munich. 3 Sep 1972 1. Finalists: 18) Before the Games Fernando Mamede set a world record of 27:13. but in the oxygen-starved air of Mexico City he never had a chance. 6. The final started slowly. and then Hill took over. Bedford.40) (29:27. Lopes was the leader for most of the first half of the final. Countries: 34. Finalists: 15) The Ethiopians stamped their personas on the event by winning each of the three heats. Countries: 26. waiting until there was 450m to go before scooting past Lopes. Viren built up a 5m lead by the finishing straight and won by 7m after a last lap of 56. was favourite because of his big finishing kick and tactical acumen. 27 Jul 1980 1. as the pace speeded up (2:49.28 ahead of Bedford’s 27:53. At 9000m Viren took the lead.2 29:57. 13 Oct 1968 Electrics 1. Yifter then made his move. Gammoudi took longer and effectively lost his chance of a third consecutive Olympic medal.28 27:44. 6. as Yifter’s last lap was 54.5. 8. then Haro.0 (29:27.8. and suffering from the altitude fell back to sixth by the finish.7) and Viren moved to the front. 5.3 last lap. when Clarke.0 29:34. when Temu fought his way past to win Kenya’s first ever gold medal. the fastest man being Simmons with 28:01.17 (Competitors: 52. the first kilometre taking 2:58. The pace began to increase with kilometres of 2:43. then jumped up and sprinted after the others.96 27:48.11 while race favourite Jürgen Haase (GDR) was missing.58 27:40.18 28:18. as Lopes passed 9000m in 25:02. Martínez moved into the lead after 14 laps. but then stopped. 5. only Gammoudi could stay in contact.50 28:08. and led until 4400m.64. and was accidentally knocked over by Shorter who was trying to avoid the Finn. Gammoudi and the Kenyans missed the Games because of the boycott. This was the first world record in an Olympic final since Ritola’s win in 1924. 8. 2:49) the Ethiopians took over with Yifter (to 4000m) then Kedir leading. Bedford led for just 1000m more (16:35.08 (Competitors: 45. Britain’s pacemaking star.35WR 27:39. 7.9) Foster. with only Temu a variation from the 1964 final four.93 28:00. and easing away to win by 25m with a 61. with Kedir’s 28:16.17 27:54.6.69 27:44. but Kedir was the leader at the end of each kilometre until 9000m. By 8000m Bedford had dropped out of the leading group. Alberto Cova Mike McLeod Mike Musyoki Salvatore Antibo Christoph Herle Sostenes Bitok Yutaka Kanai Steve Jones ITA GBR KEN ITA FRG KEN JPN GBR 27:47. Maaninka responded. the World and European Champion. None of the heats was quicker than 28 minutes.R I O 110 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 0 . with each kilo covered in 2:46-47. slowed up. . Sviridov took over the pace in the fifth lap. the Italian. 2:45.82.

Nick Rose (GBR) surged to the front during the sixth kilometre.1 lap.4. Seoul. easing sharply in the last 10m and losing some three seconds after a 65. With a second successive kilometre in 2:45. took the lead.70 27:47.09 (Competitors: 34.4. Both much faster than Hissou’s 64. Koech changed things just after halfway. Tergat then ran 62 and two laps of 62.67 27:33. Haile Gebrselassie Paul Tergat Salah Hissou Aloÿs Nizigama Josephat Machuka Paul Koech Khalid Skah Mathias Ntawulikura ETH KEN MAR BDI KEN KEN MAR RWA 27:07. At the end of a kilometre run in 2:38.11 (Competitors: 56. which Tergat closed to 6m in the finishing straight. Behind him Antibo sped away from Kimeli in the last lap. 0 0 0 m Sixteen of the 20 finalists ran faster than 28:00 in the heats.44 27:44. Gebrselassie and the three Kenyans) suddenly narrowed to a duel after a 60. He missed the world record by 7. 3 Aug 1992 1. Initially Skah was disqualified. passing halfway in 13:53.57. taking the field through 2000m in 5:23. Finalists: 20) Barcelona.07.10) was disqualified for steroid use.7 to win by 25m.86 mile pace.5 for “Geb”. and four seconds ahead of world record pace.2 last lap. Chelimo was ahead by 4000m and sped up the pace from 2:49 for the first three kilometres. 2.34OR 27:08. Machuka helped with the pace in the eighth kilometre. passing 8000m in 22:02.5 and the Kenyan was now 8m back. with Antibo another 10m back. with the winners being reigning champion Gebrselassie and his countryman Girma Tolla.39.7. which featured a 29 second 200m burst by the tall Kenyan. 4. as Cova waited until 200m to go before sprinting away.01 seconds. Gebrselassie ran his next 200m in 28. The gritty Irishman John Treacy was the leader at halfway in 14:19. 4. 3.10OR 27:09.2.75 27:37. Finalists: 20) Gebrselassie. he relinquished the lead as the pack stayed with him. Countries: 20.6 Boutayeb passed 9000m some 25m ahead of Kimeli.83 27:40. outran Chelimo in the last lap.07 28:11. covered in 2:39. with a 59. 8. which put paid to a lightning fast race.39 28:17.46OR 27:23. No-one could have imagined such a remarkable race.7.3 lap. 6.5. Kunze and Arpin who produced a stirring battle in the finishing straight. 6. The first serious move came when Korir kicked in two 63 second laps just after 7000m.7.29 27:19. with only Cova in touch. The second half had taken just 13:11.48 for his last lap compared with 57. 7.09 was less than that of Maurice Greene in the previous day’s 100m final. with Nizigama leading for most of the way.55 27:25. 3.21.01 to 27:44.75 27:20. and then reinstated. but after a first kilometre of 2:41. but Korir took over again.32 27:39. and seventh was slower than Viren’s 1972 record by just 1. producing a 62 lap in the sixth kilometre. Rose was 10m behind. but the temperature in Barcelona was 12°C hotter than Seoul at 31°C. to 2:44 for the next four. The first four broke the Olympic record.4. The last 200m took 25.17 27:24.16 27:36. The 21 year-old Moroccan ran each of the next two kilometres in 2:44. but was overtaken by ’78 European Champion Martti Vainio (FIN).88.1 as Vainio gathered himself to contain the inevitable attack by Cova. a bigger kicker than the Kenyan. 26 Sep 1988 1. and by the bell five athletes were left. and Tergat began to execute the final part of the grand Kenyan plan with six laps to go. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Khalid Skah Richard Chelimo Addis Abebe Salvatore Antibo Arturo Barrios Germán Silva William Koech Moses Tanui MAR KEN ETH ITA MEX MEX KEN KEN 27:46.79 28:20. Kenenisa Bekele Sileshi Sihine ETH ETH 27:05. Skah.93 by the Kenyan. Boutayeb ran steadily over the last kilometre without straining. A lap later the two caught Skah’s teammate Hammou Boutayeb. By 8000m (21:50. and halfway was passed in 13:45. 2.35 27:39. and slowed down the pace to a 69.9.39 . 20 Aug 2004 1. Skah. and Antibo was some 15m back. 6. The two produced a heart wrenching finish. Tanui led at the next kilometre split (5:28.9 the pace slowed to 2:46. 4. and only Gebrselassie could stay with him. By now only Boutayeb was with Kimeli. The big shock came five days later when Vainio (27:51. instead of moving out of the way of the leaders. Gebrselassie briefly slowed the pace with 1600m to go.2) Boutayeb was nearly 20m ahead of Antibo and Kimeli. 3. running side by side down the finishing straight.72 28:00. the only athlete with Chelimo after Abebe was dropped in the 16th lap. Atlanta. Finalists: 20) Antibo again led for the first kilometre in the final. while Prianon was an isolated fourth ahead of Barrios.8. particularly after the first half was covered in a comfortable 13:55. who just edged Paul Tergat 27:44.5).R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C After heats. In 26°C heat Musa Gouda (SUD) led for the first four kilometres at 28:30 pace. the fastest qualifier with 28:00.6.31 (26:55 pace) before letting Ivuti share pace-making duties.1 and 13:35.23 (Competitors: 52. 29 Jul 1996 1. Countries: 38. Sydney. opening up a 12m gap. 10:50. Athens.36 27:47. but with a closer race. Haile Gebrselassie Paul Tergat Assefa Mezegebu Patrick Ivuti John Korir Saïd Berrioui Toshinari Takaoka Karl Keska ETH KEN ETH KEN KEN MAR JPN GBR 27:18. The Kenyan slowed things down. 2. Finalists: 20) Antibo ensured this would be a memorable race with a first lap of 62. 7. which featured a 26 sec- 111 ond last 200m. 8. Countries: 29. 5.98 27:50. which saw Bitok as the fastest man with 28:12. The winning marging of 0.4.2 in the 27°C heat. he might well have threatened that mark. The final saw inveterate front runner Aloÿs Nizigama (BDI) set the pace. 5. with the Ethiopian only getting ahead in the last 10m. 5. who.19 27:46. 25 Sep 2000 1. covering the last 200m in 27.17.08 27:35.3 lap to the Kenyan’s 60. Countries: 35. and the sheer pace. and the final 3000m was covered in 7:53. was the big favourite to win the title. to the anger of the crowd at the victory ceremony two days after the race.19 28:25.20 27:18. 8. allied with the hard track meant that he would withdraw from the 5000m. 1 0 . but found the little Ethiopian gliding past him just before the bell. 7. 6. and his teammate Kimeli. the final began as a shuffle.5. Tergat kicked with 250m to go. 2. 5. The Ethiopian clocked 57. 4.8 and 2:43. Brahim Boutayeb Salvatore Antibo Kipkemboi Kimeli Jean-Louis Prianon Arturo Barrios Hansjörg Kunze Paul Arpin Moses Tanui MAR ITA KEN FRA MEX GDR FRA KEN 27:21.73 (Competitors: 46. After kilometres of 2:40.79 27:35.43 27:39. 2.44 27:24. 3. twice the World Champion by the time of the Olympics. bumped into Chelimo three times and disrupted the Kenyan’s running rhythm. The pack of five (Hissou. It was to no avail. then took over for the next 3000m: 8:07. 7. and maximising his 3:54.0. 8.18 28:27.

8 dropped all but Sihine. MEN’S 10. 0 0 0 m up a second successive Olympic 10.11 27:04. Eleven men were within 15m at this point.1).5.9) had clearly lost some of his old finishing speed. Countries: 14) Having broken Gebrselassie’s world record with 26:20. After 6400m.34 (Competitors 29. 6. unsure of how to deal with the Ethiopians. and the old master. 1972-12h3. A 22nd lap of 61. He shared the lead with Farah for the penultimate lap (62. 5.91 27:46.6 was only marginally slower than the winner.76 27:36. 1988-2. with no-one willing to challenge the Ethiopians. took the pace slowly.48 27:27. Kenenisa Bekele Sileshi Sihine Micah Kogo Moses Masai Zersenay Tadese Haile Gebrselassie Martin Mathathi Ahmad Hassan Abdullah ETH ETH KEN KEN ERI ETH KEN QAT 27:01. 8.7 seconds. 2008-1. Most Finals/Top 8 4 Gebrselassie 3 Mohamed Gammoudi TUN Virén Antibo Bekele Zersenay Tadese ETH 2004-5. the pace was never slower than 65 per lap. Mohamed Farah GBR Galen Rupp USA Tariku Bekele ETH Kenenisa Bekele ETH Bedan Karoki KEN Zersenay Tadese ERI Teklemariam Medhin ERI Gebregziabher Gebremariam ETH 27:30.001 for the bronze medal.8. 1976-10h2. 1984-4.97) and Sihine (26:50.68 27:08. London. with a smooth sprinting action.42 27:30. 2008-5. The pace was further picked up by Moses Masai (KEN) and the eighth kilometre was covered in 2:39.6. and the group was quickly cut to seven.6. the pace again slowed and Gebremehdin took over. 2008-6 2012-4 1980-5 1992-4 1964-2. 6.000m final. 1984-10h3 Gebrselassie 16 men Placing Table G FIN 7 ETH 5 KEN 1 GBR 1 URS 2 FRA SWE ITA 1 USA 1 MAR 2 GER AUS MEX TCH (CZE) 2 POL 1 ERI TUN JPN NZL BEL ESP HUN POR CAN BDI NOR UGA ROU ARG YUG (SRB) QAT RWA Totals 23 S 4 3 3 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 23 B 4 5 3 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 23 Breakdown of URS placings: RUS 2 1 KGZ UKR EST Totals 2 1 4 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 5 1 1 3 6 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 23 6 1 3 2 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 7 2 3 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 22 8 1 2 2 7 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 22 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 - 1 1 M Points 15 127 13 115 7 86 4 75 3 39 3 37 3 37 2 34 3 32 3 27 1 25 3 24 0 18 2 16 1 15 1 15 2 14 0 12 0 11 1 9 0 8 1 7 1 7 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 69 822 3 0 0 0 3 31 4 3 1 39 . 1972-dnf 2004-3. 1968-3.11 27:05. with Alejandro Suárez (MEX) leading at 1000m (2:50.2 to 68. Kogo edged Masai by 0.4/63. reaching halfway in 13:48. and only Korir and Mosop stayed with the pace.4 and 62. until the Briton moved ahead 50m before the bell.79.43 27:32. 4.15) before Athens bronze medallist Tadese took on the pace. placed sixth in his fourth Olympic final. 17 Aug 2008 1. For the first nine laps of the race the pace sedately flowed at 69s per lap. He.09 (Competitors: 24. Farah completed a memorable “Super Saturday” for British athletics. 2004-1. and the second in 13:13.4/64. 4 Aug 2012 1.0. 7. R I O Zersenay Tadese Boniface Kiprop Haile Gebrselassie John Cheruiyot Korir Moses Mosop Ismaïl Sghyr 2 0 1 6 ERI UGA ETH KEN KEN FRA ★ O L Y M P I C 27:22.57 27:25. 8. Tadese dropped two places from Athens despite running 17 seconds faster. Bekele smoothly accelerated away from Sihine with 250m remaining. 1976-1. 2.51 27:34.70 27:41. The opposition. The pace dropped in the eighth kilometre when Bekele and Sihine deliberately slowed in a vain attempt to help the struggling defending champion Gebrselassie. and by 7km Tadese and Kiprop were the only interlopers in touch with the Ethiopians.90 27:31.9 – carried Farah to a four-metre win over training partner Rupp. In the ninth.77 27:04.5 before Bekele added circuits of 61. The Eritrean ran the next two kilometres in 5:23. 1980-dnf/h2. The American’s final circuit of 53.00 after a series of laps ranging from 62.75 (Competitors: 38. 4.78) there were still 10 athletes in the leading group.9. but with 2000m left (21:53. Bekele was the hot favourite. and Greg Rutherford all won golds within 45 minutes or so.11 27:06. and completed his last lap in 53.42 – despite looking over his shoulder a dozen times. 3. Bekele covered the first half in 13:51.61 27:57. but a last lap of 53. who stayed on Bekele’s heels until the last lap. 5. with Tariku appearing to be the stronger challenger.000 METRES The Best on Points 23 Haile Gebrselassie ETH 21 Kenenisa Bekele ETH 20 Lasse Virén FIN 17 Salvatore Antibo ITA 1996-1. 4. The Kenyans were burned off with a lap of 60.31 earlier in the season. covering the penultimate 200m in a staggering 25. 2012-6 Most Appearances 4 Domingo Tibaduiza COL 3 2000-1. Countries: 20) Bekele (26:25. but the halfway point was still reached in a slow 14:05. Kogo upped the pace to 61. whereas Kenenisa Bekele (54. 1972-1.44 27:32. Jessica Ennis. Kogo and Masai then surged. Bekele then showed why he is so highly regarded. but was passed by Bekele and Sihine with 430m to go.25 27:23. 2. 3.94 27:33.6 (26:58 pace).Countries: 18) A 30-minute tempo for the first 2000m galvanised Tadese into speeding F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 0 . 8. 7. Gebrselassie. 5. 7.53) had the two fastest times of the season and were expected to repeat as the gold and silver medallists. 6.48 – featuring the final 100m in 12. and winning by over four seconds after a scintillating last lap of 52. Then Bekele and his teammates injected laps of 64.112 3.9 seconds. Beijing.17OR 27:02.0 for the penultimate lap. Defending champion Kenenisa Bekele and his brother Tariku were still in touch.

with only eight of 13 able to finish. 8. 5. Ioannis Vretos 5.0 3:09:25. St. and was slowed up by stomach cramps. the only non-Greek to finish. At 37km. Fred Lord and Jack Price (both GBR) led at five miles in 27:07 and Price was two . 0 0 0 m . 7. 5. who claimed that he had led from halfway with no-one passing him! It was later determined that the winner was. but won by almost five minutes from Corey. 8. 24 Jul 1908 1. 1 0 . but almost gave up when Lorz passed him with six miles to go.0 3:04:28. was down to 51kg at the start of the race. disqualifying him for life. 2. 7. The early leaders were Sam Mellor. 2.0 3:17:49. Flack went ahead at 24km. 6. His time was 20 minutes faster than his fifth place performance in the Greek trials race 17 days earlier. 4. was the leader to 20km. Athens. Countries: 16) The race started on the east lawn of Windsor Castle and finished in front of the Royal Box at the White City stadium. Starting the race on a hot day at 14:00 did little to benefit the runners.4 3:09:35. Elevtherios Papasymeon 6. leaving 39 non-finishers. 6. with Svanberg moving up quickly from fourth in the closing stages to take the silver medal. Arthur Newton USA FRA USA 3:28:53 3:34:52 3:47:33 London. 10 Apr 1896 40 Kilometres 1.0 3:15:54. Sherring increased the lead throughout the remainder of the race.4 2:59:44. Fourteen finished the race. Félix Carvajal Demetrios Velouis David Kneeland Henry Brawley Sydney Hatch M a r a t h o n 113 CUB GRE USA USA USA (Competitors: 32. John Hayes Charles Hefferon Joseph Forshaw Alton Welton William Wood Frederick Simpson Harry Lawson Johan Svanberg USA RSA USA USA CAN CAN CAN SWE 2:55:18. who had arrived in Athens two months earlier weighing 61kg. after a protest by Kellner.26 1. Enjoying the joke. Dimitrios Diliyiannis 7.4 3:01:44. but Louis had no difficulties. Kilometres Billy Sherring John Svanberg William Frank Gustaf Törnros Ioannis Alepous George Blake Konstantinos Karvelas André Roffi CAN SWE USA SWE GRE AUS GRE FRA 2:51:23. where he was caught by Edwin Flack. The race began just after 15:00 on a hot dusty day. Making his way through the pack he stopped for an apple. they reneged shortly after and Lorz won the Boston marathon in 1905. when the Swede took a wrong turn. Félix Carvajal of Cuba had appealed for (and received) funds to compete in St Louis. he entered the Panathenaic stadium seven minutes ahead of the others. (Competitors: 13. Lorz continued to the finish and was greeted as the winner. with Dorando Pietri (ITA). He ran for much of the time with Champion. in fact. Gyula Kellner 4. Albert Corey 3. Countries: 5) Albin Lermusiaux. who had dropped out with cramp just before 10 miles. Sherring. Spiridon Louis 2. continued Breakdown of GER placings: S B 4 G GER 1 GDR FRG Totals 1 - 5 1 1 2 ★ O L Y M P I C 6 2 2 7 1 1 2 8 - F I N A L S / M E N ’ S M Points 1 13 0 8 0 4 1 25 Marathon Athens. and Newton. leaving him to run in. was given a lift in a car which then broke down. from Luxembourg. Hicks eventually staggered home in just under 3:29. and his knowledge of the city and the course was a key part of his win. 5. Lorz.R I O 2 0 1 6 Men’s 10. 3. became the first black African to compete with some success in the Games. while Carvajal placed fourth. and he led to 32km where Louis took over. and 44kg (!) by the end. Hicks kept going with a mixture of brandy. but was well behind the 19 year-old Fast until 35km. with Blake and Frank battling for second place. Mellor continued in the lead to 16 miles. 6. 195m later became the standard for the event. 2. 1 May 1906 41.8 3:01:00. 4. Lorz posed for photos with the president’s daughter. The resultant distance of 42. 4. 5. Louis took some wine (!) at the 23km point. but the authorities were less amused. 7.0 2:57:10. with seven of the 17 runners failing to finish.2 3:07:50. and Lermusiaux collapsed. Théato was a baker’s roundsman. Sherring took the lead at the 25km point. placing ninth. The runners then began a long uphill climb. bronze medallist in the 1500m.8 3:00:46. 19 Jul 1900 40. Countries: 16) Paris.6 2:58:20. to be succeeded by Hicks as the leader.8 (Competitors: 53.8 (Competitors: 56.4OR 2:56:06. The vagaries of the course were noted by Newton. Countries: 5) With the thermometer hovering at 39°C this was a survival course. eggs and strychnine. winner of the 800m/1500m. Evangelos Yerakakis 8. 6. Ed Carr. 7. Thomas Hicks 2.000 Metres. collapsing shortly after. leading to 24km when stomach trouble forced him to retire. In sixth place. 8. initially thought to be 25 miles. the favourite. and Flack could not cope. 4. and had his only trousers cut off at the knee by discus gold medallist Martin Sheridan so that he wouldn’t boil alive in the race. the largest such number in Olympic marathoning history. was almost 26. and noted to observers that he would be leading before long. Third-placer Spiridon Belokas (3:06:30) was disqualified for receiving a carriage ride. and the dusty conditions began to take their toll. and he beat the Greek Champion Vasilakos by the biggest margin of victory ever in an Olympic marathon. Kilometres Michel Théato Émile Champion Ernst Fast Eugène Besse Arthur Newton Dick Grant Ronald MacDonald FRA FRA SWE FRA USA USA CAN 2:59:45 3:04:17 3:37:14 4:00:43 4:04:12 By far the biggest field yet set off at 15:00. 3. Louis. 3. Stamatios Masouris GRE GRE HUN GRE GRE GRE GRE GRE 2:58:50 3:06:03 3:06:35 (Competitors: 17.86 1. a Zulu. Len Tau (RSA). Harilaos Vasilakos 3. Louis increased the pace. and to the joy of the King of Greece and the crowd. Countries: 5) The course.2 3:06:47. 30 Aug 1904 41 Kilometres 1.

2. took over the mantle as Finland’s top marathon man. After a cautious start Stenroos worked his way through the field. Kilometres Hannes Kolehmainen Jüri Lossmann Valerio Arri Auguste Broos Juho Tuomikoski Sofus Rose Joseph Organ Rudolph Hansen FIN EST ITA BEL FIN DEN USA DEN 2:32:35. 6. with half of the runners failing to finish. but was not in his usual Olympic form. but a host of runners found themselves at the head of the field for brief moments before halfway. Antwerp. 7. 5. with Plaza moving up quickly to second. 5.8 2:43:24. and Kolehmainen dropped out after trying to catch Gitsham.0 2:49:47. a giant in marathoning at 1. the heatwave which had engulfed Paris eased for the marathon. Boughéra El Ouafi Manuel Plaza Martti Marttelin Kanematsu Yamada Joie Ray Seiichiro Tsuda Yrjö Korholin-Koski Sam Ferris FRA CHI FIN JPN USA JPN FIN GBR 2:32:57OR 2:33:23 2:35:02 2:35:29 2:36:04 2:36:20 2:36:37 2:37:41 (Competitors: 68. That man was actually Michael Bulger. the heat began to affect the athletes. 13 Jul 1924 1. 22 Aug 1920 42.0 2:41:39. Ray.75 1. Despite a series of feeding stations set up for athletes to take on fluids. Reports that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle assisted Pietri over the line were false. winning by almost six minutes from Bertini. With 5km to go. with Hefferon third (57:12) a second ahead of Dorando Pietri. By this point the Finn had built up a small M a r a t h o n lead over Lossman. the packwas led by Jacobsson and Strobino. At the urging of the officials he turned and quickly collapsed. Amsterdam. Joseph Erxleben RSA RSA USA USA CAN SWE USA USA 2:36:54. when the order was Yamada. his last being the Finnish Olympic Trials race in 1928. James Duffy 6.6 2:36:32. Pietri passed him at 25 miles and entered the stadium exhausted by his efforts.8 2:32:48. Yamada and Tsuda were the leaders at 5km. yet 14 years after the Paris race he was still good enough to place eighth in America’s most famous marathon. and Marttelin passed the Japanese on the specially laid matting on the run-in to the stadium. and DeMar. El Ouafi. a 1500m/Mile star more than a decade earlier. Bertini and DeMar.9 2:44:19. Andrew Sockalexis 5. and for the now standard distance would have been around 2:30:30. 8. Despite having overtaken a Belgian. Ferris. Pietri had to be disqualified for receiving assistance. At halfway Gitsham had made a break and led by 10 seconds from the Finn in 1:12:40. Hefferon then accepted a glass of champagne and was hit by stomach cramps. and went to the front of the field shortly after the one armed South African Marthinus Steytler had led the race out of the stadium.000 watched as he turned the wrong way.6OR 2:47:19. He was helped to his feet and fell three more times before crossing the line 32 seconds ahead of Irish born John Hayes. Los Angeles.6 2:48:14.0 2:54:19. Marttelin. The time for the longest Olympic marathon was the fastest ever by an amateur. Gaston Strobino 4. and it was only with 3km to go that Gitsham had to retire with leg pains. Kolehmainen was the favourite. At 15 miles the Britons had faded and Hefferon started to build up a big lead – by 21 miles this was a threeminute advantage which had dwindled to 90 seconds by 24 miles.9 2:42:18. 4. 6. 8. and he entered the stadium with a 70m advantage which he held to the finish.4 2:45:47. the Italian delighted the Antwerp crowd by joyfully producing three somersaults after crossing the line in third place. Albin Stenroos Romeo Bertini Clarence DeMar Lauri Halonen Sam Ferris Manuel Plaza Boughèra El Ouafi Gustav Kinn FIN ITA USA FIN GBR CHI FRA SWE 2:41:22.000m.4 (Competitors: 58.8 2:41:18. but Ray closed on them and made his bid for gold at 35km.4 2:42:07. Countries: 23) Ray. Sigge Jacobsson 7. Tsuda. This was the last successful race of Kolehmainen’s illustrious international career.4 (Competitors: 47. Countries: 20) Fortunately for the runners. 4. passing halfway in 1:20:08 with a good lead over Charles Mellor (USA). Ken McArthur 2. Sir Arthur.8 2:40:18. Stockholm. 7.83/79kg. A crowd of 80. 4. A kilometre later El Ouafi made the decisive move. had graduated to the marathon. Yamada passed Ray with 4km to go. 7. and started at 13:45. but so impressed the Royal family that he was presented with a gold cup by the Queen. Juan Carlos Zabala ARG 2:31:36OR . and Kolehmainen was followed by McArthur and his fellow South African Gitsham. the creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. the chief medical officer for the race. Albin Stenroos. Behind the South Africans. Christopher Gitsham 3.2 Kilometres 1. 5 Aug 1928 1. Stenroos just went further and further away. 3. Korholin-Koski. 8. Plaza. He tried two more marathons. 14 Jul 1912 40. John Gallagher 8. The early leaders were Tatu Kolehmainen (FIN) and Alex Ahlgren (SWE).4 2:52:26. and shared first place at halfway (1:13:10) with Kolehmainen. In 1910 he was second in the Boston marathon.0 2:38:42.6 2:54:33. 2.0 2:52:54. was sitting in the press box. 2. 3.114 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S seconds up at 10 miles (56:53). 3. and led by 19km. the most durable of marathon runners.8 2:37:52. won by just under a minute. Paris. Countries: 19) The race was held on a swelteringly hot day. Gitsham stopped for a drink and McArthur got clear. but failed to finish either. The bronze medallist behind him 12 years earlier in the 10. with McArthur third in 1:13:15. the latter having carved his way through the field despite suffering from bleeding feet. 6. passing 10km in 31:55. and failed to finish. These two were joined by Lossman.4 (Competitors: 68. 5. and only 12 of the 47 starters did not finish. Countries: 17) For the first time the race took place on a cool day.8 2:39:25. One of these was the veteran Gitsham who took over the lead from Broos at 10km. Cliff Bricker (CAN). Arri made up a lot of ground in the last few kilometres to beat Broos for third by a large margin. Gitsham regained the lead at 15km. who continued Italy’s excellent tradition in the event. After Umberto Blasi (ITA) then took an ill-advised break.0 2:41:30. 7 Aug 1932 1. By 15km the Swede had fallen back. to take the bronze medal. The two Japanese made a break at 28km. The 30 year-old policeman.

and Cabrera and Richards soon passed him. Mimoun .0 2:36:17. and Gorno passed him shortly before 40km (2:17:25. with Stan Cox running the number two time ever of 2:21:42. before the gun. The reigning champion stayed with the Korean until 32km. Peters then suffered a cramp in his left leg.2 2:31:42. who made up 41 seconds on the leader in the last half mile of the race. The Korean did overtake Cabrera and was less than 25 seconds behind the faltering Jansson. Paavo Nurmi ran 2:22:03. 7.0 2:38:40. 4. 4. Sohn moved away from Harper and caught Zabala just after 30km. in contrast to the fresh Ferris. he was almost “Pietri-like”. Cabrera was now ahead. and he and Jansson promptly began to ease away from the gritty Briton. 8. and Gailly was tiring. and retired shortly after. and passed 10km in M a r a t h o n 115 34:34. and the Mexican soon dropped back. and received a bonus as his teammate and fellow Korean came in third just 19 seconds behind Harper. By now Wright was third some 30 seconds behind. and entering Wembley stadium first. 7.0 2:32:45. but the other medallists ran lifetime bests. Countries: 23) With temperatures soaring to 30°C this was not going to be a quick race. However. which allied with his 5000m/m double. 6.6 2:38:41. 7. 8. Jansson and Zátopek at 5km (15:43). and by 30km Zátopek. Zátopek asked Peters if the pace was too fast. collapsed when he crossed the line. 52 behind the Belgian. The effort was too much. 2:15 behind Zátopek). Zabala led by 30 seconds at 15. but caught the Finn at 33km. 5. Zátopek had said “Men. 27 Jul 1952 1.8 2:29:35. today we die a little” – he just died less than the others. and this time built up a lead which reached 90 seconds by 15km (49:45). By 30km Lou had lost touch.6 2:36:06. 5.6 2:35:07. 3. 4. to which Peters responded that it was too slow. Up ahead Zátopek had won by 2:30 minutes from Gorno. with Richards closing in on Gailly. 5.0 2:33:46. Behind Choi. gave him the most remarkable running events treble in the history of the Olympics. 6. but was caught by Margarito Barros (MEX) at eight miles.0 2:38:11.2 2:38:04. just 20. and Tsuda and Kim one minute behind the Finns. By now Choi Yoon-chil (KOR) was the fastest moving athlete. 2. he was 1:27 clear by 40km. but was suspended by the IAAF for receiving payments for running in Germany in 1931. Sohn had run 2:26:42 the previous year. Delfo Cabrera Tom Richards Etienne Gailly Johannes Coleman Eusebio Guiñez Sid Luyt Gustav Östling John Systad ARG GBR BEL RSA ARG RSA SWE NOR 2:34:51. eventually being the final finisher (in 20th place) with 3:10:51. 7 Aug 1948 1. The man who had led the field out of the stadium was the first to return. At 28km. 2. Choi’s efforts were too much.8 2:26:42. leading from European Champion Karvonen by 50 seconds at 25km (1:24:35). achieved in a swift 1:11:29. At 30km (1:41:47) the lead was 1:12. taking the lead at 40km. and then retired.6 2:35:33.0 2:36:36. Berlin. the lead was less than a minute as Sohn and Harper were now clear of the main pack.0 2:26:41. Countries: 27) Zabala again led out of the stadium. Sohn became the first Olympian to duck below 2:30. 8. but being caught by Choi. in his first ever marathon. So Zátopek speeded up. and won by 2:04 from the exhausted Harper. Melbourne. 6. though Zabala was suffering after a brief fall. with a 12 seconds lead over Lou Wengau. At halfway.0 (Kitei Son) (Shoryu Nan) (Competitors: 56.0 (Competitors: 66. and he retired soon after 36km. 3. Countries: 15) Six weeks before the Games. 1 Dec 1956 1.2OR 2:25:35. 7. and led Zabala by 60 seconds at 35. with Peters 45 seconds further back. By five miles Zabala was 200m clear. Wright had mis-timed his effort and was passed at 38km by Zabala.5km. leading by a minute from the sprightly Ferris. 45 seconds ahead at 35km. London. 51 seconds behind.0 2:26:36. with Toivonen and Lauri Virtanen his closest pursuers. with Gorno and Cox just over a minute adrift. with Cabrera one second behind him. 2. 5.8 over 40. with Coleman finishing 30 seconds behind the gallant Belgian. Countries: 21) Gailly took the lead after three miles from Guiñez. Karvonen was closing quickest and he beat Cabrera by less than a second. 3. 7. Jansson began to flag. 8.R I O 2. 5. after improving from eighth to third in the previous 5km.2km (57:00). Helsinki. 4. 8. 6. 6. catching him at 31km (1:30:00). 3. his lead over Guiñez having shrunk to 30 seconds (1:47:01). Sam Ferris Armas Toivonen Dunky Wright Seiichiro Tsuda Kim Un-Bae KOR Albert Michelson Oskar Hekš CZE 2 0 1 6 GBR FIN GBR JPN JPN USA TCH ★ O L Y M P I C 2:31:55 2:32:12 2:32:41 2:35:42 2:37:28 2:39:38 2:41:35 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S (Onbai Kin) (Competitors: 29. 33:30 and 50:36 saw a dozen athletes bunched within a few seconds. and Zátopek fifth. Countries: 32) Jim Peters (GBR) had set a world’s best of 2:20:42. Jansson and Zátopek had caught Peters (47:58) by 15km.2 in June. Cabrera was fourth. Zabala. Peters was ten seconds adrift by 20km (1:04:27). and was a minute clear at 23km. and broke away. Like Virtanen.2OR 2:31:23. Shortly before halfway Mimoun made a sharp attack on a hill.0 (Competitors: 41. but then Gailly made a comeback. Alain Mimoun Franjo Mihalić SRB Veikko Karvonen Lee Chang-Hoon Yoshiaki Kawashima Emil Zátopek Ivan Filin RUS Evert Nyberg FRA YUG FIN KOR JPN TCH URS SWE 2:25:00 2:26:32 2:27:47 2:28:45 2:29:19 2:29:34 2:30:37 2:31:12 (Competitors: 46. and was still 16 seconds ahead at 10km (31:55).2km (worth 2:29:10 for a full marathon). At the start. Both the gold and bronze medallists were Koreans forced by the occupying power to adopt a Japanese name. with Karvonen joined by Mihalić and Kawashima. 2.4 2:28:04. having led from Cabrera and Gailly by 28 seconds at 35km.0 2:26:07. Emil Zátopek CZE Reinaldo Gorno Gustaf Jansson Choi Yoon-Chil Veikko Karvonen Delfo Cabrera József Dobronyi Erkki Puolakka TCH ARG SWE KOR FIN ARG HUN FIN 2:23:03. 9 Aug 1936 1. In Helsinki. Sohn Kee-Chung KOR Ernie Harper Nam Sung-Yong KOR Erkki Tamila Väino Muinonen Johannes Coleman Donald Robertson Henry Gibson JPN GBR JPN FIN FIN RSA GBR RSA 2:29:19. was 26 seconds clear of Jansson’s 1:39:08. Without Nurmi the race got underway with Zabala the leader out of the stadium. Peters quickly went ahead and was 19 seconds clear of Cox. 4. Sohn went away steadily. 3.0 2:37:06. and the early 5km splits pace of 16:25. This doubled to 24 seconds at 20km (1:09:29). Virtanen closed in on the Argentine.

4.4 2:21:21. Hogan and Clarke were over a minute ahead of the chasing pack. an international unknown. Bikila – who’d had his appendix removed seven weeks earlier – went into the lead clad in shoes on this occasion. 2.0 (Competitors: 68. Rhadi. won the Ethiopian trials race at altitude in 2:21:23 a month earlier by nine minutes. Heatley was now third. and Johnston now just over a minute behind the leader.0 2:25:18. who. right with him. Abebe Bikila Basil Heatley Kokichi Tsuburaya Brian Kilby József Sütö Buddy Edelen Aurele Vandendriessche Kenji Kimihara ETH GBR JPN GBR HUN USA BEL JPN 2:12:11. 6. Tsuburaya committed suicide early in 1968. with Hogan 1:29 ahead of Tsuburaya and Suto. Shorter was preceded into the stadium by a hoaxer. The two leaders passed halfway in an unheard of 1:06:40.8 2:18:12. Wolde.116 R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S extended his lead to 1:32 by the finish. ran his next 5km in 14:57. with only Bikila..8 2:25:33.2WB 2:16:19.8 2:28:04. but Bikila had a leg injury and had to retire from the race after 17km.4 (Competitors: 69. Rome. 7.4 2:18:42. and Lismont 20 seconds behind. 8. and 15km in 48:02.6 2:19:18. In the next 5km Temu moved into the lead (1:22:29).6 2:11:15. 10 Sep 1960 1. 4. 4. through 10km (31:15) with Hill. Just after 35km Hogan retired. 7. Hannachi (TUN) and Naftali Temu (KEN) in contact. 5. Of the top eight. 2. Bikila. 6. placing ninth in a personal best 2:20:26. one of the two favourites. Bikila opened a 50m gap with a kilometre remaining. the International Cross Country Champion. had made his first Olympic appearance 16 years earlier in the 1500m .8 2:14:31. 6. and now finally won gold ahead of his old friend. with the lead extending continually.4 2:15:39.6 2:16:34. Wolde ran out an easy winner. with Clarke (1:01:39) now well back. just over a minute behind Tsuburaya. 3. passing 10km in a fast 30:14. still managed sixth place. still depressed by his “failure” in 1964 and his inability to overcome training injuries. a prelude to the first ever gold medal for Ethiopia. By 30km (1:34:29) the two men were 2:23 clear of Magee and race favourite Popov. Bikila won with a world’s best ever performance for the second time. 7.2 (Competitors: 69. Wolde was a clear second at 35km.8 2:17:02.4 2:21:09.8 2:16:27. Mimoun competed in one more Olympics (34th in the 1960 marathon). By 20km (1:06:02) the leaders were Johnston and Gaston Roelants. Abebe Bikila ETH Rhadi ben Abdesselem MAR Barry Magee NZL Konstantin Vorobyov RUS URS Sergey Popov RUS URS Thyge Thøgersen DEN Abebe Wakgira ETH Bakir Benaissa MAR 2:15:16. Along the torchlit Appian way. which widened to 31 seconds over Lismont at 20km (1:01:30). up from sixth. Shorter. Bikila had beaten Popov’s world best of 2:15:17 by less than a second. 3. 5. The early leaders were Jürgen Busch (GDR) and Kenny Moore (USA). as they were considered least likely to be affected by the altitude. but was still capable of 2:34:37 in 1972 at the age of 51. 2. and 4 x 400m! Montreal. Mimoun had won five silvers behind Zátopek in Olympic and European title races. Countries: 35) The largest field in Olympic history set off at 17:30. and by 15km was five seconds up. passing 5km in 15:35. the former steeplechaser. but by 40km was 2½ minutes back.0OR 2:10:45. with Temu just behind them.8 2:15:08. At 15km (45:35) Bikila. and proceeded to warm down with some calisthenics to stupify and amuse the audience. 6.8 2:27:23.0 2:16:30. Kimihara was up to second. 5. Tokyo. Countries: 35) Ron Clarke and Jim Hogan (GBR) were the early leaders.4 2:17:55. 2. Waldemar Cierpinski Frank Shorter Karel Lismont Donald Kardong Lasse Viren GDR USA BEL USA FIN 2:09:55. At 40km they were still 1:26 ahead of Magee.4 2:23:31. with Kimihara increasing his lead over Ryan by eight seconds in the last two kilometres. Countries: 41) Bikila and Wolde were the favourites.6 2:17:18. Bikila extended his lead to 40 seconds at 30km (1:32:50). who was now 1:46 clear of Vorobyov.8 . and by 40km Bikila was almost three minutes clear of Tsuburaya. who ran almost a full lap before being bundled away. in the best Ethiopian tradition. Derek Clayton. and the Belgian retired shortly afterwards. Mexico City.2WB 2:15:41. Countries: 35) On a warm (21°C) and humid day the race was led by the world’s fastest man. Mamo Wolde Kenji Kimihara Michael Ryan Ismail Akçay Bill Adcocks Merawi Gebru Derek Clayton Tim Johnston ETH JPN NZL TUR GBR ETH AUS GBR 2:20:26. with Wolde eight seconds back. 4. The order remained the same for the top four to the finish. 5.2 2:19:09. but the Japanese star was fading. 3. Munich. and Aurele Vandendriessche (BEL) were the early leaders. 21 Oct 1964 1.2 2:16:22. 3.4 2:16:56. 10 Sep 1972 1.8 2:21:03. 2. 8.8 2:13:10. and Temu cracked shortly after.8. and at 20km (1:00:58) was five seconds ahead of Hogan. Relentlessly Shorter increased the lead to 1:05 at 30km (1:32:49). the late start being an attempt to miss the heat of the day. with Moore going through a bad patch. and he extended the lead to 150m by the finish at the Arch of Constantine – a wonderfully dramatic setting for the close of an Olympic marathon. Edelen was the freshest finisher after M a r a t h o n Heatley. Bikila. eventually placing 19th. with Mihalić getting clear of Karvonen after 35km. Frank Shorter Karel Lismont Mamo Wolde Kenneth Moore Kenji Kimihara Ron Hill Don Macgregor Jack Foster USA BEL ETH USA JPN GBR GBR NZL 2:12:19. having lost three months of training in ’56. 3. 14 seconds up on Lismont. now aged 38.0 2:27:16. 5. 31 Jul 1976 1. 8. Heatley caught the exhausted Tsuburaya with 120m to go to take the silver medal.6 2:19:49. the other highly regarded runner. with Wolde and Moore the closest followers.. Shorter passed 40km with a margin of two minutes over Lismont who had gained 21 seconds on Wolde in the previous 5km. 8.4 (Competitors: 74. 7. 20 Oct 1968 1. Wolde was ahead by 30km.8 2:11:12. By 20km Rhadi and the barefoot Bikila were 26 seconds ahead of Vandendriessche in 1:02:39.0 2:23:45. Arthur Keily (GBR). 4. and Clarke continued to the finish.

5. Seko. 4. 5. 7. but his lead of six seconds had diminished to nothing by 20km (1:03:42). 3. Just before 35km Cierpinski broke clear of Shorter. and with the race ending in Montjuïc stadium after a long uphill climb. a win in the ’76 national championships in May. and he was now 22 seconds ahead. and then went away from his exhausted competitors to win Italy’s first Olympic gold medal in the event. 7. 1 Aug 1980 1. The two Asians were now leading by 100m from Freigang and Nakayama. with Bordin a further 20m back. and Qoqaïche at 20km (1:04:00). Seoul. A pack passed through 10km in 31:15 and 20km in 1:01:26 with the USA’s well regarded Alberto Salazar dropping back. and Shorter was in front at 20km (1:01:24) with a group of seven men in attendance. Countries: 35) Shorter. Josia Thugwane Lee Bong-Ju Eric Wainaina Martín Fiz Richard Nerurkar Germán Silva Steve Moneghetti RSA KOR KEN ESP GBR MEX AUS 2:12:36 2:12:39 2:12:44 2:13:20 2:13:39 2:14:29 2:14:35 . Kim led at 30km (1:34:42). 6.4 2:14:24. Countries: 60) Hot (27 °C) but dry conditions were thought likely to make this a slow race to be won by de Castella ahead of Japan’s enigmatic Toshihiko Seko. 2. Jerome Drayton Leonid Moseyev Franco Fava RUS 2 0 1 6 CAN URS ITA ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2:13:30. and Morishita began to push the pace. and left Wakiihuri 20m behind. and when Bordin applied pressure at 31km. The oldest man to win the Olympic marathon. The pace was slow. 2. Carlos Lopes John Treacy Charlie Spedding Takeshi Soh Rob de Castella Juma Ikangaa Joseph Nzau Djama Robleh POR IRL GBR JPN AUS TAN KEN DJI 2:09:21OR 2:09:56 2:09:58 2:10:55 2:11:09 2:11:10 2:11:28 2:11:39 117 1. with Salah still four seconds ahead.0 2:13:33. By 30km (1:32:49) the top Australians had fallen off the pace. the hero of 1936. A large group went through 10km (30:32). Behind them Dzhumanazarov won the battle of the Soviets. Countries: 72) As in 1988. 4. His 5km split to 40km (2:02:56) was 14:33. Spedding and Ikangaa. Cierpinski. Freigang beat Nakayama with a finishing kick. Kotov led at 10km in 31:16. Cierpinski and Nijboer went past Gómez. Bettiol made a move just after midway (1:07:22) just as World Champion Taniguchi slipped and lost a shoe. Gelindo Bordin Douglas Wakiihuri Ahmed Salah Takeyuki Nakayama Steve Moneghetti Charlie Spedding Juma Ikangaa Rob de Castella ITA KEN DJI JPN AUS GBR TAN AUS 2:10:32 2:10:47 2:10:59 2:11:05 2:11:49 2:12:19 2:13:06 2:13:07 (Competitors: 118. would clearly be a tough one. had improved nearly 2½ minutes over his best. 5. 2. losing 20 seconds in the process. at 37. This was officially Korea’s first gold medal.” (Competitors: 107. 5. Moscow. 4. Barcelona. knowing just how good he was. and Lopes moved away with 5km to run. with only Hwang and his teammate Kim Jae-yong able to keep up. Waldemar Cierpinski Gerard Nijboer Satymkul Dzhumanazarov KGZ Vladimir Kotov BLR Leonid Moseyev RUS Rodolfo Gómez Dereje Nedi Massimo Magnani GDR NED URS URS URS MEX ETH ITA 2:11:03 2:11:20 2:11:35 2:12:05 2:12:14 2:12:39 2:12:44 2:13:12 (Competitors: 74. Bordin saw the Kenyan World Champion tiring and passed him just past 40km (2:03:39). 7. ahead of Lismont. Wakiihuri. leaving a bunch of six – Bordin. Countries: 40) Despite the boycott. Cierpinski considered that he had a psychological advantage over the American. the heat and humidity at the start were high (25°C. 8. and the reigning champion was 19 seconds clear at 40km (2:04:35). Salah worked hard to 39km. like Gaston Roelants a former steeplechaser. 2 Oct 1988 (Competitors: 67. 6. 4.6 M a r a t h o n from Spedding just before the stadium. with Hwang leading at 10km (31:59). 12 Aug 1984 1. resigned to take silver.R I O 6. By 30km (1:32:08) only Cierpinski was with the American. and he fell back to finish 10th. Hwang Young-cho Koichi Morishita Stephan Freigang Takeyuki Nakayama Salvatore Bettiol Salah Qoqaïche Jan Huruk Hiromi Taniguchi KOR JPN GER JPN ITA MAR POL JPN 2:13:23 2:13:45 2:14:00 2:14:02 2:14:15 2:14:25 2:14:32 2:14:42 (Competitors: 110. 9 Aug 1992 1. were the favourites. but it was a last ditch effort. 6. Bettiol’s move was soon covered. leading the surprising Nijboer by six seconds at 25km. 3. 20km (1:01:21) and halfway (1:04:49) together. 6. Seko was gone. Runners began to slip away. alongside Viren who was attempting a Zátopek treble. 8. 4. 3. a record-equalling entry of 74 started the race in hot (26°C) conditions. 8. but the gutsy European champion went past the cramping American for the bronze. 2. 2. Nakayama. leading him by 13 seconds at that point. These last two tailed away at 35km. with 16 men bunched together. Eventually. 5. 8. with Drayton third. 8. while he realised that Shorter knew nothing about his strengths and weaknesses. with Shorter easing slightly. 7. As the long hill to Montjuïc began each man tried to break the other with brief surges. Salah. the only time he failed to finish a race in his illustrious Olympic career. In the interim Viren had dropped out shortly after 25km. with 2km to go. Gómez made a break a 23km. but Rodgers had a foot injury which left him in 40th place by the finish. Viren was a creditable fifth ahead of Drayton. a lead which was halved at 35km. Lopes won by 35 seconds. and won by over 100m. Rodgers led the pack on a wet humid day at 10km (30:48). Hwang made his big effort. with Treacy breaking away Atlanta. but 12 were still in contention at 30km (1:33:02). Countries: 66) An early morning start would have been kinder to the runners. and Nakayama began slipping back at 37km. 4 Aug 1996 1. 80 years after Pietri had crossed the line in first place. The race began at 14:35 with the temperature at 25°C and humidity at 74%. 6. and Rodgers still in the top six. 7. The tall (1. 3. Robleh and de Castella fell back just before 35km.90m) Kardong was now third. 7. 72%). Some 600m later Bordin passed Salah. 3. a trio which produced the best grouping since 1908 when the USA had three of the top four finishers. but Hwang himself said “It was important for me to win this for Sohn Kee-Chung. Los Angeles. and his teammate Bill Rodgers.

5. 2. while de Lima managed to hold on from Brown. Ayele Abshero (ETH) and Kiprotich. the heat was not excessive (23°C). The Brazilian led for more than 15km. 1 Oct 2000 1. but it was clear his break was not decisive. who passed his teammate Merga with 250m to go. but lost 19 seconds over the next 5km. before Henrick Ramaala (RSA) opened up a 50m lead. 8. led by Domingos Castro of Portugal. Countries: 57) The expected hot and humid conditions were thought to militate against a quick pace. 7. At the 17-mile mark Wainaina surged but the wind held him back and he finally reduced the pack to a group of 4 with only Brown and the two Ethiopians in touch. Unworried by the heat. had closed to within 70m of the leaders at 38km. Abera surged ahead after 24 miles to become one of the youngest ever Olympic marathon winners at 22 years 161 days. despite the temperature of 24°C at the start (rising to 30° by the end of the race). this race was never going to be fast. On May 15. The Ethiopian tailed away over the next 5km and. The first half had taken 1:07:36. Kipsang was third. Stephen Kiprotich Abel Kirui Wilson Kipsang Meb Keflezighi Marílson dos Santos Kentaro Nakamoto Cuthbert Nyasango Paulo Roberto Paulo UGA KEN KEN USA BRA JPN ZIM BRA 2:08:01 2:08:27 2:09:37 2:11:06 2:11:10 2:11:16 2:12:08 2:12:17 (Competitors: 105. expanding the lead to 47 seconds at 30km. Fiz. 44 seconds behind. he died from his injuries after falling off a balcony at his home in Nyahururu. At the Athens closing ceremony later that day. Of these. This was closed down by 20km (63:54) and de Lima then made a break. Kifle would eventually fade to 36th. Countries: 76) Held in the early morning. the Kenyan finished in a magnificent 2:06:32. having lost about 20 seconds of a 48-second lead. 4. 5. 4. but the humidity was oppressive at 92%. Baldini caught the Brazilian just before 39km. tailing off to 47th in the last 12km. de Lima was awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal in recognition of his courage and spirit of fair play. Lel and Wanjiru all in attendance. The leading group comprised of eight men when halfway was reached in 62:34 with Yonas Kifle (ERI) leading. 4. 2. Gezahegn Abera ETH Eric Wainaina KEN Tesfaye Tola ETH Jon Brown GBR Giacomo Leone ITA Martín Fiz ESP Abdelkader El Mouaziz MAR Mohamed Ouaadi FRA 2:10:11 2:10:31 2:11:10 2:11:17 2:12:14 2:13:06 2:13:49 2:14:04 (Competitors: 100. It was evident that a quick race was in store. as was Beijing’s smog which was once anticipated to be so bad that the race would need to be cancelled. Tragically Wanjiru did not live to make further Olympic history. and the three stayed together for the next 5km (15:33). Thugwane finally escaped from Lee and Wainaina with 1000m to go. 2. 24 Aug 2008 1. The winning margin of three seconds was the slimmest in Olympic history. At 25km the gap was just seven seconds over Kirui. who placed fourth for the second Games in succession. but Kiprotich was biding his time. and broke away with just under 6km to go. 4. would fail to finish. 7. 6. Countries: 61) Wary of the heat (30°C). Samuel Wanjiru Jaouad Gharib Tsegay Kebede Deriba Merga Martin Lel Viktor Röthlin Gashaw Asfaw Yared Asmeron KEN MAR ETH ETH KEN SUI ETH ERI 2:06:32OR 2:07:16 2:10:00 2:10:21 2:10:24 2:10:35 2:10:52 2:11:11 (Competitors: 95. Benjamín Paredes 2 0 1 6 MEX ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2:14:55 (Competitors: 119. followed by 14:33. Wanjiru (21) became the youngest marathon champion since 1932 and his time was the fastest ever in a major championship or in such difficult conditions. 3. Stefano Baldini Meb Keflezighi Vanderlei de Lima Jon Brown Shigeu Aburaya Toshinari Suwa Eric Wainaina Albert Chaiça ITA USA BRA GBR JPN JPN KEN POR 2:10:55 2:11:29 2:12:11 2:12:26 2:13:11 2:13:24 2:13:30 2:14:17 (Competitors: 101. By halfway (63:15). The Kenyan then injected a 14:11 split to break up the field. Wanjiru broke away at the 38km mark. a mainly uphill section towards the centre of Atlanta. Countries: 67) The early pace suggested a finishing time of 2:09. but the three leaders got away on the downhill section to the stadium. 6. and by 40km (1:59:54) was 18 seconds clear of Gharib. while the former was dispelled with a first 5km by Wanjiru of 14:52. At the 36km mark a mentally disturbed Irishman (Neil Horan) ran at de Lima pushing him into the crowd. The Kenyan dropped Brown after 21 miles and Tola two miles later. his lead was 16 seconds. and Lee passed the Kenyan at the entrance to the stadium. 2011 at age 24. Regretably. 29 Aug 2004 1. with Merga another 1:39 back. 7. 6. was 2:44 ahead of Kebede. and went away to win by 34 seconds from Keflezighi. 3. Wainaina improved one place from Atlanta and Tola held off Brown for the final medal M a r a t h o n 28:59 and would have won the race without de Lima’s tribulations. A large pack of runners passed the halfway mark in 65:02. 8. his name was wrongly shown as “Wansiru” across Beijing’s information systems. 5. leaving all except Lee 50m behind. Beijing. The 30-35km section was the fastest of the race (15:11). 12 Aug 2012 Athens. The man was grabbed and de Lima continued on his way. Kipsang and Mutai had a slight lead over the Ugandan at 35km. losing nearly 14 minutes in the second half. 6. as Kipsang (15:23) and Brazil’s Franck de Almeida (30:38) led after the first two 5km points. with the fastest 5km section (the second) a slow 15:35. Countries: 69) With a strong wind hindering the runners. 3. 5. No great surprise that the leading 20 of the biggest Olympic field ever were together at 30km. Sydney. like his two teammates. with Wainaina chasing and catching them after 2km. 8. 2. London. the pace went slowly through the first 15km (48:15). and Gharib. 3.R I O 118 8. At 30km Merga led from Wanjiru (1:29:14) with Gharib four seconds back. Baldini had covered his fourth 10km (mainly downhill) in a superb 1. the race favourite and World Champion. the highest for an Olympic distance race since 1924. but the Brazilian might have won silver without the interruption. The latter fear proved to be utterly unfounded. At 31km Thugwane attacked. 1½ minutes behind Kiprotich and a similar mar- . with Merga. A sad indictment of a selection procedure which omitted then world record holder Haile Gebrselassie and Beijing medallist Tsegaye Kebede. He was 20 seconds quicker than Kirui over the eighth section of 5km (15:08) and extended his lead to the line for a surprising but well earned win. Gharib. Vanderlei de Lima (BRA) fared worst. 7. 8.

8WR 9:31. 3.6). 5. 7. Nurmi stayed with the tiny (1. 2004-14. 2.7e 10:42. 9 Jul 1924 1. 1932-2 1964-8. Most Placings in Top Eight 3 Sam Ferris GBR Kenji Kimihara JPN Wainaina Viktor Röthlin SUI 4 5 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 28 5 2 4 3 4 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 28 6 3 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 28 7 4 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 28 8 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 27 of URS placings: 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 - 2 2 - 0 1 0 1 17 6 5 28 Breakdown of GER placings: GDR 2 GER 1 Totals 2 1 - - - - - 2 1 3 16 6 22 Breakdown RUS KGZ BLR Totals S 2 2 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 28 B 5 2 1 3 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 28 1. 1996-87. 2012-11 Karel Lismont BEL Baikuntha Manandhar NEP Rob de Castella AUS Ahmed Salah DJI Steve Moneghetti AUS Lee Bong-Ju KOR Pavel Loskutov EST Placing Table G USA 3 JPN 1 GBR ETH 4 FIN 2 KEN 1 FRA 3 RSA 2 GRE 1 ITA 2 SWE ARG 2 URS CAN 1 BEL KOR 1 GER 2 MAR AUS NZL TCH (CZE) 1 HUN BRA CHI POR 1 UGA 1 ESP EST IRL NED YUG (SRB) DJI DEN MEX CUB TUR TAN SUI POL ZIM ERI NOR Totals 28 1964-1 1980-1 1976-2 2000-2. 8. 1972-5 Most Appearances 5 Toni Bernadó AND 4 Antwerp.55m) Frenchman to the end of the heat. . 3 0 0 0 m S C 119 3000 Metres Steeplechase 3. Countries: 8. 2. The final was run at 9:00. 3. Andersen and Loukola were the early leaders. 7. Finalists: 8) Devaney (10:23. In the final. 1972-1. 7. the two amicably crossing the line together. followed by three of 12. 2004-25. Countries: 6. won by more than 50m from Katz in a time which was just 0.875km. set by Bontemps the previous month. Flynn (10:36. 6.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S gin ahead of veteran Keflezighi. despite poor technique at the solid fence-like hurdles.2 seconds off the best on record. 1984-5. 4. and won easing up. 1988-8.3e 10:37. Nurmi had too much pace for Andersen and won the silver medal easily. 1992-48. Countries: 10. 4. more than ten seconds quicker than Dalton (9:35. Ville Ritola Elias Katz Paul Bontemps Marvin Rick Karl Ebb Evelyn Montague Michael Devaney Albert Isola FIN FIN FRA USA FIN GBR USA FRA 09:33. Finalists: 9) The domination of the Finns was evident in the heats. 2008-28 1996-58. 2. Katz fell with two laps to go but recovered from seventh place to pass Bontemps in the finishing straight.0e 9:40.8 to 77. 5.3e (Competitors: 16. 1996-42 1988-5. 1988-54 1980-10. 1928-8. 1992-26 1984-20. Hodge took over in the second lap. Loukola had been much the fastest man with 9:25. 2004-dnf.5e 09:58. 1996-7. 1976-1. Amsterdam. 1896 – 1912: Not held.8e (Competitors: 19.0e 10:01. won by Ritola (9:46.0) and Hodge (10:17. and Loukola (9:37.6e 9:38.4 for the next lap. 2004-7 1924-5. 1984-24 1976-50. Nurmi (9:58. 2000-35. 6. 3. The course comprised one lap of M a r a t h o n . 2008-6. 2000-49. though see discontinued events for other steeplechase distances MEN’S MARATHON The Best on Points 16 Abebe Bikila ETH Waldemar Cierpinski GDR 15 Frank Shorter USA Eric Wainaina KEN 1960-1. and was helped up by Duquesne. 1992-30. and ran away from the field to lead by 100y by halfway. 200858. and was a clear second. 8. and then 76. 1980-9. Finalists: 9) Ritola went into the lead early and. 2000-10 1996-2.6OR 09:44.0e 09:45.2e 9:35.1e 10:34. 2012-74 1972-2.2. yet still beat his own best on record by more than three seconds. Of the times prior to Amsterdam.0e 9:40.8).0).4) were the heat winners.5e (Competitors: 22. 1988-3.6). with the deficit reported as anything from 75y to almost 100m behind Hodge. Exhausted from the 5000m the day before. Flynn broke away from the pack in the penultimate lap.2e 09:56. Toivo Loukola Paavo Nurmi Ove Andersen Nils Eklöf Henri Dartigues Lucien Duquesne Melvin Dalton William Spencer FIN FIN FIN SWE FRA FRA USA USA 9:21. Nurmi fell in the water jump early in his heat. 1980-37.0e 10:14. 1996-3.0e 10:32. 1984-46. he eventually dropped out. 1976-3. starting and finishing in The Mall within sight of Buckingham Palace. 2008dnf 2000-36. 4 Aug 1928 1. where the pace for the 417m lap was increased from 80. 20 Aug 1920 M Points 10 120 5 84 5 78 7 64 5 63 6 49 5 47 4 42 2 40 4 39 3 32 3 30 1 28 1 26 3 26 2 25 3 22 2 20 0 16 2 13 1 12 1 12 1 11 1 10 1 9 1 8 0 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 1 7 0 7 0 7 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 84 1007 Percy Hodge Patrick Flynn Ernesto Ambrosini Gustaf Mattsson Michael Devaney Albert Hulsebosch Lars Hedwall Raymond Watson GBR USA ITA SWE USA USA SWE USA 10:00.0e 10:32.4OR 10:21. 2004-57. 5. 8.4e 09:57. By the bell he was 13 seconds ahead of Nurmi.571km in central London. 6. 2000-24. The decisive move came from Loukola in the fifth lap.6). 1968-2.2.2e 10:50. and Ambrosini was the initial leader. Paris. 4. with only Ritola of the favourites losing touch early.

4.58) (8:44.8 8:56. 8.2 2000m 5:54.68) (8:44.60) taking the first two heats. with Iso-Hollo and Tuominen comfortably winning the other heats.0 8:57.98) (8:56.39 16. but was passed by Ashenfelter coming out of the final water jump. 2. Ashenfelter duplicated his 8:51.8 2:54.8 9:07. Horace Ashenfelter USA Vladimir Kazantsev RUS URS John Disley GBR Olavi Rinteenpää FIN Curt Söderberg SWE Günter Hesselmann GER/FRG Mikhail Saltykov BLR URS Helmut Gude GER/FRG 8:45. 8 Aug 1936 1.35) (8:43.54 08.0 9:11.2 9:13.0 heat from 1952.6 in 1944). 8. and then Ashenfelter took over. Chris Brasher GBR Sándor Rozsnyói HUN Ernst Larsen NOR Heinz Laufer GER/FRG Semyon Rzhishchin RUS URS John Disley GBR Neil Robbins AUS Eric Shirley GBR 9:24. Walter Pritchard FIN GBR USA FIN GBR USA ITA USA 10:33. 5 Aug 1948 Adjusted 1. 7. and Sjöstrand and Elmsäter pushed the pace. Countries: 13.4 10:46.6 5:54. Countries: 19. Joe McCluskey 4.6 5:55. having moved up from seventh in the sixth lap.6 8:44. and as Iso-Hollo reached the finish (in 9:08.00 03.2) in windy conditions. 2.0 Splits Brasher Rozsnyói Larsen Laufer Rzhishchin Disley Robbins Shirley 1000m 2:54. 6 Aug 1932 3460 Metres 1. Disley was third. with only Siltaloppi in touch. with Elmsäter the quickest at 9:15. 5. but the Pole withdrew with stomach problems.0). placing sixth in his heat. Volmari Iso-Hollo 2.4 2:50. with five men running under nine minutes in the heats (only four had ever run sub-9 before 1952). 7. Giuseppe Lippi 8. 3.8).8 9:13.2 9:11.17) and Disley (8:59.4 5:55.0 Rozsnyói and Jerzy Chromik (POL) were the favourites.4 2:54.8 2:49. McCluskey was offered the chance of a re-run.6 9:08.6. Finalists: 12) Sjöstrand Elmsäter Hagström Guyodo Siltaloppi Šegedin Ross Miranda Differential 00.53) (8:44.1 9:26. 5. 7.2 10:58.7 8:41.92 15. Sjöstrand the fastest man of 1948 (9:02. Electrics 1. 6. to give Sweden its only clean sweep on the track in Olympic athletics history.0e 11:04. 29 Nov 1956 Electrics London. Glen Dawson 7.2 (Competitors: 28. During the race the lap counter made an error. and European champion Raphaël Pujazon were the heat winners and favourites.0 10:46. Pujazon dropped out in the final just before halfway with stomach problems.6 Although there would be no official world record in the event until 1954.5 9:12. 4. 4. 5.4 8:44. but declined. Behind them Hagström moved from fifth to third in the last lap with a powerful finish.94) (8:55.2 9:16. and Kazantsev eased off. Manning had to let go first. with only Matilainen attempting to stay with the reigning champion. Countries: 13.05) (8:44. 7.42 22.R I O 120 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Los Angeles. Iso-Hollo took the lead in the final in the second lap.0.36) (Competitors: 23.0 8:44.4OR 8:51.6 5:55. to be followed by Iso-Hollo’s 9:14.60) (8:55. Dawson and McCluskey.8 2:52. but Matilainen was third until 200m to go when.79) (8:50. stating that the official finishing line was the end of the race.8 9:21. Tore Sjöstrand Erik Elmsäter Göte Hagström Alex Guyodo Pentti Siltaloppi Petar Šegedin SRB Browning Ross Constantino Miranda SWE SWE SWE FRA FIN YUG USA ESP 9:04. Melbourne. Within 25m he gained 5m.6 1.8 2000m 5:47. Tom Evenson 3. 5. 4. to the delight of the crowd.6 8:55. George Bailey 6. Finalists: 10) 9:20. 3. 6. Finalists: 12) Dompert was the fastest heat winner (9:27.81 behind 07.8 5:54.6 9:19. 8. Iso-Hollo built up a lead of some 30m. Kazantsev made his big effort with 200m to go.5e 3 0 0 0 m S C Elmsäter. Dompert passed him to win bronze behind Tuominen.52) (8:51. Behind them. 3.87) (8:55.8 8:55. Finalists: 12) Splits Ashenfelter Kazantsev Rinteenpää Saltykov 1000m 2:50.4 5:47.6 8:50.4 10:53.5 2:53.2 9:09.6 2:50. ahead of McCluskey (9:14. (Competitors: 15. All three of the United States athletes ran under 9:20.00 9:04.0 9:20.6 (8:41. with the big favourite Kazantsev (8:58. Berlin. The Finn was dropped just after the bell.47) (9:01. and won by just over 20m after the chasing group of four made their bid for the lesser medals.2 8:43. but this time failed to qualify.4 (Competitors: 26. getting home just 3m ahead of the charging Disley.2 10:52.8 5:53. 6. and Sjöstrand proved too strong for his teammate in the last lap.0e 11:04.4 2:55. Ashenfelter’s world best time would not be improved upon until 1955.6 9:20. .68) (8:51.8 in the first heat. and built up a big lead over his pursuers – Evenson. the standard improved dramatically in 1952.2 5:55. Finalists: 10) Helsinki.0 2:55. He and Kazantsev built up a lead of 20m with one and a half circuits to go. 8. but was overtaken by Evenson in the final lap. Heyn led for 300m of the first lap. Saltykov led for the initial two laps in the final.6 9:08. 25 Jul 1952 Evenson set an Olympic record of 9:18. Countries: 12.18.4 (8:45. Volmari Iso-Hollo Kalle Tuominen Alfred Dompert Martti Matilainen Harold Manning Lars Larsson Voldemārs Vītols Glen Dawson FIN FIN GER FIN USA SWE LAT USA 9:03.2 9:01. to be followed by Ashenfelter taking the role of “dark horse” with his surprising US record of 8:51. 6.4) he was urged to run another 460m lap. 2. McCluskey reached 3000m in second place.8WR 9:06. 2. the first to run under nine minutes (8:59.6 9:18. Countries: 8. whereupon Iso-Hollo moved to the front.6 8:51. Behind him.6 8:44. Martti Matilainen 5.2 2:53.36) (Competitors: 35.2 8:55. 3.08 19.

4. Kogo caught Young at the water jump. 8.64OR 8:24. and Rzhishchin (8:48.6 8:58. and only Kogo and O’Brien could respond. neither broke nine minutes. Countries: 27.6 De Oliveira won the first heat in 8:40. but then reinstated. and the pace was improved only slightly at 2000m. He extended the lead by 10m in the next half-lap.0 5:44. and Biwott improved this in the final heat to 8:23. The Pole.5.8OR 8:32. 4 Sep 1972 1. 8. and came out of the water ahead with O’Brien just behind. with George Young (USA) the fastest non-qualifier with 8:50. Belyayev and de Oliveira moved up to overtake Young. Kip Keino Ben Jipcho Tapio Kantanen Bronisław Malinowski Dušan Moravčík CZE Amos Biwott Romualdas Bitė LTU Pekka Päivärinta KEN KEN FIN POL TCH KEN URS FIN 8:23. 7.57) Electrics 1. 4. 3. Roelants surged in the fifth lap and by 2000m was 12m ahead of his nearest pursuer Texereau.6 9:18.8 5:50. and as the Kenyans turned .92 8:29. 3.23) Sokolov (8:43. Young was 10m behind the Frenchman. led at 2000m. brushing the Norwegian with his right arm.50) (9:08. 5. Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak POL Nikolay Sokolov RUS URS Semyon Rzhishchin RUS URS Gaston Roelants BEL Gunnar Tjörnebo SWE Ludwig Müller GER/FRG “Deacon” Jones USA Aleksey Konov RUS URS 8:34.66 8:27. Finalists: 12) Splits Biwott Kogo Young O’Brien Morozov Zhelev Roelants Risa 1000m 3:04.2 6:05.4 2:52.98) (Competitors: 40.4 3:06.8 in the first heat. 6.06 8:33. passing 1000m in a fast 2:45.2 3:05.93. partially through fatigue. who had been the quickest to react to Brasher’s surge. passing 2000m in 5:45. Tokyo. an electrifying finisher.6 6:03.0 5:40. with Kipcho (8:31. with the result that the first kilometre was run in 2:54.0 RUS KEN KEN USA AUS URS BUL BEL NOR 8:51.64 8:37. but let the pace drop. where Malinowski led in 5:44.4 2:52. and though the field closed to 0.4. Rzhishchin and Brasher following 45m behind.6 8:39. and Herriott was seventh.3 2:54. 6.02) (8:51.2 2:53.5 6:04. The latter prophetically was termed by Track and Field News in their Olympic preview as “a possible surpriser”.2 2:55.0) and then Aleksejūnas (8:31. Roelants.4 5:42.6 (9:18. as he flew off the barrier straight over the water. Munich.8 6:06. Biwott was now closing rapidly. and won by 15m from Rozsnyói. Keino eased into the lead with 500m to go. and Jipcho moving up fast on the outside. passing 1000m in 2:52.0 8:51.2 seconds behind at 1000m. with Biwott third. World record holder Kerry O’Brien (AUS) failed to qualify after losing a shoe in a heat.8. At the bell Sokolov led by 5m from Krzyszkowiak. Rzhishchin went to the front with two laps to go.0 8:55.6 2000m 5:45.6 8:58. and led at the bell in 7:39.61) (8:58. won by Jipcho. 16 Oct 1968 Rome. Kogo just beat O’Brien and Young. and surging away from the others.8. 121 Mexico City.0 6:05. George Young.2OR 8:36.0 5:43. The biggest surprise of Biwott’s running was his water jump technique.6 8:51. Kogo led the field at 1000m in the final in a slow 3:04.4 6:05. 1.0 2000m 6:06. Within 50m he was 10m ahead. 3 Sep 1960 Electrics 3 0 0 0 m S C 2000m 5:38.34) (8:47.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S In the final Larsen led from the gun.6 5:44. and Sokolov took over the lead in the second kilometre. with Sokolov well clear of Rzhishchin for the minor medals. Roelants went away from the field with 2 laps to go.2 9:18. Brasher went past Larsen on the inside with 300m to go. 2. 7.30) (8:36. Countries: 21.2 (8:34. Countries: 19. 4.55) (8:42.48 8:34.34) were the heat winners. 7.4 8:59. some three seconds off his world record. 4.8 8:36. with Rosznyói.4 5:43. 5. 5.0 (8:51. with Kudinksiy having already dropped out. Larsen. At the bell Keino led with Jipcho. 8m ahead of Kogo.8 8:52. The Belgian led by 5m at the end of the first lap. was clearly the man in form. Krzyszkowiak (8:49. but stormed past all three with 30m to go with a last 418m lap of 63.5 2:55. and Viktor Kudinskiy (URS).86) (8:52.17 (Competitors: 49. 8.8 3:07. before Herriott (8:33. Brasher and Disley ready to pounce.1. and while both qualified for the final. 17 Oct 1964 Gaston Roelants Maurice Herriott Ivan Belyayev UKR Manuel de Oliveira George Young Guy Texereau Adolfas Aleksejūnas LTU Lars-Erik Gustafsson BEL GBR URS POR USA FRA URS SWE 8:30.2 2:53.87) (9:01. and 2000m in 5:53.2 8:38. However.57).0 2:53.2 6:09. Countries: 29.5 2:55. were the favourites.0 2:54.6) and Päivärinta (8:29.0) taking the other preliminaries. At the last hurdle he was still fourth. held in 30°C weather. 3. but was still 10m clear of the fast-finishing Herriott at the finish. 2. He went past Sokolov with 250m to go.56) (8:51.0 3:07. it was Roelants who was the favourite.6 9:01.86) – the favourite.2 8:38.4 9:09. 6. Amos Biwott Benjamin Kogo George Young Kerry O’Brien Aleksandr Morozov Mikhail Zhelev Gaston Roelants Arne Risa (9:18. with Rzhishchin a further 10m behind.4 8:42. looking like a long jumper. 8. 6.4.9 5:45.4 8:33.6 2:52.0 2:53. with Biwott seventh.000m Champion. but eased back in the last 200m. 5. Finalists: 9) 1.85) (8:58.0 3:08.0 8:41.7 5:45.8 5:42. Konov set the pace in the final. 3.8 (Competitors: 29.0. 2. and won comfortably.9 Kantanen set an Olympic record of 8:24. 7.6 3:04.8. with Biwott still seventh some 15m adrift.6.41) (8:59. The final saw no-one willing to lead.62 8:24.2 5:44.2 8:47. Finalists: 10) Splits Roelants Herriott Belyayev de Oliveira Young Texereau Aleksejūnas Gustafsson 1000m 2:52. Brasher was disqualified initially for his “foul” of Larsen.22) (Competitors: 32. a barrier only bettered by Kogo and the unknown Biwott.2.3 5:44. Of all Kenya’s Olympic champions there have been none with tactics more eccentric than Biwott. with Roelants and Krzyszkowiak on his heels. With 300m to go Young kicked.08) (8:55.73. Finalists: 12) Splits Keino Jipcho Kantanen Malinowski Moravčík Biwott 1000m 2:55. second at the bell. By the bell Kogo and Young were together. and led by 40m with a lap to go. with Rosznyói. having won his previous 27 races since 1961.2 3:08. 2.8) broke the Olympic record in the other heats. European 5000m and 10. though troubled with a bad knee.

was the leader in the final at 1000m (2:38. 5. recognised as a tough competitor. 3.31 8:14. With 220m left Korir kicked. The pace slipped only slightly by 2000m (5:29. The Pole’s pace judgement was sound as he closed to within 5m of Bayi at the bell.6 5:29. while Britain’s Dennis Coates was a surprise winner of the other heat in 8:18. Koech.14 8:21.51 (Competitors: 35. Barcelona. Baumgartl caught the hurdle with his trailing knee and fell heavily.53 8:22.48 8:17.5 2:43.96 8:12. passing the kilometre points in 2:47. who was then overtaken by Kantanen.99 8:14. both running national records behind the Swede.2 Van Dijck ran the fastest semi-final ever in clocking 8:15. 7.3 5:24. The slowest of the 13 qualifiers ran 8:19. and then won fame as a world record breaker in the 1500m and Mile.7 2:44. 3. The final started slowly.3 5:28.48 8:13.1 Bayi had finished ninth in his heat eight years earlier.6 2:44.17 8:13.5 2:39. 4. 2.47 8:19. Countries: 23.3 2:45. found him out. Only Rowland attempted to get close to the Kenyans. Matthew Birir KEN Patrick Sang KEN William Mutwol KEN Alessandro Lambruschini ITA Steffen Brand GER Tom Hanlon GBR Brian Diemer USA Azzedine Brahmi ALG 8:08. 8. Kariuki went away from Koech with 600m to go.14 8:18.77 8:20.99. with Gärderud third in 8:21.4 and 5:32. 4. 4.6. 3.25 8:15.3 2:44.74 8:17.52 8:16. with Tura closing to finish 8m behind Bayi. 7. 8.0 2:38. and Azzedine Brahmi (ALG) was only slightly slower in the other semi (8:16. 4.43 8:19. the favourite. and the race was over. 8.0 2000m 5:25. 5. 7. but not the surprising Baumgartl. only Kantanen could stay in contact.95. Montreal. 7. not as good as in his banner year of ’87. Anders Gärderud Bronisław Malinowski Frank Baumgartl Tapio Kantanen Michael Karst Euan Robertson Dan Glans Antonio Campos SWE POL GDR FIN FRG NZL SWE ESP 8:08. but slowing to 5:27. Julius Korir Joseph Mahmoud Brian Diemer Henry Marsh Colin Reitz Domingo Ramón Julius Kariuki Pascal Debacker KEN FRA USA USA GBR ESP KEN FRA 8:11. Bayi.47 8:21. Countries: 24.65 (Competitors: 24. He was still was on world record schedule at 2000m (5:20. and went away from the exhausted Tanzanian at the final water jump. and he ended up 8m behind Koech. Malinowski won the first heat in an Olympic record 8:18.60 8:20.9 5:29. Kariuki looked over his shoulder just after the last hurdle and eased up slightly in his last few strides.27 8:17. Countries: 16. the European Champion.36 8:12. to win by nearly 20m.3 2000m 5:28. 8. Marsh. 31 Jul 1980 1. Countries: 18. and beat Malinowski. while Korir was the quickest semi-finalist with 8:17. with Gärderud.45). 6.8 5:29.0 2:43. Gärderud was regarded as better on the watch than in major races.70 8:12. 6. the Olympic favourite. 3.9 at 2000m as his conditioning. 3 0 0 0 m S C Los Angeles.56.11). passing 1000m in 2:42. Baumgartl and Kantanen the only ones in contact.80 8:13.43. while Malinowski won the other semi in 8:21. thereby missing the world record of 8:05.6 2:44. 8.79 8:07.0). Keino had too much speed for Kantanen to cope with on the run-in. With 600m to go Kantanen began to slip back. Finalists: 13) Moscow.1). Seoul. with Malinowski. 10 Aug 1984 1.8 2:43. 5.54). Bayi was the fastest in the heats (8:21.4 5:30.4.4 5:26. Behind him Malinowski had to hurdle Baumgartl after clearing the last barrier. and Peter Renner (NZL) became impatient and went to the front.06 8:14.6 5:20.R I O 122 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S the screw.0 2:44.40.1 5:31. The Swede attacked with 300m to go. in Stockholm a month before Moscow. 7 Aug 1992 1. 6.0 5:30. 5.38) and semi-finals (8:16.6).8) with Malinowski 15m back (2:41. Finalists: 12) Gärderud and Malinowski had been the world’s top steeplechasers for two seasons. 30 Sep 1988 1. Bronisław Malinowski Filbert Bayi Eshetu Tura Domingo Ramón Francisco Sánchez Giuseppe Gerbi Bogusław Maminski Anatoliy Dimov RUS POL TAN ETH ESP ESP ITA POL URS 8:09.9 2:42.8 2:39.71 (Competitors: 32.51OR 8:06. Finalists: 12) .60 8:18. Finalists: 12) Kariuki was the fastest heat winner (8:19.84 8:09.5. breezed past Panetta.57 8:15. 7.97 (Competitors: 32.55 8:10. Countries: 25.5 5:31. 2. Finalists: 12) Splits Malinowski Bayi Tura Ramón Sanchez Gerbi Maminski Dimov 1000m 2:41. 2. Julius Kariuki KEN Peter Koech KEN Mark Rowland GBR Alessandro Lambruschini ITA William Van Dijck BEL Henry Marsh USA Patrick Sang KEN Bogusław Maminski POL 8:05.74 8:15.63. 6.15. Malinowski took over in the fourth lap. famed for his front-running.02WR 8:09. 6. 2.9 5:31. and Diemer passed the exhausted Marsh in the last few strides. dropping Malinowski. 2.39 8:15.5 5:30. with Kariuki in tow.93 8:18. 3. 5. and more than 30m clear of Malinowski (5:25.22 8:15. 4. Keino came out of the water jump ahead of Jipcho. Campos led the final at world record pace for the first kilometre (2:43. 25m ahead of Tura. leaving Gärderud to win with a new world record. Gärderud stole 2m with a better water jump clearance and reached the last hurdle 2m clear. had worked his way through the field.2 2:41. World Champion Francesco Panetta (ITA) took on the duties of pacemaker. while Jipcho caught the Finn in the last few metres. Mahmoud moved into second with 70m to go. while the German got up to finish third. He reverted to the steeplechase in 1980. 28 Jul 1976 1. and at the bell was just behind Korir. The most exciting moment came when a bizarre-minded fan tried to join the race at the water jump on the second lap.6 5:28.08 8:21. Splits Kariuki Koech Rowland Lambruschini Van Dijck Marsh Sang Maminski 1000m 2:44.6).3).75 (Competitors: 31.11 8:10.

81 8:06.18 8:11. and soon joined Mutwol and Sang at the front.59 (Competitors: 38. The pace then slowed. The pace in the final was slow.64 8:07.0 2000m 5:29. clocking 8:19. The Kenyans were seen talking amongst themselves – probably about Lambruschini – who went with Kiptanui and Keter as Birir began to fade.85.9 2:46. the only man to have run quicker than 8:00.77 8:22.91) eased across the line together.97) of the final. with Kiptanui running 60.28 8:17. 8.90) and Kiptanui (8:18.55/Kemboi).97) ran in the second heat. 3 0 0 0 m S C 123 Barmasai (8:23.3. Finalists: 15) The dominance of Kenya was never in doubt. 7.7 5:29.4 5:29.2 5:31. so it was less than helpful that he had been intially entered under the name Reuben Seroney. From this point on Kosgei kept the lead. 29 Sep 2000 1.4 Only Mutwol ran a sub-8:20 time in the two preliminary rounds.83 in his semi-final. Countries: 25. but Shaheen.2 to 63. Countries: 26. 7. hurdling it rather than running off the top of the barrier. Within 100m Birir had made his way back to fourth.0 2:45.6 2:46.23 8:22. went into the lead on the first lap of the final. 7. and increased the pace from a 66.49 8:11.2 5:29. Finalists: 15) The heats were won by two of the favourites – Kosgei (8:23. surged. Ruben Ramolefi (RSA) led a slowly paced race through the first kilometre (2:46. but common sense prevailed in time for the final in which his familiar name was used.18 8:17. only to see the Kenyans zip away.R I O Splits Birir Sang Mutwol Lambruschini Brahmi 1000m 2:45. He sped his last 200m in 30. Brimin Kipruto Mahiedine Mekhissi Benabbad Richard Mateelong Yakob Jarso Bouabdellah Tahri Youcef Abdi Ezekiel Kemboi Abubaker Ali Kamal KEN FRA KEN ETH FRA AUS KEN QAT 8:10. with only Angelo Carosi (ITA) attempting to go with them.26 8:15. and led from Brahmi and his Kenyan teammates. but was always in control in the last 150m. 18 Aug 2008 1. 2. Kosgei was already well-known as the World Junior Champion of 1998.47 8:14.6 2:44.8 2:45.58 (Competitors: 39. was blocked from competition by Kenya. and slipped over. 7. 3. The bell . the slowest of whom (Moldova’s Ion Luchianov 8:18.91 by Kosgei. from 66. 5. and the pace increased slightly in the second kilo. the only sub-eight minute performer present.01 8:13. 4.2 2:44. losing half his shredded left shoe before rejoining the pack in ninth place. 3.9 5:33. Mustafa Mohamed (SWE) then upped the pace. 5.52 8:23. 8. Boit drew level with Kosgei 20m from the finish but lost when the two bumped arms and he missed his stride. The only threat to their domination came from Saaeed Saïf Shaheen.84 at 2000m). 6.00 8:24. nine had been won by Kenya. previously Stephen Cherono. missed Beijing after placing fourth in the Kenyan trials when he fell at the final waterjump. the European Champion. Kiptanui. After 1500m the Kenyans went clear of the pack.75 8:23. The first and last heats provided no fast losers.3 5:32. 8. The Italian was powerless when the two Kenyans accelerated sharply with 250m to go. the Kenyans were still favoured to sweep the medals.36 8:16. Athens. 5.27/Koech).70 (Competitors: 40.9 5:33. but didn’t get away from the three-time World Champion until after the last hurdle.4 2:45.3 2:45. 5. Ezekiel Kemboi Brimin Kipruto Paul Kipsiele Koech Moussa Obaid Luis Miguel Martin Simon Vroemen Bouabdellah Tahri Ali Ezzine KEN KEN KEN QAT ESP NED FRA MAR 8:05. 4.5 and then 62. Luís Martin passed 1000m in 2:55. when Kemboi struck. 2. 3. as Keter (8:18. He won by two metres from Kipruto. and led for more than 95% of the race. Finalists: 12) Splits Keter Kiptanui Lambruschini Birir Croghan Brand 1000m 2:44.5 5:30.4. 31 Jul 1996 1.1. leaving Kosgei to win. The Italian thus won an Olympic bronze after two consecutive fourth places.13 8:23. The lesser-known Obaid was allowed to compete. There was no decisive break. won by Jarso (8:16.3. 6. to fall at the first hurdle. Countries: 29.17) and The world’s top steeplechaser. Finalists: 15) 1. 3. Reuben Kosgei Wilson Boit Kipketer Ali Ezzine Bernard Barmasai Luís Miguel Martin Eliseo Martín Brahim Boulami Günther Weidlinger KEN KEN MAR KEN ESP ESP MAR AUT 8:21. 4. the World Champion. Koech led his teammates until just before the final water jump. Beijing.88). but by then he had been displaced as a threat to the Kenyans by Lambruschini. He went on to set the pace in the final.34 8:10. Joseph Keter KEN Moses Kiptanui KEN Alessandro Lambruschini ITA Matthew Birir KEN Mark Croghan USA Steffen Brand GER Brahim Boulami MAR Jim Svenøy NOR 8:07. That was the version of his name which appeared in the heats.25 8:14. and Lambruschini an easing up 63.4 2:44.08) – while the third was headed by Laid Bessou (ALG) in 8:21. before Koech. Sydney.33 8:11. 4.4. with only the second semi-final seeing a sub-8:20 race.64 8:13. Paul Kipsiele Koech. 8. though the leading pack was reduced to four – the three Kenyans and Obaid – by 2km (5:24. Birir moved to the front just after 2000m.32 8:26. gaining most of his winning advantage after the last water jump. His last lap was 59. 2. Just after the kilometre mark Birir caught his foot on Brahmi’s heel.11 8:06. though Boit and Luis Martin both challenged for the lead in the final lap. 6. Countries: 22.14 ahead of Boit Kipeketer. the other likely winner.8 lap to 64. 6.15 8:22.79 8:16.5 As in 1992 the heat militated against fast preliminary race times. Kipruto became the youngest-ever to win an Olympic steeplechase medal. Ezzine finished quickly to prevent a Kenyan sweep of the medals.39 (Competitors: 35.43 8:21. causing Kallabis. 2. 24 Aug 2004 Atlanta. Keter caught Kiptanui at the last water jump. and by the bell. The Kenyans had run a team race with perfect results. reached in 5:43.12 8:08.38 8:16. Nevertheless.2 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2000m 5:32. and Moussa Obaid – two Kenyan athletes who had transferred to Qatar in 2003.84 8:18. Luis Miguel Martin had joined the pack. Koech sprinted in to ensure Kenya’s second-ever clean sweep. Of the 12 previous available medals. The Kenyans swapped the lead among themselves for the first kilometre (2:42.8 in the penultimate lap. and the pace stayed slow through the second third of the race (5:33. Carosi faded badly just before 2000m.

91 (Competitors: 39.00 8:23. 2.90 8:25. He caught McLean by the eighth hurdle. Finalists: 2) The heats were won by Goulding in 18. and led by 4m at the first hurdle. McLean got a flying start in the final. the first to use the single arm thrust technique used by all the modern top hurdlers. Moloney and McLean then won repechage heats to qualify. The 2004 champion was never threatened and won easing up in one of the outside lanes. The Slovak-born Hungarian (aka Alojz Szokol) didn’t appear for the final. led by Cabral (2:52.2e 16. Moloney (16. Kraenzlein was the finest hurdler of his era.6. Battling him all the way was the surprising Mekhissi Benabbad.4e (Competitors: 6. Again. 1952-10.73m) was 15. 1 1 0 m H Men’s 3000 Metres Steeplechase. 1964-1. 2004-1.R I O 124 ★ O L Y M P I C 2 0 1 6 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S was reached in 7:11. Thomas Curtis Grantley Goulding Athens. when defending champion Kipruto caught his heel on Mekhissi’s ankle and fell. Behind him. Finalists: 5) Most Appearances 4 Cahit Önel TUR 3 1948-5h3. MEN’S 3000 METRES STEEPLECHASE The Best on Points 20 Bronisław Malinowski POL 19 Brimin Kipruto KEN 18 Ezekiel Kemboi KEN 16 Volmari Iso-Hollo FIN Alessandro Lambruschini ITA 1972-4. 4. and the first to run over the hurdles rather than jump.70) at 1000m. St. With just under two laps to go the race took a further negative turn. Countries: 27. However. 2004-2.03 8:23. 1936-1 1992-4. Countries: 2. as his opposition didn’t turn up. 1960-10h3. their positions reversed. The winner ran the last 100m in 13. Finalists: 4) . and he got to the line just under half a metre ahead. 5.26) at 2000m.87 8:24. 1988-4. 4. though his best over the slightly shorter 120y (109. Curtis’s speed told on the run-in. Mutai and Gari led until Kemboi swooped with 300m to go. Curtis started faster than Goulding and was quicker between the hurdles. losing 15-20m. 3 Sep 1904 1. In a frenetic final lap. winner of the other heat in 16. London. while Kemboi confirmed himself as one of the great championship runners. 2. and Mutai (5:43. 14 Jul 1900 Most Finals 3 Gaston Roelants BEL Malinowski Henry Marsh USA Lambruschini Kemboi Kipruto 1960-4. 1996-3 Paris.0 with Kemboi leading. 8.5m ahead.2.6 in his heat – a world best over the metric distance. and Hoyt decided to concentrate on the pole vault. 2. as Mekhissi moved from fourth with 200m remaining to repeat as silver medallist. 7. 4.5. which he won. 1932-1. 5 Aug 2012 1.4 from Alajos Szokolyi (HUN). continued Placing Table S B 4 5 6 G BUL 1 NED 1 NZL 1 YUG 1 LAT ALG AUT Totals 22 22 22 22 22 22 7 1 22 8 1 1 22 M Points 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 66 792 Breakdown RUS UKR LTU BLR ARM Totals of URS placings: 2 1 1 2 2 - 2 2 - 2 1 3 1 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 4 29 6 4 2 1 42 Breakdown GER GDR FRG Totals of GER placings: 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 - 1 1 1 1 0 2 25 6 4 35 110 Metres Hurdles 1. 6. and Kipruto (7:12. 1984-4.0e) and McLean (16. Alvin Kraenzlein John McLean Frederick Moloney Jean Lécuyer Norman Pritchard USA USA USA FRA GBR 15.56 8:19.6OR 17. 1964-10h2 21 men Placing Table G KEN 10 FIN 4 USA 1 GBR 2 SWE 2 FRA URS GER POL 2 ITA ESP BEL 1 ETH MAR AUS NOR HUN TAN QAT POR TCH - S 7 3 1 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 - B 4 2 3 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 - 4 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 - 5 1 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 3 1 1 6 1 4 3 1 2 3 1 2 1 - 7 3 5 2 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 - 8 1 5 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 - M Points 21 176 9 94 5 86 6 60 4 55 4 50 4 42 2 35 3 31 2 27 0 25 1 19 1 16 1 13 0 10 1 8 1 7 1 7 0 6 0 5 0 4 Kraenzlein improved the Olympic record to 15. 7 Apr 1896 USA GBR 17. 2008-1. with Kipruto taking the lead with 100m to go. 2. and by Curtis (18. (4) (1) (2) (3) Fred Schule Thaddeus Shideler Lesley Ashburner Frank Castleman USA USA USA USA 16.9e DNF (Competitors: 9. it was a world’s best for 110m hurdles.4OR 15. 1976-2.08 8:19. 1988-6 1. Lécuyer made the final without having to run. the big (190/79kg) Frenchman lost out only by a metre to Kipruto.73 8:20. 3.0 16. but Goulding’s better technique over the very solid barriers got him to the 10th hurdle in the lead. Countries: 6. Ezekiel Kemboi KEN Mahiedine Mekhissi Benabbad FRA Abel Mutai KEN Roba Gari ETH Brimin Kipruto KEN Evan Jager USA Hamid Ezzine MAR Donn Cabral USA 8:18.0) in seventh place. The unfortunate Kipruto finished a disconsolate fifth. 1980-1 2012-5 2012-1 3 0 0 0 m S C .0) from William Hoyt (USA). 3.0e) were much quicker than Pritchard. Louis.8e 15. Countries: 3. 2008-7. 3. 1968-7 1976-10.7e (Competitors: 9. with Matelong a further 4m back. and crossed the line 2. Finalists: 15) The pace in the final was funereal.

0 15. 2. Athens. 4. but fell at that barrier.2e 15. Shaw ran 15. but subsequently disqualified (under the rules of the day) for knocking over three hurdles. Atkinson was the fastest in the first round.0 15.2e 15. Countries: 9. and then the strength of the big (1.9e 15.2.8e 16. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 1 0 m H 125 Antwerp. a deeply religious man. Guthrie was just behind these two. Atkinson and Anderson soon went clear of Collier. 18 Aug 1920 1. the US Champion winning his heat in 16. By the eighth hurdle Nicholson had caught Wendell and Kelly. Kinsey was still just ahead of Atkinson and managed to stay 30cm ahead of the South African’s charge. 5. Countries: 15. and could not get back on terms with Leavitt and Healey. Duncker. 4. 2.2e (Competitors: 21.4 seconds slower than his best over 120 yards (109. the fastest of the 14 first round races. 5. winning by almost seven yards. with Ashburner a metre in third place. while six others ran 15.9 credited to Anderson was clearly incorrect as photos show him still behind the last hurdle prostrate as the winner finished. carrying a bible while running over a hurdle.73m). A time of 15. missing the Olympic Record by just one tenth of a second. 3. this time was 0.6 in the first semi-final. (2) (4) (3) (1) (5) Robert Leavitt Alfred Healey Vincent Duncker Hugo Friend Henri Molinié USA GBR RSA USA FRA 16. The Briton was three tenths faster than Garrels who won the last semi-final in an eased-up 16. the 1904 US Champion won the heats in 16. 2.9 behind Dye.3e 15.2. (6) (1) (4) (2) (5) (3) Earl Thomson CAN Harold Barron USA Frederick Murray USA Harry Wilson NZL Walker Smith USA Carl-Axel Christiernsson SWE 14. former world record holder Sten Pettersson also missed the final by one place. 6. Finalists: 6) Thomson had won the IC4A title in May in a world record 14. while Weightman-Smith was hindered by smacking a hurdle hard.8 in their heats. 6. He won by just under 2m in a metric world record of 14.4 15. with Atkinson just behind him.8. Photos showing Smithson. were taken after the race. Countries: 8. 5. was the first man to rise at the first obstacle. Rand.8 14.3 15. Another Swede.0. Healey led at the last hurdle. with Friend.0e 15. Friend hit the first hurdle. In a desperately close finish Atkinson edged Anderson by less than six inches. and George Chisholm (USA) was the fastest man in round 1 with 15. Finalists: 4) Smithson. who raced neck and neck the whole way.8.9).8e 14.0e 15. 4.2e 16. 2.1 15.5. after Gerard Anderson (GBR) led by 2m until falling at the eighth hurdle. and was followed by Smithson. 9 Jul 1924 London. 4.7e 15. The slow times were due to a headwind. who equalled the Olympic record.2 15.90/84kg) Canadian began to tell. 12 Jul 1912 1. These four were clear of their Swedish opposition approaching the last barrier. 4. 3. using his double arm shift whereby both arms were thrust forward as he crossed the hurdle. with Barron an equal distance clear of Murray and Wilson. winning the eighth and last heat in 15. and he was again quickest in the semis.0e 1. The two men then won their semi-finals in 15.0e 15. 5. as Wendell got home 2m ahead in 15.5. Smithson got a fine start in the final. Finalists: 6) (Competitors: 26. In the final Kinsey was leading at the first hurdle. The final got under way at the third time of asking. Chisholm placed second in his second round race. 25 Jul 1908 1.4e (Competitors: 15.8. Weightman-Smith was fastest in the first round with 14. Finalists: 5) Healey and Leavitt won their heats in 16. leaving Kelly to get home first with his last few strides.3 15.1) (Competitors: 28.5 DQ (knocked over hurdle) (15. but Leavitt got ahead by 30cm on the run-in. this time running a world record 14. Case and Nicholson were the fastest of the round with 15. and was a clear favourite. who also ran 15. He repeated that time in the semi-finals. (2) (1) (4) (3) Forrest Smithson John Garrels Arthur Shaw William Rand USA USA USA USA 15.8 from Healey (15.3. and Castleman. inches ahead of Wilson and Barron.5 DNF 1. and increased his lead on the grass course in the centre of the stadium throughout the race.2. just ahead of Atkinson and Anderson. 3.0WR 15. The first two heats saw Dye and Anderson clock 14.3e 16.6.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Schule. when Anderson fell after hitting the ninth hurdle hard.2 16. a South African who had trained in Germany and arrived in Athens with the German team.4.4 clockings. with Nicholson and Powell slowest away. and then Schule drew away to win handily from Shideler. the 1903 US Champion. and so missed the final. though on this occasion was just beaten by Guthrie. though Atkinson was off balance from hitting the last hurdle. 2.2. Amsterdam. He was threatened by the American for the first half of the race.5e (Competitors: 24. (5) (2) (6) (1) (3) (4) Fred Kelly James Wendell Martin Hawkins John Case Kenneth Powell John Nicholson USA USA USA USA GBR USA 15. 3. In the final Schule and Shideler ran together for half the race. The third race saw Rand win the closest semi-final in 15. Collier was fastest off the blocks in the final.8WR 15.4. but was beaten by Barron by 2m in 15. 3. Countries: 24. 5.0. 4. Though a world record.5. (3) (4) (2) (6) (1) (5) Sydney Atkinson RSA Stephen Anderson USA John Collier USA Leighton Dye USA George Weightman-Smith RSA Fred Gaby GBR 14. with Dye a similarly slim margin clear of Weightman-Smith for fourth place. Countries: 11. 3. with Guthrie just behind. Finalists: 6) The first two in each heat qualified for the second round. 1 Aug 1928 Stockholm. Garrels and Alfred Healey (GBR) all ran 15.2 in the first round. (5) (4) (6) (3) (2) (1) Daniel Kinsey USA Sydney Atkinson RSA Sten-Pelle Pettersson SWE Carl-Axel Christiernsson SWE Karl Anderson USA George Guthrie USA 15. Finalists: 6) (Competitors: 41. with Sweden’s teenager Eric Wennström just eliminated behind Gaby as both ran 14. Paris. In the final Barron was drawn in lane 1 with Thomson in the outside lane. Countries: 15. won the repechage heat in 17. 1 May 1906 1. 2. . equalling the Olympic record. Thomson.

He led until the eighth hurdle. (4) Harrison Dillard 2.1 to 14. (4) 5.91) (14. and had set a world record of 13. and Dixon (14.3y just before the Games. which he hit. with Davis clocking 14. 5. the first world class black hurdler.09 0.9 (Competitors: 28. while Calhoun and the talented Lauer ran 14.7OR 13.1 14. (3) Ken Doubleday 6.84) DQ (knocked over hurdle) (15. Towns went on to run 13. 3.4 ahead of Beard (14. Finalists: 6) In 1952 Dillard and Davis had been in a different class from the opposition. who first ran internationally in 1929. Finlay (14. (2) 2. but hit it. looking entirely unruffled by the pressure he had been under.2) and Porter (14.00) (14.2 14.57) 14. (5) Arthur Barnard 4. with whom he had tied for first in the US Olympic Trials.9OR 14.4).8). (6) 3.5.6 (13. Finalists: 6) Porter Scott Dixon Triulzi Gardner Lidman Differential 0. Beard caught the sixth barrier.79) 14. Towns caught him at the third hurdle.4 ahead of Triulzi. Davis closed on Dillard. 2.5OR 13. (2) Yevgeniy Bulanchik UKR 5.0 (14. and in Melbourne the superiority of the top two was even more emphatic.73) (14.3) were 0. Scott finished quickly. The British veteran. he was a yard behind Dillard. Lidman ran 14. Davis had a false start in the final. but he fell in the US Trials. (6) 5.2 14.7). just ahead of Pollard after the American had led for most of the race.14) 3m ahead of Barnard – 14. 2.15) (Competitors: 30.70) (13. catching Keller with a driving finish. 4.8 14.8 (14.2 (14. but Dillard was technically faultless. won by Bill Porter in an electrically-timed 13. a harsh rule in view of the hindering effect of hitting the old fashioned barriers. The biggest event in round 1 for the home crowd was the demise of Finlay. but was only just favoured over Calhoun. almost catching him. Towns was fastest in both preliminary rounds.5 14. The two men flashed across the line in 13.1 14. 5.9 in the first round.8 (14. 4 Aug 1948 (Wind: 1.04 behind 0.5 14. The margin scarcely varied from the 30cm Calhoun took at the start and Davis was never able to get closer. (1) 4. edging Scott. and was followed by Porter. The rivalry between the two men was bitter after Davis had stated that Calhoun was “a flash in the pan” and wouldn’t be able to go the distance outdoors. as less than one tenth of a second separated the first three men.0 (Competitors: 31. (4) Electrics Lee Calhoun USA Jack Davis USA Joel Shankle USA Martin Lauer GER/FRG Stanko Lorger SLO YUG Boris Stolyarov RUS URS 13. Welscher was disqualified for knocking over three hurdles. (2) (1) (6) (3) (4) (5) Forrest Towns Don Finlay Frederick Pollard Håkan Lidman John Thornton Larry O’Connor USA GBR USA SWE GBR CAN 14. 26 Nov 1956 (-1. The three selected Americans were clearly the class of the field.3 faster than anyone else in the heats.2.70 and 13.51 0. and went clear for good. 14. catching him when he hit the fifth hurdle.8 (14. but Porter held on in a frenzied finish. Melbourne. Countries: 18. Countries: 20.8) and Keller (14.73 respectively. and lost the silver to Finlay on the run-in. Dillard then won his semi-final in 14.72) 14.3 14. with Lidman inches behind in fourth place. 4.23) in his heat. and while he ran well at the second attempt. Countries: 20. were favourites for the gold and silver.8 14.01.6 (14.68) (14.7OR 14. one tenth ahead of Lord Burghley and Finlay.40) (14. Welscher (14. 6. Countries: 15. Davis’s rush was affected by hitting the seventh and ninth hurdles.9) 1.00 0.4 14.R I O 126 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Los Angeles. and Fritz Pollard.5. 3.82) (15. (5) 3. Finalists: 6) Beard (14.1 14. Dillard won by three-quarters of a metre.7 14.5 and then 14.5 behind Towns.7 three weeks later. but was well in the lead by then and won by more than a metre from Beard. with Lauer next fastest (14. when Porter surged past.71) (Competitors: 24. almost four tenths quicker than the next best in the field. Countries: 10. Experts considered that on a good hard surface and with no wind.1 to equal his world record.2 was clearly incorrect.2 ahead of Gardner’s 14. The official winning margin of 0. Finlay prevented a USA clean sweep.4 14. In the final Pollard got a superb start and led Towns by half a metre at the second hurdle. All three Americans ran 14. the time would have been three or four tenths faster.7 (14. Calhoun and Lorger were fastest off the blocks in the final.8 (13.1.3 14.1 14. (3) 6.44).59 0.0 (14. well clear of Bulanchik for third.83) 14. with Barnard 4m behind. (5) 6. (2) 2. easing up in 14. In the heats Davis and US third string Shankle ran 14.73) (14. (6) Ray Weinberg Electrics USA USA USA URS AUS AUS 13.66 Harrison Dillard was holder of the world record. clocking 14. London. some 0.6) in the other semi-final.5 14.4 (14.7 15.9) were the heat winners.3e) (Competitors: 17. Beard on the inside closed up on Keller. Davis ran an unratified 13.90. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 1 0 m H same differential remained in the semi-finals. a superb starter.62) after an atrocious start. The Dillard equalled Porter’s Olympic record of 13. while Saling equalled the world record of 14. who had run 14. (1) Jack Davis 3. Davis won the other semi. (5) (2) (3) (7) (6) (4) George Saling USA Percy Beard USA Don Finlay GBR Jack Keller USA Lord Burghley (David Cecil) GBR Willi Welscher GER 14. Helsinki.5OR 14.0 in the semi-finals. (1) 4. Pollard was still second at the 10th hurdle. by the first hurdle.4 14.0. 6 Aug 1936 1. and by the second hurdle it was clearly a duel between the two star Americans. when Dixon took over. and Keller then won the first semi-final in 14. Finalists: 6) Towns.1 four times before the Games. a time emulated by Finlay in winning the other semi. and Saling went into the lead. . an auto-timed 14.25) (14. remarkable running on a soft cinder surface into a strong headwind. In the final.67) (14.83/82kg) Scott was off the fastest and led until the third hurdle. Saling hit the 10th and stumbled. Finalists: 6) Berlin.4 in the US Championships. 3 Aug 1932 Electrics 1. 24 Jul 1952 (Legal) 1. The final got under way at 15:45 with Keller on the outside fastest away. as Dixon ran 14. the burly (1. was leading in heat 5 by a metre when he fell at the final hurdle. (3) against) William Porter Clyde Scott Craig Dixon Alberto Triulzi Peter Gardner Håkan Lidman Adjusted USA USA USA ARG AUS SWE 13.

with Ottoz in fourth after a dismal start. Calhoun falling past the line in his efforts. Lindgren won the other semi-final. with the Italian – for once without his trademark sunglasses – finishing fastest of all for fourth. a metre behind Lindgren. but Drut caught him at the fourth barrier and the Frenchman showed a powerful finish in cutting back Milburn’s lead. In the other heat Davenport duplicated Ottoz’s time in windless conditions with Coleman right next to him in second with 13.24WR 13.42) (13. (8) 8.7 (13. Jones. (5) 2.77) (14. The battle for third was similarly close.0) 1.0 (Competitors: 33.7 13. reputed to be the fastest starter in the world.49). But Jones’s speed (9. Lauer also ran 13. with Willie Davenport the US Trials winner back in seventh.4 for 100y) was too much for Lindgren. while Mikhailov failed to finish. Munich. 17 Oct 1968 (0. though the reigning champion was in silver medal position until the eighth hurdle. Drut got an electrifying start in the final.6 13. Taking advantage of a near-maximum legal wind (1. (3) 5.0. and Ottoz the slowest qualifier for the final with 14. and held 30cm of that lead at the finish.0) 1. reached in a new world record time of 13.0 14. (3) 5.54). (2) 2.9 in his heat.5 – an Olympic best of 13.7 (13. The slow time is explained by the strong crosswind.38) to smash the Olympic record. (4) 6.87) to 14. Behind him Hall and Coleman battled for second.87) to 14.71 13. (1) 3. well clear of Drut (13.7 13. Finalists: 8) (13. (1) 3.76 13. Calhoun had a similar victory over Lauer in the second semi 13.3) 1. and Casañas went past Munkelt.49) and Davenport (13.4 13. (6) 5.7 (13.57 and 13. Finalists: 8) With five to qualify from each of the three first round heats.9.73 13.44 13. by the first hurdle. Lindgren closed all the way. Hall ran a lifetime best of 13. Countries: 17. Behind him.09) (14. and confirmed their form with semi-final wins of 13.34 13.45 from Munkelt (13. (5) 2. competing in his fourth straight Olympics. Finalists: 6) Calhoun.1 (14.93 13. Hill edged Davenport for third. He was pushed by Anatoliy Mikhailov (URS) in the second round. (7) 8. who had equalled the Lauer’s world record of 13. as did Davenport. with Casañas recovering from a poor start.68. Hill was second early on.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Rome. before catching Davenport at the 10th hurdle. Countries: 24. was favourite. For Jones.17) (Competitors: 37.38 13.3OR 13. (7) 4. (1) 6. (3) 4. the Russian running 13. (6) 6.8 14. (4) Rod Milburn Guy Drut Thomas Hill Willie Davenport Frank Siebeck Leszek Wodzyński Lubomir Nádeníček CZE Petr Čech CZE USA FRA USA USA GDR POL TCH TCH 13. Davenport blasted the start in the final.46) (13.02) Milburn and Hill were the fastest in the heats with 13. Milburn.33 13. 18 Oct 1964 (2.6 13. Hill displayed a dreadful start and great fluidity over the hurdles in edging Drut (13. also in 13. (2) 8. (2) Electrics Hayes Jones Blaine Lindgren Anatoliy Mikhailov RUS Eddy Ottoz Gurbachan Singh Marcel Duriez Giovanni Cornacchia Giorgio Mazza USA USA URS ITA IND FRA ITA ITA 13.8). Countries: 24.0 14.22).73) (13.1. (6) 2.6 (13. the gold was won at the start.48 13. which hindered the balance of the runners.8 13. while Milburn also came from behind in beating Siebeck (13. Finalists: 8) Tokyo.0) 1.1 (14. in the wet and cold (14°C).9. (3) 7.7 13. Mikhailov won the first semi in 13. then Foster. . running 13. Casañas then ran 13. was almost a metre clear at the first hurdle.09) (14. maintaining half of that lead to the tape.78) (13. As in 1956. As in the three previous finals. Calhoun took a metre advantage by the first hurdle in the final. Countries: 27. clocking 14. and his principal opponent then tried to cut away the deficit.9w.55) (14. while Foster ran the fastest of the day with 13. and ripped to a 2m lead by the sixth hurdle. there was little pressure on the favourites.6 13. (8) 8.65). (1) 6. 5 Sep 1960 (0.61 on electric timing. Coleman hit the sixth hurdle.20) (14.0 (14. 7 Sep 1972 (0.84) (14.41 13.4 13. (4) 2. Mexico City. Hall 13. May was perhaps six inches behind at the last hurdle and closed to within three inches as both lunged desperately for the tape. losing silver by 30cm.30 13. On the next day.5 (13. with Jones easing through in 14. (5) 7. After Foster won the first semi-final in 13. Montreal.53) home in the first semi-final.74) (13. He gained on Hall all the way to the finish. The top five were all in with a chance of gold until the eighth hurdle.55). impeded by an injured thigh.0 14. led by Davenport.8 14. and was never threatened. which on electric timing was 13.0) 1.94 (Competitors: 24.33) (13. Drut led by half a metre at the 10th.0 then 13. the world record holder and favourite. (2) 7.4 14. shot out of the blocks in the final. it was the final outdoor race of his career.34. (3) 4. leading Ottoz – 13.75) and Coleman 13. Drut (14. Behind him Mikhailov and Ottoz closed rapidly. May won the first semi handily from Jones.8. (5) Electrics Willie Davenport Ervin Hall Eddy Ottoz Leon Coleman Werner Trzmiel Bo Forssander Marcel Duriez Pierre Schoebel USA USA ITA USA FRG SWE FRA FRA 13. but May was fastest in the first two rounds.7 14.86 (Competitors: 39.67) (13.7 (13. Countries: 21.50 13.47 respectively.24. (8) 4.62.1 (13. (5) Electrics Lee Calhoun USA Willie May USA Hayes Jones USA Martin Lauer GER/FRG Keith Gardner JAM BWI Valentin Chistyakov RUS URS 13. a remarkable record. (1) 5.5 (13. (6) 3. 13. (7) 3.98) (13.2 two weeks earlier.15). Finalists: 8) The first round saw no-one run faster than 14.71) (Competitors: 36. with Jones beating Lauer off the last hurdle by 30cm. where Drut got away from Davenport.77) – were the next fastest. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 1 0 m H 127 Ottoz equalled the Olympic record in the heats.44 and 13.12). (4) 7. (7) 5.1 14. (2) Guy Drut FRA Alejandro Casañas CUB Willie Davenport USA Charles Foster USA Thomas Munkelt GDR James Owens USA Vyacheslav Kulebyakin RUS URS Viktor Myasnikov BLR URS 13.04) eased through his race.3 (13. and he performed brilliantly under that pressure. and was fractionally ahead coming off the last hurdle.68) (13. France had expected Drut to win. 28 Jul 1976 (0. the fastest ever run.3.6 (13.99) (14. The three Americans – Davenport 13. and was slightly ahead of the rest.17) (14. who lost a little ground by leaning for the line too early. (6) 4.33.12) (14.58). and Ottoz went past. (8) 3.48).0 14. (4) 6.67) (13. flowing to victory in 13.72 13.

29 13.26 13.56 10.136 Foster. looking as fragile as balsa wood.02 clear of Pierce and Jarrett at the finish. and he powered through the finish a full three tenths ahead. the biggest margin of victory other than Smithson’s 1908 win.24 to edge fast-starting Mark McKoy’s 13.38 2.41 13.42 4. (5) 6.164 0.51 10. “I don’t know if glancing across at Roger cost me the race … I’m happy it’s over.50 8.150 0.62 11.161 0. (4) 7. Countries: 39.51 11. 28 Sep 1988 Reactions RUS USA GBR USA URS GBR GBR CAN USA 12.36 10. (6) 7. (2) 7. Blake and McKoy were three-quarters of a metre ahead of Kingdom at the first hurdle.145 0. (5) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Jackson ran the fastest time of the Games – 13. (2) 7.44 and 13.46 3. Kingdom gained all the way on Foster.48 6.38 3. (7) Reactions Thomas Munkelt Alejandro Casañas Aleksandr Puchkov RUS Andrey Prokofyev RUS Jan Pusty Arto Bryggare Javier Moracho Yuriy Chervanyev BLR GDR CUB URS URS POL FIN ESP URS 13. (6) 4.21) and McKoy (13.166 (Competitors: 23.54 9.056 12. Countries: 17.43 0.139 0. 0. who finished centimetres behind Munkelt. (8) 2. running 13. (3) 2.29). and Campbell hit five hurdles to preclude any possibility of a medal.55 10. (2) 4.47 9. who beat Jackson by four tenths in 13.39 5.64 6.37 in his semi-final.19 behind McKoy.056 seconds.38 13.43 6.09 13. Kingdom was biding his time. Finalists: 8) 0.44 4.01m) Schwarthoff impressive in the first heat with 13.145 0.58 10. (7) 6.44 6.9) 1.40 2. with Bryggare third and Kingdom fourth. Countries: 16.6) 1. In the final Casañas led the field to the first hurdle. (2) 7.46 8.54 13.20 13.30.23 13.28 13.62 11.17 13.10 – in winning the first heat.97A) had ever dipped below 13 seconds prior to Kingdom’s Olympic run. and Prokofyev fourth half a metre behind the East German.52 4 5. too superb as it happened. (8) 3. (7) 6.175 0.150 (Competitors: 26.164 0. (4) 2.42 3.142 0. Jackson outran Campbell over the last four hurdles to take silver. with Puchkov outleaning Prokofyev for third.40 13. Munkelt was in the lead.100 proscribed legal level.131 USA USA GER GBR CUB USA AUS CUB At hurdle: Johnson Crear Schwarthoff Jackson Valle Swift Vander-Kuyp Batte 1 2. and lost the race to Kingdom’s closing charge. (5) Reactions Roger Kingdom Greg Foster Arto Bryggare Mark McKoy Tonie Campbell Stéphane Caristan Carlos Sala Jeff Glass USA USA FIN CAN USA FRA ESP CAN 13. Dees held second throughout the race.52 13.24 13. although he was only 0.160 0. and when he did the same at the second.95 13.46 14. was the fastest in the first round. as the world’s top two men – Greg Foster and world record holder Renaldo Nehemiah.49 in the semi-finals. with Puchkov 20cm back.33 9.80 0.48 6.68 8.47).47 7.35 2.56 11. Atlanta.55 in the heats.30 7.41 7. His training partner.17.149 0. Puchkov hit the last hurdle so hard that it smashed. Kingdom ran a toned down 13.124 0. and off the last hurdle was inches behind.149 0.78 10 11. and McKoy started hitting hurdles.35 in the first heat.49 7. Jackson was still able to run 13. The Canadian started fastest in the final.32 6. (1) Reactions Allen Johnson Mark Crear Florian Schwarthoff Colin Jackson Emilio Valle Eugene Swift Kyle Vander-Kuyp Erick Batte 0. Kingdom was unaware that he’d won until he saw the video replay. (5) 5. (6) 4. (1) Mark McKoy Tony Dees Jack Pierce Tony Jarrett Florian Schwarthoff Emilio Valle Colin Jackson Hugh Teape CAN USA USA GBR GER CUB GBR GBR 13.151 0. but the favourite.62 7 8.17. rather quicker than the 0.37 4. (4) 4.46 8.12 13. Finalists: 8) (1. The following heat in round 2 was won by Pierce.26.8) 1.40 13.144 0. Casañas gained all the way from the third hurdle.44 4.36 2.39 13.39 6. and won his next race in 13.12) were the winners in the semi-finals. Kingdom then equalled Foster’s 13. but hit the first hurdle.27. just holding off the powerful closing rushes of Ridgeon and Jarrett.51 11. (2) 8.83 .54 4.68 13. just ahead of Campbell (13.36 2.47 5. (6) 3.151 0. while Foster was characteristically philosophical about second place. (8) 5. (4) 2.142 0.68 8 9. (4) 8.15 0. In the second round Kingdom clocked 13. Los Angeles. McKoy.36 2. Pierce (13. after Bryggare had impressed with 13. The Russian bumped Munkelt and both lost ground to Casañas.42 3.93) and Kingdom himself (12.96 (Competitors: 41.40 2 3.23 ahead of Jarrett (13.71 13. 29 Jul 1996 (0. From that point on Kingdom was at least three hundreths faster between each hurdle than the rest of the field.170 Seoul.23 13.30 8. (3) 8. (1) 6. Casañas and Munkelt were the fastest in the first two rounds.46 3.54 10.80 14. with 13.45. (3) 4. the Canadian rocketed off the blocks.46 and 13.48 5.58 5.44 3.98OR 13. the World Champion and favourite.61 7.46. (8) 8. (3) 5.63 6 7.55 13. while Shishkin won the race for fourth.36 11. but Blake quickly fell apart. 27 Jul 1980 (0. Only Nehemiah (12. Finalists: 8) This was one of the worst hit events of the Moscow Games.24 in the first semi-final. an Olympian for the third time.76 13.46 5. (1) 3.24 in the first round. was the second quickest in the first round with 13.58 5 6. and at the 10th was just behind.R I O 128 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Moscow. 0.26 13. (6) 2. (5) 5.15 ahead of Blake.144 0. and Foster took the lead. Foster looked across from lane 1 to Kingdom out in lane 8. who between them ran 14 of the 15 fastest times of 1980 – were missing because of the boycott.00 (Competitors: 39.64 9.19 13.45 13.38 3. as he reacted in 0. In the final.151 0.64 9 10.48 8.5) 1.159 0.44 7.39 4. but injured his ribs in the next round.83 11. (1) 3. the fastest quarter-final ever.44 8.50 9.129 0. Behind them Bryggare held off McKoy. succeeded by 13.48 3 4.54 9.12 of the day.137 0. Countries: 27. which he hit hard. with the tall (2.36 5.46 4.61 13. with the result that Kingdom caught him at the fourth barrier. Despite hitting six hurdles.49 13. Finalists: 8) 0. 3 Aug 1992 (0. ran an Olympic record 13.78 10.78 15. 6 Aug 1984 (-0.20OR 13. (8) 8.133 0. Finalists: 8) Barcelona.” Roger Kingdom Colin Jackson Tonie Campbell Vladimir Shishkin Jon Ridgeon Tony Jarrett Mark McKoy Arthur Blake 1 1 0 m H Campbell. (3) 5. In the final Blake got a superb start.4) 1.34 2. leading to the first hurdle. while the other semi-final was won surprisingly by Shishkin in 13. and Foster himself again ran 13.51 13.40 13. (7) 6.49 9.170 0.179 0. and only smacked the last hurdle en route to his second 13.44 13.40 7. Countries: 31.160 (Competitors: 62. and was below par after that.43 5. (7) 3.

184 0. 27 Aug 2004 Reactions Liu Xiang Terrence Trammell Anier García Maurice Wignall Stanislav Olijar Charles Allen Mateus Inocêncio Ladji Doucouré CHN USA CUB JAM LAT CAN BRA FRA 12.172 0.53 DQ (r168.21).94. but the big shock came in the second race. with Jackson (13. (3) (5) Reactions Aries Merritt Jason Richardson Hansle Parchment Lawrence Clarke Ryan Brathwaite Orlando Ortega Lehann Fourie Dayron Robles USA USA JAM GBR BAR CUB RSA CUB 12. Liu appeared incomfortable as he practised his starts.16 13.154 0. and Doucouré’s quickness came to the fore. (7) 4.18. (4) 3.48 13. and the next day ran 13. Athens.169 0.6) 1.21 13. Countries: 32. García closed in on the American. (6) 2. (9) Reactions Dayron Robles David Payne David Oliver Ladji Doucouré Artur Noga Maurice Wignall Richard Phillips Jackson Quinonez CUB USA USA FRA POL JAM JAM ESP 12. The American was appreciably quicker than anyone else in the first round. (2) 5. Dorival (13. Liu and Trammell led at the first hurdle in the final. 8 Aug 2012 0.14. but which saw the demise of Allen Johnson. Reigning champion Liu Xiang and 12.3) 1. Jackson – in his fourth consecutive final – hit too many barriers to have any medal chances. The favourite to regain the title won in 1996 hit three hurdles hard.76 1 1 0 m H 129 escaped from Trammell at the fourth hurdle.30) was the fastest in the first round.43 13. Two-time finalist Jarrett had a desperate time. His coach later appeared in tears on Chinese television which also showed behind-the-scenes coverage of Liu before the heat when he could be seen kicking a wall in frustration. skewed the 10th and slipped to last place after losing his balance.221 (Competitors: 44.174 0. as he moved into second place by the eighth. The last two heats were dramatic as first Terrence Trammell – silver medallist in Atlanta and Athens – pulled out injured after one hurdle. . Crear matched Johnson in the final until the fourth hurdle.33) and Jackson (13.18) impressive behind him.30. he failed to complete one race. After the first start there was a recall and after that point Liu withdrew. Merritt.10 prior to the Games. Jackson and Valle.87w to 12.21) and a resurging Doucouré (13. Reigning champion García was next quickest with 13.46 13.10) ahead of Parchment’s Jamaican record of 13. Trammell won a close race in the other heat in 13. In the other semi. (6) 3. Finalists: 8) Merritt had ducked under 13 seconds no less than five times prior to the Games.175 0. Countries: 34. (7) 4. ahead of Trammell’s 13. Oliver (13. In more than a decade of international hurdling Johnson had only once previously fallen. Countries: 29.23) was again fastest in the first heat of the next round. The Frenchman hit the ninth. Liu (-0. (6) 4.40 13.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Jackson (13.187 (Competitors: 42.93 13.13. shocking the 91.22 13. which resulted in the Briton’s disqualification.143 0.194).18 13. He was clearly nursing a foot injury. went out with 13.91.214 0.17. Robles (13.182 0. (2) 8. (9) 7. with Schwarthoff very impressive in running 13. but Liu hit the first hurdle hard and fell with a damaged Achilles. Sydney.00 13.172 0. Then in the final heat. (7) 4. (3) 2.19) and Wignall (13.87.39 13.17) and Valle (13.64 in a heat won by Jackson in 13.32 from Johnson (13.194 0.135 0. Robles looked very easy winning his semi-final in 13. after Payne (13.49 13.61 0. (8) Reactions Anier García Terrence Trammell Mark Crear Allen Johnson Colin Jackson Florian Schwarthoff Dudley Dorival Robert Kronberg CUB USA USA USA GBR GER HAI SWE 13.33.91=WR 13. 13. Countries: 35.36 13.95. who in June had lowered the world record to 12.3) 1. Doucouré (13.169 0. Trammell won the battle for silver.244 Reigning champion Johnson and Anier García were the favourites. the only men under 13. despite a sluggish reaction time (0. won by Olijar (13.17 13. Doucouré again improved in the other race with a magnificent 13. 25 Sep 2000 (0.22).31 ahead of Poland’s rising star Noga (13.28 13. ahead of Payne (13. zipped to the fastest ever semi-final time of 12. Payne was second from start to finish. (5) 3. (4) 3. Robles had the winning of the final by the time he reached the first hurdle.23. (2) 7.16 to 13.000 crowd.169 0. while Crear duplicated Johnson’s reaction time and struggled to run 13.164 0.04 13. a time which was unusually amended to a world record equaling 12. while Oliver won the other semi in 13.139 0. Liu flowed onwards oblivious to the events behind him.204 (Competitors: 47. He flowed majestically away from the field barely touching two of the hurdles.34). and won by 2½ metres. finally falling at the ninth.24 13.161 0.18 13.28) were the fastest in the first two rounds.06. (1) 6. (3) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S The favourite was Robles. García was an easy winner of the first semi-final from Crear 13.163 0. with Doucouré lagging after a very slow reaction to the gun. Beijing. (3) 8. 13. Crear finished a metre clear of Schwarthoff. (4) 2. taking just seven strides compared with eight by all the other finalists. (8) 5.95 performer Oliver were regarded as the most likely to beat the Cuban. but lost to 2004 champion Liu Xiang 12.20 13. Johnson returned the next day to win the first semi-final in 13. 21 Aug 2008 (0.7b) (42. (1) 7. with temperatures of 27° and with largely favourable following winds. Reigning champion McKoy. when the US Trials winner (in a US record 12.27. falling after cramping and accidentally hindering Germany’s Eric Kaiser. (8) 6. Crear ran the fastest ever quarter-final with 13. whose emergence at high world class in 2012 was attributed to his conversion from eight to seven strides at the start of his race. and García edged Wignall and Olijar for bronze.94.10.22 behind Swift (13.12 13.23 13. (6) 2. Doucouré opened proceedings by setting a French record of 13.28). with Duane Ross (USA) eliminated despite running 13.13. Wignall won the first semi-final ahead of Liu. (5) 5. (8) 8.60 13.86) 0.49 13. but settled down to race.17 to 13. and reached the line in the photo-cell time of 12. Finalists: 8) (0.34). while race favourite Johnson won the final heat in 13. with both running lifetime bests.159 (Competitors: 44.183 0. (5) 5.139 London. For the second successive Games.16 in the last quarter-final.154 0.26 was necessary to make the final.24.18. (4) 6.1) 1.69 0. overtaking Johnson on the run-in for the bronze.32w) were the fastest in round 1.36) had won the other heats.169 0.139 0.14. Crear repeated his solid semi-final.158 0. and just held off the charge of Oliver. Finalists: 8) 0.92) drew clear to win in 12.26) ahead of Garcia (13.24).36) and Vander-Kuyp (13. (7) 7.96 earlier in the season. when the Chinese athlete’s cleaner hurdle clearances began to tell. García was the smoothest in the final and won easily from Trammell.13) and the sharp looking Robles (13. The other races in that round were taken by Richardson (13.42 13.21 13.33) and World Champion Jackson (13.163 0. (2) 6. now running for Austria.170 0.136 0.92 13. 0. Finalists: 8) Conditions were perfect for the heats.

seven contained a single runner.0 53. 1992-4. 1996-dq/q1.0e 58. 1968-8s2. Robles pulled up with a leg injury at the eighth hurdle and crossed the line in 42. 1996-5q3 Arnaldo Bristol PUR Placing Table G USA 20 GBR CUB 2 GER 1 FRA 1 URS CAN 2 RSA 1 SWE JAM ITA AUS POL FIN CHN 1 ARG NZL ESP BAR BWI IND LAT YUG TCH BRA HAI Totals 28 Tewksbury won the first heat in 61.971. 31 Aug 1904 (76. (2) Frank Waller 3. The two Americans were well clear of the Britons by halfway. 1968-1. Merritt’s performance capped a series of runs among the best ever seen in the event. Hillman needed that time. and Tauzin the other (no time was announced. though the New York Times refers to Orton beating Tauzin. 1972-4. (4) (3) (2) (1) Charles Bacon Harry Hillman Jimmy Tremeer Leslie Burton USA USA GBR GBR 55. but Bacon was swifter on the run-in. 2000-5 1960-1 1988-1 1980-7s2. as Harry Coe ran 57. (3) George Varnell USA USA USA USA 53.92. 1992-1.9e (Competitors: 5.4e (Competitors: 4.0 behind him. 1956-1. and at the last hurdle. 1996-6h8 1964-6h1. 1976-6s2 1964-7s1. 1976-3 1984-4. Four of the five starters qualified for the final. 2000-6 1988-6. Countries: 6. Walter Tewksbury Henri Tauzin George Orton USA FRA CAN 57. Bacon’s time became the first ratified world record. Tewksbury went into the lead from the gun. when Merritt took charge.R I O 130 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C In the final Robles and Merritt were fastest away with the Cuban slightly ahead until the third hurdle. but William Lewis did not compete in the final. 15 Jul 1900 1.0. and then lost almost all of his advantage when hitting the eighth hurdle hard. 1984-1. 2. 2000-6 Most Appearances 5 Carlos Sala ESP 4 Davenport McKoy CAN/AUT Jackson Schwarthoff Tony Jarrett GBR S 20 4 2 1 1 28 B 17 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 27 1972-4.4. Olympic records were set in the heats by Bacon with 57. Finalists: 4) There were 12 heats. 4. Finalists: 3) MEN’S 110 METRES HURDLES The Best on Points 19 Willie Davenport USA 18 Colin Jackson GBR 16 Lee Calhoun USA Roger Kingdom USA 1968-1. 22 Jul 1908 1. 3.0e (Competitors: 15. but was never able to get close to Merritt.3e 58. 1988-7. Countries: 4.0. held on a Sunday. Hillman led by half a metre. but was disqualified for deliberately knocking over a hurdle. 2. 1912 Not held . then Hillman in the second round with 56. and Orton closed on Tauzin at the finish. 19925q2. The “hurdles” were a series of 30-foot long telegraph poles. as only the winners qualified. while other sources refer to Tauzin’s loss in the final being his first ever defeat). 1976-3 1992-7. a creditable effort as he won the 2500m steeplechase that day! 1988-5q1. 1984-7. 1996-4. Hillman built up a comfortable lead from the start. 1996-3. winning by two yards. and was never headed. Poage became the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal in an athletics event. 1992-1 1992-5.6OR 58. more than a metre ahead of Richardson and Parchment – the first Jamaican medallist in the event. Most Finals 4 Jackson 3 Davenport Mark McKoy CAN Florian Schwarthoff GER 1984-4. 1896 Not held Paris.4cm.0WR 55. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S H u r d l e s 400 Metres Hurdles Athens. except for the final hurdle – a water jump. (4) Harry Hillman 2. 1906 Not held London. who won in 12. 3. with his fastest 10 races up to the Olympic final averaging 12. winning by less than two yards. Athens. 1972-6h1. Richardson passed Robles at the fourth. Louis. 1992-5. 2000dq/h1 4 10 3 2 2 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 27 5 3 5 1 4 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 24 6 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 20 7 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 13 8 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 12 M Points 57 471 5 78 5 47 2 43 2 39 2 37 2 30 3 27 1 26 0 16 1 14 0 13 0 11 1 9 1 8 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 83 911 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 GDR 1 FRG Totals 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 4 1 1 - - 1 1 0 2 23 16 4 43 Breakdown RUS UKR BLR Totals of URS placings: 2 2 2 1 3 - 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 0 0 2 30 5 2 37 Breakdown of TCH placings: CZE Totals - - - - 1 1 1 1 0 0 3 3 St.86. 1988-7. though in 1900 a silver medal was won by a black Frenchman in the tug-of-war. and Hillman had to fight him off after knocking over the last hurdle. Waller almost caught him at the next hurdle. and one heat listed had no competitors.3e 57. Coe had the galling experience of running the second fastest time of the semi-finals and yet not making the final. 1996-3. Stockholm. Countries: 1) The race was held over hurdles set at 76cm rather than the standard 91.2 cm) 1.2e 58. (1) George Poage 4. 1988-2. 1988-6s1.

and almost fell.0) were quickest in the heats. 5.6e 54. 2. 4. Accordingly. Loomis took the lead.3 . after Brookins was disqualified for running out of his lane. Facelli hit the hurdle. set at the Western US Trials two months earlier.6. Experts were greatly surprised to see Tisdall then equal the Olympic record of 52. 2. a world record.7e was clearly well behind fifth place.4=OR 53.2 over 440y.6. 31 Jul 1948 Adjusted 1.0 52.2e 55. affected by wind. Amsterdam. Christiernsson drifted out into lane 2 in the finishing straight. while Daggs. At the eighth hurdle Burghley led by half a metre from Cuhel. Brookins went clear in second place in the finishing straight.0) following Hardin and edging out George Golding (AUS). and passed the Frenchman in the last 50m to give the USA a clean sweep. Finalists: 7) Brookins was the fastest in the heats with 54. He knocked over the last barrier. Loaring finished quickly.. Countries: 20.9) and Burghley (53.9WR 52. The other semi was won by Patterson in 52.96) (52.85) (51. without ever doing any training.8 set by Hardin in the first semi-final. was won by Riley in 56. and Taylor won the first and faster semi-final in 53. 4. 5.5e beating Luigi Facelli (ITA) by 2m for the last qualifying spot. Norton and Desch closed on André.. with Areskoug. Countries: 13.0e) (Competitors: 23. Taylor and Burghley. 1 Aug 1932 (Competitors: 19. 4 Aug 1936 1.01. with Wilén 55. (3) (6) (4) (5) (2) (1) Bob Tisdall IRL Glenn Hardin USA Morgan Taylor USA Lord Burghley (David Cecil)GBR Luigi Facelli ITA Kjell Areskoug SWE 51. 3.3) (56. André went out hard from the gun.8 52. and led at halfway.7 51. (1) (5) (4) (3) (2) (6) Morgan Taylor Erik Wilén Ivan Riley Géo André Charles Brookins Frederick Blackett USA FIN USA FRA USA GBR 52. and lost ground 131 Electrics 1. thereby losing a world and Olympic record. Los Angeles.2 (53.9e. and it was only with two hurdles to go that Hardin got clear. Burghley’s full name was David George Brownlow Cecil. with Wilén 3m behind.3e) and the other three Americans ducked under 56 seconds. 16 Aug 1920 1. He coasted through the heats in 53.55). 2. Burghley and Livingstone were the early leaders of the final.7e 54. 7 Jul 1924 1. Lord Burghley. while André.0 54.05. Livingstone won the other semi in 54. Berlin. his winning margin.5e.5e) DQ (r163. Facelli and Healey all running 53. sometimes credited with running 55. the Briton looking particularly easy. Blackett was similarly disqualified in a highly eventful race. Brookins was again fastest in the semi-finals with 54. and subsequently the sixth Marquis of Exeter. Patterson caught the leaders at the next hurdle. was slightly inferior to Norton’s 54.6e 53. but was deprived of a world record by the foolish rule which prevented a record if any hurdle was knocked over – in Taylor’s case.4 52.3) (53. Wilén was credited with the Olympic record . Taylor closed in on Cuhel. Countries: 13. 6.2 51. with the Philippines’ athlete just ahead at the fourth hurdle. and was never threatened. White – 53.2 and Tisdall with 54. 4.4. with Taylor (52.67) (51.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Antwerp.8) and Burghley (54. He later became President of the IAAF and a Vice-President of the IOC. 3.1 52. As he began to tire.9.6e 53. Both races were close affairs. which slowed the race by about a second. Behind him. Finalists: 6) Hardin had improved the world record by more than a second in 1934 with a startling 50. Finalists: 6) Cuhel (54. 5. 3. and by the final hurdle was 5m clear. Finalists: 6) Joe Healey (USA) with 54. André – the 1908 high jump silver medallist – was second to Desch with 55.8OR 54. with the Briton losing bronze by just 0.2). just ahead of Taylor 54. Burghley chopped his stride approaching the last hurdle. 2.7 in the US Trials) by 0.2 53. Hardin was battled by White for the first half.15) ahead of fastest heat winner. 5.01) (Competitors: 18.5 (53. Countries: 13. (3) (5) (2) (4) (1) (6) Frank Loomis John Norton August Desch Géo André Carl-Axel Christiernsson Charles Daggs USA USA USA FRA SWE USA 54. 3.8.2. The other semi. and Pettersson finished fastest of all. 6.8 53.1OR 51. (6) (3) (5) (1) (4) (2) Glenn Hardin John Loaring Miguel White Joseph Patterson Sylvio Padilha Hristos Mantikas USA CAN PHI USA BRA GRE 52.4 (53. 6. and Livingstone began to lose ground after halfway.0 54.5m ahead of Hardin. and won his semi-final in 53. in his fourth race at the distance.6 53. and had been undefeated in 11 races since 1932. ahead of Cuhel (53.8e 54. (5) (1) (3) (2) (6) (4) Lord Burghley (David Cecil) GBR Frank Cuhel USA Morgan Taylor USA Sten Pettersson SWE Tom Livingstone-LearmonthGBR Luigi Facelli ITA 53. 2.0WR 54.6 (51. André and Taylor were off the best in the final.8. and cleared it ahead of Cuhel by a metre. London.7 52. With a better hurdle clearance he would likely have run 51. with Pettersson edging out John Gibson. both at their third and final Olympics. 4. moving from fourth to second in the last 50m.2 DQ (r163. Tisdall was ahead early in the final. (3) (5) (6) Roy Cochran Duncan White Rune Larsson USA SRI SWE 51.2 (Competitors: 32. Loomis’s time.4e 57. recovering to struggle home 1. The second race was even closer behind Tisdall.1 was better than the previous Olympic record. 3. the number three American.8e (Competitors: 25. Finalists: 6) Loomis was fastest in the heats with 55. Countries: 9.2. Taylor won by a good 6m. each ran lifetime bests.4.8. Paris. who unexpectedly beat out Dale Schofield (51. with Taylor and Facelli inches behind the reigning champion. 3. Tisdall’s weight had plummeted from 75kg to 71kg in Los Angeles and he spent 15 hours a day asleep in the last eight days before racing.6) and Taylor (55.42) – and Mantikas – 53.0). but did not impede Desch. as Wilén came up for third. the last barrier.0 54. and it was only at halfway that the 35 year-old Frenchman had to give way to the American. 30 Jul 1928 1.8. 4. while he and Desch were the semi-final winners in 55. 2. By the eighth hurdle Taylor was 3m clear.3 52.0 from Facelli (54. were the fastest heat winners.5e F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 4 0 0 m H rapidly. Riley and Brookins were level. as only Wilén (55. The final was marred by a strong wind against the runners in the back straight.6. whose 53.2 56. 6.8e 55.

6 54. Tokyo. while the others tailed off.36) (54. Jeff Kirk (USA) placed fifth. taking a slight lead over Lituyev.0 (50. 4. The US third-string – Culbreath – was fastest in the heats with 50.1). and the semi-finals were won by Lituyev – 51.5. well ahead of Cros (52. 4. The field was level in the final until hurdle three. The American began to move clear after the ninth barrier.8 (49. Cooper in 50.90) – and Moore 52. 6. . 5. The South African hit the last barrier and fell.4 (51.81) (53. Countries: 23.6 53. but had to chop stride at that barrier. Davis only began to pull back after the sixth hurdle. the US Champion and son of Glenn. and Cawley in 49. Finalists: 6) Cochran White Larsson Ault Cros Missoni Differential 0. 5 6.26 2. Davis made a big effort round the curve. Davis and Cushman both finished powerfully.8 (51. Countries: 26.49) (Competitors: 40. as he broke the world record in the US Trials with 49. (6) (4) (8) (2) (3) (7) (1) (5) “Rex” Cawley John Cooper Salvatore Morale Gary Knoke Jay Luck Roberto Frinolli Vasiliy Anisimov UKR Wilfried Geeroms USA GBR ITA AUS USA ITA URS BEL 49. 2. (4) (1) (2) Dick Ault Yves Cros Ottavio Missoni 2 0 1 6 USA FRA ITA ★ O L Y M P I C 52.0 (49. 6. while Moore was taking 15 paces between barriers. won the second semi in 51. 5. 2.8OR 51. 2 Sep 1960 Electrics 1. For the first time three rounds were required to arrive at six finalists. Cochran.8 (50.2. Helsinki. He kicked hard and finished in a good 50.08).1 (50.7 51.6 50.98) (51.8 (50. His talent over 400m hurdles came to the fore five years later. Southern led in the final.2 (50.8 (51. Countries: 24. passing the fifth hurdle in 22.5.2 52.7 49.7 with Davis two yards behind.7 in the earlier 50.4 (Competitors: 39. Countries: 18. and was co-favourite with Potgieter who had run a world record 49. and Southern’s pattern was 15 strides between hurdles rather than his usual 13 (to hurdle seven).89) and Howard – 50.74) (51. and was only fourth at the eighth hurdle.8 (50.3OR 49.06) (51.07). at which point Cushman was last.05) (50.3 52.9 (51. These two were the semifinal winners.4 50.00 1. a rare instance of poor seeding. with White comfortably holding off Larsson for the silver medal.26) (52. 24 Nov 1956 Electrics 1.9.5).4 (50. and slipped back to sixth. A month before the Games the South African was badly injured in a car crash.8 53.89) in front of Frinolli – 50. In the early rounds only Cushman – 50. who qualified from the other semi. It worked well.9 50.8 51. The surprise of the semis was the elimination of Billy Hardin. Finalists: 6) Before 1956 Southern had two races at one-lap hurdling under his belt. 3.R I O 132 4. 3. In the second round he coasted in.1 50.0 52.1 50.4 (50. Southern and Davis were drawn in the same semi-final.94) (51. and his much greater quarter-miling speed took him home more than 3m clear.93) (Competitors: 28. He enhanced his status as the man to beat by being more than a second faster than anyone else in the first two rounds – with 51.1 51.0 (52. 21 Jul 1952 Electrics 1. Finalists: 6) Moore had run 50. 5.97). two more than Davis. 2. who hit the 10th hurdle when in fourth place.88) – and John Cooper – 50.9 (50. the semifinals offered much more excitement.29) (50.4 53. Ault just took second ahead of White (both 52.6 or better. Only Cawley – 50. then 50.5 (50. Davis struggled. and six others ran under 52 seconds.90) (50.1 a month before Tokyo.78).7 (50. 3. with Southern F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 4 0 0 m H just behind at 49. Countries: 17.18 2. The time of 49. where he held half a metre advantage. 3.9 quicker than Missoni. the favourite. with Potgieter 3m behind just ahead of Culbreath.1 54.28).8). The Russian was trying to run 13 strides between hurdles as far as possible. Melbourne. 16 Oct 1964 1. In the final Davis led to the second hurdle. but still an Olympic record. and gave Davis six of the nine marks of 49. In the US Trials Davis ran 49.7. and was level with Howard at the final obstacle. and the USA had another clean sweep.91) (51.3 for 440y at altitude earlier in the year. Davis’s time was equal third-fastest ever on hand timing.8 (50. He won easily.92) ran under 51 seconds.58) broke 51 seconds in the heats. 4.6. Cochran and White led the final until the fourth hurdle. accepting afterwards that he would otherwise have broken Hardin’s world record of 50. 7.1 (22. 6.40 just ahead of Luck 50.11) (Competitors: 34.5 50. Finalists: 6) Davis had again won the US Trials in 49. Missoni won fame and fortune in later life as a fashion designer in Italy.00 0. 0.48).6. and US number one as far back as 1939. just behind in 52.7 in the US Trials to become the second man to run under 51 seconds. 5. 6.6 51.6 49. passing the fifth hurdle in 23. He built on this lead and was more than 2m up at the last hurdle. (4) (2) (1) (5) (6) (3) Glenn Davis Eddie Southern Josh Culbreath Yuriy Lituyev RUS David Lean Gert Potgieter USA USA USA URS AUS RSA 50.76 behind 1. 4.43) and Morale 50. and was a metre up on Southern at the eighth hurdle.98). with Janz third and Cushman closing fast in fourth place. (6) (5) (1) (2) (4) (3) Glenn Davis Clifton Cushman Dick Howard Helmut Janz Jussi Rintamäki Bruno Galliker USA USA USA GER/FRG FIN SUI 49. and a great duel was lost.8 56. 8. with Arifon in the outside lane.7 51. not as fast as Tisdall in 1932.1=OR 50.95).26). and Howard and Janz went past him. 2. with the latter gaining a metre on Davis.3 was the third-fastest ever.8 51. Culbreath was a convincing winner of the other semi-final with 50. (6) (1) (3) (2) (5) (4) Charlie Moore Yuriy Lituyev RUS John Holland Anatoliy Yulin BLR Harry Whittle Armando Filiput USA URS NZL URS GBR ITA 50. Larsson won the first race in 51.77) (49.51) (49.9.85 After uneventful heats with White the fastest man in 53.51) (52. as he looked very easy in running the third fastest time ever of 50.3 54. and Moore then applied pressure. Rome. Finalists: 8) As an 18 year-old schoolboy Cawley became the only man ever to be a finalist in all three hurdle events (110m/200m/400m) at the US Championships. when Cochran took command and opened up a 5m gap on the field.2 (Competitors: 25. Davis caught Janz at the ninth hurdle. As it was Davis had two teammates who had also ducked below 50 seconds.

Finalists: 8) The fastest heat winners were Hemery with 49. as he had done in his semi.0 49. 6. gained on Hemery and caught him at the eighth.66 49. Six men ran quicker than 50 seconds in the first round. Taking 13 strides between the hurdles all the way. like his teammate. Countries: 24. 4. though.65 49.1. when Akii-Bua surged past to win in 49. while Kimaru Songok (KEN) had the chastening experience of running 50.2 (49. with Cooper’s strength telling at the finish. Mexico City.35 (Competitors: 22.5.2 at the sixth barrier to 0. the Edwin Moses (nine) and Harald Schmid (six) had the top 15 marks of the year. 6. but were not in Moscow because of the US-led boycott.29 – winning by more than 10m from Gavrilenko.0 (49.72. Luck caught Frinolli at the 10th hurdle. 7. 8. Los Angeles. wonderful under any conditions. Moses was the only man under 50 seconds in the heats (49. caught Frinolli at the ninth.30 in the US Trials. powering to the third fastest time ever – 48. Oakes blasted out from the gun in the final and led by a metre from Beck at halfway.7.06). Cushman in Vietnam in 1966. 2. with Arkhipenko third.1 in the other semi.45 49. 5 Aug 1984 1. and Moses was an unknown with a best of 51.80) and Vasilyev (49. 2. Unfortunate losers in the semis were Juan Dyrzka (ARG) and Gary Knoke (AUS) who ran 49. Countries: 25. and led by a metre at the first hurdle. 15 Oct 1968 Electrics 1. 6. the 20 year-old American devastated the opposition and came home to clock the first world record of his career. running 13 strides to halfway. Moscow. and then 14s alternating his hurdling leg. his time was .3).78). as was shown by no-one breaking 50 seconds in the heats. 3. and at the fifth hurdle all three were timed in 21.66 50.8 was only approached by Whitney (24.15). 49. 5. With Akii-Bua derailed because of the African boycott. a time good enough to make any previous final.06) to 49. 4. with Beck appearing to be holding back. but staggering from lane 1 for a hurdler leading with his right leg. Cooper and Knoke went by. By the fourth hurdle Skomorokhov and Hemery had joined the Italian up front. and Cooper in the 1974 Paris air crash which killed 346.02) (49. Pascoe.14) in the first semi. (8) (2) (1) (4) (5) (7) (6) (3) Volker Beck Vasiliy Arkhipenko UKR Gary Oakes Nikolay Vasilyev UKR Rok Kopitar SLO Horia Toboc Franz Meier Yanko Bratanov GDR URS GBR URS YUG ROU SUI BUL 48. 8. 25 Jul 1976 1. 0.07) (49. 3. 5. Finalists: 8) Munich. 7.19 48. (6) (2) (8) (3) (5) (7) (1) (4) David Hemery GBR Gerhard Hennige FRG John Sherwood GBR Geoff Vanderstock USA Vyacheslav Skomorokhov UKR URS Ron Whitney USA Rainer Schubert FRG Roberto Frinolli ITA 48. two more than in all Olympic history prior to 1958. Finalists: 8) (49.73) and Dieter Büttner (FRG.64 49. (4) (1) (8) (7) (3) (2) (6) (5) Edwin Moses USA Michael Shine USA Yevgeniy Gavrilenko BLR URS Quentin Wheeler USA José Carvalho POR Yanko Bratanov BUL Damaso Alfonso CUB Alan Pascoe GBR 47.95 ahead of French veteran Jean-Claude Nallet (50. and his superior hurdling technique and strength began to tell. 5. and catching Arkhipenko at the final barrier. Hemery led the first semi until the eighth hurdle.70 48. Frinolli ran a lifetime best of 49.84 50.13 48. Howard from a drugs overdose in 1967.25 from Mann (49. Finalists: 8) The altitude which had hurt so many distance runners here was a godsend to the 400m hurdlers.69 49. well clear of Vasilyev. Radiating energy. Moses was the favourite after running a US record 48. His second half of 24. Countries: 16.87) ducking below that mark in the semi-finals.19 51. which was enough for Mann to catch him on the line. 4.67 49. Montreal. being 9m behind Hemery at halfway. (3) John Akii-Bua Ralph Mann David Hemery James Seymour Rainer Schubert Yevgeniy Gavrilenko BLR Stavros Tziortzis Yuriy Zorin RUS UGA USA GBR USA FRG URS GRE URS 47. and the first of his 45 races under 48 seconds. thereby missing qualification.51 48. and he did so to the fifth hurdle. Oakes was a further 2m back. Hemery flagged a little on the run-in.0 49.66). The Soviet athlete worked hard around the final curve and caught the Briton at the eighth hurdle. with Morale in second place.27) (49. Beck was too strong for the Ukrainian over the last 40m and won by a long metre.01 slower than Frinolli. 3.1 (48. 2. 2. 2.07 ahead of world record holder Vanderstock.0 49. 8.86 49. Three of the 1960-64 medallists died prematurely. not in world-beating shape after injury.82WR 48. and won a medal which was wholly unexpected for the British. 5.30) (50. This event was seriously devalued without the best men in the event. with Akii-Bua and Mann just over a metre behind. after hitting the first hurdle so hard he almost fell.9) who misjudged the race badly. The East German kicked hard after the ninth hurdle.2 50. but hit it. and Morale. and reached the fifth in 21.03 50.12) (49. 7.86 49.29 (Competitors: 22.2 49.7 at the last hurdle.1 49. Seymour and Christian Rudolph (GDR) led at the 10th hurdle.03) (49. 2 Sep 1972 1. Countries: 19.34 49. Behind him.75 48.82 and 49.1WR 49. 4. Akii-Bua. His lead extended from 0. 26 Jul 1980 1. as all eight finalists ran faster in Mexico City than they ever did at low altitude.11 49. Gavrilenko (49. In the second semi-final Gary Knoke heard an echo when the gun went off and didn’t leave his blocks. Seymour was a metre behind.94 50. As in 1964 Frinolli was off first in the final. Hemery was in the lead by halfway (23. and only Arkhipenko (49. and went away to a comfortable win. In the final Hemery led by the first hurdle. (6) (4) (5) (3) Edwin Moses Danny Harris Harald Schmid Sven Nylander USA USA FRG SWE 47. took fourth in 49. Cawley pushed hard from the seventh hurdle. 3. 3. Hennige equalled Schubert’s European record with 49.95). Fastest was race favourite Whitney who edged Schubert 49. and then imposed himself on the field in the semis.53) and an easing up Hemery (49.65.61 in fifth place in the two races.52 48. Slowest qualifier was NCAA champion Wheeler.13) (Competitors: 30. Only Pascoe attempted to match Moses in the final.63WR 48.00 56.97 .R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Frinolli led the field for the first half of the final. going past the tiring Oakes. (1) (6) (5) (4) (7) (2) (8) 8.25 (Competitors: 37. 4. At the end of 1975 Pascoe was the world’s number one. =6.1 (49. without getting through to the next round. but Rudolph fell and Buttner then fell over him.12) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 4 0 0 m H 133 Ugandan ran away from the reigning champion to cross the line with the first ever sub-48 clocking.

(6) (5) (3) (2) (4) (7) (1) (8) Andre Phillips Amadou Dia Bâ Edwin Moses Kevin Young Winthrop Graham Kriss Akabusi Harald Schmid Edgar Itt USA SEN USA USA JAM GBR FRG FRG 47. 3.30).23 47. with Diagana fourth. missed his personal record. Seoul. Finalists: 8) Five of the seven heats were won with times quicker than 49 seconds.35) and Moses (49. were the next fastest.33. ran hard from the gun. 6. 7.09). was disqualified. It was in that year that Moses lost to Harris.01 (Competitors: 62. Matete. and he coasted through his heat.47 by Patrick. Nylander. the slowest.32. 6.78 47.46 and the next two finishing just 0.69 48. at the World Championships.44 48. in his last serious attempt at a championship. leaving Nylander to settle for fourth despite setting his second national record within 22 hours.92.28. Phillips was pressured by Moses until the eighth hurdle. with 48. 8. then were caught by Young at the fourth hurdle.63. Bâ (49. where Phillips (49.19OR 47. 7.28.22 for Bâ) and by the third hurdle was 0.77) were the other heat winners. won the other race in 47.62. The fastest man was Erick Keter (KEN) who set a national record with 48. 5.02 behind him.28). 3.81 48. Graham and Diagana led early on in the final. leading to halfway in 22. with Phillips just ahead of Moses 20.75 and 47. this time with 48.96 47. Young (49. 2. well ahead of Wallenlind. Three years later.30 48. (6) (1) (5) (4) (8) (7) (3) (2) Derrick Adkins Samuel Matete Calvin Davis Sven Nylander Rohan Robinson Fabrizio Mori Everson Teixeira Eronilde de Araújo USA ZAM USA SWE AUS ITA BRA BRA 47.63 48. Bâ was second. Moses was again fastest in the semi-finals. 8.42 50. Sydney. 27 Sep 2000 1. Countries: 35. the second fastest of all-time with 47.R I O 134 5.34).78 49. 48. with Adkins and Robinson right with him. The 18 year-old surged past Schmid after the ninth hurdle after he had accidentally caught the German with his right arm one hurdle earlier. Keter was eliminated in his semi. Behind him Teixeira. 8. (7) (1) (8) (2) Amadou Dia Bâ Tranel Hawkins Michel Zimmerman Henry Amike 2 0 1 6 SEN USA BEL NGR ★ O L Y M P I C 49.20 ahead of Bâ. 7m up at the finish. ahead of Young’s best ever of 47. At the fourth hurdle there were four contenders.00.50 47. Finalists: 8) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 4 0 0 m H Samuel Matete (ZAM). Neil Gardner (JAM. 6 Aug 1992 1. Countries: 35.66 47.57 48. The former champion was never in any danger as he won by 3m from Harris. and was a prohibitive favourite. (4) (3) (5) (6) (8) (2) (1) (7) Kevin Young Winthrop Graham Kriss Akabusi Stéphane Diagana Niklas Wallenlind Oleg Tverdokhleb UKR Stéphane Caristan Dave Patrick USA JAM GBR FRA SWE EUN FRA USA 46. With his Los Angeles win Moses became the only man to regain an Olympic 400m hurdles title.04 48.93) American’s 13 stride pattern had broken the race apart. 1 Aug 1996 1. running 49. Adkins accelerated away from Matete on the run-in despite being half blinded from all the camera flashbulbs in the crowd.04 48.86. in 49.93 to 21. The American chopped more than three tenths off his best. Finalists: 8) Moses had won 89 finals in row before LA. Young passed halfway in 22. Only Matete.6 and by the ninth hurdle the tall (1. the order of the first five was the same in the best race of the decade. and not enthralled with his lane 1 draw.10 in 1991. More surprisingly. 8.78 (Competitors: 55. and Harris. Robinson (both 48.91) all ran lifetime bests. with Matete running the fastest ever preliminary in 48. Phillips reacted far quicker than the others (0. 6. In all.84) and Marc Dollendorf (BEL – 48. Barcelona.37) and Bâ (48.89. 6.01. Finalists: 8) In very windy conditions.50) and Schmid (48. the first round brought only one sub-49 clocking (by Samuel Matete – 48. 8.82 48. 2. Ibou Faye (SEN. 7. Laurent Ottoz. 3. despite hitting the 10th hurdle was still going away.01) and Young (21.91. becoming the number three performer of all-time.38) were the three fastest. After a rare false start by Moses the field was away at the second time of asking.98 48. but closed with a ferocious finish to set an African record.76 48. He achieved the first sub-47 clocking ever.52). Finalists: 8) Dave Patrick and Danny Harris ran 47.94 48. Countries: 46. with Moses running 47.41 48.51 while teammates Hawkins (48. and Moses was 4m clear of Schmid by the fifth hurdle (21.21.76 respectively at the US Trials but failed to make the US team. while Bâ’s run was the only sub-48 mark of his career. was the man to beat. who set a national record of 48. Atlanta.53 47. 7.56 47. with 14 of the 16 contestants running under 49 seconds.78 (Competitors: 37. In the final.26 (Competitors: 47. 6. and Phillips led off the last hurdle by more than 2m. the final qualifier. de Araújo and Robinson. in fifth at the fifth hurdle.78WR 47.1 versus 21. Matete failed to qualify in the other heat. ahead of Graham (48. 7. a view unaffected by the heats. At that point he was 5m ahead of Graham and.98). 5. though crossing the line third in 48.94).86 49. while Davis astonishingly gained 4m on Matete in the last 40m. 24 athletes broke the once-feared 50-second barrier.01 quicker than Schmid.21.28 49. son of 1968 110m hurdles medallist Eddy (48. Behind them US Trials winner Bryan Bronson ran out of gas in the last 100m and finished last in 50. Graham held off Akabusi for second. and continued in the semi-finals. 5. Countries: 28.13 48. 0. 2.93). running 47. He was fastest in the first round with 49. 5. Heading the list was local man Adkins.54 47.34 48. after 107 consecutive wins since 1977. (1) (4) (6) (5) (8) (2) (3) (7) Angelo Taylor Hadi Al-Somaily Llewellyn Herbert James Carter Eronilde de Araújo Paweł Januszewski Fabrizio Mori Gennadiy Gorbenko USA KSA RSA USA BRA POL ITA UKR 47.89 ahead of Young (48. third in 48. 4.6). a recently converted 400m man. 25 Sep 1988 1. 2.15 versus 0. The standard was very high.21 for Moses. 3. who won the first semi-final with 47. but the reigning champion began to tire.19 up on Moses and 0.69 53. The semi-finals saw most of the . winner of the other semi-final in 48. Davis. Only Schmid was thought capable of denting the USA’s hegemony. Countries: 30. Bâ (21. 4. hindered by a hamstring problem he knocked over a hurdle in the lane adjacent to his in the finishing straight and.19. and he and Adkins were level at hurdles 8-10.78 (Competitors: 45.63 48. 4. moved up.41) and Schmid (49. Moses cranked things up in the semis.76 from Swedish veteran Nylander. while Phillips showed his strength in taking the other semi-final in 48. 48. Up ahead Graham was running a Jamaican record of 47.48). 0. with Nylander 4m behind and a metre clear of Davis.9.01 in a race won by Akabusi in 48. with all six heat winners breaking 50 seconds. 4.

2004-4s1. The Puerto Rican was fastest in the heats with 48.18) were the other semi-final winners. McFarlane was a clear third with Iakovakis and Jackson next. Beijing. and led by a metre at the first hurdle.67) and Buckley (48. and then Sánchez showed his status as favourite with a 47. 6 Aug 2012 1. 1924-1. 8. his quickest since his 2000 Olympic win. Culson was a slight favourite over Greene.48) were the other heat winners. 26 Aug 2004 1.74 49. but Taylor’s stride pattern was more certain than Clement’s and he came off the final barrier 2m clear. Countries: 24. This was extended to more than 5m by the finish. the first round was not too competitive. Tinsley also gained in the straight. and was marginally ahead as the athletes came off the final bend.25 47.15 (Competitors: 49.00) and Carter (48.51 (Competitors: 35. Finalists: 8) Jackson.60 49.5 1 6 1 6 1 6 0 5 . Herbert (48. while Keïta closed impressively to move from seventh at the eighth hurdle to stride past Carter 15m from the finish.06 48.52 48.25 but was eliminated as ninth fastest. McFarlane took a firm hold on second place by the ninth hurdle.26 48. 2000-3s3 2000-7s2. Finalists: 8) McFarlane ran 48. 3. 4. Al-Somaily set a national record in taking the first race in 48. 6. 5. winner of the US Trials was co-favourite with the gifted Clement. He dedicated his newest gold medal to his late grandmother Lillian. but Taylor was even with him by the third hurdle. Culson led early on in the final. 2008-5h4. In the semis that distinction went to former champion Sánchez with an ominous 47. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 4 0 0 m H 135 London. the reigning World Champion.40) and Januszewsi (48. and was almost 2m clear of Clement crossing the fifth hurdle.25 48. 4. 2008-1.14. Taylor’s time broke his lifetime best. 5. 2. with Carter and Herbert his closest pursuers.86 49. 1932-3 2008-1. 7.91 48. and in exactly the same time as in 2004.79 was the only man quicker than 48 seconds in 2008. Finalists: 8) Undefeated in 2012 prior to London. and finally caught Al-Somaily with his last stride.96 (Competitors: 26. 2012-5 1960-1 Most Finals 3 M Taylor Moses A Taylor 2 23 men Most Appearances 4 Luigi Facelli ITA Samuel Matete ZAM 1924-4s1. Kemel Thompson (JAM) ran an excellent 48. With only 26 athletes across four heats. Sánchez won by three metres from Tinsley. the surprising Gorbenko (48.24 48.40). 8. closing on everyone except Sánchez. joining reigning champion Taylor and Sydney bronze medallist Herbert. 1932-5.58 48.98 48. set in Sydney in 2000. with Mori (48. 3. 6. who went clear after the ninth hurdle. 2000-1. (6) (4) (7) (5) (8) (3) (9) (2) Angelo Taylor Kerron Clement Bershawn Jackson Danny McFarlane LJ van Zyl Marek Plawgo Markino Buckley Periklis Iakovakis USA USA USA JAM RSA POL JAM GRE 47. (6) (5) (7) (4) (2) (3) (1) (8) Felix Sánchez Danny McFarlane Naman Keïta James Carter Bayano Kamani Marek Plawgo Alwyn Myburgh Bennie Brazell DOM JAM FRA USA PAN POL RSA USA 47. (7) (6) (5) (3) (4) (8) (9) (2) Felix Sánchez Michael Tinsley Javier Culson David Greene Angelo Taylor Jehue Gordon Leford Green Kerron Clement DOM USA PUR GBR USA TTO JAM USA 47. Sánchez and Keïta started fastest in the final. his quickest for eight years. Clement closed to within half a metre at the eighth. 2012-5 2000-3h4. whose picture was attached to the inside of his bib. 2008-8. and by halfway Sánchez and Carter led the field. and these two led until the eighth barrier. Sánchez then took over. while Clement won the other semi in 48. His tears at the medal ceremony and the warm reception he got from the crowd were one of the emotional highlights of the Games. while McFarlane (36) lowered his world master’s best to 48. when Sánchez caught the two leaders. with Taylor (48. The American went into the lead.02).76. who with 47.7.12 49. 2004-4s2.65) the fastest. Taylor won the first semi-final in 47. 2012-1 2000-1.63 47.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C top runners unfurl their banners.93 semi. Athens.30. 1956-1. the latter earning boos from the crowd by his taunting his opposition on the run-in.00 49. Taylor moved up from 4th at the 8th barrier to second at the last hurdle.5 3 35 2 34 1 32 1 28 2 27 2 16 1 15 2 13 0 13 1 11 1 11 0 11 0 9 1 8 1 8 1 7 1 7 1 7 0 6. Taylor became the 10th fastest of all-time and only the third man (after Morgan Taylor in ’24 and Akii-Bua in ’72) to have won from the confines of lane 1.50). MEN’S 400 METRES HURDLES The Best on Points 22 Edwin Moses USA 20 Morgan Taylor USA Angelo Taylor USA 16 Glenn Davis USA 1976-1. 2. who had started too slowly. 2. 2004-1.33.30 48. winning by 4m. 8. 1984-1.35 for the fastest time of the first round. 1992-dq/s2. 1988-3 1928-3. 3. just edging Jackson (48. 7. 18 Aug 2008 1. Jackson went past McFarlane at the final hurdle and almost caught the easing Clement. reached in 20. The Dominican emulated Taylor and Moses in regaining his title. and steadily pulled clear.11 48. 20125h5 Félix Sánchez DOM A Taylor Periklís Iakovákis GRE 3 23 men Placing Table G USA 18 GBR 2 URS/EUN GER 1 FRA SWE ITA JAM DOM 2 RSA CAN AUS FIN SEN BRA POL IRL 1 UGA 1 KSA SRI ZAM GRE NZL PHI PUR SUI - S 12 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - B 10 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 4 9 3 3 1 3 3 1 1 - 5 6 2 3 2 1 1 1+1= 1 1 2 1 1 5 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 . Taylor was off quickest in the final. Countries: 33. Al-Somaily led from the gun in the final. 1928-6. 6. 1996-2.38) and Carter (48.94.1+1= 1 7 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 8 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 - M Points 40 353 8 80 3 47. while Sánchez’s win was the first ever for the Dominican Republic. The hapless American finished fourth for the second time.10 48.63 48. 7. while McFarlane (48.42 48. with Culson a metre clear of Greene.42) all qualifying. Countries: 19.27 from McFarlane (48. 5. 1936-3h2 1988-6h2. 4.07 49.

90. Weinstein’s style was summed up in Charles Lucas’s book The Olympic Games 1904 with the words “little can be said other than it is far from graceful. just short of his best of 1. Countries: 10. Louis. who would later die in battle in 1914 aged only 33. Countries: 11) Competitors were required to jump at each height.675 had been dealt with. yet both men set national records. 1. by-passed the event. 15 Jul 1900 1.775 to win. there were five jumpers left. 8. 6.” It was in fact an early version of the “Western Roll. 5.70 1. =2.60.5 13 47. With Leahy unable to clear 1. winner of the US title in 1898-99.55 with athletes having to jump at each height. was the co-favourite with Leahy.96 in 1898.80. =6. jumping 1. 8. who was simultaneously competing in the Standing Long Jump. and darkness was setting in. 7. Countries: 3) Jones. and was co-favourite with 1906 champion Leahy. 2. but Hofmann failed at 1. Serviss was second after a jump-off with Weinstein. 1. almost as impressive physically as André at 1. Jones duly won.88/87kg Frenchman was built heroically. and then missed twice at 1. 30 Apr-1 May 1906 1 1 High Jump Ellery Clark James Connolly Robert Garrett Henrik Sjöberg Fritz Hofmann 4 5. and he went on to clear 1. =2. Walter Carroll and William Remington. Countries: 7) Baxter. was expected to win from Serviss. Samuel Jones Garrett Serviss Paul Weinstein Lajos Gönczy Emil Freymark Ervin Barker H J HUN USA USA 1. 5.88 1. USA USA USA SWE GER 4. 7.97 were truncated by the crowd being allowed to get too close to the jumping area. After 1.775 1.675 1. went over 1. and he went on to make 1. the first man to clear 2m. Under current rules André would have been fourth with Leahy second and Somodi third.88. both winners in other events. The event was held on a Sunday. 29 Aug 1904 1. Somodi and André were not. Though his winning jump was well short of Mike Sweeney’s world best of 1.625 and Sjöberg went out. and both in sports (he competed for France for nearly 20 years and was a rugby international) and in life (he escaped from a German POW camp in World War One) he was indeed a hero. Paris.75 1.97 set seven months earlier.975.92 at the end of May.85 and finally 1. 21 Jul 1908 1.725 1.55 (Competitors: 5.89.75.81.81OR 1.50 (Competitors: 8. Baxter was the undisputed winner. Athens. it was only 2cm lower than Sweeney’s winning height in the 1895 US Championships.90 with his Eastern cut-off style. Connolly and Garrett. The bar was then raised to 1. =4.83. with the bar being raised 2. Countries: 3) All five men cleared 1.5cm after all five had cleared 1. with the bar apparently being raised one centimetre at a time (!).94 in 1903. Leahy.905 and he went on to try a world record of 1.70 1. The competition was adjourned to the following day. ” usually said to have been initiated by George Horine.50 and 1. Con Leahy IRL Lajos Gönczy Herbert Kerrigan Themistoklis Diakidis Gunnar Rönström Bruno Söderström Halfdan Bjølgerud Paul Weinstein GBR HUN USA GRE SWE SWE NOR GER 1.79 to 1. USA USA GER 1. and then failed at 1.78 1.65 1. but dislodged the bar with his hand.75 1. Irving Baxter Patrick Leahy IRL Lajos Gönczy Carl Andersen Erik Lemming Waldemar Steffen Louis Monnier Tore Blom USA GBR HUN NOR SWE GER FRA SWE 1. Kerrigan.83 (Competitors: 22.70 (Competitors: 6. The 22 athletes were divided into four pools of jumpers with qualifying marks counting for the final result.65 (Competitors: 24.81. Porter.905OR 1.953 to head the world rankings for 1908.778 1. Harry Porter Con Leahy IRL István Somodi Géo André Herbert Gidney Tom Moffitt Neil Patterson USA GBR HUN FRA USA USA USA 1. who had jumped 1. 10 Apr 1896 1.675 won him the competition. =3.88. was surprisingly unable to clear that height. 4 0 0 m H .853 1.853 1. 3. Attempts at equalling Sweeney’s world best of 1.725 1. Clark’s “scissors” clearance at 1. London. continued Placing Table S B 4 5 6 G PAN 1 POR 1 YUG 1 BUL 1 ROU 1 TTO 1 BEL CUB NGR UKR Totals 25 25 25 24 21 20+2= Breakdown UKR BLR RUS Totals of URS/EUN placings: 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 Breakdown of GER placings: FRG 1 1 GDR 1 GER Totals 1 1 1 ★ O L Y M P I C 2 0 1 6 7 1 1 12 8 1 1 1 1 13 1 1 1= 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 21 13.90OR 1.88 1.60 1. and Leahy were the only ones to clear 1. Finalists: 7) Porter had been the best US jumper in the series of American selection meetings. The Irishman had jumped 1. 1.675 1. =5.803 1. André improved from 1.905 on his final attempt. The 1.70 1. the favourite.5 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 0 3 22 8 5 35 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S M Points 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 75 831 - Athens. A month after the Games Leahy jumped 1. While Leahy and Porter were expected to do well. 2. St.75 1. failed at 1.72 1. Gönczy.R I O 136 Men’s 400 Metres Hurdles.60 1.70. Sweeney had turned professional in 1896 so was not eligible to compete in Athens. the US Champion. Somodi.70 1. the US Champion. 2.89/84kg was the only man to clear 1. meaning that two religious Americans.88 1.675. a small jumper (1. . 3.65 1.778 1. but Baxter had cleared 1.75/68kg) was over 1.83 before passing his final attempt.

and with great dexterity. the German Champion who had a best of 1. 6. Five men made 1. Landon and American football player Muller. 3.85 1.85 1. Lewden.80 1. All the principals remaining were “western rollers”.00.90 – Ekelund. Los Angeles. a powerful though not enormous (1. 1.87 1.83 (Competitors: 26.85 1.855. 29 Jul 1928 Antwerp.93.91 1. an act which must have affected Ekelund’s concentration. 6.90 first time. 2. In doing so he popularised the Western Roll as the style to use (at least for the next 20-25 years).02. leaving Horine with the bronze.69) with great spring thrilled the crowd by winning a medal.93 in 1919 had jumped as high as 1. 3.90 1. had declined to take part in the fourth place jump-off. Only King was able to clear 1. =6. 4. The French jumper Lewden later noted with horror in his autobiography that as Ekelund began his run-up on one of his Bob King Benjamin Hedges Claude Ménard Simeon Toribio Harold Osborn Kazuo Kimura André Cherrier Pierre Lewden Charles McGinnis Mikio Oda USA USA FRA PHI USA JPN FRA FRA USA JPN 1. 8 Jul 1912 1. 2. producing 15 of the 16 best marks for that year. but this was considered an aberration.90 xo o xo xxx xxx xxx 1.02 xxx Osborn and Brown dominated the world scene in 1924. but only Landon. 4.80 1. George Horine had become the first man to clear 2m when winning the US Western Olympic Trials.85 indoors in 1911. At 1.83 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S H J 137 attempts at 1. Harold Osborn Leroy Brown Pierre Lewden Thomas Poor Jenö Gáspár Helge Jansson Pierre Guilloux Sverre Helgesen Lawrence Roberts USA USA FRA USA HUN SWE FRA NOR RSA 1. 7.93 o xxx In May 1912. had 18 men and lasted five hours. The decisive stages saw three men clear at 1. Liesche cleared first time.86/86kg) jumper.935. 5.94. 5. 4. 8.95 1.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Stockholm. who used the old “eastern cut-off”.97 1.85 for Ekelund – while Whalen and Murphy both cleared 1.936 xo xxx xxx None of the 10 best of all-time was present for the Antwerp final.94 .89 before Murphy failed at a lower height.935. This was ironic as on occasion he would hit the crossbar.94 1. When the bar was raised to 1. =7. =4. held on a spongy take-off area.92 1.91 1. just 3 millimetres beyond his best. set it back on the uprights with his hand. an American official moved Landon’s marker – next to that of the Swede.88 1. Finalists: 18) The final.95 o 1. Countries: 9. while Richards climbed over on his third attempt.91.88 1. 6. a practice which was soon outlawed. IC4A Champion. Osborn cleared every height first time. 2.935OR 1.936 – and Ekelund with 1. Countries: 9.91 including reigning champion Osborn. 3. Countries: 17. and had six of the top eight jumps of the season. and he then had three failures at 2.88. Baker.97 1. a small man (1.93OR 1. Finalists: 11) Series Richards Liesche Horine Erickson Thorpe Grumpelt Johnstone Kullerstrand 1. and Richards. 6. could clear 1. Amsterdam.91 1. Places fourth to seventh were determined by jump-offs.91 xxo xo xxx 1. Duncan McNaughton Bob Van Osdel Simeon Toribio Cornelius Johnson Ilmari Reinikka Kazuo Kimura CAN USA PHI USA FIN JPN 1. the big (1. =7. 31 Jul 1932 1.85 1. 5. and had company from Brown until the winning height. decided by jump-offs. 5. Finalists: 12) Series Landon Muller Ekelund Whalen Murphy Baker Thulin Lewden 1. 17 Aug 1920 1.91 1.89 xxo xo xo xxx xxx 1. Countries: 16) Series Osborn 1. though the ’24 bronze medallist Lewden had to be content with 1.91 1. who was an international in soccer and water polo. 2.88 1. A hiccup occurred at the Eastern Trials when he placed only fifth with 1. Places two to five were decided in a jump-off with the bar raised and lowered five times.97 1. and jumped within 1cm of his national record for third place. but dislodged it with his hand. 3. who had a best of 1.85 1.87 1. and only Murphy – winner of the US Trials with 1.83 xxo o xo o o o xxo o 1.94 1. constant rain had forced the organisers to move the high jump site and use a soggy turf run-up. Muller had cleared 1. Alma Richards Hans Liesche George Horine Egon Erickson Jim Thorpe Harry Grumpelt John Johnstone Karl-Axel Kullerstrand USA GER USA USA USA USA USA SWE 1. While this seemed an indication that the standard was not high. Horine was accompanied by Liesche. Muller cleared 1. =8.88 1.97 1.90 1. There was a tie for second and fourth places.85 o o o xo o xxo xo xxx 1. but Liesche was delayed on his last jump by the start of a race and the stadium band.85 xo xo o o o o xxx xxx 1.80 o o o o o o o xxo 1.88 o 1. (Competitors: 22. 2.88 1.89 1. He had been selected by winning the Central US Trials though many felt he should have been left off the team. and Horine remained firm favourite to win in Stockholm. 3.85 1. with the exception of the springy Toribio.85 1.92 o 1.98OR 1.98 o 2.83 1.88 1.93.84.88 (Competitors: 35. Osborn attempted a world record of 2. 7 Jul 1924 (Competitors: 29.88/93kg) Richards cleared first time with 5cm to spare.87 xxo o xo xxo xo xxx xxx 1. and on his second jump cleared the bar. using the still prevalent Eastern cut-off style. Richmond Landon Harold Muller Bo Ekelund Walter Whalen John Murphy Howard Baker Einar Thulin Pierre Lewden USA USA SWE USA USA GBR SWE FRA 1.88 against 1. 4. After nine minutes he was told to hurry up and naturally enough failed to clear. Paris. King went through 1928 undefeated.

and only overcame their refusals by nagging them further when the Canadian team arrived in Los Angeles.97 xxo o xxo xo xxx Jump-off 2.94 (Competitors: 40.94 o xo xxo xo xo 1. However under 1932 rules a jump-off was required. 2 Aug 1936 1. Finalists: 22) 1.03 o xxx o o o o xo xxx - o xxo o xxo xxx o o o o xxo o o o o o o xo xo o xxo o xxx xxx xxx xxx H J than congratulate a black man. 4.90. fourth in the 1928 decathlon. he tied with 18 year-old schoolboy Cornelius Johnson. 3. 8. Winter remains the last man to win a global title using the eastern cut-off style. Countries: 16.94 1. McNaughton was the first to clear 1.98 only five men were left. Johnson.98 first time. Finalists: 28) Series Davis Wiesner da Conceição Svensson Pavitt Söter Betton Gundersen 1. Toribio and the unheralded Duncan McNaughton. after greeting the previous winners that day.95 1. but recovered to become the world’s dominant high jumper in 1952-53 before becoming a professional basketball player.94 o o 1. As the bar rose to 2. (Competitors: 14.87 o o o o o o xo xo 1. whose style was that of a “roller” until his lead leg reached the bar. In 1952 he used his western roll to win 18 of his 21 competitions.01 in February. (28) (10) (6) (7) (5) (4) (11) (23) Walt Davis Ken Wiesner José Telles da Conceição Gösta Svensson Ron Pavitt Ion Söter Arnold Betton Bjørn Gundersen USA USA BRA SWE GBR ROU USA NOR 2. cleared first and second time respectively. 5.138 =7.85 o o 190 o o 1. 6. Helsinki.95 1.01 1. (4) 5. The take-off area was soft for the western rollers.90 1.90 o o o o o o o o 1.94 1. (13) 4. (11) 3. the best nonAmerican of 1947.007 xxx xxx xxx xxx 1. and then tied Dave Albritton in the US Trials with a world record of 2.98 1.007 just four men were left – Van Osdel. which according to US coach Dean Cromwell. leading with a first time clearance of 1.98 1. The qualifying height was too low at 1.90 (Competitors: 27. then had insult added to injury when Adolf Hitler left the stadium rather London. (22) 4. Countries: 25. In Berlin. Hitler was requested by Olympic officials to greet all or none of the winners in future – he chose none. Da Conceição had equalled his best with a 1.97. headed by the evergreen Dave Albritton. and Bob Van Osdel.90 (Competitors: 38. Finalists: 20) Series Winter Paulson Stanich Eddleman Damitio Jackes Paterson Wähli 1. with Van Osdel and Toribio taking the lesser medals. was firmer. He missed at 1. while Johnson failed at a world record height of 2. Countries: 24.08 xxx xxx Johnson won outright or shared each US title between 1932 and 1936. and by the time the bar was raised to 2.00 2. injuring his back in doing so.03 in an exhibition just before leaving for Europe. but failed at . This was a style initiated by Jim Stewart.04OR 2. Fortunately for him. and Albritton.00. (5) =6.95 1.98 clearance.90 and placed equal ninth. failed at 1.87. and so there were 20 finalists. With Yada failing at 2.(12) (15) John Winter Bjørn Paulson George Stanich Dwight Eddleman Georges Damitio Arthur Jackes Alan Paterson Hans Wähli AUS NOR USA USA FRA CAN GBR SUI 1. Berlin.95 1.95.007 1. the sole interloper being John Winter.00 o xxo 2.00 Johnson and Thurber.95 o o o o xo xo xxx 1.94 1.99 x x x x x x x x 2. Johnson kept his tracksuit trousers on until the bar reached 2.98 o o o xxo xxx xxx xxx 2.90 1. Misao Ono Jerzy Pławczyk R I O 2 0 1 6 JPN POL 1. 30 Jul 1948 1. All told. The first surprise came when McGrew had difficulty with 1. a teammate of Van Osdel at the University of Southern California. (1) 3. but then injured his ankle.04 xo xxx 2. At 2.87 and then failed at 1. 2. Winter. Only Johnson made 2.97 o xo 2.00.038.076.90 ★ O L Y M P I C 1.08.95 1. who jumped 2.00 1. all of them indoors.07 xxx Davis had suffered from polio as a child. and Albritton then won a jump-off for second place from Thurber.98 1. who had spent a lifetime being snubbed by caucasians in his home country. da Conceição and Wiesner.01 o o xxx xxx 2. and so won the gold.97 in jumpoff) Thurber (1. US Trials winner Vern McGrew.03. McNaughton had lobbied the Canadian Olympic Association to allow him to compete. (1) 2. 20 Jul 1952 1. both of whom had been faultless to that point.95 in jumpoff) Kotkas o (no height in jumpoff) Yada o Asakuma o Kalima o Tanaka o Weinkötz o 1. at which time only four other jumpers remained.97 o xo xxo xxx George Spitz was the favourite after clearing higher than than 2m on five occasions in 1932.95 xo o xxo xxo xxo xxx xxx xxx 1.90 1. (5) =7. (6) 6.90 o o o xo xxo o o o 1. and 2.00 2.007 and Van Osdel would have won from Johnson and McNaughton on today’s rules. 14 of the top 15 in 1948 were US jumpers.95 1.80 Series Johnson o Albritton xo (1.90 xo xo o o xo 1.97 1.01 only three others remained – Svensson. and runnerup Stanich. 7. Countries: 10) Series McNaughton Van Osdel Toribio Johnson Reinikka F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2. leaving Toribio as the principal “eastern cut-off” jumper left in the field. who had equalled his lifetime best.03OR 2. after receiving advice from Van Osdel. (15) 5.95. there were now two western rollers – Johnson and Thurber – one scissors jumper. and when the bar was raised to 1. all at 2. with Paulson.94/100kg) discus throwing Kotkas. None of the jumpers could clear 2. Johnson. when he rotated laying out along the bar in a straddle. (17) 2. Alan Paterson.98 o xxx xxx xxx xxx The world list was dominated by American jumpers.(11) (21) (20) (19) Cornelius Johnson Dave Albritton Delos Thurber Kalevi Kotkas Kimio Yada Yoshiro Asakuma Lauri Kalima Hiroshi Tanaka Gustav Weinkötz USA USA USA FIN JPN JPN FIN JPN GER 2. but Winter – a scissors jumper – took off at a different poin. In the US Championships.95 1. while Albritton and Kotkas cleared at their final attempts. the big (1. no-one else could get over that height. one of the two scissors jumpers (Damitio was the other) cleared 1.

Bolshov and Shavlakadze cleared first time. with athletes reportedly clearing that height in practice on numerous occasions but never in competition. Only Brumel cleared this height at the first attempt.03 2.. Nilsson injured himself just before leaving for Australia. 21 Oct 1964 Seven feet (2. 1 Sep 1960 (11) (12) 2.14 2.15) and Shavlakadze (2.09 2. (2) 3.06 o o o o o o o xo 2. Kashkarov missed at 2. (17) 4. 20 Oct 1968 1.00 (Competitors: 28. apparently had just one jumping session between the US Trials and Melbourne.16 2. (21) 5.87 qualifying mark meant that only ten of the 38 entrants were eliminated. with the powerful (1. culminating in his clearance of 2. (5) (13) Dick Fosbury Ed Caruthers USA USA 2. Kashkarov and the startling Porter all made 2.14 o xo xo xo 2. the third man to jump.10 xo xxo xxx 2. (4) 3. Dumas.16 first time. Finalists: 20) Series Brumel Thomas Rambo Pettersson Shavlakadze Drecoll Nilsson Caruthers 2. At 2. including five world records. because the meagre 1.03 o o o - 2. and failed at the qualifying height of 1. (2) Valeriy Brumel RUS URS John Thomas USA John Rambo USA Stig Pettersson SWE Robert Shavlakadze GEO URS Ralf Drecoll GER/FRG Kjell-Åke Nilsson SWE Ed Caruthers USA 2. Bolshov (2.09 2.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C 2.16 o xo xxx xxx 2.09 2. but only five at 2.08 2. The bar now moved up in gradations of 2cm.14 2. and was hot favourite to win in Tokyo. with Rome veterans Pettersson. Bolshov failed and Thomas.16 as Brumel regained the lead.23 in the US Trials. failed.. with a best of 2. these were the six jumpers remaining.06 2.03 as Phil Reavis and Vern Wilson – both 2. now far from the confident athlete he had been at lower heights.14 2.12.84/90kg) Kashkarov.16. Ken Money. Thomas had to clear to stay ahead.12. a height which almost defeated Brumel who succeeded on his final attempt. leaving the smooth-straddling Wiesner and Davis to battle for the gold. after Bolshov and Brumel had cleared.14 xxo xxo o xo xxo 2. (6) 2.03 xo o o o xo xxx xxx xxx 2.16 2.10 2. European Champion and a fine dive straddle type jumper. The top European was Bengt Nilsson.20.16 o xo xxo xxx xxx 2. (6) 4. 2. and Dumas clearing at the first attempt and Porter over on his next try.09 in the final. Pettersson got over on his last attempt but failed at 2. (4) =6. thereby winning bronze.03 2.(12) (1) 8.09. Finalists: 17) Series Shavlakadze Brumel Thomas Bolshov Pettersson 2. to the delight of the home crowd.09 (Competitors: 28.18 first time in the drizzle which had fallen throughout the competition.18OR 2.09 xxx Before 1960 there had been four clearances of seven feet or better (including indoor competitions). plus John Rambo.12 xxo xxx Rome. but 2. (3) 2.18 xxx xxx Mexico City. in the 1956 200m.06 first time. Neither man could clear 2. establishing himself as clear favourite for Melbourne.18 2. as the three Rome medallists cleared only on their final jumps.00 o o o o o o o o 2.08 o xo o xxx 2. suffering with a back problem and an even more painful knee injury. That was until Dumas went over 2.24OR 2. with Brumel winning on countback. with Stig Pettersson over on his last attempt. When the bar was raised to 2. who set a personal best in fifth. However. leaving Rambo with the bronze at 2.12OR 2.04) Davis getting over on his second attempt. The old rivals – Brumel and Thomas – cleared 2.12 o xo xo xo o xxx xxx xxx 2. also failed.09 o o o o o o o o 2. Reigning champion Dumas and steady Swede Petersson were thought to be those likely to get closest to Thomas.12 o xxo o xxx 2.00 xo o o o 2. (1) 6. In Olympic year John Thomas had 20 marks at that level. (15) 6.17). Countries: 24. was next to go. Tokyo. starting languidly then accelerating sharply and poured himself over the bar grazing it slightly. Shavlakadze and Thomas. Countries: 19. Shavlakadze then made 2. Thomas.09 o xo o o xxo 2.11).03 1. Thomas passed at 2. Porter missed and then congratulated Dumas.01. (4) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Robert Shavlakadze GEO URS Valeriy Brumel RUS URS John Thomas USA Viktor Bolshov BLR URS Stig Pettersson SWE Charles Dumas USA Jiří Lanský CZE TCH Kjell-Åke Nilsson SWE Theo Püll GER/FRG 2. The medals were settled at 2.96 o o o o o o o o 2. (11) =7. (13) =7. with the tall (2. and Brumel cleared on his second attempt.16. (5) 4.00.12.15 in the US Trials. (18) 3. when Edward Czernik (POL).06 o o o xxo xxx 2. (15) 2. 23 Nov 1956 1.03 2. Melbourne. He failed.00 2. and Ed Carruthers – the US Champion – both failed. The competition had taken more than four hours. (3) 5.12 on their second tries. but got over next time. Finalists: 22) Series Dumas Porter Kashkarov Pettersson Money Sitkin Reavis Ridgeway 1.03 2. Countries: 20. this time from Thomas and Rambo. while Dumas.16OR 2.03 o o o o H J 2. Ten men got over 2. with Shavlakadze having a very close miss at 2. Dumas. as languid away from the high jump as he was in his run-up. Up to that point both men had been faultless.06 o o o o xxo 2. (9) (7) Charles Dumas “Chilla” Porter Igor Kashkarov RUS Stig Pettersson Ken Money Vladimir Sitkin BLR Phil Reavis Colin Ridgeway USA AUS URS SWE CAN URS USA AUS 2. but Porter made it.00 o o o o Series Dumas Lanský Nilsson Püll 2.06 xxx xxx xxx 139 2.134) had seemed a particularly elusive barrier. making 2. Ten men jumped 2.12 Dumas then took his short run.14 2.18 o o xxx 2.04 decided the competition. Brumel had beaten Thomas 8-1.22 .92. Svensson also missed. and the first shocks came at the next height of 2.10. (5) 5.14 Shavlakadze. All five cleared 2. (Competitors: 32. With one attempt left at 2. cleared – a lifetime best for the Georgian. The USSR had a good squad of jumpers with 18 year-old Brumel (2.20 xxx xxx In nine meetings between 1960 and 1964.03 o o o o o o o 2.14 with Rambo moving into the lead with a firsttime clearance.20. which the other two Soviets again cleared first time. He would be an Olympic finalist again .07 men from the USA – were the biggest names to miss.00 2. Thomas’s last miss came after nearly five hours of competition. The level of improvement was evident as 20 men cleared 2.06 to qualify. limiting his training to a series of stretching exercises! 1.

24 on his final attempt. Tarmak was the only man to get over 2.14s. Tarmak was first to clear with his left leg lead straddle. Countries: 19. 6.25 and had one attempt at 2.15 Series Wszoła Joy Stones Budalov Senyukov Bergamo Beilschmidt Tørring 2.21 2. bracketed with his US teammates and Russians Gavrilov and Skvortsov.25 xo xx Stones had broken his own world record with 2.18 2.18 able to make it over 2. the only straddler in the top group. Series Wessig Wszoła Freimuth Lauterbach Dalhäuser Komnenić Proteasa Grigoryev 2. After he won the 1968 NCAA Championships. leaving the bar quivering.22.(17) POL CAN USA URS URS ITA GDR DEN (3) (4) (2) (8) (9) (11) (7) (1) Gerd Wessig Jacek Wszoła Jörg Freimuth Henry Lauterbach Roland Dalhäuser Vaso Komnenić SRB Adrian Proteasa Aleksandr Grigoryev GDR POL GDR GDR SUI YUG ROU BLR URS 2. (Competitors: 40. In the final. (11) =6.21 2.20 o o o 2.29 2. Finalists: 13) Series Fosbury Caruthers Gavrilov Skvortsov Brown Crosa Spielvogel Peckham F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2.36 xo The world record had moved up to 2. did so again when clearing 2.18 o xxo o o o o xo xo 2.31 first time. 4.29 xo o o o 2.10.140 3. 7.14 o xo o o o xo o xo Series Tarmak Junge Stones Magerl Szepesi Beers Major Akhmetov 2.12 o xxo o xxo xo 2.05 o o o o o - 2.21 2.31 2. The Californian had been misquoted as saying that all French Canadians were rude (he was referring to the organising committee of the Games).14 2. the previous world record holder and a straddler.24. 4. 1 Aug 1980 1.18 then cleared 2. in dry conditions.27.10 o o o o o o o o 2.10 o o o o o o o 2. 8. By 1967.18 o xxo xxx xxx H J Montreal.21 o xo o xxo o o o o 2.21 first time. headed by Tarmak at 2. 5. The wet conditions hurt all the jumpers.15. Finalists: 14) Munich. He was also the most unpopular athlete in Montreal. 8cm above . Thirteen men cleared 2. At that point the boyish-looking Wszoła led because he passed all heights up to 2. the most notable failures being Kęstutis Šapka (URS/LTU) and Hungary’s stiff-backed István Major – both “floppers”. with six actually reaching the qualifying level of 2. Finalists: 19) 2. Countries: 26. the shock being that none of the Soviets managed to do so.21 or better prior to the Games. 6. A record 14 men cleared 2.32. Just four men made the Olympic record height of 2. but noone got over 2.25. Six men made 2. 5.33 xo xxx xxx 2. All four successes had been first-time jumps.35. Fosbury again cleared first time. because the shape of his garden inhibited the straddle. Wszoła cleared 2. The 18 year-old Stones then cleared.16 o xxo xxx xxx 2. Fosbury.29 before calling it a day. which would have been enough for victory after Joy cleared third time and Stones failed.22 o xo xxx 2. (3) (13) (1) (5) (9) (4) (11) (8) Jacek Wszoła Greg Joy Dwight Stones Sergey Budalov RUS Sergey Senyukov RUS Rodolfo Bergamo Rolf Beilschmidt Jesper Tørring (14) 8. but his back-first take-off was still considered a curiosity. 5. he became a medal threat.36WR 2. and then was the only man to clear 2. the three GDR jumpers and Wszoła.15 2.25OR 2. Whenever he appeared he was booed. was injured in 1980. leaving three floppers as the medal winners for the first time. Gavrilov passed 2.21 2. (15) 3.21 xo xo xxo xxx xxx 2.15 o o o xo o o o o 2.18 2. and was hot favourite. he had jumped 2. However. 4.23 xo xxx xxx 2. with only four of the 10 who had cleared 2. Brown just missed 2.23 2. 7.14 2. especially as the best Soviet jumper. which affected his run-up. Only Gavrilov and Skvortsov made 2. Carruthers also cleared easily. Dick Fosbury developed his high jumping style out of necessity.24 2.24 2.18 o o o o xxo xxx xxx xxx 2. but the three Americans passed that height.27 o o xxo o xxx xxx 2.20 2. 6.14.14 2. with Peckham and Chad’s Ahmed Senoussi unable to repeat their earlier 2. Countries: 23. But the garrulous Stones had a bigger problem – the Montreal rain. Countries: 25. Skvortsov also failed.23 first time. as far as the local crowd was concerned. Wszoła was favourite.12 ★ O L Y M P I C 2.21 2.31 a month before the Games. (9) 4.18 2.21. Moscow. At 2. with Stones second.18 (Competitors: 37.24 o xo o xo xo xxo xxx xxx 2. seven made that height.23.09 o o o o o o o o 2.29 only Wessig failed first time.16. while Junge also cleared second time from the other side of the run-up apron.14 o xxo o o o o xo xxx 2.31 o xo xo xxx 2.18.24 xxo xxx Rather like George Horine with the western roll. but nine of those missed at 2. 7. The locals had jeered at the sight of Stones sweeping away water from the take-off area.21 (Competitors: 30. Vladimir Yashchenko. 10 Sep 1972 1. but cheered for local man Greg Joy.21 o o o xo xxx xxx xxx xxx 2. (13) Jüri Tarmak EST Stefan Junge Dwight Stones Hermann Magerl Ádám Szepesi John Beers István Major Rustam Akhmetov UKR URS GDR USA FRG HUN CAN HUN URS 2.15 2. 3.23 o xxo xxx x 2. 8. while the other two Americans cleared. jumping 2.18. whose style had amazed the crowd. who cleared 2. The Russian failed to clear another height. but made it on his second attempt. 2. and took sole lead when Gavrilov had his first failure of the competition. 3.21 first time to move ahead of Budalov.29.16 2.12 to make the final.14.18 2. 2. (10) 5. Stones broke his world record again.23 2. At 2. Finalists: 12) 2. with Wszoła and the FRG’s Dietmar Mögenburg – absent because of the boycott – the co-record holders.05 xo o o o o o 2. the 19 year-old then made 2. (12) (11) (3) (1) (7) (6) Valentin Gavrilov RUS Valeriy Skvortsov RUS Reynaldo Brown Giacomo Crosa Günther Spielvogel Lawrie Peckham R I O 2 0 1 6 URS URS USA ITA FRG AUS 2.26 xxx Nineteen of those eligible to compete had cleared at 2. The following week. then cleared 2. He then had three average cracks at a world record of 2. 31 Jul 1976 (Competitors: 39.31 2. 8.21 to make the US team behind Carruthers and the 17 year-old Brown.20 first time to join Fosbury in the lead. 1. (2) 2.18 2. He then lost second place to Carruthers who cleared the second time.

28.31. but Lauterbach. He then became the world record holder at 18 and the European Champion in 1982.34 first time. 3. thanks to a series of world records culminating in 2. (1) Troy Kemp BAH =8.34 being Paklin. Steve Smith (GBR) and Marino Drake (CUB) were the only jumpers to clear 2. when Steve Ovett collapsed on the edge of the high jump apron. but neither could do so in the final.34. in fourth place.24 xo o o xo o - 2. 2. moved to second by clearing 2.34. was perfect to 2. 4. with six of those making 2.36 o o xo 2.35 o xxx xx Seoul.34 2.33 o xo x xxx 2.31 o xo o o xxx xxx xxx xx 2.28 o o 2.31 2.36 xo x x 2. Dietmar Mögenburg (FRG).31 2. missed.29 2. Finalists: 12) Series Mögenburg Sjöberg Zhu Stones Nordquist Ottey Liu Cai 2.39 x Sotomayor.34 proved to be the final clearance height for the remaining five jumpers.34 2. with Avdyeyenko grazing the bar on his clearance having missed on his first attempt at the winning height.31 2. 8. Sotomayor was the only man to clear 2. Sjöberg. (11) Ralf Sonn GER 7. finally competed in the Olympics. while the other four made the height second time. (5) Dragutin Topić YUG/SRB IOP (12) Marino Drake CUB (13) Charles Austin USA 2. missed the Seoul Games through yet another (smaller) boycott. Avdyeyenko then had one attempt at 2. 1983 World Champion. Los Angeles. when aged 17.38. The finest competition yet saw 12 men clear 2. Wszoła and Freimuth made it second time. Ottey and straddler Liu in places five to seven. 28 Jul 1996 1.39 in Germany the month before Los Angeles. 2 Aug 1992 1. (4) Tim Forsyth AUS (8) Artur Partyka POL (10) Hollis Conway USA 6. leaving the ’87 World Championship medallists – Sjöberg.34 2.29 2. with bronze going to Zhu because Stones had one failure in his series to 2.27 o xo o o xo xxo xo 2.34 2. (11) Hollis Conway USA =3. losing fifth place on countback to Nick Saunders of Bermuda.28 2.20 o o o o o o o 2.28 xo o xo o o o 2.33 cleanly to earn the gold.38OR 2.34 2. Wessig cleared 2.27.25 o xo o 2. 1.20 o xo o 2.35 2.29 four cleared. Yet the emergence of Zhu had overshadowed the tall (2. with runner-up Sjöberg becoming the only man to win three consecutive medals in the event.33 on his second jump after Mögenburg had made it first time.36 2. who made 2.28 (Competitors: 43: Countries: 27.31 o o xo o o o xx xxx - 2. and failed at his next heights. Mögenburg cleared 2.01) German. 2. With 13 others he made 2. 25 Sep 1988 2.31.31 Series Sjöberg Saunders Mögenburg Grant Paklin Thränhardt 2. He made the most of his 1992 Olympic season.31 o x xo o o o 2. Steinar Hoen (NOR). Countries: 20. 7. but those who missed represented a who’s who of world high jumping: Dalton Grant (GBR).36 2. leaving Nordquist. Finalists: 14) Series Sotomayor Sjöberg Forsyth Partyka Conway Sonn Kemp Topić Drake Austin 2. but looked near his limit for the day. None of the medal prospects missed at a height until 2. and Igor Paklin (EUN).R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C on his best prior to 1980 and a personal best. the most prominent failure at 2. the best jumper of his generation. After Freimuth had failed to improve his personal best for a second time.31 2. Despite being only 24 he had missed two Olympic opportunities through boycotts.38 xo xxx xxx Atlanta. Defending champion Mögenburg cleared 2. (11) (4) (8) (3) (9) (7) (1) (6) Dietmar Mögenburg Patrik Sjöberg Zhu Jianhua Dwight Stones Doug Nordquist Milt Ottey Liu Yunpeng Cai Shu FRG SWE CHN USA USA CAN CHN CHN 2.24 for 12th place.21 o o o o o xo 2. 5. while Drake tied with World Champion Charles Austin for eighth at 2.40 xxx Dietmar Mögenburg had been the world’s best in 1979.33.36 2.31 o o o 2.37 . the world’s best. Countries: 18.34 o xo xxx x xx 2. as compared to second-time clearances for former world record holders Sjöberg and Povarnitsyn. The other three tied for third place. and Wszoła had finally bowed out after two close attempts at 2. but 2. He grazed the bar lightly with his shorts and bounced gently off the landing area on to the ground head first.27 (Competitors: 30. Finalists: 16) Series Avdyeyenko Conway Povarnitsyn 2.24 o o xo o o 2.38.25 o xo o o o o H J 2. (Competitors: 27. The Chinese jumper’s concentration was disrupted when waiting for his second attempt.44.36 first time. (15) Dietmar Mögenburg FRG =7.34 2.37 xx xxx xxx xxx xxx x x xx 2. winning 14 of his 17 meetings prior to Barcelona.28 2. Eighteen year-old Sjöberg and Commonwealth champion Milt Ottey failed once at 2. and led from the surprising Conway.26 to qualify for the final. Both the veteran Stones and Zhu missed at 2.36. Avdyeyenko. At 2.33.33 2.31 all cleared the higher height.20 o o - 2.30 in the qualifying.34 o xo xo xo xo xx xxx x 2. a fast running straddler. though the FRG’s Carlo Thränhardt had to retire after attempting to compete on a sprained ankle.27. (9) Dalton Grant GBR (7) Igor Paklin KGZ URS (3) Carlo Thränhardt FRG F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Barcelona.34 o xo o 2.31 2. (6) Patrik Sjöberg SWE =3.40 and two more at 2.28 - 141 2.40. It was the first high jump world record in Olympic history. 2. (10) Gennadiy Avdyeyenko UKR URS 2. (14) Javier Sotomayor CUB 2. Paklin and Avdyeyenko – as the most plausible gold medal candidates.29 o x o o xo x 2. with Smith making only 2.29 2. Seven cleared 2. The quick but uneven surface was felt to be responsible for such a relatively low level.35 first time. 11 Aug 1984 1. 6. He then had three reasonable jumps at a world record of 2.38 xxx xx xx xx x Javier Sotomayor.31 2. (2) Rudolf Povarnitsyn UKR URS (16) Patrik Sjöberg SWE 5. (9) (1) Charles Austin Artur Partyka USA POL 2.34 2.39OR 2. (13) “Nick” Saunders BER 6. his seventh jump of the day without any failures. the baker from Schwerin put the icing on the cake with a second time clearance at 2. The top six all had at least two attempts at 2.31. and the three who elected to try 2.

34 xxo o o xo xxx xxx 2. was favourite with previous champions Austin and Sotomayor well regarded as medal possibilities.37 leap in London a week later convinced the Russian selectors to include him at the expense of Andrey Tereshin.25. Countries: 27.37 on his second jump with an effort that looked a good 5cm above the bar. who had cleared 2. 8. 7 Aug 2012 1.33 . 2. only reigning champion Holm and Silnov had a perfect record. and the gold medal was his. Finalists: 14) Series Austin Partyka Smith Topić Hoen Papakostas Forsyth Lee F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 2. The 1999 World Champion Vyacheslav Voronin and 1990 European Champion Dragutin Topić cleared 2. Partyka won his second Olympic medal of the 1990s. Finalists: 12) (Competitors: 37.37 xx xo xx x x x x 2.81).36 2. (7) 5.32 2. 19 Aug 2008 1. 24 Sep 2000 1. The tall (2. and was not initially selected for Beijing. (3) (2) (9) (7) Stefan Holm Matt Hemingway Jaroslav Bába Jamie Nieto SWE USA CZE USA 2. the European Champion.29 (Competitors: 35. (13) (4) (3) (7) (2) (10) Steve Smith Dragutin Topić SRB Steinar Hoen Lambros Papakostas Tim Forsyth Lee Jin-taek R I O 2 0 1 6 GBR YUG NOR GRE AUS KOR 2. A fiery competitor. 7. All the finalists made at least 2. 4. 2.36 on his first try.20 o o o o o o o o 2.29 o o o o o xo 2.29 ★ O L Y M P I C 5.29 2. 6. Atlanta champion Austin only cleared 2.34 2.25 were included.29 o x o o o o xo xxx 2. came really close to clearing 2.32 2. Voronin was the last to clear this height and placed 10th.36 2. Both men went over 2.32 o o o o xo xxo xxx 2. Nieto solidified his hold on bronze with a successful second jump at 2. Of the three other jumpers only Nieto. When the bar reached 2.34 2.29. with only three eliminated at 2. so a further four men with good countback at 2. Countries: 25.32 2. Countries: 27. 7.32.34 clearance. 5. He astounded onlookers by being the first over 2. 4. as 14 others went over 2. the Briton was joined by Silnov and Rybakov with first time clearances at 2. with the most notable non-qualifier being World Champion Jacques Freitag (RSA). (5) Sergey Klyugin Javier Sotomayor Abderahmane Hammad Stefan Holm Konstantin Matusevich Staffan Strand Mark Boswell Wolfgang Kreissig RUS CUB ALG SWE ISR SWE CAN GER 2.34 2.20 in the qualifying round. but only eight jumpers cleared 2.35 the heavens opened.142 3.32 2. and only two failed to clear a further height.25. Partyka then cleared 2. Leading after that height was Hemingway. 8.28.34. Series Holm Hemingway Bába Nieto Sokolovskiy Rybakov Boswell Ton 2. (11) 4. Silnov cleared 2.25 o o o o xo o o 2. 6.32 2. 22 Aug 2004 1. At seven Olympic. Sydney.34. The three-time world indoor champion Holm was in fifth place after two failures.32 2.32. Holm.01) Hemingway continued his fine jumping with a first-time clearance at 2. (6) (8) 8. 2. Silnov. World and European Championships between 1992 and 1998. Seven jumpers had cleared 2.34 London. and then launched himself over 2.29 o xo xxo o o o 2. (11) (2) (8) (3) (1) (6) (4) (9) Andrey Silnov Germaine Mason Yaroslav Rybakov Stefan Holm Raul Spank Jaroslav Bába Tomás Jankú Tom Parsons RUS GBR RUS SWE GER CZE CZE GBR 2.34 and only Bába could emulate him.34 o o o x xx x xx 2. Athens. Finalists: 12) Series Silnov Mason Rybakov Holm Spank Bába Janku Parsons 2. Just Steve Smith of the remaining five cleared 2.29 in the final.39 for their final attempts. 5. Countries: 28. 6. had placed fourth in the Russian Championships.32 in the final.29 2. and he finished =11th in the final.28.32 2.32 xo o xx o o xo xxx xx 2.26 in the qualifying without making the final. In the final 10 jumpers remained as the bar was moved up to 2.32 2. The next height of 2.29 (Competitors: 38.36 o xxx xxx xx x x The qualifying height was 2.32. 3. (7) (6) Ivan Ukhov Eric Kynard RUS USA 2.34.29 o o xo o o o 2. (13) 2. 7.25 o o o o o o o o 2.34 2. and the shortest man in the field (at 1.25 (Competitors: 40.32 first time. (10) 3. with his last jump.35 o xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx Vyacheslav Voronin.36 o xxx xxx xxx x The qualifying round neatly saw 12 men clear the required height of 2.32 2. he never failed to win a medal. (3) =6.35 o o xo xx xx xx xx 2.35.32 2. severely inhibited by an ankle injury. Both Smith and Austin passed to 2.20 o o o o o o o o 2.25 o xo o o o o o 2. As Klyugin was readying for his first attempt at 2.38 2.32.32 2. but were preceded by the surprising Mason.34.46 xxx A damaged ankle effectively ruined the chances of defending champion Sotomayor. Spank and Bába all making desperation efforts at 2. as 1991 World Champion Charles Austin and Poland’s competitive Artur Partyka were the only ones to clear first time. Beijing. a Jamaican transfer to Britain. 3.32 o o xxo o xxo x x 2. 4.40 in Aug 2000. and Klyugin was the only jumper to manage this height in the wet and windy conditions. but missed 2. and after Holm missed once.36 without a 2. and none of the others could get over that height. Finalists: 13) Series Klyugin Sotomayor Hammad Holm Matusevich Strand Boswell Kreissig 2. 8.36.25 o o o xo o xo xo 2.32 xo o o o xxo xxo xxo xxx (12) (4) (8) (5) H J Andriy Sokolovskiy Yaroslav Rybakov Mark Boswell Svatoslav Ton UKR RUS CAN CZE 2. Ten of those made 2.32 2.35 2.36 first time.41 xx 2. but a 2.20 o o o o xo o 2.35 2.32 2. 7cm short of the required height. Holm then cleared 2. and Austin sailed over without touching the bar to win the gold.35 proved to be the litmus test of quality.32 2.29 2. clearing only 2.39 o x x 2.29. 2. When Austin failed for a second time it seemed certain that the Pole would win. ahead of Sokolovskiy and Nieto.

1904-4. with increments of 10cm.45 from fellow American Charles Dvorak (3.36. 1988-3=. 10 Apr 1896 1.40 (Competitors: 5. Countries: 28.29 2.25.5 6 82 6 49. P V 143 Men’s High Jump. 2008-4 1920-7=.5 3 38 3 34. 1972-31Q B 4 5 6 7 8 7+2= 6+2= 5+2= 3+2= 2+2= 1+1= 1+1= 6+1= 2 1+3= 2= 2 2+1= 3 2 1 1= 2 2 2+1= 2 2+2= 2+2= 2 1+1= 1 1 2= 1 1= 1 2+2= 1 1 1 1 2 1= 1 1 2 1 . 1932-3.5 12 6 1 85.70. 1928-7= 1928-4. USA USA GRE GRE GRE 5. 2012-nh/Q 1960-18Q. .60 2.30=OR 3.5 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 1 1= GDR 1 1 1 1 FRG 1 1 Totals 2 2 2 2+1= 2 1+2= 1= 1 1 1+1= 2 2+2= 2+2= 2 2 2 3 1 6 35 28 19 82 Breakdown of GBR placings: GBR 1 1 IRL 1 1+1= Totals 1 2+1= 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 5 23. Bascom Johnson (USA) won a special event with 3. 3. Ukhov – who curiously lost his shirt after jumping 2.29 2. but Ukhov was the worthy winner.3 0 15. Countries: 5) The event was held on a Sunday afternoon. 2000-21=Q. William Hoyt Albert Tyler Evangelos Damaskos Ioannis Theodoropoulos Vasilios Xydas 3. Leading after 2. Paris. 2. failing to go higher than 2. 1936-12= 1956-4. and the result was contested by the Americans. The organisers had stated four days earlier that religious Americans would have a chance of jumping on the Monday in an attempt to better the Sunday marks. who had just won the high jump. 1976-3.20 o o o o o xo o 2. Colket and Baxter. Javelin star Eric Lemming shared fourth place.30OR 3.29 and had to borrow Silnov’s vest – and the US collegiate champion Kynard. 1972-18 1972-3.20 3.5 8 85. 1968-14=Q. (9) (2) (12) Mutaz Essa Barshim Derek Drouin Robbie Grabarz Jamie Nieto Bogdan Bondarenko Michael Mason 2 0 1 6 QAT CAN GBR USA UKR CAN ★ O L Y M P I C 2.3 91 998 1 1 2= 2= MEN’S HIGH JUMP The Best on Points 19. 1996-4.5 4 33 3 29 4 28. after the three Greek vaulters had failed at 2.29 2.38 o x 2.10 3.40 x-x World Champion Williams and defending champion Silnov were out of sorts.29 2. 200410.60 2. but the US again protested when this was given no recognition. 2004-1.60 (Competitors: 8. 1964-4 1964-10.5 1 19 2 15. 1964-24=Q. 15 Jul 1900 1. Ukhov then cleared 2. 1996-11=. and Tyler then failed at 3. 1984-4 1984-2.36 o x 2.40. 1906-2 2000-4.1+1= RUS 3 FRA 1= POL 1 2 AUS 1 1 NOR 1 CUB 1 1 JPN CZE PHI FIN CHN GRE ALG BRA ITA UKR SUI QAT - 1984-2.20 2. (3) (10) (14) 6.29 2.80.38 at once.29 were Barshim.10 2. continued Placing Table S B 4 5 6 7 8 G QAT 1= 1 YUG (SRB) ROU 1 1 BER 1 ISR 1 YUG 1 BAH 1 TCH 1= DEN 1 KOR 1 RSA 1= 1= IOP (YUG/SRB) Totals 28 25+5=22+10=21+5=23+2=19+14=13+18=15+5= Breakdown of URS placings: RUS 2 1 2 UKR 1 1= GEO 1 BLR KGZ Totals 4 1 2+1= 2 1 3 1= 1= 1 1 2 5 2 1 0 0 8 49 17. Irving Baxter Meredith Colket Karl “Flisa” Andersen Eric Lemming Jakab Krauser Emile Gontier Karl Staaf August Nilsson USA USA NOR SWE HUN FRA SWE SWE 3. 1992-2 1900-3. Dan Horton then won a third event with 3. They both cleared each height up to 3.36 first time. Finalists: 14) Series Ukhov Kynard Barshim Drouin Grabarz Nieto Bondarenko Mason 2.5 3 24. 2.5 Patrik Sjöberg SWE 18 Lajos Gönczy HUN Stefan Holm SWE Most Finals 3 Gönczy Pierre Lewden FRA Simeon Toribio PHI Stig Pettersson SWE Lawrie Peckham AUS Dwight Stones USA Sjöberg Javier Sotomayor CUB Dragutin Topić IOP/YUG Holm Most Appearances Topić IOP/YUG/SCG/SRB 6 4 Kuniyoshi Sugioka JPN 3 27 men Placing Table G S USA 13 12+2= SWE 1 2 URS 4 1 GER 2 2 GBR 1 2+1= CAN 1 1 HUN . this Olympic event was one which did not compare unfavourably with the best of the era. The next day.5 0 0.38.1+1= 1 1= 1 1= .35). The bar went up sharply to 2.80 2. =3. Ukhov piled on the pressure by clearing 2.38.R I O =3. but changed this ruling on the Saturday apparently without notifying the Americans. Kynard had a good try at 2.25 3. =4. 2004-10 1992-8=.5 1 6 1 6 0 6 0 6 0 5.25 o xo o o o o o o 2. With the US championship record at 3.5 1 5 Pole Vault Athens. 1924-3.33 o o xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx 2. 7.5 - 1 1 2 1 1 M Points 1 5 0 5 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0. 2000-2 1992-8=. Grabarz and Drouin. took part and duly took the top two places. 8.1+1= 1= 1 2+2= 2= 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1= 1= - M Points 36 341.3 1 12 1 11 0 10. and when Kynard failed once and passed to 2.33 and only two men were able to clear. 1992-2 1992-1. 8. 1988-3=.20 first time.1 5 90.29 (Competitors: 35. 1968-8.5 21 44. Countries: 2) Tyler and Hoyt started competing at 2. 1960-5.25 in the final.29 xo o o o o xo xo xxo 2. but to no avail as officials decided to keep the Baxter competition as the only legitimate event.5 1 9 1 8. 7. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S H J . 2008-17Q.10 3.2+3= 1= 1= 1= . 1996-4.

71. Up to 3. 7.40 only Söderström had no failures.35 3. Performances were carried forward to the final. Countries: 7. (3) (5) (8) Athens.80. Charles Dvorak Leroy Samse Louis Wilkins Ward McLanahan Claude Allen Walter Dray Paul Weinstein USA USA USA USA USA USA GER 3. Countries: 11. Frank Foss Henry Petersen Edwin Myers Edward Knourek Ernfrid Rydberg Laurits Jørgensen Eldon Jenne Georg Högström USA DEN USA USA SWE DEN USA SWE 4. Samse beat Wilkins in a second jump-off and McLanahan similarly beat Allen.00 3.71. who placed second in the US Trials but then cleared 3. 7. who one month later would jump 3. Jacobs and Söderström sharing third place after all three cleared 3.50 3.80 o xxx 3. Antwerp. 20 Aug 1920 1.35.75 o o o o 3.43 o o Norman Dole (USA) and Fernand Gonder (FRA) had both jumped 3.50 3.50 o o o o 2. The next four had a jump-off.06.35 3.R I O 144 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C St. London.00 3. some 30cm above the bar. 4.35 o o o o o xxx 3.00 x 4.43. Stockholm. 2. when four jumpers remained.71 to 3. with the bar raised 25cm through to 3.66.85 3.65 3. 6.43 o xxx xxx xxx 3.60 3. and Glover failed 3.58.71 ahead of Gilbert – 3.50.71OR 3.69 in 1904. 2. =2.60 in the qualifying round. as the Toronto Globe dramatically described.40 o o xxx 3.80 3.35 (Competitors: 15. while Bellah had reportedly cleared 3. leaving Alfred “A. Countries: 2) Series Dvorak Samse Wilkins McLanahan 3. =3. The qualifying competition was held on the morning of 24 July in three sections. Finalists: 8) 3.(10) (6) 1.95 o 4. Fernand Gonder FRA Bruno Söderström SWE Edward Glover USA Theodoris Makris GRE Heikki Åhlman (Pennola) FIN Yorgos Banikas GRE Otto Haug NOR Imré Kiss HUN Stefanos Koudouriotis GRE 3.71 xxx Jump-off 1 3.90 in a minor meeting before being injured. 8. turned to rugby in 1908 and so missed the London Games. with the bar being raised 3” for each new height. 4.90 o 4. The hazardous nature of the event was emphasised by Happenny’s fall while attempting 3.00 3. with all clearing 3.80 3. Gonder. C. though it was Nelson who caught the eye with a booming clearance at 3. Another with bad luck was Ed Archibald (CAN).25 3. 8. but Myers had cleared the same height.35 3.70 3.40.80.” Gilbert. 6. Foss was the favourite after winning the US Trials with 3. and Samse and Wilkins making 3. He then cleared 3. it lacked Leroy Samse. 2.50 (Competitors: 16. but neither was present for the Olympic event.00 3.65 (Competitors: 25.60 3. but could not match this in the competition proper. Makris missed at 3.98 elsewhere. In warming up Gonder had cleared 3.95 before failing at a world record of 4.50 o xxx While this was the most international Olympic pole vault to date.09 o All finalists cleared 3.99. with Söderström winning the first section with 3.58 3. and almost impaled himself on a broken borrowed pole early in the competition.35 o o o o 3. winner of the US Eastern Trials with a national record 3.80 o o xo o xo o 3.02 in the Eastern Trials.35 3.90 by 30cm in the Western Trials. and the two-time US Champion also made 3.43 only Dvorak was able to succeed.88/74kg) Babcock who became the only man to make 3.43.58 from Jacobs – 3. and had jumped 3. The starting height was 2. Dvorak had three tries at a world record 3.83 in an exhibition in 1905.50 3. 3 Sep 1904 1. Cooke won the next section with an Olympic record 3.85 3. The two shared the gold medal on the basis of Cook’s earlier 3. who had lost his pole on a train in Italy.50. Babcock was the most consistent jumper in the Stockholm final. of whom eight were Americans. with Archibald. All heights in the final were measured in feet and inches. 4.25 o o o o 3.40 3. . Finalists: 11) (Competitors: 11.65 3. 5. 11 Jul 1912 1. =5. At 3. hindered by an official who meandered across the runway after he had started his run-up.25.28. 25 Apr 1906 7. in his turn. having won an Olympic title.90.28 3. Nevertheless.78.90 o xxx xxx xxx 3. and Jenne had jumped 3.06 xxx Eleven men qualified for the final. Countries: 7.58 3.60 3.66 in a competition disrupted by the excitement surrounding the finish of the marathon.70 xo xo 3. a height Gonder made with ease.50 o 3. Countries: 8) Series Gonder Söderström Glover Makris P V 3.60 3.09WR 3. 24 Jul 1908 =1.855.35 and 3.95OR 3. so the winner was in doubt before the final.505. 3. as favourite.00 3. but he was unable to clear 3. Edward Cook Alfred Gilbert Edward Archibald Charles Jacobs Bruno Söderström Yorgos Banikas Sam Bellah Károly Szathmáry USA USA CAN USA SWE GRE USA HUN Harry Babcock Frank Nelson Marc Wright Bertil Uggla William Happenny Frank Murphy Samuel Bellah Frank Coyle Gordon Dukes Bill Fritz USA USA USA SWE CAN USA USA USA USA USA 3. =6.00 (11) 2. and Gilbert outjumped Cook 3. 5.58.80 3. (4) (1) (7) =4.60 3. (9) =8.00 o o o o 3.505OR 3. had missed the 1904 event. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Gonder. 3. Wright had set a world record of 4.35 3.66 – and Archibald 3.85 o xo xo xo Injured xxx 3. without success. 3. Bellah won the last section with 3. He had to be taken away “with blood dripping from his nostrils”.35 o o o xxx Series Babcock Nelson Wright Uggla Happenny Murphy 3.58 3.00 (Competitors: 7. Louis.75 3.71OR 3. Finalists: 13) Series Foss Petersen 3. it was the slender (1. Another to miss London was Walter Dray.50.

but graciously handed his Olympic spot to Bob Gutowski after being hobbled by an injury. Myers beat Knourek 3.315 on his last attempt after Nishida had just grazed the bar with his chest.10) o (3.06. the Americans had company from Nishida.11.25 4.80 (Competitors: 20.15 4.00 (Competitors: 30. inhibited by a foot injury. and Jefferson (4.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C By the time the bar reached 3. The relatively small (1.37 in winning the US Trials in a competition which saw 16 men clear 4.30 in April. He competed only in the 400m and 800m.30. Countries: 21. At 4.20 on his second attempt. but caused a shock by failing at 4. The USA had to do without George Varoff. Los Angeles. Graber had passed 4.35OR 4.65 (Competitors: 20. but he had an off-day.20m Carr cleared first time to take the gold medal. (1) (4) (2) (7) (3) (5) (6) Lee Barnes Glenn Graham James Brooker Henry Petersen Victor Pickard Ralph Spearow Maurice Henrijean USA USA USA DEN CAN USA BEL 3. Paris. only five men were left. Miller who had been flawless from 4.45 Jump-off xxx o (4. 2. 5.80. (21) 3. 4.20OR 4.00 o o o o o xo xo o o o o o xxo xxo o xxo 4. and was the youngest-ever pole vault winner at 17. Countries: 13.20 o xxx 4. Nishida’s sincere congratulations of Miller won the plaudits of the Californian crowd.70 3.40 xxx Bill Graber had set a world record of 4.90 3.00 3. Sabin Carr William Droegemuller Charles McGinnis Victor Pickard Lee Barnes Yonataro Nakazawa Henry Lindblad János Karlovits USA USA USA CAN USA JPN SWE HUN 4.25 xo o xo o xxx 4.80 3.66 in qualifying.20 onwards then cleared 4. Berlin.00 4.25. 4.90 3. 7. After clearing 3.15.10. (18) 4.10 3. with Victor Pickard the only non-American.90 3. Brooker ensured a clean sweep for the USA after beating the excellent Petersen in a jump-off. (22) =6.00 4. He was the favourite ahead of teammates Miller. 5. Finalists: 9) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 3. Finalists: 7) The finalists qualified by clearing 3. Third to fifth was decided by a jump-off. 3.30 USA USA JPN BRA GRE BRA 4. 3.25 o xxo xxx xxx 4.90 3. 5 Aug 1936 1. who placed only fourth in the US Trials.09.35 xo xxx xxx xxx 4.50. 2. leaving Petersen in silver medal position.25 4.95 3. (6) 2.95 3.15) o (4.90 o o o o o xo xxo 3. only Foss and the 19 year-old Petersen were left.31 xxx Jump-off Series Miller Nishida Jefferson Graber Nelli Barnes had improved Carr’s 1927 world record of 4. (8) (6) (4) (1) (3) (2) 3. 1 Aug 1928 1. who placed second in Stanford with 4.95 3. which he cleared first time. 4. and then went over 4. which only Miller and Nishida cleared. Foss went on to clear 3. At 4.60 o o o o o o o o o o xo o o 3. After nine men made 3.95) George Jefferson Bill Graber Shizuo Mochizuki Lúcio de Castro Petros Hlentzos Carlo Nelli 145 (Competitors: 8. 6. Graham’s son James made the 1956 Olympic team. On remeasurement it was found to be 4. Amsterdam. 7.90.11 in 10 competitions in 1928.00 4.73m/66kg) Foss remains one of only two men to have set a world record in Olympic pole vault competition.15) With 25 competitors the event was almost interminable.15 xxo o xxo (NH) 4. 8. 6. Nishida then cleared 4.10.90 3.00 4. and after a failure at 4. (16) 5.27 to 4. 10 Jul 1924 1.00 he moved to a world record of 4. Carr and Droegemuller both made 4.20 4.315OR 4.19 in Japan.00 4. and then watched as the other three failed three times. with Barnes placing fifth – very much an off-day for a man who cleared 4.95 3. the official film of the Games which gave full and artistic coverage of the event.15 4.315 xxo xxx 4.75 to 3. as he had done at the previous height. who equalled his Asian record.15 o o o xxo xo xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx 4. in November he would clear 4.66. Ralph Spearow then became favourite.95) x (3.20. 5.75 NH 4. 2. but the world’s top vaulter Charles Hoff (NOR) was missing.80 was needed to eliminate Julius Müller (GER). (7) (5) Bill Miller Shuhei Nishida USA JPN 4. 7. the final was started at 3.95 xxo xxo o o o xxx xxx 4.95 3. and ending under floodlights. Countries: 4) (14) Series Carr Droegemuller McGinnis Pickard Barnes Nakazawa Lindblad P V Earle Meadows Shuhei Nishida Sueo Oe William Sefton William Graber Josef Haunzwickel Danilo Innocenti Alfred Proksch Kiyoshi Adachi Wilhelm Sznajder Syl Apps Bo Ljungberg Péter Bácsalmási Jan Korejs CZE Richard Webster Viktor Zsuffka USA JPN JPN USA USA AUT ITA AUT JPN POL CAN SWE HUN TCH GBR HUN 4. 6.00 4.00 4.10 o o xxx xxx xxx 4. When the bar was raised to 4. but Meadows fought off the stiff . but 3.00 4. Countries: 13. the world record holder. (3) (4) (5) (7) (11) (12) (13) (15) (23) (25) o (4. 3 Aug 1932 1. and had won the US Trials – on countback from Droegemuller and Carr – with 4.30 o xxo 4.20 o xo o - 4. still a record.00 4. Foss cleared. Barnes won the gold medal in a jump-off with Graham.10 first time. Finalists: 25) Series Meadows Nishida Oe Sefton Graber Haunzwickel Innocenti Proksch Adachi Sznajder Apps Ljungberg Bácsalmási Korejs Webster Zsuffka 3.30 on his third attempt.70 in a jump-off for third.00 4.80 o o o o o o o o o o o o o 4.95 on the third attempt. This added to the drama of Leni Reifenstahl’s “Olympia”.22 in the trials). after Miller and Jefferson had cleared first time. taking a full five hours.25 4. improving his best for the third time.15) x (4.

failed to make the final – Bulatov being carried off after sustaining an injury while warming up. Richards considered that in good conditions he might have cleared 4.25 (Competitors: 19.25 4. By 1948 Warmerdam was coaching. Countries: 20. Eight men cleared 4. and some surprises occurred.30 xxo xxx xxx Series Richards Gutowski Roubanis Mattos Lundberg Ważny Landström Preussger 4. (5) 2. with Bob Richards third after clearing 4. All three then cleared the next two heights with Roubanis second on countback ahead of Gutowki.40.53.95 3.95 3.15. (3) 5. Olenius of Finland failed to clear 4.30 first time.45 o xxo o Strong winds reduced the heights achieved by 15-20cm. this was a tactical error which left him watching Kataja. 5. 7 Sep 1960 1. before gambling on clearing 4.50 4.55 xxo xxx 4.20 4. failed at 4. (1) =6.30 o o xo o xo xxx xxx xxx 4. was later much better known in his own country as a player in the North American National Hockey League and as a Conservative MP. Finalists: 12) 3. Laz then failed three times at 4.81 in the US Trials. Laz and then Richards cleared on their second jumps. rather than the metal poles popularised during the 1940s.20 o o o o o o 4.30 o o o o o 4.10 4.25 o o xo o o o xo xo 4. 22 Jul 1952 1. 2. bringing the prospect of a jump-off if Series Bragg Morris Landström Cruz Malcher Petrenko Sutinen Tomášek 4. European Champion and record holder. 3.20 o o o xo xo o xo xo 4.35.42. The best European was Roubanis.55. coming in the US Trials where Richmond “Boo” Morcom beat Guinn Smith on countback. 6. fight Smith and Richards for the medals. with four men beating the previous Olympic record. Roubanis missed.50. were unable to clear higher than 4.(10) (9) 8.40 xpp The war years deprived Cornelius Warmerdam (USA) of the opportunity of winning two gold medals. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Richards missed. 2 Aug 1948 1. Countries: 21. and the best vault of 1948 was 10cm below 15’. (4) 3.20 o o xo xxx xxx xxx 4. After Kataja and Richards missed three times at 4. (6) Don Bragg USA Ron Morris USA Eeles Landström FIN Rolando Cruz PUR Günter Malcher GER/GDR Igor Petrenko UKR URS Matti Sutinen FIN Rudolf Tomášek CZE TCH (Competitors: 31. (7) 4.10 3. 8. (8) 3. At 4.25 4. 4. All of the four contenders cleared 4. Countries: 12.50 4.70OR 4.40 o xo o xxx 4.00 and then cleared 3.60 o xo xxx xxx 4.40 first time. Countries: 12. the Americans cleared first time with Gutowski making the better jump before Richard grazed the bar.30 4.50 4. Finalists: 14) (Competitors: 21. and so won the gold medal. It took five hours to complete. while Victor Sillon (FRA) and Yorgos Roubanis also made 4. Finalists: 13) 4.00 o o 4. Apps.95 xo o o o o o xo xo Series Smith Kataja Richards Kaas Lundberg Morcom Göllers Olenius 4.50 4. 7. the leader. (11) 2. (2) (8) Guinn Smith Erkki Kataja Bob Richards Erling Kaas Ragnar Lundberg “Boo” Morcom Hugo Göllors Valto Olenius USA FIN USA NOR SWE USA SWE FIN 1. 3.56 xxo xxx Rome.15 o o o o xo 4. The three USSR vaulters.70 o xxx Bragg was expected to win after setting a world record of 4.56OR 4.60 xxx Nineteen of 25 competitors cleared 4. Andrzej Krzesiński (POL) and Morris were added to the final after clearing 4. though they had the same number of failures. The Greek UCLA student joined the flawless Richards and Gutowski in clearing 4.40 4.55 o o o xo xxx xxx xxx xxx 4. 26 Nov 1956 London. Warmerdam was generally considered the best ever vaulter prior to the advent of Sergey Bubka. levered himself over the bar to maintain the USA’s winning streak in the event. who tied for sixth.40 4.55OR 4. (6) 6. all 4. 6. Nishida and Oe were officially second and third but in a gesture of friendship they cut their medals in two and had them soldered together.95 in the final. Dave Clark (USA) and Vladimir Bulatov (URS).60 4.35 o xo xo o xxx xxx xxx xxx (19) (14) (13) (16) (18) (5) (6) (12) Bob Richards Don Laz Ragnar Lundberg Pyotr Denisenko UKR Valto Olenius Bunkichi Sawada Vladimir Brazhnik UKR Viktor Knyazhev BLR USA USA SWE URS FIN JPN URS URS 4. 4. both 4. (3) 5.50 (Competitors: 29.50 with their first attempts. 4.40. which meant that another long final was in prospect.20 4.55 4. Dimitar Khlebarov (BUL). 2. Melbourne. 7.10 xo o xo o xxo xxx xxx 4. Third place was decided on the basis of Lundberg having taken fewer jumps than Denisenko.50 o xo xo o o o o o 4.50 o o o 4.50 xo xo xxx xxx 4.40 o o o o xxx 4.40 xo o xo o o xxo xxo xxo 4. and then all missed 4. 4. Finalists: 19) Series Richards Laz Lundberg Denisenko Olenius Sawada Brazhnik Knyazhev 4. (7) =7.60 vaulters. and leaped out of the pit triumphantly. Morcom had an ankle injury in London but qualified at 4. Helsinki. 4.50 4.40 performers. but made 4.95 P V (8) (4) (11) (13) (10) (9) (6) (2) Bob Richards USA Bob Gutowski USA Yorgos Roubanis GRE George Mattos USA Ragnar Lundberg SWE Zenon Ważny POL Eeles Landström FIN Manfred Preussger GER/GDR 4.35 4.00 in qualifying. who was suffering the effects of a knee injury.20 4. (9) 4. and was one of 10 men to clear the qualifying height of 4.R I O 146 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Japanese challenge by clearing 4.55 4. who was using a new fibreglass pole. 8. 5.20 4.25 4. The first man to clear 15 feet (4.20 4.30.40. which left the runway waterlogged. and at the next height Richards again cleared while making the bar wobble.53 o o xxx 4.30 but did not qualify.30 4.10 o o o o o o o xo 4.53 4.30 to set a Finnish record in fifth place. while Eeles Landström. In the rainy conditions. He produced his best jump of the day. with unheralded .20.35 on his second attempt. leaving George Mattos in fourth place.57). though Richards brushed the bar on his jump.72. Smith.

Renato Dionisi (ITA).20 5. 16 Oct 1968 1. Mexico City.. negating the clearance.40 5.50 with his final clearance before failing three times at 5.50OR 5.35 5. Tokyo. failed to qualify.. with European Champion Nordwig the next man most likely to succeed. and the German triumvirate – Reinhardt Lehnertz and the veteran Preussger. Bragg (first time). as compared to six four years earlier. were the next to depart – at 5.5 speed for 100y). though Nordwig was closest.85. 3. Pennel was suffering with an injured back and failed at 4. Johnson. Hansen failed twice. 5.10 o xxo xxo xo o o 5. leaving Landström with the bronze.05. bronze medallist in the ’71 Europeans was injured. leaving the two veterans to duel. with unhelpful swirling winds.40OR 5.60 qualifying height.05 5.55. Pentti Nikūla. 4.90 xo o o o o 4.45 o xxx xxx xxx o - 5. 4.45 o xxx 5. while Morris was close only on his last attempt. while ahead of him Schiprowski was the surprise of the event. but the Swede was injured by Munich.45 . Bliznetsov. Finalists: 18) Series Hansen Reinhardt Lehnertz Preussger Bliznetsov Tomášek Nikula Pemelton 4. 5. and might well have won even if Seagren “et al” had been allowed to use their preferred poles.95. 6. In the final only two athletes went out before the bar was raised to 5. Montreal. 6. This left quite a few vaulters at a disadvantage (partly psychological) at a time when equipment should not have been a prime factor.45 first time. and Cruz (second attempt) clearing 4. Finalists: 15) Series Seagren Schiprowski Nordwig Papanikolaou Pennel Bliznetsov D’Encausse Engel 5. Hansen then gambled.10 for the gold. Bliznetsov dropped a place from 1964 despite clearing 5. 2.40. 8. and more than six hours after the competition started. Bragg tried a world record of 4.15 to beat the incumbent Olympic record. cleared 4.20 5.50=OR 5. Countries: 20.10 (Competitors: 21.35 5.35 5. 3.90 4. all cleared 5. 7. Only Bragg and Morris went over 4. and Johnson third. 17 Oct 1964 1. with just Landström. (10) (12) (4) (13) (1) (3) (11) (7) Wolfgang Nordwig Bob Seagren Jan Johnson Reinhard Kuretzky Bruce Simpson Volker Ohl Hans Lagerqvist François Tracanelli GDR USA USA FRG CAN FRG SWE FRA 5. Seagren was ahead because he had one less miss at lower heights.18).30 or better.00 first time.40OR 5. The rule was changed the following year.30 – 35cm more than in Tokyo – leaving five men to battle for the medals.70. and failed to clear a height in the qualifying round.95 xo o xxx 5.81 to 5. 26 Jul 1976 1.10 5.05 o xxx xxx xx x 5.40 - - xo - o - xo o - o xo o xo xo - - o - o o xxo o xo o xo - xo o o xo o xxx xo xo xo - o xxo xxx xxx xxx xxx Munich.40 on his second jump. on the grounds that the pole had not been available to all competitors for 12 months. and nine went over 5. 2 Sep 1972 1.00 4. and 13 others.35 third time compared with Hristos Papanikolau’s first-time effort. Finalists) Series Nordwig Seagren Johnson Kuretzky Simpson Ohl Lagerqvist Tracanelli 5.50 xxo 5.56. he scraped over 5. 4. At 5. passing 5. Seven men were now left in. Morris. Hansen had to make 5.30 5. improving his best four times with booming athletic clearances at each height. and Seagren was well over on his third attempt. but his pole passed under the bar. Bragg had a good clearance at 4. None of the three made 5.05 5. who was flustered by the equipment ruling. (5) (10) (15) (13) (2) (18) (6) (11) Fred Hansen USA Wolfgang Reinhardt GER/FRG Klaus Lehnertz GER/FRG Manfred Preussger GER/GDR Gennadiy Bliznetsov UKR URS Rudolf Tomášek CZE TCH Pentti Nikula FIN Billy Pemelton USA 5.50=OR 5. 5.00 5.20 5.30 5.10. Earlier Hansen. taking the world record from 4. making him the gold medal favourite.50=OR 5.20 o xo xo o xo xxo xxx 5. Countries: 12. He was affected in part by the IAAF’s decision to ban the “Cata-poles” used by Seagren and Isaksson. 3.80 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S P V 147 Seagren was favourite. and Seagren had won the 16th consecutive gold medal (excluding 1906) for the USA The previous Olympic record was beaten 29 times by 11 athletes. making 5. The last of these was set by Fred Hansen in the USA versus USSR match of 1964. 6. failed to clear. Malcher went out at the next height. among others. among them John Pennel. Thirteen men cleared the Olympic record height of 4. The GDR star dealt best with the cold conditions. only three men were left. (4) (3) (12) (17) Tadeusz Ślusarski Antti Kalliomäki David Roberts Patrick Abada POL FIN USA FRA 5. as the other Germans failed 5. 7.10OR 5. good enough for the bronze medal . the first man to clear 5m. 2.00 o o o o x xx 5. then missed at 4.85 o o o xo xxx 4. but came down on the bar.40OR 5. They. with Seagren leading from Nordwig. a height which defeated the number three American Billy Pemelton. Nordwig was the bronze medal winner.20.56 xxx Seagren and Kjell Isaksson (SWE) had been the best vaulters of the year. 4.25 5.95 4. (9) (13) (7) (4) (10) (5) (15) (12) Bob Seagren USA Claus Schiprowski FRG Wolfgang Nordwig GDR Hristos Papanikolaou GRE John Pennel USA Gennadiy Bliznetsov UKR URS Hervé D’Encausse FRA Heinfried Engel FRG 5. the gymnastic Czech. 2. 7. 2. and the big (1.20 (Competitors: 23.82 and his third failure took place more than six hours after the competition had begun. (Competitors: 30.70.15 5.28. 8.30 5.40 on his final jump.35 5. presaging a lengthy final. Pennel placed fifth after clearing 5.40 xo xxo xxx 5.90 to qualify. Eleven men cleared 5. Eighteen athletes cleared the 4.45.35 o o xo xxx 5. Countries: 15.90/90kg) Ukrainian. along with Steve Smith (USA). Nordwig then improved his Olympic record to 5. Then Pennel made 5.70 o o o o o o 4. 8. but was in keeping with Pennel’s rotten Olympic luck. the first man to clear 17 feet (5. 3.05.20 5. the fastest man on the runway (9.10 to win.05. Nordwig cleared 5.10 xxo xxx The development of the fibreglass pole revolutionised the event between 1960 and 1964 with 10 accepted (plus seven unratified) records.25 5.60. and. Four men cleared 5.30 xo o xxx xxx xxx 5.90 4. and when Reinhardt cleared first time.80 o xo o o xo xxo o 4. Tomášek.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Günther Malcher leading.

80 first time.40 (Bubka and Gataullin 5.40 5. None of the top six missed at 5.60 o o - 5.55 after one failure at 5. with Kjell Isaksson.60. while Bell and Vigneron failed. one of them very close.65 x xxo - 5. and Gataullin cleared 5.77). (6) Earl Bell (14) Thierry Vigneron 5. and Vladimir Kishkun (URS) the most notable of those unable to get to that level. (8) (1) (3) (2) (9) Władysław Kozakiewicz Konstantin Volkov RUS Tadeusz Ślusarski Philippe Houvion Jean-Michel Bellot Mariusz Klimczyk Thierry Vigneron Sergey Kulibaba KAZ POL URS POL FRA FRA POL FRA URS 5.90 xxo xxx 5.10 to qualify. At 5. though Montreal’s silver medallist Kalliomäki was eliminated after failing his opening height.60 these three and Pierre Quinon were the only men left. Kozakiewicz celebrated by gesturing to the crowd to let them know his opinion of them. though four passed 5.30 5. but limped out of the pit. Bell and Tully the likely medallists. the – 1979 number one – clearing only on his final jump to tie Ślusarski for silver. He later described his winning jump as “one of my best vaults ever”.78WR 5. The third of the strong Polish squad – Buciarski – also missed twice at 5. Quinon. (1) Kimmo Pallonen 6.70 and Vigneron withdrew at 5. but watched Quinon clear 5. (6) 2. the most frequently beaten field event world record.60 5.70 along with the other two. suggesting that 5.70 5. On his second attempt he brushed the bar. Ślusarski.80 o 5.25.45 5.95 xxx xxx By the time of the 1988 Games.55 o xxx 5. 8. (13) Mike Tully =3. with only two attempts available at 5. The American passed to 5.65 o xxo xxo xxo xxx xxx 5. and could go no higher. Yegorov 5. .55. were considered the best in the field. Finalists: 15) Series Bubka Gataullin Yegorov Bell Collet Vigneron Bagyula D’Encausse 5.55. No-one was able to clear 5.65 Tully cleared after Quinon had failed once.70 o xx xxx xxx 5. The US magazine Track and Field News reviewed the event as “the USA versus France”.50 5. Houvion and Klimczyk had failures at early heights in the final. 8 Aug 1984 (Competitors: 28. In the final. Bubka changed poles.45 5. missing at 5.25.55 or 5. Finalists: 20) Series F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 5.20 would have been a more sensible standard. Countries: 13. (13) =5.50 o o - 5.148 5.75) and Houvion (5. cleared first time. Kozakiewicz was the only man to clear 5.65 xxx - 5. the setter of seven world records in 1984.40 5.45 xo o xo - Series Quinon Tully Bell Vigneron Pallonen Lytle Böhni 5.60 5.55 5. The qualifying height was 5. Vigneron (5.82.90OR 5.50.80 xxx Sergey Bubka.90. (9) 4. 12 cleared 5. P V Los Angeles. 30 Jul 1980 (5) (6) (12) 4.75 by him would not be enough to win. but now went for 5.60. Countries: 13. The medals were determined at 5. with Volkov. Seoul. Kozakiewicz was faultless at 5. 7. but it stayed on.60 o o 5.65 5.45 5.60 (Competitors: 21. Twenty cleared 5. 75. using a larger one. François Tracanelli (FRA).30 5. were the two best in the world. and Vigneron had an off-day. Kozakiewicz (5. Finalists: 12) Series Kozakiewicz Volkov Ślusarski Houvion Bellot Klimczyk Vigneron Kulibaba 1.30 5. Quinon and Tully passed and the other two cleared first time.75.75 5. 6. After two poor failures.55 - o - xo o o - o - o o o xxx xxx - o - xo xo xo o - o xxo xo xo xxo xxx x xxx xxx xx xxx Moscow. Kozakiewicz cleared 5. 80 and 5.85. 8. 8. Bubka had established himself as the greatest vaulter in the world.70 – to the disappointment of the booing. Yegorov set an Olympic record in clearing 5. 5.85 5.60 o xxx o o xo 5.25 5.70 o xxx xxx 5.78. Then at 5.45 5.65 5. The win cemented the first and only Soviet clean sweep in the event. Tully had made 5. with Roberts.35 5.65 5.40. and had one of his soaring clearances for the gold. and then had three misses at 5.60 after clearing the preceding height. 1. (12) Doug Lytle 7.40 ★ O L Y M P I C Ślusarski Kalliomäki Roberts Abada Buciarski Bell Bellot Takanezawa 5. as only 15 made 5. All three safely qualified for the final.75 first time.78 xo The pole vault.75 o x 5.60 5.70 in the US Trials. but on this occasion 5. who had set a world record of 5.50.65 5. Countries: 14. (7) (19) (2) (8) Wojciech Buciarski Earl Bell Jean-Michel Bellot Itsuo Takanezawa R I O 2 0 1 6 POL USA FRA JPN 5.70 5.60 5.55 o o o o xxx xxx 5.70.70 5. ill-mannered crowd – and set a lifetime best of 5.55.80 5.70 xo o xo o xo xo 5. 5.72).45 5. before missing first time at 5.75 after injuring an ankle.20 5.81 at the same facility in the US Trials. 5. to finish equal third.50. the world’s best in 1975.45 5. leaving Ślusarski the winner on countback over Kalliomäki after Roberts failed at 5. but the Soviet boycott deprived them of possible medals. 7. (10) (5) Sergey Bubka UKR Rodion Gataullin RUS Grigoriy Yegorov KAZ Earl Bell Philippe Collet Thierry Vigneron István Bagyula Philippe D’Encausse URS URS URS USA FRA FRA HUN FRA 5. with nine outdoor world records including the first ever 6m clearance three years earlier.45 xo xo o o FRA USA USA FRA FIN USA SUI ITA 5. and Władysław Kozakiewicz. was improved by three vaulters in 1980 before Moscow. (5) Pierre Quinon 2. Countries: 10.50 o xxx xxx 5.85 xxo - 5.60 o o o xo 5. =2. for a new world record.75 o - 5.40 5.(14) (8) (Competitors: 19. (7) Mauro Barella (Competitors: 19. In the final six men made 5. and Konstantin Volkov. Finalists: 14) Roberts. it was decided to terminate the proceedings. Bubka had passed 5.85 at his third try. 28 Sep 1988 1.80 was just too much.55.65 first time. (7) 3. Abada and Bell gambled and lost at 5. 7. Only the Soviets opened higher than 5. Bell and Collet failed. Tully already had the silver. and the surprising Kalliomäki – who set a personal best – all clearing first time. with Vigneron.45). (10) Felix Böhni 8.80 as a first time clearance at 5. leaving the three passers – the Soviet jumpers – to fight for the gold.50.75 xxx xxx x 5. 6. The Frenchman then passed on to 5.

(3) (4) (5) (6) (1) (13) 7. 4.70.95 at his last attempt.95 xxo xxx xx 6. with García winning Spain’s first ever field event medal. Finalists: 13) By 1992 Sergey Bubka had won three world titles. and Mack then tried 6.65 xo o o xo o 5.80 5. followed by less excellent efforts.75 5.90 but it stayed on. In the final. Grand Prix events tend not to insist upon a maximum of two minutes for each jump. Five men made it safely over 5.65s of Romain Mesnil (FRA) and Matti Mononen (FIN) would have been enough to reach any previous Olympic final.60 5.96 xxx xxx xxx xxx x Six times World Champion Sergey Bubka had further bad Olympic fourtune. 149 6. Series Mack Stevenson Gibilisco Pavlov Ecker Börgeling Miles Averbukh 5.92OR 5. Mack cleanly went over 5. Hysong battered the bar at a personal best 5. and was the reigning Olympic Champion.80 5. One of five to clear 5.90 5. 8. and curiously the bar was then raised in increments of 6cm. Countries: 11.65.90 o o x x 5. causing the biggest shock of the ’92 Games.80 to win the gold.90 o xo xxo xxo xxp xxx xxx xxx 5. and failing to select a stiff enough pole.55.85 - 5.75 xo xxo xxx xx 5. 3. though only three made it.70 in the qualifying round. Six made the qualifying height of 5.80 5.90 xxx xxx Atlanta.86 twice. cleared on his final attempt.80 xo xo xo xxo o xxx 5.80 with the American being unfairly booed by the Spanish crowd. =5.55 o o xo o xxo o o - 5. Bubka waited until his usual starting height of 5. 2.80 5.70 until entering. Tivontchik again had a second time clearance as all three broke Bubka’s Olympic record.90 on the final attempts to take the next two places. gambled at 5.80. Athens. 2.90 5.60 o o o xo - 5. 8.65 o - 5.70 o o x xxx 5.80 o xxo xxx xxx 5. with three first-time clearers of 5.60 added to the final. Igor Trandenkov.02 xx xxx Sergey Bubka.80 xo xxx xx x 5. who had passed 5. Eleven men went on to clear 5.60 in the qualifying. sadly failing to make the final for the third time. most notably Germany’s 6m vaulter Tim Lobinger. and Bubka found the rule too hurried for his taste. Igor Trandenkov. Only four men did better than 5. 8. (11) (12) (3) (10) (2) (5) (4) (7) Maksim Tarasov RUS Igor Trandenkov RUS Javier García Kory Tarpenning Dave Volz Asko Peltoniemi Philippe Collet “Danny” Krasnov EUN EUN ESP USA USA FIN FRA ISR 5. a Paris-based American jumper.75. 29 Sep 2000 1. led by Gibilisco.86 5.92 with his remaining attempt. 4. 5. with Stevenson taking the lead.90 5. 7.97 x xxx xx x 5. Finalists: 12) Series Tarasov Trandenkov García Tarpenning Volz Peltoniemi Collet 5. After winning just three medals between 1976 and 1996. 2 Aug 1996 (14) (9) (3) (12) (4) (1) (13) (5) Jean Galfione Igor Trandenkov Andrei Tivontchik Igor Potapovich Pyotr Bochkaryov Dmitriy Markov Tim Lobinger Lawrence Johnson FRA RUS GER KAZ RUS BLR GER USA 5.80 5. and was almost as surprising here. None of the jumpers made another height. Markov and former Soviet Tivontchik got over second time. but still found himself in second behind Galfione.75 5.50 o o xxo o o o 5. After two failures he passed to 5.95.00 xxx x xx All 16 finalists cleared 5.55 5. and France won its third title in 90 years. 7. and had to give up when his damaged achilles tendon did not respond during the warm-up. he missed.90 first time. The depth of the event was such that the best-ever marks were achieved for third to 14th place. with Germany. and cleared. Countries: 26. was less fortunate in the Olympic arena.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S P V Barcelona.70 5. four were eliminated by the time the bar was raised to 5. (3) (4) (6) (13) (9) (11) (16) (2) Tim Mack Toby Stevenson Giuseppe Gibilisco Igor Pavlov Danny Ecker Lars Börgeling Derek Miles Alex Averbukh USA USA ITA RUS GER GER USA ISR 5. Both men had close failures at 5. 3. having made 5.80 5.40 Sydney.85 5.90.92 o o xo x xx xxx xx 5. Finalists: 16) (Competitors: 37.80. 8. cleared 5.75 5. 2.95OR 5. who missed 5.65 (Competitors: 23.92OR 5. and the Australian imports Markov and Chistyakov. 6. 6. Finalists: 14) Series Galfione Trandenkov Tivontchik Potapovich Bochkaryov Markov Lobinger Johnson USA USA RUS GER AUS AUS RSA GER (Competitors: 35.86 o xx xo o o xo x 5. who again made the height first time. and Tim Lobinger.75 5. (2) (7) Nick Hysong Lawrence Johnson Maksim Tarasov Michael Stolle Dmitriy Markov Viktor Chistyakov Okkert Brits Danny Ecker (Competitors: 35.70 o o xo o o 5.90 5. 7. as did Galfione. but championships do.60 o xo xo o o o 5.80 o o xo xo o o xo xo 5. Clearing 5. 4.70 xo o o o o xo 5. the USA had won the top four medals of the six available in 2000-04. At 5. Countries: 24. 3. .86 5. 6.86 5. 4. Defending champion Tarasov and Stolle then cleared 5. Bochkaryov and Trandenkov.80 first time were Hysong and Johnson.90 5.85 xo xo o xx 5. European Champion Averbukh was the next star to miss out. both failed at 5.86 first time. Both men tried 5.65.75 o o o xo o xxo xxo xxx 5.70. Stevenson again had a close miss. but only Tarasov was close. 3. All finalists made 5.65 5. 5.80 Series Hysong Johnson Tarasov Stolle Markov Chistyakov Brits Ecker 5. the German 6m vaulter.85 there were still six athletes. Countries: 22.00 and was close with his final attempt. Potapovich. 5.65 for eighth place.80. while Johnson flew clear on his second attempt. 27 Aug 2004 1. The Spaniard and Tarpenning. and the 5. who astonished with his 2003 world title. was the biggest casualty at 5. Others to miss out included six-metre vaulters Okkerts Brits (RSA) and 2001 World Champion Dmitri Markov (AUS). 7 Aug 1992 1. Ukraine and the USA each with a full complement of three. while the other fair haired Russian.70 and were joined by seven who scaled 5. Nine countries were represented in the final.80 5. 2. Mack and Stevenson reacted by clearing 5. Tarasov cleared 5. 1.92OR 5. now a five-time World Champion.75 5.

5 24.80.97 xo o o 6.91 x xo xxo 5. Countries: 5) . L J MEN’S POLE VAULT The Best on Points 22 Bob Richards USA 15 Bob Seagren USA 14.50 - o xo 5.70 5. and matched Lukyanenko with a third time clearance at 5. Remarkably. 200816=Q 2000-30=Q. this time at an Olympic record of 5. Neither German could make a further clearance.85 o xo xo xxx xo xxx xxx xxx 5. Countries: 23.75 5. London. (7) 4.70 5.85.97OR 5.5 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 1.75 5. 2000-16=Q 1996-7.65 in the final while reigning champion Steve Hooker and leading American Brad Walker no-heighted. Up through 5. before winning gold with another final attempt at 5. 1956-5 1964-15=. but he slipped to third when the athletic Holdzeppe and the more powerful Otto both cleared 5.5 1 22. 1968-7.80 xxo o 5.97.60 o xxo xo xxo xxo o xo 5.5 7 61 Long Jump 1. 1972-11 1972-nh. 1988-5= 1996-7.R I O 150 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Beijing.70 5. 6. 1984-3=. 5. 4. 2000-13. and none of them had a clean slate at that point.2+1= 1+1= 2+1= POL 2 1= 1 2+1= JPN 2 1 1 2+1= 1 CAN 1= 1+1= 2 1= AUS 1 2= DEN 1 1 1 NOR 1 1 1= HUN 1= 1= 2= 1 2 ITA 1 1= 1 ESP 1 UKR 1 KAZ 1 PUR 1 . 1968-4.1 0 4 0 1 999 88 Athens.55) and 40 year-old Jeff Hartwig (5. 2004-18Q.5 Tadeusz Ślusarski POL 1948-3. 2004-11= 2000-10=. (14) 2.74 (Competitors: 9. 1984-3=.85. looked a gold medal winner with his first-time clearance at 5. 22 Aug 2008 1. For the slight but gymnastic Lavillenie. 2012ht/Q Lobinger Roman Mesnil FRA Thirteen men cleared 5. 1972-nh/ 1964-18. 1996-20=Q.75 xxx 5.65 o o xo xo o o 5. (12) (4) (11) (1) (2) (9) (10) (13) Steve Hooker Yevgeniy Lukyanenko Denys Yurchenko Derek Miles Dmitriy Starodubtsev Danny Ecker Jerome Clavier Raphael Holdzeppe AUS RUS UKR USA RUS GER FRA GER 5. 1952-3.55) also failed to make the baker’s dozen. 7. 1972-2 1976-1.91 first time.75 o o xo o xo xo xxo 5. 1980-2= Most Finals 3 Richards Ragnar Lundberg SWE Hervé D’Encausse FRA Hrístos Papanikolaou GRE Ślusarski Earl Bell USA Thierry Vigneron FRA Tim Lobinger GER Giuseppe Gibilisco ITA Danny Ecker GER 1948-5.60 5. 2.1 1 7. 2000-13. Lukyanenko. 8.35OR 6.84 5.5 3 41 3 33. 4.96.5 1 15 1 15 1 13 0 11. 2. 7 Apr 1896 Ellery Clark Robert Garrett James Connolly Aléxandros Halkokondilis USA USA USA GRE 6.65 in the qualifying round. 10 Aug 2012 1.5 1 6 1 6 0 5 0 5 0 4. Veterans Tim Lobinger (5. M Points 44 403 8 93 5 74.91 5. 2004-9.65 5. 1992-3.70 5. Denys Yurchenko UKR 3 30 men Placing Table G S B 4 5 6 7 8 USA 17+2= 12+2= 9+2= 8+1= 5 5+1= 3 2+3= GER 1 3 4 3 2 3 2 4 FRA 4 1= 2+1= 1+2= 5 2 URS/EUN 2 2+1= 1 1 1 1+1= 1 2 SWE 1 1+1= 2= 3 1= 3+1= 2 RUS 2 1 2 2+1= GRE . 2004-5. 3.70 in the final. Finalists: 14) Series Lavillenie Otto Holdzeppe Starodubtsev Lewis Lukyanenko Filippidis Kudlička 5.85 xxo xxo 5.1+2= 2 1+2= 1= 2 FIN 2 1 . 2012-9 2000-30=Q. who no-heighted. the 2008 World Indoor Champion.75 5.90 xxo xxx 5. 2004-3.91 5. Eight men cleared 5. and that confrontation was repeated in London.96OR 5.85 5. but 2007 World Champion Brad Walker. Only six men cleared 5. (8) (4) 7.. 1952-1. Countries: 11. Finalists: 13) Series Hooker Lukyanenko Yurchenko Miles Starodubstev Ecker Clavier Holdzeppe 5.02 x xx xxx 6. Lavillenie passed to 5.87/85kg) Hooker cleared on his final attempt.07 xx x xxx Lavillenie had won the European title six weeks earlier in a great battle with Otto and Holdzeppe. 2008-14=Q. leaving the 1-2-3 exactly as it had been in Helsinki in June. and on his final attempt went clear for the gold medal.5 6 61 3 48.70 o o xo xo xxo xxx xxx 5. only Lavillenie had a perfect record.96 xxo P V . (12) =5. (3) (2) Renaud Lavillenie Björn Otto Raphael Holdzeppe Dmitriy Starodubtsev Steven Lewis Yevgeniy Lukyanenko Konstadinos Filippidis Jan Kudlička FRA GER GER RUS GBR RUS GRE CZE 5. it was particularly satisfying having only won bronze in the 2011 World Championships after being favourite to win.0 3 41.0 3 31.90.60 (Competitors: 26.00 5. 1976-1.1+1= 1 TCH (CZE) BLR 1 BRA 1 BEL 1 RSA 1 SUI 1 ISR 2 AUT 2= GBR 1= 1= CZE 1 Totals27+2= 25+4= 23+7= 23+6=21+11=18+15=22+2=20+3= Breakdown of GER placings: GER 2 3 FRG 1 GDR 1 1 Totals 1 3 4 2 1 3 Breakdown of URS/EUN placings: RUS 1 2+1= UKR 1 1 KAZ 1 Totals 2 2+1= 1 1 2 2 2 1 3 2 2 3 1 4 5 1 2 8 63 16 14 93 1 1+1= 1 1+1= 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 1 6 29.5 3 41. 2008-nh/ 2000-8. 1980-2= 1976-6. 2008-3. 1988-4 1980-7.65 (Competitors: 32. Hooker – looking like a fair haired version of Władysław Kozakiewicz – achieved his fourth successive clearance on his third attempt. 2004-11=. was not one of them. (13) 3. 1956-1 1968-1. 2008-6 Most Appearances 4 Javier García ESP xxx xxx 1988-nh/Q. but burly (1. 3. 8.

but tried too hard in the last round.70 6. Countries: 3) Irishman Peter O’Connor. as they would until the 1936 Games.09 7. 3.63 Frank Irons had followed his 1908 win with US titles in 1909-10. but still produced a sixjump series which averaged 7.34OR 6.21 7.585m jump from toe to heel was more than seven metres. O’Connor protested that only one judge was present for Prinstein’s jump.97 6. 2.04 7.94 6.755 6. 5.62 x 4 7. though his loss to Daniel Frank a few weeks earlier gave the contest a more competitive air. Prinstein won by almost half a metre.57 at home in Ireland two weeks after the Games.84 6. and only Irons. (C5) (B5) (E4) (A4) (B3) (C3) (B4) (B7) Frank Irons Daniel Kelly Calvin Bricker Edward Cook John Brennan Frank Mount Pleasant Albert Weinstein Tim Ahearne IRL USA USA CAN USA USA USA GER GBR 7.30 6.635 6. the world record holder.93.89 6. Sections were A-4/B7/C-5/D-6/E-9) 1. with 7.96 This eagerly-awaited clash was settled in the first round.44. [7.85 7.025 6.725 6. while Worthington won the final group.04. Having been unfancied even by the Americans.09 6. which would have been good enough to win gold. 6. messing up his run-up to leave the 1-2-3 the same as it had been after the qualifying.185 5.81 6. but even in 1896 a jump of 7m would have been required to give this the stamp of a top class event.18 6 7. Countries: 6. Prinstein was enraged to discover that Kraenzlein did indeed jump on the Sunday – overtaking him by 1cm – and had to be restrained from hitting Kraenzlein. and was quickly overtaken. Irons then extended his Olympic record with 7.18 7.82 2 7.88 6.03 6. held on a Saturday. and the two top men agreed not to compete on the Sunday. 2.15 6. 8.97 6. 7.825 6. 7.82 (Competitors: 29. Mellander’s 6. Paris. as the top three jumpers were allowed three further jumps in the final.825 6. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S L J complained when his own third round jump was ruled a foul because he fell back on landing – the rule of the time. Finalists: 3) Edward Cook had won both the IC4A title and the Eastern trials.21.97 x 6.26. 3. Åberg improved in the finals to 7. London. Gutterson then produced the second best jump of all-time.01 3 x x 6.845 6.175 6. Prinstein led the qualifying round.705 6.04 6. Finalists: 3) Series Prinstein O’Connor Friend Mellander Abrahams Cronan Rönström Somodi 1 7.60]. and had won the US Central trials with a relatively modest 6.94. Irons opened group one of the qualifying round with 6.42 x 6.25 7.95 6.28 – well ahead of Bricker’s best of 7. reaching 7.86 6.300 (Competitors: 12.48 in the final. who reached 7.99 6.49 6 x 7. 4.930 7. which he then improved to 7.48 in round 2.80 – which proved good enough only for ninth place.045 (Competitors: 27.96 6. but it was the Central US Trials winner. his best jump coming in the final round. 5. Countries: 12. Athens.89 6. Louis. Prinstein’s college (Syracuse) refused permission for him to jump on Sunday as it was the Sabbath (though as a Jew the Saturday was Prinstein’s Sabbath).365 5 x 6.91 6.77 6.435 6.635 6. The jumpers were split into five pools. The tiny (1. 6. 5.94 6. first by Allen with 6.175 on his second jump. Countries: 9.98 5 7. 6. Kelly and Bricker were able to exceed 7m.15 6. but missed catching Åberg by a single centimetre.585 6.86 x 2 x 6.21 6. Gutterson tailed off in the final. leaving Prinstein as the favourite. Alvin Kraenzlein Myer Prinstein Patrick Leahy IRL William Remington Albert Delannoy John McLean Thaddeus McClain Waldemar Steffen USA USA GBR USA FRA USA USA GER 7. and Stockholm. St.21 6.655 6.R I O 151 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Three days before his high jump win.63 (Competitors: 9. Kraenzlein was second on 6.48 7.67 6. Albert Gutterson Calvin Bricker Georg Åberg Harry Worthington Eugene Mercer Fred Allen Jim Thorpe Robert Pasemann USA CAN SWE USA USA USA USA GER 7.185 6.21. Countries: 10. Finalists: 5) Marks made in the qualifying round counted towards the final result.72.82 6. 7.84 6. 8.92 7.20 7.20 6. 8. Finalists: 3) Series Gutterson Bricker Åberg Worthington Mercer Allen Thorpe Pasemann 1 7. He had placed second in the 1895 US Championships.705 6. 13 Jul 1912 1.21 x 5. 22 Jul 1908 (Jumping order shows section and then numerical order. 27 Apr 1906 1. Myer Prinstein Peter O’Connor IRL Hugo Friend Hjalmar Mellander Sidney Abrahams Thomas Cronan Gunnar Rönström István Somodi USA GBR USA SWE GBR USA SWE HUN 7.74 6. just one centimetre behind O’Connor’s world record.655 6.60OR 7. Myer Prinstein Daniel Frank Robert Stangland Fred Englehardt George Van Cleaf John Hagerman USA USA USA USA USA USA 7. 8.185OR 7.63 6. 5.96 6. 2. 5. 3. which he followed up with a good 7.72 (Competitors: 31.18 7. was the principal absentee.045 4 6. In the second group Bricker qualified for the finals with 7.60 6. 4.80 3 7. 6.685 6. 4. . a 20 year-old schoolboy (!) had won the Eastern trials with 7.585 6. 2.08 6. A challenge to settle the matter in competition the following day was declined by Prinstein.175 6. 15 Jul 1900 Qualifying 1. Clark won the long jump title on his third jump after two fouls. Tim Ahearne. 1 Sep 1904 1. 6.07.48OR 7. 3. 4.435 6.89 6. 2. 3. Irons.66/60kg) Irons took control in the qualifying round.18.94 and then Åberg 7. while Harry Worthington.710 6.65 6.03 6.22 5.09 6. could only reach 6.07 6. 4.025 6. In the event. 7.755 6. who struck form at the right moment.54 5.

6.32 7.585 6. Cator also had a long foul (7. William Pettersson (Björneman) Carl Johnson Erik Abrahamsson “Dink” Templeton Erling Aastad Rolf Franksson Sol Butler Einar Ræder SWE USA SWE USA NOR SWE USA NOR 7.96 to Gordon’s 6.49 x - Cator.11. (D1) 3.35 7.73 7.68 7. 7. when he damaged his left achilles tendon landing in the pit. and clearly deserved his gold medal. while Amsterdam non-qualifiers Gordon. followed by 7.94) Gordon settled things early with 7. behind Hansen (7. Reportedly.275 7. Gourdin then took the lead and was succeeded by Hubbard.66 7.27 2 7. (15) =4.50 x 7. The jump was measured. Leading the qualifying round with 6.74w 7. but had done little of note since then. Ed Gordon Lambert Redd Chuhei Nambu Eric Svensson Dick Barber Naoto Tajima Héctor Berra Clovis Raposo USA USA JPN SWE USA JPN ARG BRA 7.12. It was the only mark from that season good enough to rank in the world’s top 100 in any event in the last year of the 20th century.64 in the first round – and all the medals had been decided by the end of the second round.58 in the next round.90 in the US Trials. Countries: 11. was bracketed in 11th place with Tuulos and Oda at 7.25).32 7. He had shown great consistency with five other competitions of 25 feet (7.08 6.66.07 6. 18 Aug 1920 Qualifying (17 Aug) 1. Oda and Nambu (triple jump).39 7. Remarkably the event contained six Olympic Champions in horizontal jumping events. 6. One of the foul jumps by Redd was measured at 7. but Hamm responded with jumps of 7. when he took Hamm’s world record with the first ever 26 feet jump – 7.95 6. (A7) (A1) (B6) (B4) (A3) (D8) (C7) (C8) Ed Hamm Silvio Cator Al Bates Willi Meier Erich Köchermann Hannes de Boer Ed Gordon Eric Svensson USA HAI USA GER GER NED USA SWE 7. Countries: 21.885 Sol Butler had won the US title with 7. 5. Hubbard.24 3 7. but after the qualifying round was only third.095 7. 2. Hubbard and Gordon (long jump). 8.60 6. who had jumped 7.05 x 5 7. 8.66 6.40 7. Countries: 9) Series Gordon Redd Nambu Svensson 1 7.22 6.62 6.50. (9) (14) (7) Jesse Owens Luz Long Naoto Tajima Wilhelm Leichum Arturo Maffei Bob Clark John Brooks Robert Paul USA GER JPN GER ITA USA USA FRA 8. Hamm. 5.41w 7. Redd’s shoe barely touched the tip of the the elevated clay. 7. broke the world record with 7.39 7.57.(B14) 4. Hubbard.39 - 6 x 7. Berlin.87w 7.63 6.35 7.32 7. pulled a muscle in the qualifying round.80+) with his opener. He improved to 7. 7.99 6. After changing his name to Björneman.27 x x 6 x 6. 3.29 (Competitors: 43. nursing an injured ankle.67w 7.41 4 x 7.34) and Pettersson (7.60 7.99 x 6.86 7. Finalists: 12) The day before the long jump Robert LeGendre created a sensation by jumping a world record 7. would have his day in September. 2. 4.05 7. (8) 3. DeHart Hubbard.73 6.60 x 7. At the head of the competition Hamm jumped 7. The tall (1. with Nambu just ahead of them in ninth (7.35 7. but was not on the team for the long jump. The only Haitian ever to win an Olympic medal had been the world’s number two man in 1925.20 6.00 7. took three of the top four places in Los Angeles.095 7. Finalists: 6) Series Pettersson Johnson Abrahamsson Templeton Aastad F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1.93.99 6.26 7.58 x 7.75 7.15 6. and so taking three more jumps.12 x x 6. but it was the Swede who triumphed on the day.15 7.43 x x 7.73 7.34w (Competitors: 43. and looked set to become the first black American to win an individual gold medal – until the first round of the Olympic final. (C2) 6.64 x 7.63 in the US Trials.07 6.26 7. Cator.15 7. and Tuulos. was the favourite. Paris. jumping 7. Countries: 27.(12) (2) 6.39 7.82 1 6. 6. but eventually declared a foul. 7. 5.22 7. 3 7.885 6.89 6. after fouling a jump of 7. 4.12 7. (B9) 7.94. (C7) L J 6.98 was ruled invalid because the pit was found to be an inch below the level of the take-off. Finalists: 16) .16 7.43 (Competitors: 13.45 7.06w 7.6 man over 100y.R I O 152 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Antwerp.79 x 7.445 7. Pettersson later graciously wrote “the best man was unlucky in the event”. Carl Johnson (7. (3) 2. 4. 4 Aug 1936 Amsterdam. Sixth place was determined by a jump-off with de Boer reaching 6. who had jumped 7.22 6.80 on his winning jump.23 6.32 Hamm was the prohibitive favourite.26) and Gourdin (7.45.95 6.19). 3.765 during the Pentathlon. who captained the Haitian soccer team.92 7.92 (Competitors: 34.(D12) 8. (A1) 2.64 7.45 7.06 5 x x 7.65. 2.04 2 7.85 (Competitors: 30.15. Finalists: 14) 4 7. Countries: 23. Pettersson wrested the lead back from Johnson’s opening 7. had a dismal competition in 1932 jumping only 5. The plasticine next to the board had apparently not been laid down correctly and was about 2cm higher.52.62 2 7. William Comins.58 7.19 7.73 3 7.08 6.85 x Los Angeles. a 9.26) had shown good form in 1919.73 in round 2.73w 7.93. 31 Jul 1928 1. 2 Aug 1932 1.89 the following year and in 1927 was deprived of the first 26 foot jump when his 7. (B3) 5.73w 7. Nambu and Svensson. having set a world record of 7.07 6.97 7. which was enough to triumph. 8. second in 1928.92 6.68 x Series Hamm Cator Bates Meier Köchermann de Boer 1 x x 7. The jumping order shows the qualifying round sections and the order of jumping within the section. after having had a foul in round 1 reportedly just below 8 metres.62) or better.40 7.95.68 and 7.07 with a leap of 7. with 7.25 7. Qualifying DeHart Hubbard Ed Gourdin Sverre Hansen Vilho Tuulos Louis Wilhelme Christopher Mackintosh Virgilio Tommasi Jaap Boot USA USA NOR FIN FRA GBR ITA NED 7. 8 Jul 1924 1.39 7.41 7. 3. 8. who fell back from around 7.94 6.51 in winning the IC4A title.

22 x 5.36 7.96 3 7.16 7. Countries: 19.32.11 7. won the bronze with a modest 7. Countries: 14.75w 7. Countries: 21. Long.73w 7.51 7.87 in the next round. 5. who had jumped 7.50w x 7.73w 7.39w 3 7.54w 7. and the next best of the contenders were Douglas (7. 31 Jul 1948 1.02 153 4 x 7. 2.18.68 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - Willie Steele was the most talented jumper to appear in the 12 years since the retirement of Jesse Owens.R I O Series Owens Long Tajima Leichum Maffei Clark Brooks Paul 1 7.77 x 7.25w 7.20 or better.36 7. 7. and improved to 7.13 7. who was battling an injury and saving himself for the decathlon.47w 7.57 7. 6.58 7.74w x x 7.65 to 7.555 7. The best qualifier (Henryk Grabowski.02 (Competitors: 27.57 for 16 of those meetings.95 5 x x 7.28 7.94 The event was held in very windy conditions. He won 14 of his 17 competitions and averaged 7.44 7.77 7.92 7. 4. Melbourne.57w Owens had already dazzled onlookers with his 100m running. Long responded with 7.12OR 8.89 x 7.07 7.58 (Competitors: 35.57).69) and Ted Bruce (7.19w 7.65w x 7.15 x x x x L J Rome. Finalists: 14) .07 x 6. (4) (10) (11) (2) (12) (13) (7) (9) Greg Bell John Bennett Jorma Valkama Dmitriy Bondarenko RUS Karim Olowu Kazimierz Kropidłowski Neville Price Oleg Fedoseyev RUS USA USA FIN URS NGR POL RSA URS 7.16 7.825 2 7.84w 7.78. Neville Price of South Africa.45 7. Steele jumped 7.73w 7. Finalists: 11) Series Steele 1 7.15 was reached by 13 of the 39 entrants. and backed it up with 7. Finalists: 13) 2 x 6. 3.825OR 7. finished tenth.92 7. Hamm’s Olympic record of 7.73. 8. 6. Europe’s best jumper. to battle for the gold. 7. Countries: 17. All told. 5. with Biffle’s 7.38 7. a Nigerian whose country was not part of the Olympic movement until 1951. Owens finally won the gold medal on his fifth jump. 3. 4.60w 7.30 7.03 7.08w 4 x 7.87. Földessy. Wright placed fourth. (9) (4) (6) (11) (2) (5) (10) (12) Willie Steele Theo Bruce Herb Douglas Lorenzo Wright Prince Adedoyin NGR Georges Damitio Harry Whittle Felix Würth USA AUS USA USA GBR FRA GBR AUT 7.30 x 7.73 was reached 12 times. but would fare better as a reserve relay runner in the 4x100m relay.61 his leg stiffened up.14 x 6. with just four men qualifying as of right by reaching 7.68 – before retiring.22 6.14 7.22w 7.94.74 to take third position from Maffei in this remarkably high level competition.48 7.10 7.06 7.91 6. also had difficulties but made it through to the final with his second jump. though wind readings on specific jumps were never released. After a second jump of 7.68 – after spiking himself. Bell had a marginal foul jump of 8.42 6. 4.94w 7. 7. and August 4 saw him sprinting 200m heats in the morning and qualifying in the long jump.57 7.81 in 1942 as an 18 year-old. 3.82 and 7. Steele. 2. Owens led early with 7. In the final.04 7.25 3 7. and Biffle.30 7. eight of whom did not participate – including Rafer Johnson.34w 2 7.66 7. opened with his best mark of the day – 7.57 The 1952 world rankings saw George Brown ranked first in the world for the second time in a row.20 x x 6 x 7.33 a week after the Games which more accurately reflected his abilities.38w 7.68 7.90 versus the 7. 21 Jul 1952 1 2.44 7.17 7.52w 7. (2) (10) (8) (9) (6) (1) (11) (4) Ralph Boston USA “Bo” Roberson USA Igor Ter-Ovanesyan RUS URS Manfred Steinbach GER/FRG Jorma Valkama FIN Christian Collardot FRA Henk Visser NED Dmitriy Bondarenko RUS URS 8.83 7. Berlin marked the first time that qualifying marks were not carried forward to the final. 3. with wind readings ranging from minus 14 to plus 9m per second. Additionally.41w 6. 7. 1 7. None of the others got close. took just two jumps – 7.60w 7.16 6.83OR 7.99 6. He had two fouls before reaching the qualifying distance of 7. considered very much the US third string. All of the top jumpers leapt 25-30cm less than the distances they would have achieved in good conditions.74w 7.36 in the preliminaries. Finalists: 13) Series Bell Bennett Valkama Bondarenko Olowu Kropidłowski Price Fedoseyev 1 6.00 (Competitors: 21. with 7. the leading European.545 7. the run-up was soft and loose.06w x x 7. 5.27 (Competitors: 31.27 7. In the Olympics he had a qualifying jump of 7. The qualifying distance of 7. 4. leaving Gourdine.83 on his second jump.84 in the third round.87w 7. the US Trials winner.30.12 7.15 after taking off more than half a metre behind the board.52w 7.23 7. London. with Tajima improving from 7. with Bruce just edging Douglas for second.48 7.53 x 7. Britain took fifth through Prince Adegboyega Folaramni Adedoyin. All jumps were wind-assisted with the official report quoting a breeze of 3.00 6.77 6. Only the inconsistent Lorenzo Wright had any 1948 pre-Olympic mark within range of Steele (7. reached only 6. 2.68 7. as well as a hairline foul of 8. 8.21 7. instead of a more usual 45m.27 x x 2 7. and jumped 8.06 – on his last jump.40 in the final. Bennett.61 x x 6.74w 7.49 7. Owens rounded out his competition with the second furthest ever – 8.60w 2 0 1 6 5 7. to which Long responding with 7.27 4 x 7.28 7.28 7.11 8. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Series Biffle Gourdine Földessy da Sá Valtonen Grigoryev Israelsson Faucher (12) (9) (5) (3) (1) (8) (11) (13) Jerome Biffle Meredith Gourdine Ödön Földessy Ary Façanha da Sá Jorma Valtonen Leonid Grigoryev RUS Karl-Erik Israelsson Paul Faucher USA USA HUN BRA FIN URS SWE FRA 7.04 8.10 7.30 7. Steele led the qualifiers with 7. 8.69 7. while Leichum moved up from sixth to equal fourth with 7.7 metres per second.67w ★ O L Y M P I C 6 8.23 6. while Bell reached 7. Both men achieved their best jump in the the third round. 6.52). In view of the weather conditions it was fortuitous that the best two jumpers wound up in the top positions. 24 Nov 1956 1.36 7.87w 7.42w 7.52w 7.97 for Steele).53 sufficing for the win by 2cm.06 7.39w 7.07 in 1947. but then had three fouls in the final.23 6.34w 7.97 6.5 to 3. 6. who had tied Bell in the US Trials.77 in the next round before getting cramp in his leg on his fourth attempt.74.03 6 7.68 7.55 5 x 7. and only 38m long. 5. 7. 8. 2 Sep 1960 1. suffering from an ankle injury.98 7. Helsinki.53 7.00 7. but his three losses included the US Trials and Helsinki.

the day belonged to Wales. and the jumpers had to contend with headwinds.91 x 7.34 7.43 5. Finalists: 12) Series Davies Boston T.00 7.24 8.96 7.63 x 7.81 7.52 7.60+ in the USSR Championships. 7.03.97 7. (4) (6) (17) (13) (10) (9) (14) (15) Bob Beamon Klaus Beer Ralph Boston Igor Ter-Ovanesyan RUS Tõnu Lepik EST Allen Crawley Jacques Pani Andrzej Stalmach USA GDR USA URS URS AUS FRA POL 8.80 7.94 (Competitors: 35.66 7.80 to 8. As a result only the two best jumpers of 1960-64 – Boston and Ter-Ovanesyan.18 8.09 8. to be overtaken by Beer’s lifetime best of 8.36 7.16 8. Only once before had two men jumped beyond 8m in the same competition.07 8. (9) (3) (8) (5) (6) (7) (2) (11) Randy Williams Hans Baumgartner Arnie Robinson Joshua Owusu Preston Carrington Max Klauss Alan Lerwill Leonid Barkovskiy UKR USA FRG USA GHA USA GDR GBR URS 8.26 x 6 7. 8. The final was even colder (12.60 in the cold (14°C) and wet conditions. 9 Sep 1972 1. a newcomer.27.40 was the required distance.03 7.99 7.45 7. When offered the jumps at the end of the competition. with 8.04 8.64 7.40 7.19 in round 2. Ovanesyan West Cochard Areta Ahey Stalmach 1 7. 8. The top three all improved in the fourth round.91 7.03 8. (3) (2) (4) (11) (7) (1) (9) (8) Lynn Davies Ralph Boston Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Wariboko West Jean Cochard Luis Areta Mike Ahey Andrzej Stalmach RUS GBR USA URS NGR FRA ESP GHA POL 8. 6. and was then overtaken by Bo Roberson. Finalists: 12) . sporting a bandaged left thigh. but Tony Watson.08 7.35 in 40 years. Roberson was nominally the US number three. The powerful (1.03 7.78 7. and a steel tape had to be used. and Boston achieved his best jump of the day – 8.99 7. a new European record.29 x The almost mythical world record of Jesse Owens. 7.75 6 x 7.68 7. 5. and Boston reached 8.10 3 7. They had to go on. We’d look silly.71 2 8.46 sufficed to qualify.09 8.75 x x 7.44 7. 3.16 in round 1.16 8.19 8. finally fell after more than 25 years. and the places remained unchanged until the last round. the rain made the run-up slippery and conditions became more difficult. NCAA champion and an 8. The Ukrainian-born Russian resident of Armenian descent produced a fine jump. 2.99 Just five men reached the automatic qualifying distance of 7. plus Davies.59 7. 4. 18 Oct 1964 1. not far removed from average weather for Wales.50 7. the 19 year-old who had jumped 7.56 x 7. Countries: 25. Roberson was last to jump. 3. 4. the fourth longest jump ever. The effects of altitude were such that jumps of 8.99 7.26 (Competitors: 32.97 7.30 7. Countries: 21.30 x 4 7. Steinbach had jumped 8.85 x 7. 5. rather than a world record.16 jumper.60 7.09 8.31 7. Ter-Ovanesyan could not get his steps right.07 x 7.60 7.90.32 in the qualifying when 7.74 8. Boston was rated even with Ter-Ovanesyan.90 7.62 x x 7.34 7.99.75 (Competitors: 36.85) leading from Ter-Ovanesyan (7. cutting the sand at 8. Beamon was in a state of paralysed hysteria at the unbelievable announcement. 3.5°C).58 3 8. Whether it was this or the qualities of physical strength and motivation inculcated by coach (and television commentator) Ron Pickering. had increased again by the same margin in three years.12 7. and the Commonwealth Champion.35.94 7. Ter-Ovanesyan and Davies. However.90WR 8.13.97 8. He eventually came down – past the electrical measuring devices.TerOvanesyan had produced a hairline foul of 8. is unsure.19 8.44 7.03 – in the final round.04. The other jumpers were staggered.11 8.96 8. the talented European Champion and record holder. “We can’t go on after that.27 2 x 8. A record which had risen 55cm from 7. The wind lulled to a relatively calm -0.62 7.10 7. he refused.26 2 x 7. Ter-Ovanesyan immediately responded with a jump of 7.96 2 0 1 6 5 x 7.05 8.62 7. had managed only 7. 6. 5.60.68 x x 7.99 7. 6.50 ★ O L Y M P I C 6 7. when Boston jumped 8.61 7.43 7. He sped down the runway and seemed to spring to an extraordinary height.80 7. Attention focused on the fourth jumper in the final – Beamon. For sheer shock effect it exceeded even the amazing 200m by Michael Johnson in 1996 in Atlanta.76.37 4 7. too deflated by the most astounding performance in athletics history.31 6. It was Ter-Ovanesyan who led after round 1 with 7.81 x 7.94 3 x 7.75 8.45. The conditions.84 x 7.36 7. 2.03 7.7 as Davies prepared for his fifth jump. just missed the final six. 18 Oct 1968 1.50+ were expected compared with the existing world record of 8.82 x 7.92) in the first half of the competition. with Boston (7.16 5 8. Gayle Hopkins. making all four contenders 27-feet jumpers in 1968.76 7. were able to jump beyond 25 feet (7.14 in the German championships to have the jump ruled windy. Countries: 22. Like Hopkins in 1964 Charles Mays had three fouls – one of them around 8. Boston jumped a solid 7.85/84kg) football star from Cornell University landed in the vicinity of Boston’s best. Munich. Ovanesyan Steinbach Valkama Collardot Visser Bondarenko 1 7. but Davies sped down the runway and launched himself to a lifetime best of 8.00 and a guaranteed fourth place.02 x 7. Boston launched into his hitchkick in round 3.90. landing at 8.78 7.96 and was followed by TerOvanesyan. may have F I N A L S / M E N ’ S L J affected Davies less than the others.80 x 7.58 7.84 After an unbeaten season Beamon was expected to triumph over the big three – Boston. ” said Davies. Thereafter.01 7.80 7.69 x 7. Mexico City. Unproven in big time competition.04 8. Tokyo.97 8.00 7.12.88 7.12 8. Now he reached an official German record of 8.59 7.02 7.R I O 154 Series Boston Roberson T. 7.20 6. 4. the talented but erratic Mike Ahey. Steinbach was in fourth place after three rounds with 7.21 three weeks before Rome.90 7.69 7.61 7. 8. 2. had such difficulty with the conditions that he was unable to register a fair jump.59).01 7. Eventually the measurement came through – 8. and 7. Boston had a foul of over 8. 8. Even these quality athletes were unable to get beyond 26 feet (7.07.75 5 x x 8.62). Boston led the qualifying round with an Olympic record 8.82 x 7.88 x 7. and Davies was mistakenly not given three more jumps after being level with Stalmach after three rounds.85 at the US Trials. because the wind gauge had not been operated.76 7. An optical measuring device – being used for the first time – showed that Roberson had missed gold by 1cm.88 4 7. Finalists: 17) Series Beamon Beer Boston Ovanesyan Lepik Crawley Pani Stalmach 1 8.10 6.51 x 7.78) and Davies (7.12 7.

72 8. Countries: 11. 7.18 8. who had improved from 7.15 8.22. but soon found himself in fifth.15). 6. and the best at low altitude. 3. who edged into fourth with 8.80 x x 5 8. 4.99 x Undefeated since 1981.97 7.34 for Randy Williams.00.00 7. 7. In the final Williams opened with 8.34 – on his final attempt. the longer of which was a personal best 8.73 7. the US number two then dropped to fourth.95 7.17.99 7.04 x 8.26w to make the US team.02 8.97 8.63 7. 2.08 7.95 7.89 7.99 7. Finalists: 12) Series Robinson Williams Wartenberg Rousseau de Oliveira Stekić Podluzhniy Baumgartner F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 8.21) passed him on successive jumps.79 8. the long jump was in a state of flux.18 for silver. did best with two 8m jumps.02 7. mindful of his remaining competition at 200m and the relay. On a less savoury note it was found many years later that he had.81 7.10 8.18 7.81 8. (1) (5) (9) (8) Carl Lewis Mike Powell Larry Myricks Giovanni Evangelisti USA USA USA ITA 8. Myricks.75 4 7.97 x 7.88 7.35 8.27 8.30w.32 7.10 x 7.15 7.13) and Dombrowski (8.06 to 8. who reached 8.13 7.32 8.10. to effectively end the competition.54 away from the board. 8.84 4 8.18 7.02 (Competitors: 23. 4.88 x 7.38).77 x 7.21 8. Lewis soared to 8.69 7. while injuries prevented Cuba’s David Giralt and Yugoslav European record holder Nenad Stekić from qualifying.74 x 8. Lewis was such an overwhelming favourite that the question seemed to be whether he might break the world record. (1) (11) (3) (2) (10) (4) (7) (12) Arnie Robinson Randy Williams Frank Wartenberg Jacques Rousseau João Carlos de Oliveira Nenad Stekić SRB Valeriy Podluzhniy UKR Hans Baumgartner USA USA GDR FRA BRA YUG URS FRG 8.81 x 7.09 8. Moscow.09) and Paschek (8.81 (Competitors: 31. After leading the qualifying round by 28cm with 8.86 x 7. Myricks managed 8.72 8.16 in the fifth round.34 7.03 7. Behind him Preston Carrington also set a lifetime best with 8.67 7.76 2 x 7.84 1 8.51 x 7. 6. 8. He supported it with another fine jump – 8. 3. and Lutz Dombrowski (8.08w .82 x 7.89 x 7. 5.05 x 8. Konstantin Semykin (8.56 ★ O L Y M P I C 6 x 8.08. (11) (2) (1) (12) (6) (8) (3) (5) Carl Lewis Gary Honey Giovanni Evangelisti Larry Myricks Liu Yuhuang Joey Wells Junichi Usui Kim Jong-Il USA AUS ITA USA CHN BAH JPN KOR 8.78 7.66 x The most dramatic events of a lacklustre competition were the unfortunate fracture suffered by Larry Myricks. lasted as the furthest ever by a junior for more than 30 years. was one of the greatest ever European jumping talents.53 3 7.24 8.87 7. 2.77 7.24 8.81 3 8.21 x 8.45 the week before LA).00 7.76 7.70 7.85 x x 7.09 x 3 x x 7. Los Angeles.16 7. as Corgos (8.09 in the first round.13 x 7.35. but both Evangelisti and Honey showed great competitive abilities by leaping 8.26 7.13 8. Larry Myricks. After a foul Lewis then passed his remaining jumps. 2.94 7.71 7. Podluzhniy opened the second half of the final with his bronze medal winning jump – 8.91 7.07. Finalists: 12) Series Lewis Honey Evangelisti Myricks Liu Wells Usui Kim 1 8. Paschek and Dombrowski led the qualifiers with 8. was having trouble.56 2 7.75 7. in front of a home crowd.01 7.35 8.00 8.91 7.66 x 7.54 on his opening jump and the gold medal was decided. 4.83 8. Countries: 25.89 7.13 8.81 7. 4.13 7.70 x 2 8.92 x 8. and high jumped 2. and the rest were unable to catch up.99 7.94 7.87/87kg) produced another quality jump in the fourth round (8.61 2 0 1 6 5 7.88 4 8. The excellent Ukrainian jumper Podluzhniy opened the competition with 8.85 7. a world junior record of 8.00 7.59 6 8.80 x x 7.76 x 5 8. He had two further jumps beyond the best of Munich winner Randy Williams. Podluzhniy improved to 8. Dombrowski then boomed out to 8. Behind him.72 x 5 x x 8.24 8.77 4 7. 7.65 7. Seoul. rather than simply win.R I O Series Williams Baumgartner Robinson Owusu Carrington Klauss Lerwill Borkovskiy 1 8. helping ensure continued political correctness from that country’s athletes.97 7.92 7. and the opening jump of the final. 26 Sep 1988 1. 28 Jul 1980 1. He pounded down the runway in the penultimate round and powered off the take-off board perfectly into his simple hang style.84 x 6 7.97 x 1.84 to 8.63 6.11 7.07 8.24 6.99 7.36 in the Soviet bloc “Druzhba” meeting).02 L J 155 With no Americans the competition was severely devalued.84 x x 7. Finalists: 12) Series Dombrowski Paschek Podluzhniy Szalma Jaskułka Belskiy Corgos Yanev 1 8. 6 Aug 1984 (Competitors: 33.49 8.95 7.21).94 7.87 7.97 7.69 7.24 x x 7.91 2 8.62 7.88 x 3 x x x 7.00 8. worked as an informer for the GDR secret police. Jumpers missing from the fray who would have been medal factors were Jaime Jefferson of Cuba (8.18. Robinson started the competition with his lifetime best of 8.18 in the third round. The only jump of quality in round 3 came from baby-faced Belskiy.99 7. 6.88 7. Dombrowski.32 to win the gold medal.89 7.11 8. broke a bone in his foot as he was on the runway warming up for the final.54 8. 3.54 8. Trailing Italy’s slender Giovanni Evangelisti 8. 3. but was quickly overtaken by Szalma (8.77 7. Countries: 25.82 7.24. Both Robinson and Carrington had trouble with their run-up.81 8.98 7. favourite for the runner-up position. It was the second furthest jump ever.16 x 7. 5.54 7. 29 Jul 1976 1.02 7.76 7.21 8. although Larry Myricks and Carl Lewis would have had to excel themselves to be up with the winner. Williams’s jump.06 x 7. into a slight headwind. who had triple jumped 16.85 x With only Lynn Davies and Igor Ter-Ovanesyan – in his fifth Games – of the old elite still in competition. Montreal. 5. Baumgartner. 8 (10) (5) (1) (3) (12) (2) (4) (6) Lutz Dombrowski Frank Paschek Valeriy Podluzhniy UKR László Szalma Stanisław Jaskułka Viktor Belskiy BLR Antonio Corgos Yordan Yanev GDR GDR URS HUN POL URS ESP BUL 8. with GDR’s Frank Wartenberg the only other man to leap more than 8.10.54 7.24 for national records and the minor medals.96 7.09 8.87 7. the best of his career.09 7. in a qualifying round which saw the best mark of the meeting. under pressure.90 x 7. behind Australia’s Gary Honey.18 7.28 7. Dombrowski (1. to land 8.82 x 8.77 7. Neither man made the final.97 8.61 at the age of 17. 2.60 7.16 7.91 7.

31 x 7. 8. 6. with Lewis emerging the victor 8.26 x 8.86 8. the best qualifying jump ever. To show he was in good condition Lewis led the preliminary round with 8.34 8. followed by Greene (8. 6.08 7.50 into a 1.22 x 8.95 7. 4. Barely reaching the board he landed 8.89 Lewis and Myricks had produced a stirring duel in the US Trials. but the measurement showed it to be 3cm short. Lewis improved to 8.56w in the second round.67 7. Lewis continued with 8.00 x x 4 8.27 8.33 7.27. Nation: 40.87 (Competitors: 50. with his highly individualistic leg shoot.84 7.50 8. surpassing Al Oerter as the most durable champion of all.69 7. Finalists: 13) Series Lewis Beckford Greene Bangué Powell Cankar Glovatskiy Sunneborn 1 x x 7.10 8. landing slightly to the right of the pit.07 7.11 after three rounds.93. Barcelona. 8.19 in the first round.96 x x 5 x 8.28 8.97 3 8.65 Powell had beaten Lewis with a world record 8.75.68. though the World Champion was more concerned with gold than saving silver.13 8.41 8.51 x 7.33 8. but would have had to defer to Lewis.00.06 4 8.40 x 8.57 for Powell and 8. Noone else reached 8. Joe Greene.06 x x 6.87 x 5. Sydney. 2. and the Frenchman still led as Lewis got ready for his third jump.33 x 7. 6.58 3 x 8. 6.98 7. After two rounds of the qualifying stage.87 2 8. Just five men reached the automatic qualifying mark of 8. 3.53) in the US Trials. 2.88 8.80 8. (12) (5) (2) (10) (3) (9) (7) (11) Iván Pedroso Jai Taurima Roman Shchurenko Aleksey Lukashevich Kofi Amoah Prah Peter Burge Luis Méliz Dwight Phillips CUB AUS UKR UKR GER AUS CUB USA 8. the pencil-thin US third string.87 4 x x 8. ” Lewis took off. 28 Sep 2000 1. winning in an event usually unkind to that kind of longevity. The measurement was worth looking at – 8.49 8. Countries: 38.84 7.21) and Powell (8. . fouled three of his last four jumps.34 in the fourth round.32 to lead the qualifying round.87 7.67 8.28).72 x 8. who jumped 8.17 x x 7.17 8. but he was not the favourite he had been at the past three Games.26 8.94 7. Lewis opened his account in the final by booming another big jump – 8. Lewis thus won his fourth title. and was favourite to win.00 7. The greatest long jumper in history sealed the event in the fourth round with a monster jump.98 7. 7.30 7. 7.44 for Myricks on their best measured jumps. Without detracting from Lewis’s win. With his final jump Powell cut the sand virtually level with the leading marker of Lewis. who never performed to his capabilities in the Olympics.08 8.79 5 8.53.04 5 8. In the final the early leader was Bangué.86 x 7. Powell began slowly with 7.34 7.24 x 7.80 7. Remarkably. 29 Jul 1996 RUS (Competitors: 41.50.19 8. Countries: 31.06 4 x x 7.79 7.08 8.156 5. surprising Russian Yuriy Naumkin (8.74.22 and then 8.72 from the front end of the board – 8. 7. 3. 4.76 to 8.95 x 7.15 8. one of them over 8.90 from where he took off! Biomechanical analysis of the event gave toe to heel measurements of 8.99 x x 7.14 8.11 8. Seoul was expected to be similarly close.76 8. Giving it the “Full Monty.03 x 7.14 8.88 7. with 7. but required hamstring surgery in 1996. He nevertheless qualified for the final with 8.11 8. He then flew to the front of the qualifiers with 8.97 7.04 7.95 at the 1991 World Championships.17 7.34 8.15 7. 1. and Lewis (35) and Powell (32) were on the team together for the third time.03 6 8. 8.99 8.07 8.05.03 8.24 – and held second until Beckford.55 8.33 2 8.29.19 7. Myricks.82 x 6 8.11 x x Iván Pedroso had failed to gain a medal on his two previous Olympic attempts. 6 Aug 1992 1.50 8.00 7.06 (Competitors: 52.56w 8. Countries: 37.89 2 8.08 8.24 8. He only made the final with his third round jump of 8. and the best mark of 1992.00 or better.04 7.01 8.75 The three Americans were the same as in Barcelona. he was fortunate not to meet a healthy Iván Pedroso. 4.89 ★ O L Y M P I C 1 8. 5.08 7. followed by teammates Powell (8.52 8.50 8. to lead the fourth US clean sweep of the event. Greene also achieved his best jump in round 3 – 8.99 5.07 8.19 7. Lewis finished off his third Olympic final with two jumps of 8.34 8.92 x 7.06 7.46 x x x 8. 2. (2) (13) (11) (12) (7) (9) (1) (8) Carl Lewis James Beckford Joe Greene Emmanuel Bangué Mike Powell Gregor Cankar Aleksandr Glovatskiy Mattias Sunneborn USA JAM USA FRA USA SLO BLR SWE 8.41.49 x 7. but had won eight world titles indoors or out.62 to 8.84 8.11 7.08w x x x 7.21). and coolly looked towards the markers to his right as he came down.50 8.10 so the medals were already settled.98 7.23) and Myricks (8. 8. Finalists: 12) Series Lewis Powell Greene Pedroso Jefferson Koukodímos Bagryanov Huang 1 8. 7. he had reached only 7.64 x 7.50.11 8.55 8.93 8.79 7.14 7.50 7. and Myricks passed Powell with 8.90 3 x 8. Some athletes raise their game when the pressure increases. Lewis had qualified for his fifth consecutive Olympics in the long jump. with Cuba’s 19 year-old Pedroso in third with 8.29 x 6.77 taken as the 12th finalist.78 3 8.11 8. Finalists: 12) Series Lewis Powell Myricks Evangelisti Corgos Szalma Brige Voloshin F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 8. Finalists: 12) Series Pedroso Taurima Shchurenko Lukashevich Prah Burge Méliz Phillips 1 x x 7.49 x 8.63 x 8.95 and improved to 8.41 8.18 x x x 8.23 8. and Lewis was that type of competitor.89 x 8.14). but Powell reacted with 8.97 x 2 8. moved past Powell with 8. 5.53 8.02 7. Lewis opened the final with 8.11 8.67.22 7.14 x 8.64 8.19 8. and Powell psyched himself up to jump a personal best of 8.52 x x x x x 6 x x x 7.93 8.52.33.97 x 5 8.3 wind. He repeated this victory (8.30. slipped past in the last round with 8.79 8. (2) (11) (4) (6) Antonio Corgos László Szalma Norbert Brige Leonid Voloshin R I O 2 0 1 6 ESP HUN FRA URS 8. checking the distance even as he flew.55 L J Atlanta.74 7.88 x x x 8. but placed only 12th in the final with 7.49. Between 1993 and 1995 the Cuban had established himself as the best jumper in the world.88 7. 5.31 8. (8) (11) (6) (3) (9) (12) (10) (7) Carl Lewis Mike Powell Joe Greene Iván Pedroso Jaime Jefferson Konstadínos Koukodímos Dmitriy Bagryanov RUS Huang Geng USA USA USA CUB CUB GRE EUN CHN 8.29 8. 3.30 7. one of 13 to jump 8.06 (Competitors: 53.

98 7.73 earlier in the year and was recovering from injury.15 8. 1996-12. 1968-4. 2.20 until round four. Every jumper from fourth to 12th achieved the best for that position in an Olympic final. The qualifying standard of 8.19 7. 3. Finalists: 12) Series Rutherford Watt Claye Tornéus Bayer Tomlinson da Silva Mokoena 1 6.21 and 8.48 Most Appearances 5 Ter-Ovanesyan 4 Lewis Pedroso 1956-nm/final. The Australian had missed much of the season through injury and didn’t look as quick as in 2011.19 2 8.24.17 x 8.87 x x 3 8.27. (5) (4) (6) (11) (1) (10) (3) (7) Greg Rutherford Mitchell Watt Will Claye Michel Tornéus Sebastian Bayer Chris Tomlinson Mauro da Silva Khotso Mokoena 8.09 x 5 8.25 to close out the first round.31 8.05 6 x x 8.83 7.26 Athens. who appeared to have a board foul.21 7. when he had jumped 8.85 8. 2.21 2 x 8.11 x x 8.12.47 8. 3.10 was met by just two men.01 to advance in ninth place of the qualifiers. 1. The Cuban fouled then fouled and Taurima flew out to 8.34 in the fourth. when Gaisah moved into fifth with 8. 6.31 (8.96 7.40 in round 4.04 8.35.03 x 7.12 x x 1 7.06 8. edging Makusha and Martinez (8.41 (the jumping order changing after round 3 with 1st place jumping last).09 8.31 x 8. 1904-1.02 x 8.21 and ensured gold with 8. but was given the white flag for a jump measured at 8. 5.31.76 x x This was the most open of field events.23 8.35 8.94 Just three men reached the automatic qualifying standard of 8. 1988-1. which saw the pre-Games leading mark at 8.75 6 8. 1972-13Q . (5) (8) (9) (11) (6) (12) (7) (2) Irving Saladino Khotso Mokoena Ibrahim Camejo Ngonidzashe Makusha Wilfredo Martinez Ndiss Kaba Badji Luis Felipe Meliz Roman Novotný PAN RSA CUB ZIM CUB SEN ESP CZE 3 x 8.06 3 8.19 8. managed 8.11 8.18 and was then followed by Pedroso with 8.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Taurima took the lead in the second round with 8.21 1 8. Ţăruş and Tomlinson responded well with jumps of 8.13 7.93 2 8. 7.94 8. 1968-3 Most Finals 4 Igor Ter-Ovanesyan URS (RUS) 1956-nm.10 8.10 5 x x 7.08 4 8.63 7. possibly due to the fall in world standards. 4 Aug 2012 (Competitors: 40.16 World Champion Phillips settled things quickly with an opening leap of 8.11 8.05 8. the bronze medal was a Ukrainian duel.98 7. 8.28 in the next round and was followed by Martinez.02 7.23 8.16 x x 5 x 8. reaching 8. won by Shchurenko ahead of Lukashevich.93 8.80 x 7.05 4 8. 3. Taurima matched this in the next round and improved to 8. 1992-1. A tight battle for the other medals was won by Mokoena’s 8.55.32 8.07 7. 5.28 x 7.12 8.59 8.24 8.05 to be the best ever non-qualifier in athletics history. 8. The Jamaican with the distinctive landing technique then had a jump on the same part of the board as Martinez’s 8.09 8.15. 1964-2.10 8.14 x 7.21 8.16 8. Saladino appeared to be favouring his injury.06 8.28 8.20 8.33 8.23 only moved him one position upwards to seventh.07 8.93 8.12 7.19) for the bronze. 1960-3.32. 2000-1. 1996-1 1900-2.07 7. Countries: 32.97 8.24 and was then overtaken by Beckford’s 8. In the qualifying. Two jumps later the NCAA Champion Moffitt produced a lifetime best of 8. 6.96 7.93 (Competitors: 42. 18 Aug 2008 1. 4.86 7. Countries: 30.21.24 8. with only Rutherford able to get close to his best.12 8.20).87 Series Martinez Badji Meliz Novotný 2 7.54. Finalists: 12) Series Saladino Mokoena Camejo Makusha 1 x 7. Saladino.07 8.34. 8.07 7.90 x 8. Defending champion Pedroso was able to produce his best in round six.87 8. Beijing.03 7.01 7.02 8. to the joy of the crowd. Pedroso had taken the lead earlier in the round with 8. Finalists: 12) Series Phillips Moffitt Martinez Beckford Tomlinson Gaisah Pedroso Ţăruş F I N A L S / M E N ’ S MEN’S LONG JUMP The Best on Points 32 Carl Lewis USA 23 Myer Prinstein USA 21 Ralph Boston USA 1984-1. Moffitt moved into second with 8.62 4 8. and an efficient jumping style similar to 80s star Larry Myricks. His compatriot Rutherford took a more substantial lead for good in round two with 8.92 8.60 8.49. Rutherford cemented his win with a fourth-round 8. 4.16 8. 4.00 157 4 8. With one jump remaining Pedroso’s response was that of a champion.17 in round 2.24 7.82 6 8.10 7. Only Tomlinson was able to clear eight metres in round one of the final.24 8.00 GBR AUS USA SWE GER GBR BRA RSA 8. utilising his speed (6. reaching 8.16.09 8.20 6.16 x 7.59 8. Claye edged into silver medal position in the fourth round with 8.19 x 3 x 7.34 8. with Camejo (8.08 8. (8) (2) (7) (6) (12) (3) (1) (11) Dwight Phillips John Moffitt Joan Lino Martinez James Beckford Chris Tomlinson Ignasious Gaisah Iván Pedroso Bogdan Ţăruş USA USA ESP JAM GBR GHA CUB ROU 8.19. He then took the lead with 8. Behind the big two. 1964-3.44 a month earlier.47 over 60m). as he leapt 8.31 8.19 8. Countries: 30. The Greek had spanned 8. 2. but 8. There were no further jumps over 8.31 to 8. Bulgaria’s Petar Dachev achieved 8.15 8.07 7. the lowest world leader since 1978. 1960-3.32 but this jump (of around 8.07 8. who had jumped 8.92 8.01 x 5 x 8.96 8.47 to win the silver medal.01 x 8.74 x x 6 6. 26 Aug 2004 1. 7.06 x 7.47 x 8.19 8.59. L J London. 1968-4 Lewis Iván Pedroso CUB 1992-4.24 8.98 7.02 x 8. 2004-7 (Competitors: 39.06. 8.25 8. finally settling the gold medal.50) was ruled a foul. 7. but was overtaken by Watt who finished with 8. but then had three fouls in the final. 6.06 8.32 8.31 8. 1964-3.88 8.98 7. Leading the way was Louis Tsátoumas who jumped 8. The cooling conditions and variable winds affected the distances achieved.79 8. 1906-1 1960-1.04 8.383 from take-off).96 7. 5.25 8.34 8. behind Makusha’s 8.

34 12. based on his reputation.98 13.47OR 13. Myer Prinstein James Connolly Lewis Sheldon Patrick Leahy IRL Albert Delannoy Alexandre Tuffère USA USA USA GBR FRA FRA 14. 2.64 13.07 12.75 12.5 Breakdown RUS UKR EST BLR Totals 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 1 4 2 1 0 0 3 30 9 4 3 46 3 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 3 27 14 41 of URS/EUN placings: 2 2 1 3 2 Breakdown of GBR placings: GBR 1 IRL 1 1 Totals 1 1 1 Triple Jump 1.725 12. 5.68 2 13. 3. and the lanky (1.48 3 x 13.725 12. Also: - M Points 48 432 6 76. but an injury in the long jump meant he only managed 12.80 13. Countries: 6) Prinstein won handily from the reigning champion.R I O 158 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Men’s Long Jump. and led until the last round when O’Connor produced a lifetime best.70 13.83 5 13. 6. So excited was O’Connor that he climbed a flagpole and replaced the British flag with an Irish one. 3. Countries: 5) Connolly won with his hop-hop-jump style. Myer Prinstein Fred Englehardt Robert Stangland John Fuhler George Van Cleaf John Hagerman Samuel Jones USA USA USA USA USA USA USA 14. Countries: 9. Both Edward Bloss London.545 13.61 x 13.30 11.665 12. 2. Connolly’s winning jump gave him the first title to be won in the modern Olympic Games. 5.91 (Competitors: 7. 6 Apr 1896 James Connolly Alexandre Tuffère Ioannis Persakis Alajos Szokolyi Carl Schumann USA FRA GRE HUN GER Hristos Zoumis Fritz Hofmann GRE GER 13.2+1= GDR 1 2 1 FRG 1 Totals 1 4 1 2+1= 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 3 1 4 1 6 34. 3. Louis. Persakis jumped in the local style of two steps and a jump. 2. continued Placing Table G S B 4 USA 22 15 11 7 GER 1 4 1 2+1= GBR 2 1 1 URS/EUN 3 2 SWE 1 2 3 AUS 4 FRA 2 CUB 1 1 1 FIN 1 1 ITA 1 1+1= JPN 2 ESP 1 CAN 1 1 HUN 1 1 JAM 1 1 BRA 1 UKR 1 1 NOR 1 RSA 1 GHA 1 NGR 1 POL PAN 1 GRE 1 HAI 1 NED ZIM 1 CHN BAH SEN SLO YUG (SRB) ARG BLR AUT BUL CZE KOR ROU Totals 28 28 28 27+2= 5 6 3 3 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 6 5 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 27 7 5 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 8 1 3 1 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 .075 x 13.915OR 14.70 6 14.675 13.71OR 12. 1 Sep 1904 1.735 13. 4. Paris.52 12.94 x x 13. 6.76 . and he eventually won handily. T J and Charles Reber were 14m jumpers (and 7m long jumpers) who might well have given the event greater international stature had they been present.36 12. 5. 4.36 (Competitors: 13. Prinstein thus gained some measure of satisfaction after the distasteful events of the long jump.70 12. Prinstein had been expected to do well. Athens.27 and 11th place.665 x 4 13. 2. (Competitors: 7. Prinstein was the favourite. Peter O’Connor IRL Con Leahy IRL Thomas Cronan Oscar Guttormsen Dimitrios Muller Francis Connolly Vasilios Stournares Carl Pedersen GBR GBR USA NOR GRE USA GRE NOR 14.075 13. 3. 16 Jul 1900 1.97 13.125 12.50e F I N A L S / M E N ’ S L J . 4.125 12. 2.885 12. 6. 8. (B7) (B9) Tim Ahearne IRL Garfield MacDonald GBR CAN 14. 7. 7.35 13.61 12.38 12.98 13. Finalists: 3) Series O’Connor Leahy Cronan Guttormsen Müller Connolly Stournares Pedersen 1 13.83 13. Countries: 1) With no US Championships between 1894 and 1905 this was a difficult event to gauge beforehand.53 12. though he did not overtake Englehardt until his last attempt.68 (Competitors: 21.5 31 8 76. 4. St.34 13.93) Lewis Sheldon.5 4 52 3 46 3 44 4 34 0 34 2 31 1 19 1 17.58 Leahy was the favourite. 25 Jul 1908 1.48 13.75 12.17 12. as compared with the now conventional hop-step-jump of Tuffere. 30 Apr 1906 1. 5.90 13.5 2 17 1 17 2 16 1 15 1 12 0 12 1 11 1 11 1 10 0 10 0 9 0 9 1 8 0 8 1 7 0 6 0 5 0 5 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 84 995 Athens.

moved just ahead of Landers with his last effort of 14. (A2) 6.97 14. Almlöf’s 14.32 x 14. begun at the unusual time of 11:30.42 to move to number three on the alltime list behind Ahearn (15. which he further improved on his next jump.505 14.48 Series Winter Brunetto Tuulos Rainio 1 x 15.505 14. just 5cm behind Brunetto.74 13.725 ahead of MacDonald’s 14.14 14.13 5 x 6 15.095 14.19 x x x 13.60 or better.58 x 13. 5.06 4 x x x 5 14.55 x 4 x x 14.17 in the final round. (A3) 4.13 14.06 14.85.52.73 15. Antwerp. 8.72 13.395 x 14.46 14. 3. with the top three then taking a further three jumps.18 15.70 14.175 14.70 x 4 15.30 in the pre-Olympic year.22 14. 6.925 x 14.48.72 x 14.525 15.23 14.27 13.395 4 14. went on to win a further seven titles up to 1928. Countries: 7) Series Ahearne MacDonald Larsen 1 13. Almlöf (14. 8.16 (Competitors: 20. Ahearne led the qualifying round. 1912 was the only year between 1910 and 1918 that he did not win the US title.21 15. with Landers fourth. This lasted until the first-round of the next pool.65 13.17 15. Amsterdam.21 14. making him the number two performer of all-time.76 13.37 14. Countries: 8. two days later.92 2 3 14. The leading contender prior to the Games was Charles Brickley.01 13.51. winning the second section with 14.48 14.20 14. except that he fell back to 14. 4.01 3 x 14. 3.96 1 14. beating his national record by 3cm.46 14.41 (Competitors: 24.13 x 14.01 14. 7.19) and Janson (14. and didn’t get to Stockholm. having a fierce duel with Garfield MacDonald.35 14. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Series Almlöf Sahlin Landers Ahearn Nylund 1 x x 14. the athletes had three jumps in three separate groups.70 14. Countries: 13.17 in the final round of the same group assured Sweden of its only field event sweep in Olympic athletics history.3.27 2 14. Tuulos then produced a big jump in round 4.915 14.45. Janson also produced his best in the sixth round. After a fifth round foul of around 15.175 14.505.51 14.775 x 13. 7.35 14. 6.03 13.34 x 14. 7. and Oda then had a foul of just over 15m.59 14. Finalists: 12) Series Oda Casey Tuulos Nambu Tulikoura Järvinen Peters Rainio 1 15.07 13.09 14. a jump good enough for first place. This was Ahearne’s best ever mark.75 13. (A5) 2. Landers had a foul of about 14.30 x 15.16 13.525WR 15.93 14.51 14. (B1) Mikio Oda Levi Casey Vilho Tuulos Chuhei Nambu Toimi Tulikoura Erkki Järvinen Willem Peters Väinö Rainio JPN USA FIN JPN FIN FIN NED FIN 15. which would be enough to win. 2.76 14.02 14.01 14. Paris.27 14. improving his South American record by 27cm to 15.90 13.17 x Tuulos had jumped 15. Ahearne made amends.525. 12 Jul 1924 Stockholm.35 14.30.08 13.11 15. 8. Gustaf Lindblom Georg Åberg Eric Almlöf Erling Vinne Platt Adams Edvard Larsen Hjalmar Ohlsson Nils Fixdal SWE SWE SWE NOR USA NOR SWE NOR 14.235 14.425 15.97 x 14.09 14.37 159 4 14. 7.14 14. but he could reach only 13.70 3 4 14. 2.90 6 x 14.865 x 13. breaking Ahearn’s world record by half a centimetre.17 15. 15 Jul 1912 1. which shattered the Swedish record (14.90 3 14. Finalists: 3) Series Lindblom Åberg Almlöf Vinne Adams Larsen 1.86 13. After the qualifying round. Winter produced a massive jump in the final round.13 14. who had already won two national championships. which was estimated by experts to be 15.48). He opened the competition with 14. ahead of Janson’s 14.85 6 14.425 x 14.63 x 14.53 14.19 13. The final. 8. 4.12 – Gustaf Nordén) with 14. 5. The third Swede.(B10) 3.17 14. 4.88 in Stockholm for ninth place.41 3 15. who won the US Eastern trials with 14. 4. Almlöf improved to 14.34 14. when Lindblom jumped 14.37 15. 3.09 13.79 14.00 13. (B2) 7.21 x x 6 x 15.27 in round 5.34 6 14.97 13.74 2 13.175.50 14.12 14.55 14. Finalists: 6) Series Tuulos Janson 1 2 14. In the first group Åberg moved from a non-qualifying position with his third jump.23 “Nick” Winter Luis Brunetto Vilho Tuulos Väinö Rainio Folke Janson Mikio Oda Earle Wilson Ivar Sahlin AUS ARG FIN FIN SWE JPN USA SWE 15. and then jumped 14. 6.65 14. 6.74 13.12 The fact that the USA were shut out of the medals seemed as pleasing to the British press as the win by Ahearne.22 2 15. (B3) 5.00 14.53 14. After an unhappy long jump competition.52) and Tuulos (15. and by 1911 had leaped 15. Countries: 12) (Competitors: 20.94 2 15.37 Brunetto shook the field in the first round.695 T J 3 14.63 13.76 As in the long jump.675 (Competitors: 21.59 ★ O L Y M P I C (Competitors: 19.16) were in the medal positions. Vilho Tuulos Folke Janson Erik Almlöf Ivar Sahlin Sherman Landers Dan Ahearn Ossian Nylund Howard Baker FIN SWE SWE SWE USA USA FIN GBR 14. The measurement then was announced at 15. dropped the final “e” from the surname. Countries: 8. 2 Aug 1928 1. just behind the Finn. Sahlin.18.01 14.92 13. Janson jumped 15. Winter responded with 15.02 14.17 14.06 5 14. (C2) (C4) (A3) (C1) Edvard Larsen Calvin Bricker Platt Adams Frank Mount Pleasant Karl Fryksdahl John Brennan R I O 2 0 1 6 NOR CAN USA USA SWE USA 14.16 x 5 14.11 15. as his younger brother Dan emigrated to the USA. 21 Aug 1920 1. 5. but not the family record. (A8) 8.395 14.74.08 5 14.23.17 13. 2. Tuulos. 6 14.10 The world record holder Dan Ahearn missed part of the 1912 season.62 5 x 14.84 15.62 x . 5.645 13.75 14.09 in Paris a week later in a USA v SWE v FRA international.

91 4 14.21.11) improved.50 for Harada. Sarialp won Turkey’s only athletics medal in Olympic history. Finalists: 15) Series da Silva Shcherbakov Devonish Ashbaugh Nilsen Iimuro de Oliveira Norman 1 15.89 2 16.52 15.27 x x 15. Countries: 25. who had been the best Japanese triple jumper from 1933 to 1935 had a poor day. More unlucky yet was Henry Rebello of India – fifth on the preOlympic lists with 15.22WR 15. 8.20. 4. His 15. Peters had a first round foul of around 15. and averaged 15. The first three rounds reduced the field from 23 to six. His speed on the runway was unexceptional.65).17 and veteran Tuulos (15.56 x x 12. 4. The qualifers had been led by the stylish George Avery with 15. in the third round.32.72WR 15.76. 3. (1) (3) (14) (7) (10) (12) (8) (11) Arne Åhman George Avery Ruhi Sarıalp Preben Larsen Geraldo de Oliveira “Valle” Rautio Les McKeand Adhemar da Silva SWE AUS TUR DEN BRA FIN AUS BRA 15.99 14.66 6 16.50 14.23 15. but his ability to retain his rhythm throughout the three phases was unmatched because of the remarkable elasticity in his legs. and then followed with three phases of 6. with five fouls as he tried to catch his teammates.21 x 14.09.08 x 6 x 15.88 14.50 15.52 ahead of Ashbaugh (15.39) and Shcherbakov (15.89 14.01) ahead of Casey (14. he pulled a muscle on his run-up. Berlin. with 15.85 x 15. but Moberg had a rare off-day in the final. Finalists: 14) 1 15. 5.85 (Competitors: 16.98 14. 2.42 14. and win a silver medal.05 15.38 x 14.77 14. 5.39 14. In doing so.32 x 15.72 14. (2) (8) (3) (4) (1) (15) (10) (9) Adhemar da Silva BRA Leonid Shcherbakov RUS URS Asnoldo Devonish VEN Walter Ashbaugh USA Rune Nilsen NOR Yoshio Iimuro JPN Geraldo de Oliveira BRA Roger Norman SWE 16. 4.18 14.04 15. who led in the first round with 15.22 15.75 and 5. while the other group was won by Nambu (15.97.22.22 for his second world record.70 This was seen as a likely battle between Europe’s best Shcherbakov. 2.22 x 15. in the cold conditions.32 15.365 14. 6. while da Silva again broke the old record with 16. while European Champion Rautio. 3 Aug 1948 1.26 15. his three phases being 6.33.36. only Casey.He then set a world record 15.25.67 14.995! . Countries: 19.09 15.93) and Järvinen (14. In the first group Oda quickly took charge with 15.025 14.40 15.53 14.12 15.44 15. Oshima.00. who was to improve to 15.66 15.54 15. 6.07 15. After an opening jump within 6cm of his 16.98 15.01 world record.825 14. 4. totalling 16.08 15. 5.83 4 16.89 (Competitors: 40.12 15.12 Defending champion and world record holder Oda was injured and placed only 12th with 13.70 14.R I O 160 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C The field was divided into two sections. Oda set 20 national records in Olympic events between 1922 and 1931 and won six Far Eastern Asian Games titles in the long and triple jump and decathlon. 3.73) and Tulikoura (14.89 14.66 in the final round. Countries: 12) Series Nambu Svensson Oshima Fitzgerald 1 15.54 x 3 15.49 (Competitors: 27. who broke the Olympic record with 15.85 6 14.07 14. 6. the qualifying had been a too generous 14.95 14. The Russian improved to a fine 15. The surprising Devonish moved into second place with 15.32 15. placing 13th with 14.50 15. but Japanese (and Germans) were not allowed to compete in the London Olympics.21 x 14.99 x 14. da Silva thrilled the knowledgeable crowd with his second jump of 16. Los Angeles. 8.05. both gaining medals.22.23 Series Åhman Avery Sarıalp 2 14.53 x x 5 15.00 15. The fourth round yielded 15.90 x 14. 4 Aug 1932 1.025 3 14.26).05 4 14.39 4 16. Tuulos (14.20 14. Readying himself for his first jump he had to wait 30 minutes before being allowed to compete because of various victory ceremonies. 6.02 5 x 14.70 x 5 16. Not surprisingly.58 14.95 x 3 15. 7.76 15.13 14.45 in the opening round.93 14.32 in the second round with 15.50 on the next jump of the competition.07 14.83 14. and da Silva the world record holder. and Avery produced his best jump in the first round.84 15.65 15. which would be the gold medal winning jump.39 15. also produced his best jump in the first round. 8. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S T J London. the second best jump of all-time. well down in Olympic year on his 1946 form. managed only sixth place.04 x The Japanese had been succeeded by Jack Metcalfe as world record holder with 15. 3.83 2 x 15. (3) (15) (12) (5) (14) (6) (11) (13) Chuhei Nambu Eric Svensson Kenkichi Oshima Eamonn Fitzgerald Willem Peters Sol Furth Sidney Bowman Rolland Romero JPN SWE JPN IRL NED USA USA USA 15.39 15.68 x 15. 23 Jul 1952 1.52 15.87 14. 7.80 and 5. He retained a life long love of athletics and died in 1998 at the age of 93.70) qualified for the final stages.83 14.67 x 14.27 14. The most consistent performers of 1947-48 had been the Swedes Lennart Moberg and Arne Åhman.07. Countries: 16.98 high jump in 1949) without great speed. He had beaten the existing world record four times.68 15. 5. a European record. Finalists: 23) Series Tajima Harada Metcalfe Wöllner Romero Oshima Joch Wilkins 1 15. Later in that round Tajima soared to the first ever 16m jump. 3.27 15.12. this time 16. with the top six after three rounds taking three further jumps. 4. His place as top Japanese jumper was ably taken by Nambu. 4.66 14.95 15. 15.67 15. the Australian took the lead with 15.01 and emphasised his superiority with 15. 7.00.88 14.365 15. Helsinki.72 in the fifth round. The 18th to jump was Tajima.78 in 1935.05. In the finals.88 14.07 14. and then responded to Svensson’s 15.01 14. a springy type (1. (18) (7) (8) (9) (11) (20) (3) (17) Naoto Tajima Masao Harada Jack Metcalfe Heinz Wöllner Rolland Romero Kenkichi Oshima Erich Joch Dudley Wilkins JPN JPN AUS GER USA JPN GER USA 16.98. The popular Brazilian rounded out his afternoon with another 16m+ jump. It was da Silva who led the qualifiers with his 15. 8.13 14.83 (Competitors: 31. 6 Aug 1936 1. After Harada jumped 15.21. Åhman.01 3 15.05 x x x 13.40 15.88 14. 2.66 15. 7.78 x 6 x The world list was headed in 1948 by Keizo Hasegawa.70 x 5 15.45 x x x x 14.50 14.40 was enough to take the gold medal. Nambu became the only man ever to officially hold both the long and triple jump world records.00WR 15. 2.13 and then 15.29.89 2 14.

73 15.43 16.11 16.63.50 qualifying mark with a new Olympic record of 16.85w 15.64w 6 17.91 x x 13. Davis went to shake hands.96 x 3 16.78 1 16.90) failed to make it to the final six.02 14.09 2 16. 6 Sep 1960 1. The Australian publication Olympic Saga noted that da Silva had produced “a magnificent exhibition of rhythmic strength.14 15.36 14.05 16.55 16. 2.01 4 16. Finalists: 13) Series Saneyev Prudêncio Gentile Walker Dudkin May Schmidt Dia 1 16. and he exhibited his ability with his third round jump of 16. reaching 15. 8.65 15. while Takeyuki Okazaki (JPN) and the veteran US star Davis were considered as the best medal prospects.58 16. behind Alsop’s second Ukm record of 16. Schmidt’s 10. before bouncing out to 16.30w 16.29 15.21 x 16. The best qualifier was Britain’s Alsop. 6.71 4 x 4 16.84 17.54w x 17.26w 16.37 in the first round of the final.93 15.58w 15. The boos which greeted Kreyer’s name at the victory ceremony reduced the Russian to tears.96 x 15.09 (Competitors: 34.77 x Schmidt had surgery on his knee in late August.70 16.58 16.75 x 16.37w 16. controlled power.02. but was a shadow of his former self in the final with 15.40.27 16. 4.45 16.10 x 5 14. and led 15 men over the 15.21 x x x 15. and superb co-ordination. which Kreyer – thinking he should wait till the very end of the competition before congratulations – rebuffed. Countries: 20.57 16. and further 16m jumps were the property of da Silva.5 man over 100y.15 15.24 15.64 2 16.06 16.84 15.10w 15.69 x 15. 8.80 6 16.26w x x x x 15. 27 Nov 1956 1. He reached only 15. Finalists: 15) Series Schmidt Goryayev Kreyer Davis Einarsson Malcherczyk Hinze Rahkamo 1 16. below the required 15.48 16.02 15.77 16.15 x 17.46 15. 3. Standards had risen sharply in the previous four years with the result that 22 exceeded the qualifying standard of 14.81. Adhemar da Silva had set a world record in Mexico City.07 for 14th place. and Saneyev and Walker were both considered as potential world record breakers at the same venue.23 16.87 15.27 17.12w 16. Countries: 24.43.73w 5 16. Countries: 25. Da Silva also went over 16m with 16.55 15.63 16.93 15.35OR 16.41 in the second round.81 3 15. 4.26 15.15 16. casual grace. Showing more swiftness than previous record holders.09w 17.63 6 16.81 15. 7.18 6 13.81.15 15.23 16.83 15.63w 15.37 16.73w (Competitors: 34.53w 16.51 x 15. This was far exceeded by the 16.37 15.65 in round 2. seventh . 17 Oct 1968 (Competitors: 39. 4.75 15.20 16. Kreyer had meanwhile passed Sharpe with 16. Both Davis (16.64 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S T J 161 competition at the top level in the event. 5. 6.80.37 15. He was a hot favourite.26 in the next round by Einarsson. Behind him Davis overtook Einarsson’s opening 16.23 16.88 15.67 16.39 17. and improved to 16.28 15.88 15. Tokyo. 2. (2) (13) (6) (9) (7) (11) (1) (3) Józef Schmidt POL Oleg Fedoseyev RUS URS Viktor Kravchenko RUS URS Fred Alsop GBR Şerban Ciochină ROU Manfred Hinze GER/GDR Georgi Stoykovski BUL Hans-Jürgen Rückborn GER/GDR 16.35 x 15.50 on the springy surfaces now used.33 17.84 2 x 2 16.4 speed for 100m allied with good technique gave him a powerful advantage over his contemporaries.41 16. remarkable jumping for a man not long out of hospital.” Rome.90 15.64) and Shcherbakov (15.39 16. 2.79 15.41 16.57) and Fedoseyev (16.04 16. Da Silva made his fourth final with 15. Schmidt won the title with his opening jump of 16. 5.35 16.63 5 16.10 15. 3.83 in Sweden in October.89 16.61. Finalists: 13) World record holder da Silva was favourite to win.79 13. 8.59 14. the double bronze medallist was the biggest shock.12 1.43 16.12w 17. The first shock came when Sharpe set a US record of 15. though Shcherbakov and Kogake were considered dangers because they had both jumped farther than 16.81 16. roughly equivalent to 17.01 15.38 15. Schmidt overtook the Briton with 16.85. Alsop had to succumb to the Soviets as Kravchenko (16.89 15. Countries: 22. his best ever jump at low altitude.01 16. while the failure of Vitold Kreyer (URS).81w 17. 7. 2.66 16. 3.73 15. 6.90 15.77w 16.10 16.48 6 x 16.83 In 1955. 8. who set a national record of 16. Finalists: 22) Series da Silva Einarsson Kreyer Sharpe Řehák Shcherbakov Sakurai Kogake 1 15. concentration under pressure.80.44 4 17.46.58) both slipped by.51 x x x 5 16.26 and 16.06 16. (9) (4) (11) (10) (2) (8) (5) (3) Viktor Saneyev GEO Nélson Prudêncio Giuseppe Gentile Art Walker Nikolay Dudkin BLR Phil May Józef Schmidt Mansour Dia URS BRA ITA USA URS AUS POL SEN 17.99 16. Kogake (15.80 15. who rounded out his day with 16.02 16. to the anger of the crowd. (9) (13) (20) (6) (10) (3) (19) (17) Adhemar da Silva BRA Vilhjálmur Einarsson ISL Vitold Kreyer RUS URS Bill Sharpe USA Martin Řehák CZE TCH Leonid Shcherbakov RUS URS Koji Sakurai JPN Teruji Kogake JPN 16. 7.59) led the way. He was overtaken by Goryayev in round 4 with 16.48 16. who had jumped 15. Davis was brimming with speed but lacked the discipline that comes from regular 1.22 15.41.88 to lead the field at the end of the first round.17 16.58 16.48 3 17.10 x 15.22 17.61 x x 15.38 x 16. 6. 7.58 15.63 16. Schmidt responded to these improvements by bounding out to an Olympic record 16.02 x x 16.06 15.14 16.21.13 16. Mexico City.78. 5.00) and Okazaki (15. and was not considered a possible winner by the cognoscenti.66 Józef Schmidt became the first man to jump 17m a month before the Games.71 2 16.09w x x 16.18.46 16.49 16.83 15.04.84 Series Schmidt Fedoseyev Kravchenko Alsop Ciochină Hinze Stoykovski Rückborn 1 16.85w 15.57 x 16.43 16.73w 17.73 16. 5.85 16.01 x x 3 16.52 4 x 16. 4.82 5 16.85OR 16. A 9.14 15.37 with 16.39WR 17.15 16.58 16. 16 Oct 1964 (Competitors: 32. Schmidt qualified with a seasonal best of 16.71w 3 15.02 16. (4) (10) (5) (3) (11) (9) (12) (2) Józef Schmidt POL Vladimir Goryayev BLR URS Vitold Kreyer RUS URS Ira Davis USA Vilhjálmur Einarsson ISL Ryszard Malcherczyk POL Manfred Hinze GER/GDR Kaari Rahkamo FIN 16. 3.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Melbourne. He had one competition at the end of September.00 16.35.81OR 16.71.70 16. Less favoured was Italy’s Gentile.44. and by Melbourne bronze medallist Kreyer with the Russian’s last jump of 16.05 x 16.

81 15.43 4 16. Drehmel fouled his first jump. and America’s best James Butts were considered the class of the field.51 x x 16. Finalists: 12) Series Saneyev Butts de Oliveira 1 x 16.78 16. of which six were wind legal.85 4 x 17. jumping 17.07 x 14.85 16.96 to take an early lead from Saneyev (16. The Georgian held the lead until the fifth round. Finalists: 12) Series Uudmäe Saneyev de Oliveira Connor Campbell Chochev Bakosi Lorraway 1 x 16. 7..19 x 16. claiming that Campbell had grazed his foot along the ground. Both jumps were in the region of the 17. but still cut the sand at 17. who had the pit raked before any measurement could be made.26 x 14.35 with a barely illegal wind of +2. who had suffered step problems all afternoon.85w 16. 4. (7) (8) (4) (11) (3) (10) (1) (6) Viktor Saneyev GEO James Butts João de Oliveira Pedro Pérez Tommy Haynes Wolfgang Kolmsee Eugeniusz Biskupski Carol Corbu URS USA BRA CUB USA FRG POL ROU 17.91 5 17.22 16.02 on his second jump.79 16. 7.85w 16.91 16.02 16.39 Olympic record flag at around 17.62 16. Other than Campbell’s 17.22 16.8 in the next round.83w 16.22.44 (Competitors: 36. and he replied in round 5 with his 17. Finalists: 12) Series Saneyev Drehmel Prudêncio Corbu Craft Dia Joachimowski Fløgstad 1 17.43 (Competitors: 25. and 16.35 17. 8 (7) (8) (5) (1) (3) (4) (9) (6) Viktor Saneyev GEO Jörg Drehmel Nélson Prudêncio Carol Corbu John Craft Mansour Dia Michal Joachimowski Kristen Fløgstad URS GDR BRA ROU USA SEN POL NOR 17.00.29 16.05 x x x x x This was expected to be a battle between Saneyev. (8) (12) (10) (6) (7) (5) (4) (9) Jaak Uudmäe EST Viktor Saneyev GEO João de Oliveira Keith Connor Ian Campbell Atanas Chochev Béla Bakosi Ken Lorraway URS URS BRA GBR AUS BUL HUN AUS 17. who therefore amazed onlookers with a world record of 17.23/+2. and Drehmel who had surprised the great Georgian jumper in winning the ’71 European title. The Brazilian had two long efforts ruled invalid.98 x 5 16.48 x 16.50.35 16.69 16.28. 8.22 and Saneyev 17.” Videotape of the jump showed quite clearly that the Australian had not fouled. Saneyev had meanwhile produced a supporting effort of 17. 4. Neither Campbell nor de Oliveira had another legal jump. Prudêncio backed up his record with 17. He was seen to walk away angrily after examining the board for signs of a foul.84.49 16. 30 Jul 1976 1.49 16. world leader at 17. It was only in round 3 that Oliveira edged past the Cuban with 16.77 16.06 14.0 to move from third to first. On the next jump.04 17. 4 Sep 1972 1. the crowd had to wait until round 3 to see a 17m jump.24 x x x 16.47 16. 4. 6.83w x 16.69 6 x 16. Montreal.64 16. who managed only 15.35w 17. playing safe.12 x 16.19. Both of the Italian’s records were in still conditions.24.55 16. Art Walker.07 Series Pérez Haynes Kolmsee Biskupski Corbu 2 16.71 16.83 16.44 3 17.71 16. hit 17. 5. Countries: 19. I would either have fallen forward or lost my balance and had to abort the jump … the physical evidence just doesn’t add up.72 16. The final opened quietly enough when Oliveira cleared 16. The pre-Olympic world record had been bettered with eight jumps. “I defy anyone looking at .15 3 17.77 16. Oliveira then reached 17.23 15.61 16.42 became the cut-off point for 12 finalists.03 - 6 17. and the last jump of the competition – and of his career – belonged to Saneyev. with Prudêncio getting beyond 17m on his last jump for the final medal.47 16. Then Viktor Saneyev came into the reckoning.04.87 16.05/+1.87 16. until Drehmel reached 17. A few moments later an official raised a red flag. Campbell protested vehemently to the judges. The 34 year-old produced a fine jump of 17. Saneyev was rightly regarded as the event’s greatest ever competitor.71 17. 2.31 for a GDR record and silver. reaching 17. who had set an altitude-assisted world record in the 1971 Pan American Games. 2. 6.61 16.35 to take a big lead. but with three golds and a silver he almost matched Al Oerter’s medal achievements in an event where age was a much greater problem than in the discus throw. Butts uncorked a legal lifetime best in round 4.28 16. Oliveira improved slightly in the last round. “If I had dragged my foot . The final was led in round one by Pedro Pérez.47 16.0 (!) for gold and the final record of the afternoon.78 16.00 6 x 16. 3.55 16.53 x 16.68 16.83 16.40 5 17.68 16.87 x x 16.18 T J 3 16.44 (Competitors: 23. No-one else was over 16.88w x 16.83 x 14.31 15. 5. when Prudêncio leapt 17.85).18 16.81 16.35 lead.08 17. Countries: 18. Countries: 28.2 on an effort which featured a tremendous jump phase. the speedy Australian hit the board well and landed beyond Saneyev’s 17.72 16.72 x 16. with six spikes on the shoe.12w with the penultimate jump of the contest.R I O 162 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C on the pre-Olympic lists. Moscow..48 16. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 16.10 in the second round of the qualifying competition. 7. On his first jump in the final Saneyev took care to hit the board.34w 17.55. but otherwise had never impressed in major competitions.58 x x 5 x 16.90 1.71 x x x This was an event which ran to form.90.35w x 16.68 16.77 15. as he landed standing up at the new world mark of 17.24 x 16.97 6 x 15.27/+2.0. 25 Jul 1980 Munich.31 x 13.24 17.40 16. and looked set to take the USA’s first gold since 1904.85. The best of them came from Campbell. 2. though the last three records were all aided by the coincidental maximum legal wind of 2.44 3 17.56 15.29 17. world record holder Oliveira. as Saneyev.90 16. Gentile again produced a superb jump – this time in the opening round of the final.54 x 16.39/+2. In 2015 Australia appealed again to both the IAAF and the IOC regarding the third round jump of Campbell.31 17. and.05 16.32 x 16.80 16.56 16. but was annoyed with himself for not waiting until the wind dropped – the headwind was 1.15 x 15. took off just behind the board but leapt a good 17. The powerful GDR star fouled his next two jumps.70 An innocuous qualifying round saw only seven men meet the standard of 16.20 4 x x x 16.11 16. only to see the superb Saneyev bound out to 17.75 16.35 17. 5. and the medals were settled. and he was thus deprived of a certain medal.46 16.50. 3. 6.76 16.24 metres per second.0 for the third world record of the day.29 after hitting the board for the one and only time of the competition.69 x 2 16.28 17. The other major surprise of the preliminary was Pertti Pousi (FIN). He later said.69 x 2 16.02 in the qualifying. but the wind began to pick up a little as Prudêncio kept Brazil’s traditions alive with 17.96 16. 3. 8.98w 17.15 in the final round.18 14. In the final round Uudmäe supported his winning jump with 17. Uudmäe made the leap of his life.62 x 4 x x 16. the second of which was in the area of 17. and then Saneyev produced the competition’s first 17m jump.12 2 16.

87 16.04 17.06 - 6 18.38. Kovalenko was the first to exceed 17m in the final F I N A L S / M E N ’ S T J 163 with 17.36.67 16.46). 7. while Britain’s surprising Eric McCalla was the one other man over 17m with 17.” Los Angeles. In second place was Quesada. (7) (2) (12) (11) (10) (9) (5) (3) Mike Conley Charles Simpkins Frank Rutherford Leonid Voloshin RUS Brian Wellman Yoelbi Quesada Aleksandr Kovalenko Zou Sixin USA USA BAH EUN BER CUB BLR EUN CHN 18. Countries: 32. 5.94 x 16.87 16.56 The qualifying was led by the three Soviet jumpers. 4. as reigning champion Markov (16.15 16. (10) (4) (6) (9) (11) (1) (2) (12) Khristo Markov Igor Lapshin BLR Aleksandr Kovalenko BLR Oleg Protsenko RUS Charles Simpkins Willie Banks Ivan Slanář CZE Jacek Pastusiński BUL URS URS URS USA USA TCH POL 17.99 x 17. the European Champion and slight favourite led the first round with 17.77 16.90 16.61 17.97 16.72 16.86 x 16. Frank Rutherford also moved into a medal position in round 2 with 17.03 16. Finalists: 12) Series Joyner Conley Connor Zou Bouschen Banks Agbebaku McCalla 1 17.26w 17. one of the greatest talents in US track history. Conley had enhanced his position with a qualifying jump of 17. this time a lifetime best of 18. which would be threatened only by Simpkins in the last round.95 16. 4. Connor took the bronze with a mere 16. In the final round Conley produced his usual sixth round surge.84 16.77 16.16 16.58 16.54 x x 17.60.18 17.54 16.32. but his series was peppered with fouls – the longest of which was in the final round.90 (Competitors: 43.61 16.24 17. the first of four jumps by him beyond 17m.26. 8.40 16. and ’92 World Cup winner Jonathan Edwards (15.83 17. 6.1. 4.04 x 16. leaving the US jumpers and European Champion Keith Connor – not the athlete he had been two years earlier – as the medal contenders.19 x 17. were able to respond positively to Markov’s jump until the final round.36 17. the third Soviet finally got his run-up almost right.32 x 17.50 6 17. and Barcelona was his opportunity for absolution.58 x 5 16.18 in the third round.75 17.36 x 16.91 16.18 16. You can tell with the naked eye that the trailing led came through with a full unimpeded clearance. with 16.40 and 6. 2.31 in the fourth round. Lapshin. 8. 24 Sep 1988 1. then produced the winning jump – 17.18 x - Eight of the 12 finalists made the qualifying distance of 17. and Protsenko with 17. who celebrated his 19th birthday a day early with 17. Conley had missed the Seoul Games after a controversial judging decision in the US Trials. was favourite.75 16.75 x 3 15. Barcelona. Countries: 21.10 17.16 x x x 16. the longest ever jump in a preliminary round.33 17.32 17.33 16.38 16. 8.61OR 17.62 x 16.76) were among the 33 who did not qualify.44 6 x x x x 16.1.42. 5.52 x 16.44 17. a new Olympic record. 7.78 x 5 x 17. (10) (3) (6) (12) (5) (4) (7) (11) Kenny Harrison Jonathan Edwards Yoelbi Quesada Mike Conley Armen Martirosyan Brian Wellman Galin Georgiev Robert Howard USA GBR CUB USA ARM BER BUL USA 18.08 16. the only jump of the competition to be windy.06 17.75 16.63.90 4 18.24 16.72 2 x 17. Countries: 31. His jump here was 17.83 3 17.63 x 16.29 16.” said Athletics Australia President David Grace.32 in the fifth round.40 16.34 x 16.13 x 16.75 16. and the result of those errors should be corrected and an additional gold medal awarded to Ian Campbell to recognise the fact that he did jump the winning distance.42 17.42 17. He had won the US Trials with 17.52 with his last jump – measured from take-off at 17. 3.64 2 17. Voloshin was overtaken by Conley in the second round. aided by a barely illegal wind of 2. a jump aided by a barely illegal breeze of +2. Voloshin.21.66 (Competitors: 28.85 16.04 x 16. 4. 2.38 x Injured 15.36 in the next round.44 17.40 x x 17. 6. 27 Jul 1996 1. 6.91 the cut-off.40 in round 2.00.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C that video footage to see any evidence whatsoever of a scrape.36.59 x 4 17. Seven of the world’s 10 best jumpers were prevented from competing by the Soviet revenge boycott. Markov.66 17.23 14.17w 17.24 16.87 16.28 16.51 - x 16.04 16.52 17.82 x 16.98 17.36 17. Finalists: 12) Series Conley Simpkins Rutherford Voloshin Wellman Quesada Kovalenko Zou 1 16.00 3 17. A leap of 16. Only Kovalenko with 17. topped by Lapshin (17. Atlanta. 8.72 (Competitors: 43.74 17.24 17.04 17.09 17.63 16. 3. The Druzhba event in Moscow two weeks later saw three men clear 17. Conley took the lead in the first round with 16.83 16.97 16. with World Champion Markov the only other jumper to reach the qualifying distance of 16.29 or better. Seoul.67 x 3 16. possibly the best power jumper ever.38 17.95 16.71 16. 7.17 16. 2. when he jumped over 17.33 6 17.17w 17.92 16. (11) (6) (3) (1) (9) (5) (8) (10) Al Joyner Mike Conley Keith Connor Zou Zhenxian Peter Bouschen Willie Banks Ajayi Agbebaku Eric McCalla USA USA GBR CHN FRG USA NGR GBR 17.92 17.32 16. both men using the board well with perhaps 5cm to spare.75 16.26w 16.75 16.82 16. Finalists: 12) Series Markov Lapshin Kovalenko Protsenko Simpkins Banks Slanář Pastusiński 1 17.88 17. heading off Voloshin’s second 17.69. 5.40 16.99 17.67 16. 4 Aug 1984 1.81 16.18 x 16.29 x x x x 16. floating out to 17.05 x x 4 17. Finalists: 12) Series Harrison Edwards Quesada Conley Martirosyan Wellman Georgiev Howard 1 17. 2. until the number three American Al Joyner bolted down the runway and soared to 17.00 (Competitors: 47. to be followed by Protsenko with 17. “We say there were errors made.29 x 16.61 – with the three phases measuring 6.03 16.09OR 17.50.82 x 17.72 2 x x 17.60 x 16. 5. Countries: 32.71 x x x x 16. Conley responded with 17.88 17.60 17. 7. 3 Aug 1992 1.92 16. and specialised in producing last round winning jumps.75 17.85 16.83 16. 6.01. the Bahamian repeated the 17.91.29 17.00.09 17.37).29 sufficed to make it through to the final. 5.52 . and made no contact with the track.89 4 x 16.84 x 2 17.31 x x 5 x x x x 16. 3.66 Mike Conley.15.87.48 x x x 5 x x x x x x 16.90.17 – 20cm beyond the world record. 3.

77 x The qualifying was led by Britons Achike (17. Among the nonqualifiers was Melvin Lister. Edwards then responded with 17. and he opened here with a new legal Olympic best of 17.05 16. Countries: 27.59 x 4 17.13 x 16.83. producing 17. floating out to 17. Olsson’s win was Sweden’s third in the event.68 17.13 17.96 2 17.62 17.16 x 15.08 17. Edwards could then watch to see if his position was threatened.00 but failed to qualify. With the order switched after round 3 so that the leader jumped last. but only Quesada produced a legal jump of any consequence in round 2 with 17. (5) (2) (7) (8) (1) (9) (6) (10) Jonathan Edwards Yoel García Denis Kapustin Yoelbi Quesada Larry Achike Phillips Idowu Robert Howard Paolo Camossi GBR CUB RUS CUB GBR GBR USA ITA 17.29.R I O 164 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Edwards revolutionised the event in 1995.30. 2.01w.87 (Competitors: 39. but the day belonged to Harrison. and was followed by Girat’s 17.95 16. Only Aliecer Urrutia of the favourites missed the final.37. who had qualified with 17.47.40).62. 3. a jump he matched in the third round.10 17.71.47 x 17. 9 Aug 2012 Athens.22 17. bounding out to 17. Finalists: 12) 17.59 17. 2. The Cuban tendency to jump well in round 6 was echoed by Quesada who placed 4th with his 17.15 x 17. 7. 4. 4. 2. 6. 5.27 x Beijing.12).70 range. Sands produced a Bahamanian record 17. An even dozen made the 17.13 jump in round 3. 5. Finalists: 12) .97 x 16.16 17.34 17.79 x 16.56 in round 2 to take the lead.97 17.88.27 x x x T J 3 17.24 17. with Cuba’s Alexis Copello producing the longest-ever non-qualifier of 17.48 17.27 17. achieved 17. 8. 6.55 x 16.10 standard. 1. Behind him Oprea was not cowed by Olsson’s jumping.55 17.48 6 16.95 Series Olsson Oprea Burkenya Betanzos Gregório Melétoglou Gushchinskiy Quesada 1 17.45 x x 17. The Swede settled matters in the final with the first jump of the competition.47 17.00 x 16.24 x 13.96 6 x 17.83 16.58.46 17. Harrison had won the US Trials in his only other competition of the outdoor season with 18.44. The Portuguese jumper effectively deflated the competition with no-one thereafter able to get beyond 17. 3.69 17. 8.46. Edwards then took the lead with 17. Harrison with an Olympic and American record 18.29. undefeated in 2008 was the favourite. Quesada (17.87 3 x 17.70 x x 17. to be followed by the three other contenders all achieving their best of the competition.29 16.40. Countries: 21.11 16. 8.62 17. The experienced Conley jumped a safe 17.51 16. Achike supported his qualifying jump by leading after round 1 of the final with 17.47 17.79 17. The British World Indoor Champion.48 17. 8.75 16.96 1 17.20 x x Four jumpers went beyond 17.31 16.17 x x 17.68 was the longest-ever qualifying jump.79 – exceeded in 2004 only by Olsson’s indoor best of 17.46 x x x 17. Edwards finished with two fouls.95 x 6 17. 22 Aug 2004 1. Finalists: 12) Series Edwards Garcia Kapustin Quesada Achike Idowu Howard Camossi F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1.69.12 17. and backing it up with three jumps beyond 17.19 17.60 3 17.04 16.48 17.82 16.83 x 16. (5) (7) (8) (9) (12) (4) (11) (6) Nelson Evora Phillips Idowu Leevan Sands David Girat Marian Oprea Jadel Gregório Larry Achike Viktor Kuznetsov POR GBR BAH CUB ROU BRA GBR UKR 17. 5.67 x 17.74 16.69 17.99 x 17. led by Idowu’s easy 17. and Americans Conley and ’91 World Champion Harrison.31 17. Sydney 25 Sep 2000 1.31 17. Event favourite Jonathan Edwards jumped 17.30) and Idowu (17. though Garcia moved from fifth to second with his final round 17.81 17. 7.08 16. 2007 World Champion Evora improved from 17. 21 Aug 2008 (Competitors: 39. Evora showed his competitive ability with 17.11 16. Sydney sixth-placer Idowu fouled out in the final. 5.51. (9) (1) (6) (5) (12) (2) (10) (8) Christian Taylor Will Claye Fabrizio Donato Daniele Greco Leevan Sands Benjamin Compaoré Tosin Oke Alexis Copello USA USA ITA ITA BAH FRA NGR BRA 17.09 with his muscular style.92 (Competitors: 27.24 16.31 17.47 16.32 x x 16. His principal rivals were Cubans Quesada and Urrutia. after sandwiching the winning leap of 17. while Harrison led the qualifiers with 17. headed by favourite and World Champion Christian Olsson.55 17.12) and local favourite Andrew Murphy (17.80 from toe to heel). Round 4 produced fireworks as Edwards recovered his elegant form.96 (Competitors: 47.17 16.08. 4 16. but had been the number one jumper in the world for four of the five seasons prior to Sydney.59 in the third round.32.08 16.81 5 17.17 x 4 17.48 x 16.45).41 x 17.91 17. one of them over 18. winner of the US trials with 17. 4.37 x x 16.22 17.47 17. Finalists: 12) Series Evora Idowu Sands Girat Oprea Gregorio Achike Kuznetsov 1 17.05 16.26 17.73 x x 16.47 17.20 17. jumping 16. and Conley with a good 17.93.31 to 17.71 17. 6. 7.48 in round five (part of a three-jump sequence all in excess of 17.19 17. 4.34 17.52 17.59 17.39 5 16.14 16.19 16.05 16.69 17.37 17.82 16.22 17.06 x - Nine of the 12 qualifiers exceeded the automatic qualifying level of 17m.52 x 16.99.71 2 17. Countries: 27. and thus won Portugal’s first ever field event gold or medal. London. His first effort was in the 17.71 17. 6. to be overtaken two jumps later by Kapustin’s 17.47 in round two and held the bronze medal until Burkenya jumped 17.78. 2. Countries: 36.08 two jumps later to ensure a full six jump series.71.26 17.24.09.08 x 16. whose 17. immediately after Idowu had jumped 17.62 17. No-one got close.38 17. and the first for 56 years. 7.19 17.78 17.82 17.58 17.15. (1) (10) (4) (3) (9) (8) (2) (6) Christian Olsson Marian Oprea Danila Burkenya Yoandri Betanzos Jadel Gregório Hrístos Melétoglou Viktor Gushchinskiy Yoelbi Quesada SWE ROU RUS CUB BRA GRE RUS CUB 5 17. while injured World Champion CharlesMichael Friedek surprisingly made the final with 16.52.56 17.67 in round 4 (17.37 17.06 x 17. Edwards had last been a global champion five years earlier.67 17.52 16.29 17.55 in the first round.79 17.37. Edwards had two fouls before making a safe 17. setting two world records in the world championships and becoming the first man to jump 60 feet with 18. and duly led after the first round of the final with 17.93 2 17. Betanzos. 3.53.55 16. 3.

4.07 11. with World Champion Taylor leading the way on 17. 8. Ralph Rose Wesley Coe Lawrence “Leon” Feuerbach Martin Sheridan Charles Chadwick Albert Johnson John Guiney Nicolaos Yeorgantas USA USA USA USA USA USA USA GRE 14. 31 Aug 1904 1.19 17. 3. 7 Apr 1896 The shot was put from a 2. Louis. Countries: 5) As in 1896. Sheldon improved to 14. 5. 1992-5. 1960-14 1984-23Q.39 DQ (for throwing rather than putting) (Competitors: 8.85 12. topped by a fourth-round 17.05 in fourth place. 1996-2. 2004-21Q.62. The phases of his best effort were 6. 6. 5. 1980-2 1920-1. who jumped 17.10 to cement an easy win. 1972-1.44 17.75 5 17. 3.92 x x 16. which followed two fouls. 1996-26Q 1988-23Q. In the final Donato (35) backed up his recent European title with four excellent jumps. but their marks held up for second and third. continued Placing Table S B 4 G IRL 1 ARM SEN NGR UKR Totals 28 28 28 28 5 1 28 6 1 27 7 2 26 8 1 1 25 Breakdown of URS/EUN placings: RUS 2 3 2 GEO 3 1 BLR 2 1 EST 1 Totals 4 5 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 4 3 1 13 49 31 22 8 110 Breakdown of GBR placings: GBR 1 2 1 IRL 2 1 Totals 3 3 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 3 7 49 28 77 Breakdown GER GDR FRG Totals 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 17 7 7 31 of GER placings: 1 1 - M Points 0 5 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 1 84 998 MEN’S TRIPLE JUMP Shot Put The Best on Points 31 Viktor Saneyev URS (GEO) 20 Vilho Tuulos FIN Mike Conley USA 1968-1.36 and 6.16 16.68 x x ★ O L Y M P I C 6 x 16.68 The smallest field since 1980 started the qualifying round.27 x 14. 2008-21Q.15.20 10.45 x 17. 2012-14Q Phillips Idowu GBR S 7 5 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - B 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 - 4 6 2 3 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 8 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 6 6 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - 7 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 - 8 4 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 - M Points 17 215 13 110 7 77 8 72 6 56 5 54 3 39 2 37 3 31 1 31 2 26 1 26 1 21 2 18 1 17 2 16 1 15 1 15 1 15 2 14 1 11 1 8 1 7 0 7 0 7 1 6 1 6 0 6 0 6 0 6 0 5 Robert Garrett Miltiades Gouskos Yorgos Papasideris Viggo Jensen USA GRE GRE DEN 11.10.53 x 16.12 14. 1996-3.13 (7-foot) square.66 x 16. plus a 1. S P 165 Men’s Triple Jump. 1992-1. with the local crowd vociferously disappointed at Garrett’s victory over Gouskos.13 10.00e. The Field reported that only four men took part. 2. 1928-3 1984-2. Ellery Clark USA.6cm margin at the board.92 2 x 17.81 17.35). 2.54 in the second round. 7. but some sources also give the following throwers: 5.95 x 2 0 1 6 4 17. 1956-1. Only Sands was able to join him above the automatic qualifying standard of 17.25 13. 5.15 17. Richard Sheldon Josiah McCracken Robert Garrett Rezsö Crettier Panayiotis Paraskevopoulos Gustav Söderström Artur Coray Truxton Hare USA USA USA HUN GRE SWE HUN USA 14. 1992-nm/Q.02. the shot was thrown from a 7-foot square. 2000-4. 4. 2004-nm/Final.43. By then he had been overtaken by Claye.58 to 12. 6.35 12.55 17.52 11.85) and Garrett (12. St.21.80 from McCracken (12.91 x 3 17.18 11. Paris.43 17.10OR 12. 200019=Q Jonathan Edwards GBR Brian Wellman BER Quesada Fabrizio Donato ITA 2000-25Q. 1992-35Q.36 10+ (Competitors: 7.38 16. 2. 1952-1. Sheldon led the Saturday qualifying round with 13. Countries: 2) . as Crettier could improve only from 11. Carl Schumann GER 10. 7.81 and Claye 17. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S T J .22OR 11. Fritz Hofmann GER. 4. 2004-8 Most Appearances 4 da Silva Saneyev Francis Dodoo GHA Placing Table G USA 7 URS/EUN 4 GBR 3 SWE 3 BRA 2 JPN 3 FIN 1 CUB AUS 1 GER POL 2 NOR ROU ITA FRA BAH BUL 1 CAN GRE RUS ISL POR 1 ARG HUN BER TUR VEN CHN NED TCH (CZE) DEN - 1. The last two refused to compete in the final round held on Sunday.54 17.34 17. 3. 7.40 13. but the Americans were also to peak with their fourth efforts: Taylor 17. 2012-3 2000-6. 6. Claye ended up as the first man since 1936 to win Olympic medals in both the horizontal jumps. 2008-2. 2000-1 1988-34Q.92 (Competitors: 11.08 16. and the event was very close. 15 Jul 1900 1.62 17. Taylor had only made the final eight with his third-round jump of 17. 1988-17Q.48. Athens.37 12. 1996-4 Most Finals 4 Adhemar da Silva BRA Saneyev Yoelbi Quesada CUB 1948-8. 1976-1. 1996-6. 1924-3.R I O Series Taylor Claye Donato Greco Sands Compaoré Oke Copello 1 x x 17.90 x 15.48 x x 16.81WR 14. Countries: 4) 1992-6.

8 Jul 1924 Qualifying Rose and the comparatively diminutive (1.26 11.895 14.93 13.81. with victory going to Rose.10 13.18 13.605 Although records show that Pörhöla won the Olympic title. 6.290 14.(B10) 5.83 12.76 14.81 12.255 13. (B2) 3.325. 5. and Coe began with an effort of 14. 7.85/85kg) Houser at both the US Championships. 4. 8. 18 Aug 1920 1. Hartfranft was only fourth after the qualifying round. (B9) 7.21 ? 14. 6. Both Rose and Horgan improved in the final with 14. Countries: 8) Series Rose Horgan Garrels 3 12.0.65 13. Ralph Rose Denis Horgan IRL John Garrels Wesley Coe Edmond Barrett “Bill” Horr Jalmari Sauli Lee Talbott USA GBR USA USA GBR USA FIN USA Qualifying 14. Rose opened up with 14. However.08 x 13. Finalists: 6) Series Pörhölä Niklander Liversedge McDonald Nilsson Qualifying 14. 4.21 and 13. Athens. 27 Apr 1906 1. London.265 (Competitors: 28.375 after the competition.62 Martin Sheridan Mihály Dávid Eric Lemming André Tison Vasilis Papayeoryiou USA HUN SWE FRA GRE 12. when Rose slightly extended his lead with 14.87 13.(A10) 8.08 13. Niklander led the qualifying.53 Hartranft. in 1922. Rose’s 14.15 14. so was no more than co-favourite with the much smaller (1.87 13.81 14. was favourite to beat 1911 US Champion McDonald. 3.34 14.18 Antwerp. (A7) Herman Brix 3.450 14.62 13. (B4) Emil Hirschfeld USA USA GER 15. In wet and slippery conditions Rose led the qualifiers with 14.78/95kg) Wesley Coe.81 12. The Irishman threw 14. Niklander finished four places lower in his fourth Olympic Games. but the top two would have been threatened by Ireland’s Denis Horgan had he been present. with Horgan a long way back with 13. The furthest throw was actually recorded by Verner Järvinen. Finalists: 6) Stockholm.24) that he had produced in practice shortly after arriving in London. (A7) “Bud” Houser Glenn Hartranft Ralph Hills Hannes Torpo Norman Anderson Elmer Niklander “Ville” Pörhölä Bertil Jansson USA USA USA FIN USA FIN FIN SWE 14.13 12.84 2 x x x x 13.21 13. (A2) 4.R I O 166 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C The 19 year-old Ralph Rose had set a world best earlier in the year with 14. only to be overtaken by Coe with 14.995 14. 6.71 5 x x 6 x x Amsterdam.09. 5.400 14. Coe (who had set a world record of 15. “Ville” Pörhölä Elmer Niklander Harry Liversedge Pat McDonald Einar Nilsson Harald Tammer George Bihlman Howard Cann FIN FIN USA USA SWE EST USA USA (Competitors: 20. 3. whereas Pörhöla took just one title.18 13. Finalists: 3) Series McDonald Rose Whitney Niklander Philbrook 1 14.18 Series Mudin Nilsson 2 x 12.13 3 14.81 14. Rose reacted with a word record-equalling put of 14.07 12.87WR 15. (C2) 6.995 14.62 12.81 to the delight of the people present.88/85kg) was a superb athlete.08 Final 14.83 11. 8.34 to take the gold medal.98/107kg) was untested in big competition. The positions remained the same until the first round of the finals. 3. 5.77/108kg) Horgan finally met. but moved up to second in the final three rounds with his 14.62 respectively.09 in the 1905 US Championships) and Horgan.34OR 15. 10 Jul 1912 1. capable of running 100y in 10.45 14.37 13.08 13. 7.33. 4.64. the officials decided that the Finn was throwing rather than putting the shot. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 1 x 12. The relatively small (1. who reached 13. He won the Finnish title no less than 11 times between 1909 and 1924. (A3) 2. Rose threw 14.255. and in Paris. Hills was the only other putter to improve in the final. it was Niklander who was the dominant shot putter in Finland in the first 25 years of the century.87 Final 14.265 14. Feuerbach was an easy third. He then made his winning effort with his final throw. 8. 2. The final qualifier was Garrels. who failed to improve in the final on his effort of 13. 14. In the first round of the final McDonald produced a lifetime best of 15.63 (Competitors: 26.88 in Ireland less than three weeks after the St Louis event.58 11. Countries: 15.64 14. 2. Pörhöla took the lead with his next throw of 14.98 13.915 in round 4.915 14. Countries: 8) In the absence of Rose.35. He topped the world shot list in 1924. the event was a low-quality affair with Sheridan winning by a clear half metre from Dávid. but the young giant (1. 3. Pat McDonald Ralph Rose Lawrence Whitney Elmer Niklander George Philbrook Imré Mudin Einar Nilsson Patrick Quinn USA USA USA FIN USA HUN SWE GBR 15. who had ballooned from 107kg to 127kg since 1904.71 in the same round was his best throw of the finals. Despite throwing further than in 1920.72 .08.29 14. and his lead over McDonald after the qualifying rounds suggested that the “status quo” was being properly maintained.735 13. 2.08 14. 4.50 x 13.55 14. but after a mediocre effort of 13. 16 Jul 1908 1.62 13. consolidating his third place with 14.10 13.40.50 14. a tall rawboned type (1. Countries: 14.25 13.78 15.02 11. 1.00 (Competitors: 17. (Competitors: 22. which was conducted in groups.18. 2.33 13.89 12.52 12. 5. but was outshone by the slightly smaller (1. but was a long way from the puts of 50 feet plus (15.98.65 x 4 15.25 13.75 15. 7.155 x 13. Countries: 10. (B11) John Kuck 2.93 13. Liversedge also moved up in the last round to take bronze from McDonald. who had damaged his hand in practice.500 14. 29 Jul 1928 1.08 14.81/86kg) Whitney exhibited smooth technique in taking the last qualifying place well behind his two countrymen.62 Rose. S P Paris.155 14.01.15 14.325 11.54 14.

7. 7. but Brix placed only fifth in the US Trials behind the consistent Sexton.03 14. Countries: 14. Torrance had a poor day. who edged Torrance and 18 year-old Dmitriy Zaitz.82 x 6 x 16.59 14.56 x x The pre-Olympic list was headed by Herman Brix and Leo Sexton. London.40e 15.64 3 15. (A2) 7.28 15.12 16.31 3 15. well ahead of Rothert and Kuck.21 15.22 Until June. In the Olympic final.16 15.58 2 15. Finalists: 15) Series Kuck Brix Hirschfeld Krenz Wahlstedt Uebler 1 15.37 5 16.75 15.90 14.05 14.05 14.88 15.03 15.98 15.05 15.66 15. Countries: 14.43 15. Los Angeles.14 16.55 16.24).28 15.23 (Competitors: 22.82. and topped the world javelin list in 1926 with 65.12 in the same round.00e 14.02 (Competitors: 20.80 14.50e 15.38 15.80 14. 6.68 3 15.54.03 15.72.46 13.69 14.20e 15.50. 6. He was overtaken by Sexton.61 15. Any of the three Americans could now win.12 1 15. (11) (4) (13) (12) (5) (6) (2) (1) Parry O’Brien Darrow Hooper Jim Fuchs Otto Grigalka RUS Roland Nilsson John Savidge Georgiy Fyodorov Per Stavem GEO USA USA USA URS SWE GBR URS NOR 17. 3. (A8) 5.90/102kg.98 14. but had never again thrown beyond 17.99 14.03 15. Douda’s 15.09 5 16. ahead of Uebler’s 13.66 13.38 15. Finalists: 12) F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 3. the biggest of the three medallists at 1. Woellke opened with 15.87/98kg) German led the other group with 15.78 16. In the final Thompson was the best thrower. and the worst throw from the US men was almost a metre up on the rest of the world.87 – to stun the other two. 8.75 14.99 14.85 In 1934 the huge (1.96.42 15.90e 14.01 13.00 x 15. was considered the principal rival to Hirschfeld.67 16. Leo Sexton Harlow Rothert František Douda CZE Emil Hirschfeld Nelson Gray Hans-Heinrich Sievert Zygmunt Heljasz József Darányi USA USA TCH GER USA GER POL HUN 16. but was only 7cm ahead of Hans Woellke.61 14. 3. while the smaller (1.61. 5. one report mentions 55 feet (16.90/100kg) Brix opened with 15. Charles Fonville (USA) was the best putter in the world with all 13 of the year’s recorded 17m throws. 3 Aug 1948 1.32 14. 4. (B6) Eric Krenz Armas Wahlstedt (Valste) Wilhelm Uebler Harlow Rothert József Darányi R I O 2 0 1 6 USA FIN GER USA HUN 14. which held up as the lead until the penultimate round when Woellke reached 16. 31 Jul 1932 1.39 17.56 15.61 in the first round held up against Hirschfeld’s two 15. The new champion. 2 Aug 1936 1.57 14. 2. Countries: 15.50.77 15.55 (Competitors: 24.60 x 4 16. Fifth place was determined by a throw-off.84 14.47 16.46 15. He topped the preOlympic list with 16.37 x 15.40e 14.92.63 5 15. 6.94 14.80e 15.61 15.90/138kg) Torrance had thrown a world record of 17. Finalists: 13) .20OR 16. won by Wahlstedt.66 14.36 14.00 15. Countries: 11. and won fame and fortune as a film star in the role of “Tarzan”. 4.68 (Competitors: 16.69 14. who finished the year with six of the season’s 10 puts over 16m.42 15.30e 14. 21 Jul 1952 1.32 15.54 x x 6 16. In the event.67 15.00e 13.79 14.68 16.67. Countries: 14. 7.94 2 17. where he had his only loss in 19 competitions that year.69 14.77 and then 15. with just two throws barely beyond 50 feet (15.72 14. and Bärlund countered in the next round with 16. who had three throws beyond the best mark of Francis.09 14.49 14. but he then aggravated an old spinal injury and placed only fourth at the US Trials. while Woellke battled with Sulo Bärlund for gold.80 16.68 14.87 13. 2.80 14.56 15. Finalists: 12) Series Thompson Delaney Fuchs Arvidsson 1 16. 4.68 16.24 15.03.91 14. 2.72 Series Woellke Bärlund Stöck Francis Torrance Zaitz Douda Viiding 2 14. winner of the US Trials with 15. Only Kuck was able to reach 15 metres behind them.56 15. S P Gerhard Stöck Samuel Francis Jack Torrance Dimitri Zaitz František Douda CZE Arnold Viiding 167 GER USA USA USA TCH EST 15.63.20e 15. was an accomplished allround thrower.40.16 3 16.49 15.06 16.35 ★ O L Y M P I C (Competitors: 22.94 before reaching 16m in the last round. 5.02 14.45 15. The best American was Sam Francis.33 15.32 15.05 13. Rothert moved up from seventh in 1928 to take the lead for the first two rounds with 15. Finalists: 10) Series Sexton Rothert Douda Hirschfeld Gray Sievert Heljasz Darányi 1 15. (A1) 6. but his best marks occurred after Amsterdam.14 15.50+ efforts in the final two rounds. The battle between the two principals was rudely interrupted by Kuck in the fifth round. 4.06 16. 13. All three were beaten for bronze by Stöck.90 15. Helsinki.4.19 16. Thompson’s last round throw was a foul in the region of 17. 3.60 15. with the top throw of the three Americans in each round.52 15.56 15.675 15.09 15.34 14. as he produced a world record – 15. He finished with three throws beyond the best of Delaney. Herman Brix. and Fuchs led the qualifiers.45 15. Berlin.07 5 15.58 15.005OR 15.20. Competing in the first qualifying group the muscular (1.96 15.57 x 6 14.52 4 15.69 2 14.(B12) 8.38 13.58 Emil Hirschfeld ended 1928 with 11 of the best 13 marks of the year. Kuck was reputed to have thrown vast distances in practice.67 15. 7. (10) (2) (3) (8) (1) (7) (6) (12) Wilbur Thompson Jim Delaney Jim Fuchs Mieczyslaw Lomowski Gösta Arvidsson Yrjö Lehtilä Jaakko Jouppila Čestmír Kalina CZE USA USA USA POL SWE FIN FIN TCH 17.42 15.10e 15. Brix later changed his name to Bruce Bennett. while Sievert showed his area of strength as a decathlete in taking 6th place – over the next two years he would improve the decathlon world record three times.68 15.67 4 15. Hans Woellke Sulo Bärlund GER FIN 16.99 14.28 16. who threw 15.23 4 15.97 15.41OR 17.37 15.40 14.29 x 14.90 14.74 15.76 16.99 15.20 16.87 15.43 14.22 15.76).20e 14. 5.80 14. 5.78 14.28 15. 8. 6.78 6 15. Fifteen men in all qualified for the final by exceeding 14. while the Finn also threw his best of 16.12 14.12OR 16.72 13.07 14. 8.75. 8.09 15.56 14. 2.09 14.98 15.

52 18. which was good enough for the win.98 15. which 15 athletes did manage to exceed. improved in the last round to 19.57.97 18. while Hungary’s best.67.80 17.63 16. 4. with Hooper the winner. Finalists: 14) Series O’Brien Nieder Skobla Bantum Balyayev Uddebom Wegmann Tsakanikas 1 17.10 to 20. but Skobla countered with 17.47 17.49. so it was clear that this would be a close battle.74 5 18. his best for the day.88 18. while Long slipped into second place with 18. In 20 competitions in 1956 before Melbourne O’Brien averaged 18.09 x 5 19.65 16.19 x 2 19.08 16. 7.77 16. and Nieder felt certain that he could win after a practice put of 20.51. 2.39 19.12 16.44.86 18.64 18. Finalists: 15) 1 18. 6. together with intense weight training and every possible psychological stimulus.41 x x 17.20 19.01 16.17 15. he felt he did not have the power of concentration that O’Brien possessed.62 19. but after third placer Dave Davis suffered a wrist injury and Nieder broke his own world record with 20. Countries: 17. 17 Oct 1964 1.68. 2.92.39 16. (10) (13) (4) (3) (1) (14) (12) (15) Bill Nieder Parry O’Brien Dallas Long Viktor Lipsnis UKR Mike Lindsay Alfred Sosgórnik Dietrich Urbach Martyn Lucking USA USA USA URS GBR POL GER/FRG GBR 19.80 x 17.52 6 x 18. O’Brien also reached his best of the day in the fifth round with 18. 3. with Skobla in second (17. hurling the 16lb ball out to 17.52 18. overcome by nerves.55) and Britain’s massive (2.55 19.43 (Competitors: 24.37 15. O’Brien focused his energies on his first throw.02 earlier in the round.39 19. missed the Games with a broken leg. son of Jaroslav.27 x 16.59 x 16.66 17. Nieder had taken off the bandage on his injured knee for freer movement and pushed the shot out to 18. Fuchs had three fouls. and was expected to vie with Varjú and Komar. 7. 28 Nov 1956 1. The Czech.61 17.80). led by O’Brien with 16.03 ★ O L Y M P I C 6 16.45 16.33 x 16. the third best of all-time.20 19.79 17.34 17. trying too hard to counter injuries to his wrist and ankle.20 18.48 in round 4.96 16.33OR 20.65 16. The qualifying round eliminated the seven athletes who could not reach 14.93 16. O’Brien led the field with what would turn out to be his worst throw – 17.57 18.48 16. Earlier.18 16.88 17.34 16.68.61 16.23 18.43 x 2 18.50 18.87 16.53 17. were favoured to take the three medals.65 17.90 17. secured third place with 17. (3) (13) (12) (10) (7) (8) (5) (14) Parry O’Brien USA Bill Nieder USA Jiří Skobla CZE TCH Ken Bantum USA Boris Balyayev RUS URS Erik Uddebom SWE Karl-Heinz Wegmann GER/FRG Yorgos Tsakanikas GRE 18.68 17.21 Series Nieder O’Brien Long Lipsnis Lindsay Sosgórnik Urbach Lucking 2 18.30 3 19.75. O’Brien made the team for the fourth time. 7. Countries: 10.05 x 16.27 16.43 18.63 in qualifying. Italy’s Meconi.31 4 16. 4. and Zsigmond Nagy (HUN) also failed to qualify.43 17.51 17. O’Brien contented himself with 16.20 18.01 17.67 18.11 to 18.05.88 18.05 16. Lipsnis led the battle behind the Americans with 17. Mindful of the problems of operating from a wet circle.11 16. as 14 men reached the weak qualifying standard of 14.90 17.68OR 19.41 4 20. and was a solid favourite with Randy Matson. who had thrown 61 feet while still aged 17.77. but the qualifying standard was set at 16.84 18.81.01 17.18 17.55 16.82 17.80 17.90 x 16.60 and saw just four athletes with 50 feet efforts.14 5 19.29 x 16.02 3 16.33 20.99/109kg) equally favoured for silver.39 19.41 and a new Olympic record ahead of Hooper’s 17.57 17.31 By 1956 O’Brien had fully developed the technique which would be the model for all throwers in following decades.95 18.08 x 15.86 18.05 x 16.68.00.67 18. However.14 2 17.21 16.65 in the final round.06 16.83 17. 8. This.99 16.52 4 18. Nieder came good with a fifth round throw of 19.06 6 18. with shoulders the size of football pads. outgunned Nieder in the first round of the final. and distances increased as a result.39. The precocious Long. With Fuchs at 16.39 The three Americans.39 x 16. the 19 year-old giant (1.77 19.07. 6. He reached 16.19 x 18.54 16.06.93 in the opening round the medals were settled.39) ahead of the athletic giant (1.65 x 16. Using the circle to its full diameter O’Brien effectively increased the arc that the shot had to travel before leaving the athlete.78 ahead of US College-educated Roland Nilsson (16.93 17. behind Skobla (17.96 16.51 17. took the . the weather began to change as the athletes warmed up.96 15.47 17.61.09). Nieder had placed fourth in the US Trials. Rowe had a nightmare qualifying competition. which he improved upon in the next round to 17.25 x 17.81 17.57 17.33 x x Less than two inches had separated the three Americans at the US Trials. He did so again in the next round 19.78 16. Countries: 14.18 17.06 15. as Nieder got a fair throw of 17.70 x 16. before hitting 17. 5.77 to 18.53 16. all of whom had set world records during the season.23 x 17.92 x 17.34 19.47.32 18.40 17.25 18. 3.01 and stayed in third place.57OR 18.43 4 18.18 Dallas Long broke his own world record four times in 1964. 18.53 19.86 x 18. improving from 20.98/107kg) Bantum. Bantum moved up to 17. made O’Brien the most formidable athlete of his generation. 8. 5.71 3 x x 18.19).77 18.63 16. 2.88 19. Hooper just missed gold with his final effort of 17. Britain’s Arthur Rowe was their biggest threat.76).48 15.56 (Competitors: 14. O’Brien went over 60 feet in the next round with 18.58 16. (7) (6) (13) (9) (11) (1) (3) (12) Dallas Long USA Randy Matson USA Vilmos Varjú HUN Parry O’Brien USA Zsigmond Nagy HUN Nikolay Karasyov RUS URS Les Mills NZL Adolfas Varanauskas LTU URS 20. 3. who had won the heavyweight title in weightlifting in 1932. In the final.63 17.37 17. though Grigalka showed good competitive qualities in reaching 16.11 18.41 17.24 16. Tokyo. 5.19 2 0 1 6 5 17. O’Brien.98 6 x 19.47 17.26 18.18.50 x 18. 31 Aug 1960 1. Finalists: 13) Series Long Matson Varjú O’Brien Nagy Karasyov Mills Varanauskas 1 19. chasing his third consecutive gold. 8.61 18. the Melbourne silver medallist was given Davis’s spot. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S S P Rome. ahead of Britain’s Mike Lindsay (17.29 18. Vilmos Varjú.11 19. The relationship between Nieder and the intense O’Brien was little short of vitriolic. In the final.62 x 17. 4. and Nieder (16.00/110kg) marine John Savidge (16.88.91 16.56 3 18. Melbourne.28 17. Long.39 17. a distance no other putter had ever reached.90 x 18.90. 6.02 16.41 (Competitors: 22.R I O 168 Series O’Brien Hooper Fuchs Grigalka Nilsson Savidge Fyodorov Stavem 1 17. However.

07 2 20.78. 5.27 20.54 x 20. Matson actually placed third in the US Trials. as Beyer moved from fifth to first with 21.10 20.14 in the fourth round. with the gargantuan (1. and was followed by Oldfield with 20. Komar disappointed.43 18. All told.88 to take the lead in the third round.77 19. (14) (11) (6) (13) (10) (7) (15) (9) Władysław Komar George Woods Hartmut Briesenick Hans-Peter Gies Al Feuerbach Brian Oldfield Heinfried Birlenbach Vilmos Varjú POL USA GDR GDR USA USA FRG HUN 21.05 21.63 x 19.20 18.58 20.00 20. The Russian responded to Feuerbach’s second round 20.06 x 20.00 20.20 19.41 19. 8. 24 Jul 1976 20.46 18.45 20.23. The favourite was defending champion Beyer.12 20.86 21.86 x 19. and another Olympic medal. Komar then produced a Polish record 21. Countries: 17.83 20.11 20.43 18. (4) (8) (6) (5) (3) (2) (10) (12) Vladimir Kiselyov UKR URS Aleksandr Baryshnikov RUS URS Udo Beyer GDR Reijo Ståhlberg FIN Geoff Capes GBR Hans-Jürgen Jacobi GDR Jaromír Vlk CZE TCH Vladimir Milić CRO YUG 21. 20. before the athleticlooking Gies (1.43 19.17 2 20.15 x 17. 1.08 20. (1) (4) (2) (3) (7) (9) (8) (6) Randy Matson George Woods Eduard Gushchin RUS Dieter Hoffmann Dave Maggard Władysław Komar Uwe Grabe Heinfried Birlenbach USA USA URS GDR USA POL GDR FRG Montreal.01 20.54 20.65 This was expected to be a duel between the USA and GDR. 3.14 21. 7. Countries: 19.14.13 19.09 x 19.61 to Varjú’s 19.18OR 21.21 19.13 20.82 19. After the excitement of the first round.24 20. to be followed by Woods. Finalists: 12) Series Matson Woods Gushchin Hoffmann Maggard Komar Grabe Birlenbach 1 20.24 20. leaving the the highly-regarded Americans and Capes well behind.90 20.02 19.13 5 20.91 21.17 20.88/136kg) Woods the slight favourite. 2. 3.37 20.32 20. Finalists: 12) Series Beyer Mironov Baryshnikov Feuerbach Gies Capes Woods Höglund 1 20.90.80 20. Countries: 14.47 20. Briesenick then took second place on countback by throwing 21.06 20.50 20.17 21. 4.01 20.29 20. Moscow. but was measured at 21.74 18.55 20.18. The main action occurred in round 4 as Matson set a world junior best of 20.50 in the fourth round with 21. and led the final from round 1 with 20. 2. (3) (10) (6) (12) (8) (5) (7) (11) Udo Beyer GDR Yevgeniy Mironov RUS URS Aleksandr Baryshnikov RUS URS Al Feuerbach USA Hans-Peter Gies GDR Geoff Capes GBR George Woods USA Hans Höglund SWE 21.50 20. while Beyer. the world had begun to catch up and the number of 20m throwers increasing from two in 1967 to seven in Olympic year. 9 Sep 1972 1.06 6 21.39) and O’Brien (19.34 x Matson.33.36 20. With five efforts beyond 20m Matson was clearly the best thrower in the event. The stocky (1.18 accompanied by an enormous roar to take the lead. 5.17 (Competitors: 23.98 19. Feuerbach became the fifth man to beat 21m in round 5.91 x 19. He opened with a qualifying effort of 20.48 3 18.67 20.26 20. and all of the top five attained their best throws in round 1. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S S P 169 21m efforts in the next two rounds.08. which would prove enough to win.85 20.00.01 x The principal absentees caused by the boycott were Ralf Reichenbach (FRG) and Brian Oldfield (USA).70 x x x x x 3 21.55 20. It hit Komar’s marker before reaching the ground.84 20. 8.47 20.90 x 17. 4.17.19 20. 2.35 x x 20.12 20.17 20. only surpassed .67 6 x 21.55 20.03.31 x x 6 20. Baryshnikov rotated to 21.09 20.45 20.20) had their best throws of the day.74 19.14 21.80 19.15 20.36 20.19 x 19. The tension of the occasion reduced the expected distances.61 5 21.14 20.37 20.14 20. who would almost certainly have been medal contenders. By 1968.74 21. 7.60 x x 3 20.03 x 4 20.88 20.53.71 21.62 x 5 x x x 20.45 19.85 19.54 20.28 19.35OR 21.17 21.80 2 20.08 21.03 20.03 21.86 20.00 19.89 x 5 20.96 20.49 20. 14 Oct 1968 1.54 19.97 21.03 20.82 20.02 21.15 x x 19. bettered the world record five times in the years 1965-67.67 6 20.28 18.58 19.69 x 19.21 20. 7.55 20.67 x 19.87/120kg) but quick Kiselyov took the lead from Geoff Capes’s 20. but was still a universal choice to win in Mexico. 8.55 with 21. He launched the shot to an Olympic record of 21. who had been the undisputed number one thrower in the world for three years. 30 Jul 1980 Munich. Matson’s Olympic record was beaten 20 times by the top six.05! The explanation was that Komar’s marker was not in the right place. and won gold with the first throw of the final.05 20.03 18.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C lead immediately with 19.00 20. so one felt it would have been further than 21.94/105kg) blasted the shot out to 21. 3.62 20.13 x 19.97. improving Long’s mark by more than a metre to 21.53 19. Finalists: 18) Series Komar Woods Briesenick Gies Feuerbach Oldfield Birlenbach Varjú 1 21.32 20.00.06 20. Round 5 changed the picture.50 19.10 3 20.87 x x 4 20.18 20.66 21. Mexico City. 2.39 20.85 4 x 20.21 18. 6. to which Long replied with 20.50 20. 3.69 4 21.05.10.80 (Competitors: 19. in the second round.09 20. and Mironov powered a throw out to 21. and Woods then came up for his last throw.38 19. 5. probably the finest talent the event has seen.00 20.68 to break the Olympic record.32 20.87 x Baryshnikov had set the first world record with the rotational technique earlier in the month. 6. who looked curiously flat. 4.47 19.26 19.07 20.32 20.00 19.69 19.20.66 18.61 x 21.28 20. 6. 8. 5.18 x 19.10 (Competitors: 29. while Matson got beyond 19m in round 2 and improved to 19.85 and Feuerbach on 20. Finalists: 12) Series Kiselyov Baryshnikov Beyer Ståhlberg Capes Jacobi Vlk Milić 1 21.01 x 20. Briesenick became the first to put further than 20m with 20.23 20.54.20 in ninth place.00 20.33 19.20 19.68 18.38 20. 22.75 18.05 21. It was in that round when both Varjú (19.98 20.20 x 19.91 20.10 2 x 20.33 19.97 20.13 20. only Briesenick and Gies had 1.66 18. 4.32 in the qualifying round. with only 18.14 21. 6. 7. who overcame his nerves to push the ball out to a tantalisingly close 21.07 (Competitors: 16.54 19.10 20. helping the shot on its way with a leonine roar. Countries: 11.

8.28 19.96 20. both improved – Timmermann to fifth with 20. all three medallists had been banned for drug use before 1992.28.35 x - 5 20.26 21.27. 2. (2) (4) (7) (6) (8) (10) (9) (1) Randy Barnes John Godina Aleksandr Bagach Paolo Dal Soglio Oliver-Sven Buder Roman Virastyuk C.47 22.91 in the final round.58 20.61 21. 2.70 20. 4.11 x x The USA were expected to sweep the medals ahead of Andrei and Günthör.74 20.72 21.19 19. 6.82 in the fifth round.49.16 x 21.26 20.97 in round 6. Udo Beyer moved into third with 21.69 18.26 x This was possibly the best shot competition ever.94 20. Of the non-medallists only Ståhlberg improved in the second half.01/127kg) Augie Wolf reached 20. 2. John Godina . with 20. Stulce. the East German stamped his authority on the event with a massive 22. For the American crowd Michael Carter was the best known. Timmermann came up for the last throw of the competition.97 20.25 x 6 21. 7.29 19.70 20.47 and his fourteenth win of an unbeaten season.98 19.00 in the fourth round.96 20.10 19.36 4 21.48 20. 2.90 20.79 x 20. Barnes threw 22. 3.35 20.21 x x 5 20.88 19.47OR 22.75 20.“I decided to get reckless.32 20. 4. then Barnes was that thrower.26 x x 3 21. but remained in fourth place.91 20. and Günthör one place higher with 20.79 20.81 19. Finalists: 12) Series Andrei Carter Laut Wolf Günthör Montelatici Tallhem de Bruin F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 22.93 19. Countries: 17. Finalists: 12) Series Stulce Doehring Lykho Günthör Timmermann Bodenmüller Perić Klimenko 1 21. a constant source of great throwers (Hooper.09 20.30 20.70 x 19.92 20. smoothly opened with a personal best of 21. Atlanta.99 and 22.39.38 20. Carter led the first round with 20. 8.12 20. 8.38 20.17 x 3 22. with 21.65 1 20.89 20. who led the rest with 20. Timmermann.75 x 19.08 19.91 in June.03 20.38 19. the fifth Olympic record of the competition. 23 Sep 1988 1. Günthör was fifth after three rounds.11 2 21.16. After Günthör reached an Olympic record 21.36 x S P round. 26 Jul 1996 1. the athletic-looking putter from Texas A&M.70 and Timmermann increased his lead with 22.74 20.31 20. These two were well ahead of the physically awesome Günthör (2.74 20.42 20.37 20.03 20. 3. 8.32 20.93 x 5 22.97 20.40 20.02.62 x 20.09 x 19. Hunter Dragan Perić SRB USA USA UKR ITA GER UKR USA YUG 21.39 20.14 Günthör was the favourite.40.09 19. 3.31 20.97 20. He improved to a more respectable 20.31. Barcelona.01 20.99 21.71 x 20.93 two throws later. rather than for his prowess as a shot putter. (3) (10) (5) (9) (11) (7) (4) (2) Alessandro Andrei Michael Carter Dave Laut Augie Wolf Werner Günthör Marco Montelatici Sören Tallhem Erik de Bruin ITA USA USA USA SUI ITA SWE NED 21.12 20. having got lost in the city. when the pre-meet favourite Dave Laut spun a throw out to 20. before being passed by Andrei. Countries: 13. with reigning champion Timmermann seventh. having thrown 21. 5.02 20. and one of the greatest Olympic battles in history.12 20.23 (Competitors: 26.82 20. Barnes spun the 16 pound ball out to 21.58. 3. It transpired that Beyer had injured his back at the start of the final. but the Swiss only just made it to the stadium in time for the competition. and then 21.01 21.94 20. 5.49. as only squat (1. Günthör and Timmermann improved further in the penultimate round with 21. ” he said. 5.63 20.85 x x 6 20.35 20. his third personal best of the day. 7.45 x 20.98 20. Matson.82 20.26 21.46 x 20.17 21.66 2 20.50 20.36 20.03 20.35 with his final throw to beat Baryshnikov’s Olympic record. Barnes now had one chance left.91/118kg) but not gigantic putter with a smooth glide technique.92 x 20. Günthör.45 in the first round of the final.91 20.09. (9) (7) (12) (8) (1) (5) (10) (4) Mike Stulce Jim Doehring Vyacheslav Lykho RUS Werner Günthör Ulf Timmermann Klaus Bodenmüller Dragan Perić YUG/SRB Aleksandr Klimenko UKR USA USA EUN SUI GER AUT IOP EUN 21. 6. J.03 20. Dismayingly.99 x 20. 31 Jul 1992 (Competitors: 19.98 4 20.07 Two weeks before Atlanta. 7.86 20. Finalists: 12) Series Timmermann Barnes Günthör Beyer Machura Weil Andrei Smirnov 1 22. He powered the shot out to 22. Just 34cm separated first from sixth until the last round.92 19. The Italian improved further in round 3 to 21.60 20. 4. Laut needed this as big (2.09 20. The Swiss held third until round 5.31 in round 4.23 3 x x 20.31 19.17 x 20. the athletic (1.39 19. then threw 21.74 x 19.38 20.46 19.39 21.75 3 x 19.41 20.63.51 20. ” he said later.R I O 170 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C 21m in the third round. a solid (1. This was because he was expected to join the San Francisco 49ers football team after the Games.41 x 19.28 19.90 21.99 21.12 20. 6.13 x x 2 21.54 x 4 20.49 20. 4.36 20.07 (Competitors: 36. 6.26.36 (Competitors: 21.65 19.39 20. Barnes).40 in the second 1. finally reaching 21. His throw flew out to 22.32 20.11 20.40 20.32 20.59 x 4 21.84 20.38 19.83/120kg) Doehring and Lykho could approach 21m. 11 Aug 1984 1. Los Angeles.92 20.96 20.55 20. Countries: 24.81 19.00/115kg).39 21.29 21.48 19.64 x 20. recovering from a back injury.16 x 20.16 19.31 20. with Carter countering each time – 20. “I could make my place in Olympic history.94/108kg) GDR thrower was favourite to win ahead of World Champion Günthör.04 20.72.65 2 20. Countries: 18.93 20.91 20. 7.81 x x 6 x 20.62 20.13 20.27 19. Timmermann led the qualifiers with 21. with Randy Barnes lagging behind the top three at 20. (11) (7) (6) (9) (8) (2) (5) (3) Ulf Timmermann GDR Randy Barnes USA Werner Günthör SUI Udo Beyer GDR Remigius Machura CZE TCH Gert Weil CHI Alessandro Andrei ITA Sergey Smirnov RUS URS 22.23 19.93 20. 5.21 20.45 20.91 x 19.85 20.71 20.49 19. the best throw in the world since 1990. Finalists: 12) Series Barnes Godina Bagach Dal Soglio Buder Virastyuk Hunter Perić 1 19. and if any thrower could be said to be favourite in a fairly even field.44 19.69 and then 21.51 20. Carter went on to win three Superbowl winners’ rings with the San Francisco 49ers.29 respectively.49 20.45 20.07 x 5 21.98 20.29 20.99 19.39 19. Stulce continued to be the most impressive.79 20.57 20. Only Kiselyov reached 21m in the second half of the final. Stulce then improved to 21.98 19.59 21.22 19.57 20.70 in the fifth round.06 20. Seoul.41 20.

3.19. 7. 5.34 20. finishing off with a marginal foul of 21.51 21. Olsen threw 21.00 x x 21. 6.20 in round 1 of the final.93 The favourites were the Americans. Nelson improved slightly in round 3 with 21. Barnes had produced a superb last round throw in 1988. 2. Belonog.04.04) Olympic Shot Put Champion.41 20.98 20.51 20. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S S P 171 Only eight of the 24 throws in the second half of the competition were valid.71 x 20. Majewski (20.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C reached 20.80) led from Cantwell (20. 5. Countries: 27. 2004.19 (Competitors: 39. to which Godina had no answer. the Belarusian was banned for life in 2013.55 19. and Nelson fouling out.05. Having previously been suspended in 2001-2003.81 19.79 in the fifth round to get ahead of Paolo Dal Soglio’s 20.16 20.11 x x x x 4 x x 20. responded with his own 21. Olsen Manuel Martínez Andrey Mikhnevich Yuriy Belov Justin Anlezark Ralf Bartels John Godina USA DEN ESP BLR BLR AUS GER USA 21. Nelson fouled five of his throws.60 x x x 6 x x x x 19. but was immediately upstaged by Harju’s 21. which saw only six men reach the standard of 20.21 20.22 20.38 x 5 x 20. 18 Aug 2004 1.88 x 20. 3 Aug 2012 1.87 20. when big (1.09 21. had moved into first on countback with his 21..31 20.60 20. with Adam Nelson next at 20. Harju showed this was no fluke with 21. So the first Olympic competition at Olympia for 1621 years began with the morning qualifying round. Olympia. Barnes. who had thrown 22.87 19. 4.86 x 20. 3. Belonog and Godina duplicated their efforts of the first round. Countries: 33.15 x 19.29. The only other 21m throw came in the final round.80 20.06 x 6 x x x 20.64 5 20.42 20. Adam Nelson. with Hoffa reaching only 20. who threw a lifetime best of 21. The intense Nelson began the final with 21.20 20.40.48 20. who had been languishing in sixth place boomed a final throw of 21.18 3 20. to be threatened shortly after by the surprising Armstrong’s 21. Finalists: 12) Series Majewski Cantwell Armstrong Lyzhin Belonog Hoffa Sofin Smith Mikhnevich 1 20.31 x 20.42 20. 8. 6. 3.21.21 21.74. but Mikhnevich took the lead at the start of the second round with 21. 4.62.07 20. and Godina moved up to 21.18 (Competitors: 37. 2. led by World Champion Hoffa. No other throwers managed beyond 21 metres.57 19.” Beijing.92 20.07 5 x x 20. 4. More significantly. which was threatened by Belonog’s 21. That’s something I can never replace. 7. but it was another five months before the IOC officially confirmed the re-allocation of medals to three legitimate recipients.32 x Double World Champion John Godina led the A pool of qualifiers having been substituted for the disqualified reigning World Champion CJ Hunter.98 20.29 21. Majewski showed himself to be a fine big-time competitor as well as being the tallest-ever (2.84 19.04 20.67 earlier in the year. good enough for only ninth place.81 x x 21. 15 Aug 2008 1. all his results from August 2005 were annulled. 22 Sep 2000 1. The qualifiers were led by Majewski. 7. Much to his frustration.16.37 20.53 20.07 20.47 20. and in 2014 the IOC confirmed the corresponding Beijing Olympic medal upgrade. London.” said the American. 8.98/145kg) Cantwell reached 21. “The downside of this is I feel like our country was robbed of a medal at the relevant time. but managed only 19. and after a drug suspension had returned to to do the same in 1996. in February 2015! An IAAF re-test of the doping sample of Mikhnevich from August 2005 had shown the presence of multiple banned substances.30.39 20.89 21. 5. 2.15 2 x 20. Sydney.51 20. For more than eight years the result remained the closest in Olympic throws history.26 x 21. a situation brought about by athletes trying too hard.78 20.20 20.41 (Competitors: 44.63 x 20.70 20.16 21.88 x 20.97 21.16 The Greek organisers decided to hold the shot at Olympia.00 two weeks prior to the Games.05 3 21.07 to move into third ahead of Martínez. The Ukrainian was stripped of his gold medal and title immediately.41 20.23 .73 2 20.87 20. and then set his third lifetime best of the day with 21.53.40 20. to focus attention on the event and use the ancient Olympic venue two days before the start of the main programme of athletics. and then in December 2012 the Executive Board of the IOC agreed that Belonog had committed an anti-doping rule violation.53 x 20.04.84 20. “One of the biggest parts of an Olympic career is when you hear your anthem and see your flag when you stand on that podium.86 21. Finalists: 12) Series Nelson Olsen Martínez Mikhnevich Belov Anlezark Bartels Godina Belonog 1 21.69 20. (3) (9) (6) Tomasz Majewski David Storl Reese Hoffa POL GER USA 21. A prohibited substance had been found in a re-analysis of a sample collected on August 18.20 19.51.20. Finalists: 12) 1 21. the favourite.20 20.70 19.34 20. (6) (11) (3) (5) (2) (4) (7) (9) Adam Nelson Joachim B. The other group was headed surprisingly by Arsi Harju’s lifetime best of 21.15 later in the round.09 x x x x x 20.72 20.45 19.07 4 x 20.78 x x x 20.09.31 x x 6 20. Countries: 28. Nelson became the rightful Olympic Champion.98 20.16 x 19.89 Series Harju Nelson Godina Bloom Belonog Martínez Roberts Buder 2 21.30 x 4 21.19 21.73) at the end of the first round of the final.98 21. (11) (9) (12) (8) (4) (5) (10) (3) Tomasz Majewski Christian Cantwell Dylan Armstrong Pavel Lyzhin Yuriy Belonog Reese Hoffa Pavel Sofin Rutger Smith POL USA CAN BLR UKR USA RUS NED 21. Cantwell’s last-round effort pushed Armstrong out of the medals.33 x x x 21.40 x 20.53 x 20.39.47 20.. who had thrown 21. 2.55 20. 6. 3.25 20.63 20.89 18. and the American then put 20. Majewski eased into the lead in round three with 21.62 20.26 20.53 20.21 20.84 20.40.50 18.43 19.21 20.84 20.04 20.77 21. throwing immediately before Nelson.33 20.29 21. (10) (2) (9) (8) (6) (4) (5) (11) Arsi Harju Adam Nelson John Godina Andy Bloom Yuriy Belonog Manuel Martínez Janus Robberts Oliver-Sven Buder FIN USA USA USA UKR ESP RSA GER 21.32 20. and Athens fifth-placer Mikhnevich.57 20.20 in the 5th round.07 20.49 x x 20. 8. but the Canadian did eventually receive a bronze medal .15 3 x 21. The biggest surprise was the failure of Reese Hoffa (USA).56.16.78 20.44 21.47 20.21. The other American throwers disappointed.46 20. while Godina fouled an effort of around 21m.

5. 197223Q Udo Beyer GDR/GER 1976-1. Many of the throwers found their best casts going into the under- . 5. 1924-6 1912-16.86 in the second round. showed why he was so highly-rated with an opening throw of 21.64 and missed the cut for the top eight.11 x x 20.16 20. Storl had improved to 21. 200819Q Andrei Mikhnevich BLR 2000-9.23 20. 6. Majewski showed what a fine competitor he is with a final throw of 21. Countries: 8) This is the only throwing event in Olympic history where trees and accuracy played a major part in deciding the competition. Panayiotis Paraskevopoulos 3.84 x x 4 x x 21.71 x 3 21.74 x 20.53 x 20.69 2 21.87 21.72 x 19. Robert Garrett 2. so the regulation 2kg discus seemed easy to throw in comparison. all world bests with the 2kg event in its infancy. 2. Countries: 6) Garrett had practised in the USA with an implement weighing some 20 pounds (9kg). 1980-3. just edging out Paraskevopoulos. 1924-9. 3. 1988-6. 200432Q Manuel Martínez ESP 1996-15Q. 1964-7.19 21. Countries: 35.72 in the second round. D T 4 28 5 27 6 1 26 7 1 1 1 1 1 26 8 2 2 1 25 1 3 4 2 1 3 2 1 3 3 1 1 5 1 1 2 4 4 0 8 54 52 3 108 Breakdown of URS/EUN placings: RUS 2 3 UKR 1 1 BLR 1 LTU Totals 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 1 0 0 6 42 14 5 1 62 Breakdown GBR IRL Totals of GBR placings: 1 1 - - 2 1 3 2 2 - 2 2 0 1 1 16 11 27 Breakdown CRO SRB Totals of YUG placings: - - - - - 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 1 1 2 GDR 2 2 FRG Totals 3 1 4 M Points 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 1 84 991 MEN’S SHOT PUT The Best on Points 28 Parry O’Brien USA 23 Ralph Rose USA 19 Udo Beyer GDR 1952-1.95 20.19 x x x Hoffa led the qualifying with 21. 1920-12.34 20.19 20. 7. 1956-1. =8. 1988-4 Most Finals 4 O’Brien 3 12 men Most Appearances 4 Elmer Niklander FIN Raoul Paoli FRA O’Brien Les Mills NZL 1908-AC.60 34.17.40 20.25 34.51.93 20.93 5 21.30 33.95) and Armstrong (20. 1988-4. Majewski responded with 21.89.93 20. 2012-dq/Q Placing Table G USA 18 GER 3 URS/EUN 1 FIN 2 POL 3 HUN SWE GBR GRE TCH (CZE) ITA 1 UKR SUI BLR DEN CAN ESP FRA EST ARG AUS AUT - S 19 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 - B 12 4 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 - 4 11 4 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 - 5 7 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 - 6 5 3 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 5 5 1 3 1 1 2 2 1 - 8 4 2 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 - M Points 49 461 8 108 6 62 4 61 3 37 2 30 1 30 1 27 2 22 2 21 1 18 1 17 1 15 0 15 1 12 1 10 1 9 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 Discus Throw Athens. 6. 1980-3. the World and European Champion.36.71 20. 1912-4.R I O 172 4.54 19.84 20.82 20.15OR 28. 6 Apr 1896 1. Sotirios Versis 4. 1992-13Q. The event was held in the Bois de Boulogne with the throwing area lined by trees. 2004-4. continued Placing Table S B G CHI NZL RSA RUS SRB IOP (YUG/SRB) YUG NED NOR Totals 28 28 28 (Competitors: 40. George Robertson Positions after 4th not known: Louis Adler Yorgos Papasideris Henrik Sjöberg USA GRE GRE GBR 29. 28.65 20.20 FRA GRE SWE (Competitors: 9.21 19. who had successively thrown 28.84 20.69 Men’s Shot Put. 2008-dq/Final. and 28. S P .50 32. Finalists: 12) Series Majewski Storl Hoffa Armstrong Cantwell Lauro Kolašinac Lyzhin 1 21.23. (1) (2) (4) (7) (11) Christian Cantwell Dylan Armstrong Germán Lauro Asmir Kolašinac Pavel Lyzhin 2 0 1 6 USA CAN ARG SRB BLR ★ O L Y M P I C 21.72 21. 1964-4 1904-1.955 27.04OR 35. 2004-4.18 20. His 21.93) with his third throw of 21. Paris.98 20. 1920-2.04 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 21. while Soslan Tsirikhov of Russia had the galling experience of throwing the longest ever non-qualifying mark of 20. 2000-6. 1908-1.89 x x 20. 7. 1928-18 1960-11.65 20.34 21. while World Indoor Champion Whiting threw only 20.955.95 20.46 20. With the heritage of the event very much rooted in ancient Greece. this was a particularly difficult loss for the host country to accept.50 (Competitors: 16.78 25.86 20. 1992-19Q Gert Weil CHI 1984-10. 1912-2 1976-1.04 33. although he was a certain winner by then. and in defence of his Olympic crown pumped one out to 21. 1968-11. 1996-8.07 32. but his form deserted him in the second half of the competition as he tried to get ahead of the Pole. 4.65 33. Hoffa – at last doing himself justice at the Olympics – drew clear of Cantwell (20. Rudolf Bauer František Janda-Suk Richard Sheldon Panayiotis Paraskevopoulos Rezsö Crettier Gustaf Söderström John Flanagan Eric Lemming Charles Winckler HUN BOH USA GRE HUN SWE USA SWE DEN 36. 8.88. 2000-16Q. Storl.87 in round 3.46 21. 15 Jul 1900 1. 1960-2. 199622Q Dragan Perić IOP/YUG/SCG (SRB) 1992-7.84 in the final.89 was the third longest of his career and his best in three years. Nevertheless the American only won with his fifth throw.

21OR 42. held in 3 sections) As in the shot Hartranft topped the world rankings. A remarkable athlete.44 just edging out Verner Järvinen. Yeorgantas.68 36. 7. All the top marks came in the qualifying stage on the afternoon of August 21.16 46.13 41.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C growth. Niklander threw a fraction under half a metre more than Taipale in the preliminary rounds.130 40. Armas Taipale Richard Byrd James Duncan Elmer Niklander Hans Tronner Arlie Mucks George Philbrook Emil Magnusson FIN USA USA FIN AUT USA USA SWE 45. St.42 43.(B12) 8.58 in the qualifying. and that on his third attempt. 5. world record holder at 43.09 41. the greatest discus thrower of the day.75. 8. (C7) 6. Finalists: 6) World record holder Taipale (48. “was as nearly perfect to the style of discus throwers of old as could be looked for. Countries: 2) Series Sheridan F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 ? Sheridan had won the US title from Mitchel in June and was slight favourite to win.48 41. 16 Jul 1908 1. 3. 4.63 were the top candidates.875 39.61 42.52 38. after Niklander had won the previous 10 championships. 5.190 42.92 39. Taipale was capable of throwing 44m with either arm.(C16) 2. The athletic (1.06 36. (A6) 4.46OR 38. was an easy winner. 12 Jul 1912 1. (A1) “Bud” Houser Vilho Niittymaa Thomas Lieb August Pope Ketil Askildt Glenn Hartranft Elmer Niklander Heikki Malmivirta USA FIN USA USA NOR USA FIN FIN 46.28 42. Qualifying 1. Of the top throwers only two improved in the finals – Janda-Suk from 35. 13 Jul 1924 (Juraj Luntzer) (Competitors: 41.82 35. Finalists: 3) Series Taipale Byrd Duncan Niklander Tronner Mucks Philbrook Magnusson (Competitors: 6. but was headed by Giffin 40.91.19 42. 8. though Rose.160 (Competitors: 32. 4.96 to Rose’s 36.90/88kg) by today’s throwing standards. it was the Greek.58 some seven weeks before the Games.81/81kg) Sheridan was the only one of the three finalists to improve. particularly after his shot win. to edge Finland’s Elmer Niklander out of the final.49 42. although Sheldon’s throw was the longest on the finals day. The sculpted physique (1.09 39.10 to 34. (C3) 3. 2. who threw a world record of 47. 1 36.23 5 x x x 6 45. who won the most plaudits.28 37. As the athletes warmed up. though on this occasion Lieb was a slight favourite having won the US Trials (with . as recounted by Charles Lucas. After a poor opening throw. which were won by Dearborn. He was a man of small stature (1.70 39. Martin Sheridan Merritt Giffin “Bill” Horr Verner Järvinen Arthur Dearborn Lee Talbott György Luntzer André Tison USA USA USA FIN USA USA HUN FRA 40.685 44. 2.14 2 ? 3 ? 4 38. 5. 2.89 for the win. Bill Horr was third with 39.410 38.42 38. while only Zallhagen improved in the final. Countries: 9) ∆ Sheridan.07 40. Taipale threw 42m.420 43.950 44.25.190 (Competitors: 16.(B10) 7. but neither changed any of the placings. Taipale produced a throw good enough to win the gold medal.32 42.40 38. 5. Paris.24 x 40. Zallhagen (45. 3.28OR 39. 3. None of the three Americans had been a winner in the selection meetings for the Olympic team.54 x 39.62 34.84 37. (B3) 5.69.70 to 40. 3.81 (Competitors: 21.875 39. 6. Countries: 11. reaching 40.24 40. 2.91 2 43. Armas Taipale – a lanky (1.28 x x 40. 3 Sep 1904 1.” The Greek managed 37.83 44. 7.830 44.21.93 x x 3 x x x x 41. with the final taking place at 10:00 the following day.81/85kg) and classic style of throwing from the standing position without “making two turns and twisting his body in all shapes”.93 40. 6.93/90kg) type who towered over his American opposition – stepped into the breach.34 38. Another Finn.44 39. 22 Aug 1920 Athens. 7. Burroughs and Ralph Rose. Countries: 15. and the only “throw-off” in Olympic history then took place.30 Qualifying (21 Aug) 1. However. Antwerp.09 41.32 42.04 to 35. 6. Louis.60. 2. 6.91 42. Countries: 8.405 42. The two top Americans were tied with 39. and Sheldon from 34. with Sheridan winning 38.92 x 4 44.91 (Competitors: 41. and was barely threatened in the finals.09 41. and his margin of victory was the greatest ever in the event.27 in 1913) had won Finnish titles in 1919 and 1920.97 40.28 D T 173 Stockholm. Countries: 18.95 44.160 40.405 42. London. Elmer Niklander Armas Taipale August Pope Oscar Zallhagen William Bartlett Allan Eriksson Valther Jensen “Ville” Pörhölä FIN FIN USA SWE USA SWE DEN FIN 44. 8.685 44.28.230 38. was favourite to win.77 in 1916) and Pope. but was a good enough athlete to win a medal in the 1908 standing long jump and place ninth in the triple jump. on the day Duncan could only reach 42. with a supporting throw of 41. Martin Sheridan Nikolaos Yeorgantas Verner Järvinen Eric Lemming André Tison USA GRE FIN SWE FRA 41. 4.21 x x The favourite was James Duncan.41 44. Finalists: 3) Sheridan.155OR 44. 4. 43. almost 3m ahead of the field.28. with Robert Garrett (three fouls) most notably affected. They. 25 Apr 1906 1. and then twice improved in the finals.155 44.10 5 39.02. Martin Sheridan Ralph Rose Nikolaos Yeorgantas John Flanagan John Biller James Mitchel USA USA GRE USA USA USA 39. 4.15 1 37. probably the most famous father in Finnish athletics history. 5. was clearly a threat.68 which was good enough for third place.34 41.89 40. 3. winner of the US Trials with 44. ending up with 45.

becoming the first man to make 50m throws commonplace.50 42e 44. as he registered no valid throw until his third round winning 47.65 48. Los Angeles. who was also an international 110m hurdler. Countries: 17. in round 4.07 x x 6 47.72 46.53 49.72 with four of his throws beyond LaBorde’s best of 48.48 x x 48. and placed fourth behind his chunky (1. 8.59 6 47. the worst piece of officiating in the 1932 Olympics took place in the discus. Amsterdam. 3.78 47.18 x Just eight throwers reached the qualifying mark of 46. which indicated Anderson’s leading throw. 2. 5.25 (Competitors: 18. After Syllas of Greece led the first round of the final with a modest 47.78 48.00. 3. Hartranft only made the final six by 7cm.75 47. 8.07 40.32. the Frenchman hurled the discus out beyond the flag marking 49. 4.65 47.09 x 5 50.74 47. other than Hartranft’s best. Kivi improved to a personal best of 47. with Consolini topping the list with 51.17 41.15 47. Houser.R I O 174 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C 46.80 43e 40e Concentrating on the discus and leaving the shot.50 43.77 4 x 50. 5. Finalists: 13) Series Carpenter Dunn Oberweger Sørlie Schröder Syllas Bergh Hedvall 1 x x 46. 6. The only thrower to improve in the second half was Carpenter with his winning throw of 50.58 47.32 45.77 47. but was never a factor for a medal.80 44.34 47.82 44. throwing no more than 39.50e 47.02) teammate Ernst Paulus – third ranked prior to Amsterdam – missed sixth place by 2cm with 44.21 47.22 44.51 42.45 45. 5 Aug 1936 1. At the halfway stage Carpenter was third after overtaking Sørlie’s 48.65 a week after the Games. The winner’s six throws averaged 48.21 48.28 47. Dunn threw 49.79 45.66 47.11 50. Houser led the qualifiers.23 46.36 49. 3.45 46.39.50 5 48.75 44.36 in the next stanza. 7. (C1) 7.77 with 48. who had become world record holder in 1926 with 48. and Henri LaBorde. The efficacy was clear when. and missed seeing Noël’s throw.87 48.15.83 4 x 47.19 46. Countries: 11) Series Anderson LaBorde Winter Noël Donogán Madarász Kotkas Jessup 1 47.23 in the third round. (B6) 4. 2 Aug 1948 1.62 39. however.10 45.21 47.19.07 47. 6.77 a week before the Games. The principals were the large Americans Gordon Dunn (1.10.50 43. but could not repeat the effort. London.(C10) 6. Until then.74 6 50. 7. with Houser again having the “right stuff “when it mattered.56) and Gordien (48.32 43.47 42.39 48.50 5 46.32OR 47.79. Taipale threw 47. All the top throws.72 48.17 44.87 43.20 3 47.67 47.85 x 39.00 6 43e 42e 47. Schröder. while Corson had his best throw in the last round.87 45. Both Niklander and Taipale.85 46.15 4 45e 46e 45.86 x 47.81 47. 4.50 x 43.04 49.08 ahead of Tosi (50.67 51.00 44. the previous two champions. and the altogether leaner Italian Giorgio Oberwerger (1.52 45.95 2 52.30 44.33 47. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S D T pole vault.48OR 49.20.93 47. 5.49OR 48.15 43.78 50.89/82kg).25 42e 43. Countries: 18.17.77 x 48.20 (Competitors: 31.08 46.87 44.49 x 47.43 51. 8.78).22 46. (A1) 3. Countries: 19.14 2 48. 4. Both Consolini and Gordien were quick and relatively small – in the 1.87 44.97 2 x 45e 47. Corson had led with 47.77 47.13 46.54 (Competitors: 28.00 40. Hoffmeister had a miserable day. Bergh and Schroder contested a throw-off for a place in the final three rounds which the German won 47. 2. Ken Carpenter Gordon Dunn Giorgio Oberweger Reidar Sørlie Willi Schröder Nikolaos Syllas Gunnar Bergh Åke Hedvall (Competitors: 34.94 50.98 47.34 5 50.20 2 44. were disappointments.97 Berlin.25 4 49.78OR 51. who had beaten the US laws on alcohol prohibition by claiming that wine was an essential part of his diet.85 47. Finalists: 12) Series Houser Kivi Corson Stenerud Anderson Kenttä Paulus Trandem 1 x 45. though Hans Hoffmeister had thrown an unratified 48. (D9) 2. (6) (7) (12) (9) (5) (3) (4) (8) Adolfo Consolini Giuseppe Tosi Fortune Gordien Ivar Ramstad Ferenc Klics Veikko Nyqvist Nikolaos Syllas Stein Johnson ITA ITA USA NOR HUN FIN GRE NOR 52.67 In 1934-35 Harald Andersson dominated the event.23 47. 1 Aug 1928 1.80 3 47.80 44.77 47.23 45. Although Willi Schröder set a world record of 53.93/105kg) and Ken Carpenter (1. The final took place in wet conditions. made occasional trips to the tunnel leading out of the stadium to fortify himself with swigs of champagne. 7.51 x 48. Andersson injured his throwing hand and didn’t reach the qualifying level of 44m for the Olympic final. 6.75.15 3 48. and Oberwerger achieved his best of 49. but not without some angst.42 47.52 45.74 x 44.01 44.98. All the officials were watching the final stages of the USA USA ITA NOR GER GRE SWE SWE 50.23 46.98 48.00 ahead of Kivi’s 45.38 x x Despite the debacle of the 1932 steeplechase. He was awarded an extra throw.36 46.97 3 49.23 48. came in the qualifying stage. Andersson ended up with seven of the 10 best throws that year.48 47. In 1936.26 44. produced two efforts further than 47m before Amsterdam and was favourite. a notably inconsistent thrower did make the final.81 49. His giant (2. (13) (15) (17) (8) (9) (2) (11) (6) John Anderson Henri LaBorde Paul Winter Jules Noël István Donogán Endre Madarász Kalevi Kotkas Paul Jessup USA USA FRA FRA HUN HUN FIN USA 49.50 44.64 to 46.47.48.77 49.83-84m/100-105kg range – while Tosi was a big man . Behind them.44 45.22 45. 2. but neither man improved his position.78 45e 43e 43e 43.25 46.89 44.50 44.79 47. (D3) 8.23 in the fifth round. 3 Aug 1932 1.47 47.16 44. with the result that nearly all the best throws took place early on before the circle got too slippery. when the athletes ran an extra lap. (A5) “Bud” Houser Antero Kivi James Corson Harald Stenerud John Anderson Eino Kenttä Ernst Paulus Johan Trandem USA FIN USA NOR USA FIN GER NOR 47. Finalists: 12) Series Consolini Tosi Gordien 1 49.74/91kg) teammate Paul Winter. (B4) 5.25 46. Jules Noël.10 45.01 47.39 45.40).93 47.90/102kg).

16 55.37 60.06 55.12 just behind Szécsényi’s 55.68 Oerter. Melbourne.26 3 53.73 55.27 52.99 2 53.06 52.81 54.03OR 53.71 x 45. 22 Jul 1952 1.71 51.18OR 58. Gordien.55 52.83 59.99 54. Rated just behind them was the 20 year-old Oerter.65 59.08 x x 49. (11) (6) (5) (14) (10) (1) (12) (21) Al Oerter “Rink” Babka Dick Cochran József Szécsényi Edmund Piątkowski Viktor Kompaneyets UKR Carmelo Rado Kim Bukhantsev RUS USA USA USA HUN POL URS ITA URS 59.36OR 54.11 x 56.60 53.21 51.96) in 1962. for which he thanked Babka.18 x x 50.34 58.70 2 58.46 57. (13) (14) (4) (15) (16) (5) (17) (9) Sim Iness Adolfo Consolini James Dillion Fortune Gordien Ferenc Klics Otto Grigalka RUS Roland Nilsson Giuseppe Tosi USA ITA USA USA HUN URS SWE ITA 55.27 x 51.78 53.98/109kg) achieved his winning distance in round 3.59 3 56. 4.33 54.13 47.18. this was bettered by the long-limbed (1.93 54. Iness reached 54. and three of his six throws were beyond the best of Consolini.81 by Gordien in the final round. He was still able to throw 51m+ in the final round.94/106kg) Daněk with 64.06 52. 6.52 59.91/107kg) third year university student produced two more throws beyond the best the rest could muster.52 5 59.61 x 51.00OR 60. 4. Countries: 20.23 57.49 59.75.29) next. 15 Oct 1964 1.65 52.28 49. 6.79 55. despite Babka’s victory at the US Trials and the fact hat he equalled Piątkowski’s world record of 59.45 55.66. who led the qualifiers with 51.16 50.13 50. 3.18.97 4 53.53 52. (9) (7) (3) (1) (4) (2) (11) (8) Al Oerter Ludvík Daněk CZE Dave Weill Jay Silvester József Szécsényi Zenon Begier Edmund Piątkowski Vladimir Trusenyov RUS USA TCH USA USA HUN POL POL URS 61.71 50.02 as compared with Oerter’s 57.28 52.49 50.06 55. Cochran moved to third in the fifth round with 57. 2. 8.79 x 6 52. 6.97 55. Countries: 15.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C (1.85.86 54. the American eventually out-threw the surprising Pharaoh. with Consolini moving into second with 53. Finalists: 22) (Competitors: 32. Iness dominated proceedings.78.84 50.83 51.06.16 and Piątkowski edged into fifth with 55.10 48.03 175 1. and the bronze was won by Koch. Like Gordien. always thought of as a championship competitor. but the sporting Babka advised him to carry his left arm higher in the circle.83 53.61 4 56. 5.40 54.37 52.40 54. Twenty-two men made the soft qualifying standard of 52. Finalists: 16) Series Oerter Gordien Koch Pharaoh Grigalka Consolini Klics Radošević 1 56. being the first to reach 200 feet (60.40 53.45 51.00 53.55 in August.03 53.00.66 51. 5.36 and the Olympic record.06 54. In a season when the world lists were topped by Consolini (55. Tokyo.85 Series Iness Consolini Dillion Gordien Klics Grigalka Nilsson Tosi 2 54.41 54.47.84 53.25 51. Oerter watched Gordien reach 54.78 3 55. it was no great surprise for the Olympic result to follow the same ranking. The definitive Olympic competitor. 3.94 in Olympic year. which was 54.79.81 49. .48 x x 5 54.87 52.17 52. Oerter followed the advice and came up with a personal best of 59.29 x 54.52 53.64 49. At halfway Kompaneyets headed the bald Szécsényi by 20cm with 55.12 55.93 x x Consolini led the qualifiers with 51.22 x 53.33). Gordien was content to make the final with 47.98 4 54.43.94 59. Up ahead Oerter was still second.91 three weeks before Rome. However.79 55.24 57. with Cochran (54.69 4 55. Oerter later said of his win “I don’t know how I did it.01 Gordien topped the world list with his US Trials win of 57. The big (1.36 52. The final was quickly settled. 7.54). although Gordien only managed to do so with his third throw.49 55.52 57.22 51. whose throws suffered from being launched at too high an angle.38 55. 7. had developed into a record breaker. the last of which was 62.03 53. Consolini’s Olympic career finally came to an end with a relatively modest 52.27 to finish just 13cm behind Koch.96/123kg) Babka took the lead in round 1 with 58. who was less affected by the difficult circle.06 49.93 54.13 52.75 54.75 x 51.15 57.53 56. Countries: 21. Consolini Series Oerter Babka Cochran Szécsényi Piątkowski Kompaneyets Rado Bukhantsev 1 57.52 51.52 56.06 48.45 x 54.66) in the second round. Countries: 22.” The result – a lifetime best of 56. 7 Sep 1960 Helsinki.13 51. Finalists: 12) Series Oerter Daněk Weill Silvester Szécsényi Begier Piątkowski Trusenyov 1 57. from teammates Gordien (52.81 54. with Consolini just behind with a new European record of 56. 3.21 51.80) and Gordien (54. The part Sioux giant (1.14 48.81 54. 4. 5.00 53. (9) (6) (15) (10) (16) (1) (5) (12) Al Oerter Fortune Gordien Des Koch Mark Pharaoh Otto Grigalka RUS Adolfo Consolini Ferenc Klics Dako Radošević BIH USA USA USA GBR URS ITA HUN YUG 56.12 x 6 57.51 55.61 51.06 51. with Iness taking the lead in the first round with 53.37 52.02 x 54.82 51. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S D T had an off-day. also reached his best (52.75 50. 7. 8.63 53.92 51. 5.69 52.52 48.28 51.78 48.18 57.28 52.08 53.19 57.52) and Dillion (52. Babka’s effort fell short.89. 3.64. and felt inspired.23 x 5 61.32 2 56. and wished him luck.60 on his next throw.20 52.09 x x 6 57. and tightened up on his throws.71 54.07 x 48. 4.66 56.73 54.13 50.34 57.” Rome. 2.49 x 52. 6.78 (Competitors: 28.09 52.44 for 17th place.44 x 5 53.76 51.16 55.00 58. and later said “I really was keyed up.39 52. led by Oerter’s Olympic record of 58.14 52. 27 Nov 1956 1. 7. but the USA had its fourth clean sweep in Rome. Tosi (54.09 57.75) and Piątkowski (54. the Italian faltered under the pressure exerted by Iness.02 57. Finalists: 12) 1 53.81 54. The huge (1.93/125kg).03 3 55.36 54.21. as 12 men beat the 46m standard.47 52.66 49.08 Oerter was favoured to win.94 53.54 56. 2.75 50.85 49.47). 8.73 x 56.82 51.47 51.61 (Competitors: 35.74 50. 2.69 (Competitors: 20. 8.29 6 54.58 54.64 58. everything just went right. who savaged the British record with his fifth round 54. and then setting three further records.90 49.

78 62. 3. beating Oerter 6-2 and improving the world record to 68.16) both improved in the third round.94 63.12 60. 7.50 59. (11) (8) (2) (6) (13) (1) (5) (10) Mac Wilkins Wolfgang Schmidt John Powell Norbert Thiede Siegfried Pachale Pentti Kahma Knut Hjeltnes Jay Silvester USA GDR USA GDR GDR FIN NOR USA 67.48 63. threw 64.68 61.24 61.09 to move into third place ahead of Oerter.62 62.72 58. with Daněk’s opener (59.50 60.08 x 61. as the disk flew out to 61.94 x 52.24 61.73) leading from big (2.82 62. 4.70 61.40 59. winning 20 of his 22 competitions.54 58.50.68. Jay Silvester.62 x 61. Oerter was meanwhile being treated with ice packs to stop internal bleeding.98 x 59.60 2 67. launching the disk out to 66.20 64. 2.50 x 64. Moscow. 2. 3. 5.22 65.40 62.08 as Silvester moved into third by equalling Oerter’s 61.54 x 62. the furthest ever seen in major competition. 3.01/121kg) Dave Weill (59.40 x (2) (9) (8) (12) (4) (1) (11) (5) Ludvík Daněk Jay Silvester Ricky Bruch John Powell Géza Fejér Detlef Thorith Ferenc Tégla Tim Vollmer CZE TCH USA SWE USA HUN GDR HUN USA 64.04 64.52 x 60.40 and the gold medal.06 61.10 58.62 63. was still recovering from walking into a low concrete beam on entry to the stadium.12.12 61. having broken the world record three times in one day in May. 4.92 62.38 63. to 64.22 to win the silver medal and hearty congratulations from Wilkins.40 prior to the final round.00 61. while Oerter piled on the pressure with two more over 64m. Countries: 12.49). As the competitors warmed up for the final a virulent thunderstorm began. 3.88 58.12 62. He coped well with this. Silvester got off a good throw in the third round (63. who had lived “discus” while in Munich.08 x 61. 5. never technically brilliant but possessing an arm like a freight train. 2. 8. who continued to throw.24 D T 3 62.50 61. He was already the favourite. now 125kg.16 x 6 64.62 62.78. 5.64 65.40 61. Powell. and so it turned out.42 60. Daněk led the qualifiers past 59m with 64.40 58.62 x 60. Just one thrower remained out in the rain – Oerter. However. with 61.02 x 61.02 61. 4 62.50) which was threatened only by Bruch’s 63.24 (Competitors: 29. The immense (1.46 59.48 x 59.93/118kg) Oerter turned a little slower in the fifth round.28 (Competitors: 27. The one threat to him was considered to be Wolfgang Schmidt.32 65.78 to 61.12 4 62.86 62.62 59.70 64.70.10. though better than the rest. 15 Oct 1968 1.16 65. Finalists: 14) 5 61.40. John Powell.78 59. led Silvester when the competition finally got under way. 4. With his final throw. 2 Sep 1972 1. and then tore cartilages in the lower rib area which needed to be bound up.40 62.24. Milde increased the lead with 63.82 62. before Thorith (62. In the final Silvester led the first round with 62.24 63. (2) (4) (3) (7) (10) (1) (8) (5) Al Oerter Lothar Milde Ludvík Daněk CZE Hartmut Losch Jay Silvester Gary Carlsen Edmund Piątkowski Ricky Bruch USA GDR TCH GDR USA USA POL SWE 64.98 60.38 61. which rendered him unconscious.28 58. you die for them. Countries: 20.96 60. trying to make his implement fly higher. Finalists: 12) Series Oerter Milde Daněk Losch Silvester Carlsen Piątkowski Bruch 1 61. Finalists: 12) . had slowly improved to fifth place.78 62.42 59. Silvester finally had a medal at the third attempt.46 57. 25 Jul 1976 1. 8. in the final Oerter was in third at halfway. 6.82) moved ahead in round 2. 6.56) and the technically excellent Powell (62. Throwing meant that “it felt like somebody was trying to tear out my ribs. a former world record holder. 7.48 62.38 x x 62. The young East German led in the first round with a relatively modest 63.42 59.76 x x x x x 1. Schmidt took great care in the circle.74 58. both Milde (62.64 66.26 58.54. He managed just one throw further than 60m with his last four throws.04 63.24 63. Countries: 18.30 57.44 60. 6.46 58. Silvester made the top eight in his fourth Olympics at the age of 38.54 In an Oerter-less environment Daněk.74 60.06 57. Fejér (62.50 61.50 6 64.” Daněk improved in round 4 to 60.06 x Mac Wilkins boomed his first throw in the qualifying round out to 68. with 65.44 58.52 60.40 59.38 66. Oerter.04 61.32.52.44 65.98 (Competitors: 30.78 63. Daněk.58 62.04 58.22 62.44 x 61. with Oerter setting a record of four consecutive gold medals.12 61. Montreal.66 58.08 62. acclimatising himself to the circle. (10) (9) (11) (6) (8) (12) (5) (1) Viktor Rashchupkin RUS Imrich Bugár CZE Luís Delís Wolfgang Schmidt Yuriy Dumchev RUS Igor Duginyets UKR Emil Vladimirov Velko Velev URS TCH CUB GDR URS URS BUL BUL 66. Mexico City.60 x 62. and Silvester threw 59.24 61. it worked.78. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S Series Daněk Silvester Bruch Powell Fejér Thorith Tégla Vollmer 1 58. which effectively deflated Silvester.02 3 64. 7. Silvester led the qualifiers as the only man to throw over 200 feet – 63.26 2 60. Countries: 19.34 – a new Olympic record.68 62.78OR 63.34 x 59.56 62. The mountainous Oerter.38 59.12 63.24 61. whose relationship with the German was much warmer than with Powell. let go a lifetime best of 64.66 60. and Schmidt (65. 7.92 62. However. and the top positions remained unchanged. 8.44) and European Champion Losch (62.78 59. rotating twice in the circle after the implement was on its way. 6. Finalists: 15) Series Wilkins Schmidt Powell Thiede Pachale Kahma Hjeltnes Silvester 1 61.30 64.60 x 58.12 59.12) were ahead of the Americans.98 6 66. 4.66 64.60 58.34 59. 5.58 64. Silvester and Bruch were considered difficult to grade.00 for his third gold medal. 8. and there the top three positions stayed until the last round.R I O 176 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C Oerter had a cervical disk injury during the season.12 61.94 2 x 63.70 x 63.02 x 3 63.50 63. 2. but Wilkins then took control with 67. 28 Jul 1980 Munich.30 59. Four throws later came the hammer blow. but now needed a good throw.52 59. the third American. The Czech put everything into the throw.18 63.28 5 64. setting an Olympic record in qualifying with 60. Daněk had taken over third on the first throw after Oerter’s big effort.60 60.34 Jay Silvester ended the season as the number one thrower in the world. Though beaten.50 66.28. ” but as Oerter said later – somewhat tongue in cheek – “these are the Olympics.26 61.26 x 5 x 63.14 66.22 64.60 x 4 63.40 63.04 (Competitors: 18.92 60.42).

14 59.30 65.38.28 x 62.68 64. only to be overtaken by Bugár’s 66.74 67.40 63. both 65m men.72 The big story of the year had been the comeback of 43 year-old Oerter. except win. who finished second on the world list with a lifetime best of 69.70 63. one felt that he might have placed higher in that meeting if he knew his country would be attending the Games.30 65. 5. 5. with only the Baltic countries fully seceded from the USSR by the time of Barcelona.50 62.28 63. . 5 Aug 1992 (Competitors: 20.74). Mac Wilkins.58 63. Wilkins led the qualifiers with 65.32 61. failed to qualify with the cut-off at 59.70 63.68). 4.12 62.72 61.20 63.94 x 62.86 62.88 2 64.64 63. and Powell then had his best throw. “I did everything right. (12) (8) (4) (9) (10) (3) (2) (6) Romas Ubartas Jürgen Schult Roberto Moya Costel Grasu Attila Horváth Juan Martínez Dmitriy Kovtsun UKR Dmitriy Shevchenko LTU GER CUB ROU HUN CUB EUN RUS EUN 65.06 63.12 64.76 61.46.72 x 61. Ahead of them all.50 62. In a fascinating battle.22 5 x 66. 8. 6.04 61.22 x 65.04 60. Romas Ubartas had been the top thrower of 1991 but had missed the World Championships.02 x 62.78 x 63.82OR 67. The leading qualifier was Bugár at 65.28 64. Finalists: 12) Series Ubartas Schult Moya Grasu Horváth Martínez Kovtsun Shevchenko 1 60.76 66. 2.74 x 63. Wilkins replied with a gold medal throw.90 for fifth place.30 65.28 4 68.72 61. who would never again approach such a distance.20 64.84 x 62. but was fighting an injury to his right leg.30 60. Wilkins was still good enough to throw 65. Ubartas led the qualifiers with 66.32 64.58).92 3 64.14.78 2 62. 8.86 60. former world record holder who finished with 66.66 63.54 65.38 62.22 1 64. Countries: 14. who backed up his 1986 European title with 67. 6.78 (Competitors: 32.38 65.48 62.84 62.32.20 D T 177 Seoul.58 64.86 x 62.80 x x Schult had won the 1987 world title with 68. 1. Bugár led after round 1 with 65.84 60.26 by 10cm. another removed from Olympic contention because of the boycott.90 62. World record holder Schmidt was the favourite.64. The challengers were classy: Dumchev.60 66.34 x 65.20 61.72 62. Hjeltnes (64. Schmidt then edged into the lead on 65.26 67.98 64.72 63. (2) (5) (11) (1) (4) (6) (7) (12) Jürgen Schult Romas Ubartas LTU Rolf Danneberg Yuriy Dumchev RUS Mac Wilkins Géjza Valent CZE Knut Hjeltnes Alois Hannecker GDR URS FRG URS USA TCH NOR FRG 68. was very much the number three German before LA. Danneberg. Finalists: 12) Series Danneberg Wilkins Powell Hjeltnes Burns Wagner Zerbini Fernholm F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 6 66. but in the fourth round he sent the discus out to 66. Danneberg went over 66m again in the final round. 3.12 in the opening round.96 64. Countries: 20. having thrown 64.12.04 x The Soviet Union was in the middle of disintegrating during 1992.72) and Powell (64.56 62.46 64.70 61.12 59.82 60.16 x 62. (2) (7) (6) (4) (11) (8) (5) (1) Rolf Danneberg Mac Wilkins John Powell Knut Hjeltnes Art Burns Alwin Wagner Luciano Zerbini Stefan Fernholm FRG USA USA NOR USA FRG ITA SWE 66.16 62. having failed to qualify for the 1982 European final. Delis stepped up for his penultimate effort and let fly a beautiful throw.28 (Competitors: 29.06 x 62.12 64. finishing third in the German trials.48 67. 1 Oct 1988 1.86 65. a giant (2. The second thrower in the final. preferring to wait a year to compete for Lithuania rather than represent the USSR again.42 65. This was a lifetime best for the Russian.46.72 63.42 for a solid fourth place. Schult produced four throws beyond the best of the rest for the most dominant win since Oerter’s 1968 victory.08.46 64. who had slipped to third behind Hjeltnes’ 65.38 66. but had to wait until round 3 of the final before overtaking Schult’s 64.94 63.30 65.94 5 65.40 x 62.48 in the last round to edge Danneberg.30). and unlike the Russian a former Olympic winner.08.72 60.60 x 64.58 x 4 x 63.36 x 62. Finalists: 12) Series Schult Ubartas Danneberg Dumchev Wilkins Valent Hjeltnes Hannecker 1 68. threw further than his 1984 win to take bronze with 67.42 x 65.80 64.74 65.32 x x x 61.04 61.94 64.04 63.54 6 68.78 63. 2. 4. Grouped behind him were Danneberg (64.98 64.18 61.66 x 6 x 63. the 1984 boycott affected the discus as the best two throwers of the year – Imrich Bugár (TCH) and Luís Delís (CUB) – were not in Los Angeles.88 x 63.38. Countries: 24. the reigning champion.50 3 65. 5.92 66.82 61.64 62.74 3 65.42 62.22 61.14 2 0 1 6 5 60.64 65.34 62.14 62.38 62. and was firm favourite for Seoul gold.92. only for Ubartas to respond immediately with 65.12 62. In fifth place with 65.94 x 63. At 37.64 x x 5 65.72 61.64 x x 61.08 64. like Dumchev an erstwhile world record holder.14 x x 64.40 62.82 62.18 60. the longest ever throw in a major championship.08 62. while Armin Lemme (GDR) and Iosif Nagy (ROU).20 4 66. and whirled the discus out to an Olympic record 68.96 with his first throw of the final.90 64. 6.94.74. 3. 7.08 2 x x 63.24 x 63.50 63. 10 Aug 1984 1.82 As in so many events. Barcelona.60 x 64.00 61.50 61.14 x 3 63. Danneberg.86 65.34 63. but again foot fouled.46 61. Best of the silver medal contenders was Romas Ubartas.12 65.80 64. One who did get close enough for a bronze was Cuba’s relatively small (1.54 x 60.10 60.48 64.78 62.02/125kg) Lithuanian.R I O Series Rashchupkin Bugár Delís Schmidt Dumchev Duginyets Vladimirov Velev 1 62. 2.50 63. He placed only fourth in the meaningless US Trials. A bigger surprise was that World Champion Lars Riedel and Ubartas’s experienced countryman Vaclavas Kidykas each failed to qualify.18 64.38 65.90 65. Schult regained the lead in the penultimate round with 64.90 64.82. before Rashchupkin produced the sixth change of lead with 66.60.60 63. Wilkins.18 63. 4. 65.94 60. 8. 3.86 and improved to 65. then Dumchev (65. In the final. Los Angeles.04 4 66. ” said Wilkins.30 60.26 64.88 63. The American trio was expected to sweep the medals.30.36 63.18 62.96 65.18 62.28 2 67.64 66.56 66. was again the best thrower in the world.60 63. and then reached 66. in his third Olympics in 12 years. 7.85/105kg) but quick Luís Delís. 7. with the old firm of Wilkins and Powell fighting out for the gold. Schult stepped into the circle. Roberto Moya was the surprise bronze medallist. which landed around 67m and was measured at 66.46 65.64.28.60 x ★ O L Y M P I C 6 x 65. to take the bronze medal.30.96 66. He had a poor international championship record.82 66.10 63. and was overtaken in the third by Schmidt (65.

63 6 64. Fazekas then took a victory lap.50 62.82 65.80 x 62.49 4 68.02 65. The massive Kruger (2.42 65.04 63. 6.02 64. The qualifying round saw the demise of all three US throwers.78 x x 64. Finalists: 12) (Competitors: 46.88 Lars Riedel had won three world titles by the time of Atlanta but his failure to qualify for the Barcelona final gave him a big incentive for the ’96 Olympics.28 62.10 to Alekna’s 67. Before the medal ceremony. and it was only in the fourth stanza.34 x 64. So the title was retained by Alekna. that Alekna (67.80 65.32 in June).24 also exceeded the old record.76 x 5 69.08 62. 8. America’s best. possibly the finest natural talent the event had seen (Al Oerter was left openpmouthed in wonderment at Riedel’s physique when the two met for the first time) had to wait until the fifth round before producing a throw commensurate with his talent.18 67.44 61.73 63.89. Alekna proved his status as favourite by improving to 69. and his teammate Kaptyukh who was in second with 65.98 64. Alekna tightened up.80 61.97 x x x 6 65.87 62. (12) (5) (7) (2) (9) (8) (11) (10) Virgilijus Alekna Zoltán Kővágó Aleksander Tammert Vasiliy Kaptyukh Frantz Kruger Casey Malone Lars Riedel Hannes Hopley 1 x 64.25 x 5 x 65. The imposing (2.38 63. Finalists: 12) (Competitors: 39. until Kővágó hit 67. 4.58 (Competitors: 39.42 67. 2.33 62. the Hungarian was disqualified as he “refused to provide a complete urine sample”.93 3 x 66.25 2 66.60 in the second round.44 66.35 (9) (6) (8) (4) (7) (5) (2) (10) Virgilijus Alekna Lars Riedel Frantz Kruger Vasiliy Kaptyukh Adam Setliff Jason Tunks Vladimir Dubrovshchik Jürgen Schult LTU GER RSA BLR USA CAN BLR GER (11) (7) (4) (10) (9) (2) (12) (6) Gerd Kanter Piotr Małachowski Virgilijus Alekna Robert Harting Frank Casanas Bogna Pishchalnikov Rutger Smith Robert Fazekas 1 58.04 64.34 62.78 61.38 65.25 in winning the 2002 World Cup.98 x 67.43 (Competitors: 37. 5.43 3 62.54) and Alekna (67. 8.16 64. 1 69.80 x 64. 69.10) close behind.65 - 68. The Hungarian led the qualifying with 68.89 57. Ahead of him were Dubrovshchik.44 62.82 67.15 with Kruger (67.34 Alekna was a slight favourite over World Champion Kanter. 3.70 61.13 60.91 67.40 was an Olympic record.73. Riedel had preceded the South African with 68. as Kruger improved to 68.60 65.39 Series Alekna Kővágó Tammert Kaptyukh Kruger Malone Riedel Hopley Fazekas 2 x 66. and Kruger was followed by Alekna with 68.45. 8.34 4 66. In the final Fazekas began with 66. Countries: 30.46 61. Having led the 39 throwers in the qualifying with 64. with Tammert (65.03/118kg) was the early leader in the final with 67. Sydney.78 63. 6. and by the end of the next round he had consolidated his lead with 67. Riedel’s challenge for a medal dissipated with his third round groin injury which caused him to withdraw.13 64.50 59. Finalists: 12) Series Riedel Dubrovshchik Kaptyukh Washington Alekna Schult Sidorov Kidykas LTU HUN EST BLR RSA USA GER RSA Series Kanter Małachowski Alekna Harting Casanas Pishchalnikov Smith Fazekas 1 63.31 66.39 59.38 67. 31 Jul 1996 1.32 64.82) clicked.89 58. 69. Fazekas. just ahead of Kaptyukh’s pb throw of 67. 3.13 64. Riedel had one chance left following two foul throws in the final.30 64.80 65.48 2 x 66. 4.10 64.50 68.07 63. Consistent Małachowski surprisingly led at the end of the first round in the final with 66. 8.77).36 62.58 65.86 63. throwing well only in the fifth round with 69.33 - There were two candidates for gold.63 60.31 63.19 67.30 with his penultimate throw.95 x 2 67.38 60. 4.42 65. 7.59 63.72 66.10 59.73 68.89.73 - Beijing. Harting went into silver medal position in round three with 67.09 64.89OR 67.35 x 63. on consecutive throws.93. 6.89 x 62.11 65.78 62.55 65.82 61. Countries: 30.82 63.18 66.30 64.78 Athens.84 62. before Kanter set off on a joyous vic- . and his final throw of 69. but the drama was not finished.18) in the final round.66 65.54 64. Countries: 26.80 62.40 64.50 66.66. 5. 3.80. ahead of Kanter (66.82.79 67.51 66.60 64.68 x 61.50 68.83 3 68.93 60.62 63.41 5 69.08 68.49 65.96 Reigning champion Riedel led the qualifiers with 68. 7.72 65. Round three saw major movements.25 65.49 58. Countries: 29.49.79 x 64.40OR 66. and Kanter (68.09 64. (6) (7) (10) (8) (1) (3) (9) (2) Lars Riedel Vladimir Dubrovshchik Vasiliy Kaptyukh Anthony Washington Virgilijus Alekna Jürgen Schult Vitaliy Sidorov Vaclavas Kidykas GER BLR BLR USA LTU GER UKR LTU 69. 19 Aug 2008 1.34 62.15 61. and European Champion Robert Fazekas (HUN). who improved Lars Riedel’s Olympic record of 69. 25 Sep 2000 1.01 x x 62.52 3 65. Behind them Tammert’s opening throw held up for third.R I O 178 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C F I N A L S / M E N ’ S D T Atlanta. Anthony Washington.54 x x 64. who had thrown a massive 71.04 in the fourth. 3. Alekna had the only other 67m throw (67.64 - EST POL LTU GER ESP RUS NED HUN 68.38) and Alekna (65. 4. the second-longest throw ever in a major meeting.50. 5.62 x 62.79).75 66.99 70. 2.42 62. he responded by throwing 65. 2.50 63.82 63.78 62.19 67.09 66.30 68.70) the only other thrower to reach the automatic qualifying mark of 64.77 64.88 64.95 63.00 x 65.50.34 64.25 64. Riedel.40 with 69.58 59. according to the IOC. 6.82 67.53 64. His 69.74 63.54 64.33 x 65. After a toilet break.00/130kg) winner had once worked as a bodyguard to the former President of Lithuania.79. then threw 70. 5. Finalists: 12) Series Alekna Riedel Kruger Kaptyukh Setliff Tunks Dubrovshchik Schult 5 69. 6 x x x 63.80 x 60. having defeated him 3-1 in 2008 prior to Beijing.99 64.06 64. defending champion Alekna.39 63.42 x 57. was just 2cm ahead of the German.59 66.24 x 65.10 x 64.18 66.40 x 59. the tough Belarusian who threw 66.10 65.68 6 69.09.88 61.88 65.28 62. 23 Aug 2004 1.04 66.24 65.61 62.66 65.58 69.03 64.66) and Alekna. 2.49 x 65.78 4 63.10 64.62 62.39.59 64.82 x 64.40 x 63.64 68. 7.41 4 x 67.92 67.19 but found himself only in third place.82 x 60.40 for fourth position. but was quickly overtaken by Tammert (66.45 x 65.59. along with Zoltán Kővágó (HUN) and Iran’s talented Ehsan Hadadi (69. 7.30 67.

73/46. Reports that the event was held on July 15 probably give rise to the second set of distances.50 for the top three. 2012-27Q 1906-5.12 63. The first (shown here) is 51.01. 8. 1968-1 1996-5.92 64. He was forced to sleep rough overnight and only got access to the Olympic village the following morning.92 63. 1960-10 1964-2. 2012-7 Frank Casañas CUB/ESP Flanagan.48 6 67. Countries: 2) 1996-25Q.79 68.28 66. 1968-5. 1996-8. 1912-4.16 63.96 66. John Flanagan Truxton Hare Josiah McCracken Eric Lemming Karl Staaf USA USA USA SWE SWE 51. 1972-2. a distance he had achieved four times in 1899. The first marks appear in the New York Times. 1968-3. Kanter moved up from fifth to second with a seasonal best 68. 1920-1.56 64. Men’s Discus Throw. 1972-1.08 x 66. 1906-1.R I O 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C tory lap.85 65. The Finnish publication Olympialais-Kisat 1 gives a slightly different mark for Flanagan (50. Hadadi spun the discus to around 68.27 67.25 44.13/42. 1996-6. F I N A L S / M E N ’ S D T . and then Harting crept into the lead with 68. 6. 2004-3. 2004-34Q 2000-24Q. 1992-15Q. who had emigrated from Ireland in 1896. 1960-17 1948-5.01/46. 1976-8 1988-1. 2008-3. 1952-5.18 68.50. 1920-11 1908-AC. 1956-6. After winning his Olympic gold. Countries: 24. 1896 Not held Paris. Finalists: 12) Series Harting Hadadi Kanter Alekna Małachowski Wierig Casanas Gowda 1 67.38 62. The Iranian maintained his lead until an eventful fifth round.03 x x 64. 2000-34Q.18 65.27 68. . Harting’s celebrations included his usual barehanded shredding of his singlet “Hulk” style and speeding over the women’s barriers set up for the 100m Hurdles final. 2004-1. 16 Jul 1900 1.79 2 x 64.27. With the final throw of the contest. 1908-1 1948-1. 1992-2.15 5 68. 1996-1.89 Harting was the solid favourite and reached 67. The best he managed was 50m for a 400g tin of sardines London. 2.07 67. His day ended on a lower note when his wallet and accreditation were stolen while partying on the MS Deutschland. 4.99). which almost certainly came from a qualifying competition.48 64.79 x 66. 2004-17Q.79 with his initial effort. 1956-7. 5. Such marks were normally included in the final result.5 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 84 989 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 2 2 1 1 2 4 3 2 9 50 44 18 112 1 1 2 2 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 0 1 0 2 20 8 7 7 42 MEN’S DISCUS THROW The Best on Points 32 Al Oerter USA 31 Virgilijus Alekna LTU 24 Martin Sheridan USA Most Finals 5 Alekna 4 Adolfo Consolini ITA Ferenc Klics HUN Oerter Ludvík Daněk TCH (CZE) Jay Silvester USA Jürgen Schult GDR/GER Most Appearances 5 Alekna Aleksander Tammert EST 4 Hammer Throw 1956-1.95 3 67. 200030Q Lars Riedel GER 1992-14Q. 2000-8 Athens. 7 Aug 2012 1. 2. 1964-1.01 46. 1924-7 André Tison FRA Elmer Niklander FIN Consolini Klics Oerter Daněk Silvester Schult Vaclavas Kidykas URS/EUN/LTU 1988-13Q. 2000-2.46. 4. the New York Times invited him to see how far he could throw a variety of familiar objects.03.85 64.56 64. but this was probably converted from 167’ 4” rather than the 167’ 4. but his foot just touched the rim of the circle and so was red-flagged.45 66. 5.03 4 66.50 63. 3.03 67. anchored at Canary Wharf. but the lead was held by Hadadi’s excellent opener of 68. 2000-1.5” which equates to 51.38 67. continued Placing Table G S B 4 USA 14 9 13 6 GER 4 4 1 4 FIN 2 3 1 2 HUN 1 1 1 URS/EUN 1 1 1 LTU 3 1 1 ITA 1 2 1 GRE 2 2 1 2 1 TCH (CZE) 1 SWE 1 2 NOR 4 BLR 1 1 2 POL 1 EST 1 2 FRA 1 1 CUB 2 RSA 1 GBR 2 BOH 1 IRI 1 ESP ROU 1 AUT CAN RUS BUL DEN NED UKR IND YUG (BIH) Totals 28 28 28 28 Breakdown of GER placings: GER 2 2 GDR 1 2 FRG 1 1 4 4 1 Totals 1 3 4 Breakdown of URS/EUN placings: RUS 1 1 UKR LTU 1 BLR Totals 1 1 1 H T 179 5 8 2 7 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 27 6 6 4 3 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 26 7 8 2 3 2 2 2 2 3 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 4+1= 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1= 1 1 1 1 25 24+2= M Points 36 340 9 112 6 68 2 58 2 42 4 40 4 36 4 36 4 31 1 30.02 x x x x 63. (10) (7) (4) (3) (11) (12) (6) (1) Robert Harting Ehsan Hadadi Gerd Kanter Virgilijus Alekna Piotr Małachowski Martin Wierig Frank Casanas Vikas Gowda GER IRI EST LTU POL GER ESP IND 68. 2008-5.18. 2004-7 Dragan Mustapić BIH/CRO 1992-29Q. 7. 1996-27Q. 1912-30. For the first time five men threw beyond 67m in a major championship. 1960-1.19 65. while others quote 49.98 x 60. because the ceremony didn’t take place until later that day. and the Manchester Guardian. 2000-9.07 67. Two versions of the result exist. 1952-2.50 (Competitors: 5.99 x x 65.98 65. 2012-4 1904-1. 1976-9 1964-4. Happily his medal was safe. 3.19 65. was the only man able to throw beyond 50m.25/44. 2008-12. 1908-8.09 65.5 0 30 2 25 1 22 3 20 1 16 2 15 1 11 0 10 1 7 1 7 0 6 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2.79 (Competitors: 41.34 65.27 x 68.79 65.

43 48. 5. Finalists: 12) .68). 5.875 47. 8. John Flanagan John DeWitt Ralph Rose Charles Chadwick James Mitchel Albert Johnson USA USA USA USA USA USA 51. 14 Jul 1908 Qualifying (in three sections) 1. and won with his sixth round throw. 4.99 3 54.61 43.90 Injured x x x 45. 8.055 48.875 48.18 48. Both Nicolson and Talbott.23 46.39 x 46.78/86kg) Irish-American backed up his winning effort with another throw of 50.075 44. The third string American was Jack Merchant.18 48.(B10) 6. 2.61 x 6 54.25 47.05 50. 1906 Not held London.78 43. but in the Olympics settled things early. (A9) Pat O’Callaghan Ossian Skiöld Edmund Black Armando Poggioli Donald Gwinn Frank Connor Federico Kleger Ricardo Bayer IRL SWE USA ITA USA USA ARG CHI 51. having two throws more than 4m beyond his nearest rival. 7. who had set the world record of 57. producing eight of the top 10 marks of the season. Flanagan settled things early. Finalists: 3) 1.39 48. 3. Countries: 5. 5.700 44.58 43.785 42.18 to 50.06 38. 5.17 48.86 46.700 (Competitors: 12.50 (Competitors: 18.83 53.78 4 5 52.73 42. Countries: 8. while Rose’s cumbersome technique was shown up as he threw only 45. who had injured himself in training. (Competitors: 6.09 47.935 (Competitors: 15.39 51.17 46. Ryan did not compete in Stockholm. Behind him the athletic (1. who had competed in the long jump in Antwerp.975 45. 4.84 48. missing the qualifying rounds.17 39. Like Sheridan in the discus.50 45.92OR 51. 1.56 45. to become the first man to win three consecutive Olympic titles over an eight-year period.250 47. The two were expected to battle for the gold medal.35.295 50. Matt McGrath Duncan Gillis Clarence Childs Robert Olsson Carl-Johan Lind Denis Carey Nils Linde Carl Jahnzon Paris. 8.67 45.R I O 180 2 0 1 6 ★ O L Y M P I C St.70 52. The big (1.29 46.875 48. (B9) 7. but McGrath suffered a knee injury and had to retire after two throws in the qualifying stage.86 The two top throwers – Flanagan and McGrath – were seeded in the same qualifying group. 10 Jul 1924 48.600 47.88/113kg) Ryan had an easy victory.60. Every one of his six throws was well in advance of the opposition. 2. (B7) 4.295.35 51. Flanagan was able to regroup after the qualifying round.61 43. 3. 7.58 43.90. Pat Ryan Carl-Johan Lind Basil Bennet Malcolm Svensson Matt McGrath Tom Nicolson Nils Linde James McEachern USA SWE USA SWE USA GBR SWE USA 52. (B3) 5. The stocky (1.83/95kg) De Witt was a solid second with 50. with his six casts averaging beyond 54m. and several of his opponents lobbied successfully for him to be allowed to compete in the final. Finalists: 12) Tootell and McGrath dominated the event in 1924. who moved up from fourth in the final to take his third medal in 16 years.23OR 50. 3.37 47. who dominated the event. 3.09 46.60 46. leading the qualifiers with 50. were both well capable of throwing beyond 50m. Fred Tootell Matt McGrath Malcolm Nokes Erik Eriksson Ossian Skiöld James McEachern Carl-Johan Lind John Murdock USA USA GBR FIN SWE USA SWE CAN 53. but here he was nearly 9m below his best with 41. which indicates the harshness of the qualifying system.75 46. 4. Simon Gillis.74OR 48.15 46. Countries: 11. 8. Antwerp. 5.48 50. Countries: 1) Alfred Plaw. 29 Aug 1904 1.74 45.26.50 45.74 x Qualifying 47. 6.32 42.78 2 54. 6.62 to 50. (A1) 8. 4. The first native born American to win the Olympic title won by more than 2m from the 45 year-old McGrath.28 48.77 a year before World War I. Countries: 10. 4. who had beaten Flanagan in the US Championships. 19 Aug 1920 Qualifying (18 Aug) 1. sprained his ankle on his third throw and had to be carried off.94 45. Amsterdam. 7.50 48. Finalists: 6) Athens. 6.225 44. producing 51.265 45.03 48.290 46. Ryan.58 (Competitors: 15.000 48. 2.94 45.670 45.885 44. Rose had reputedly thrown over 58m in training.455 for ninth place. 30 Jul 1928 1.830 48. and then hurling the ball and chain out to 53.29 49.785 F I N A L S / M E N ’ S H T This was the era of McGrath and Pat Ryan (both USA). 14 Jul 1912 USA CAN USA SWE SWE GBR SWE SWE 54.34 (Competitors: 16. Finalists: 3) Series McGrath Gillis Childs Olsson Lind Carey 1 54.(A12) 3. who did not qualify. 6. A nice touch was added when Nicholson arrived late for the competition. (C1) (C3) (A3) (B2) (A4) (B3) (C2) (A1) John Flanagan Matt McGrath “Con” Walsh Tom Nicolson Lee Talbott “Bill” Horr Simon Gillis Eric Lemming USA USA CAN GBR USA USA USA SWE 51. more than 5m in advance of the next best thrower.73 with a single turn as opposed to the two turns used by the first two men. Tootell had won the US Trials with his last throw. was missing from the competition but defending champion Flanagan’s opposition was thought to be fierce enough. Louis. while De Witt had looked impressive in practice. 2.39 48. 7.(A10) 2. Between them they won all but two US titles between 1908 and 1922.41 48. The other pools were won by Walsh and Nicolson.285 45. 2. which McGrath won 51.50 x 43. 3.05 Stockholm. so the way was clear for McGrath. 6. Countries: 4.23 in the first round.17 46. had won the US title just ahead of McGrath (51.

flying up and out over his left shoulder in a perfect arc .50 49.00 53.04 54.84 49.42 for ninth place.20 3 54. 5.34WR 58.07 54.61 x x 6 x 58.39 51. having caught the Swede’s 54. By then.21 52. Helsinki.49 x 50. Finalists: 17) 1. who had led the world in 1926 and 1927.87 x 50. A.33 6 56.03.81 56.88 4 50.11 52. while O’Callaghan was third with 47. Connor lagged in sixth with 46.07 ensured the first male Hungarian athletics gold in 48 years. Countries: 17.30 49. Meanwhile Germany had developed two excellent throwers in the two years leading up to Berlin – Blask and Hein.21 in the second round. Countries: 18.45 x 54.90 51.55 54..27 50. The unfortunate Skiöld thus lost the gold by just 10cm.34 58. 6. with his final effort. It was only in the penultimate round that O’Callaghan took the lead. the missile soared high above the flags marking the throws of the other competitors.28 56.49.66 53.05 51.73 53. Blask threw 55.” Berlin.95 51. and here had three throws beyond the best of runner-up Gubijan.33 47..77 2 52.33 49. 3.46 181 4 54. (7) (18) (1) (6) (2) (3) (16) (19) József Csermák HUN Karl Storch GER/FRG Imre Németh HUN Jiří Dadák CZE TCH Nikolay Redkin UKR URS Karl Wolf GER/FRG Sverre Strandli NOR Georgiy Dybenko UKR URS 60.79 47.13 52.76 x 48. O’Callaghan and Skiöld. but he could only reach 50. 7.98 51.92 54.47 3 50.27 47. After the three had throws just beyond 52 (and the best of anyone else that day).86 57.60 5 x 57.49 50e ? ? 45e 3 ? 51.36 55.29 x ? 45e 4 ? 50e 45e 45e 2 0 1 6 5 51. 6. Hein then reached 56.85 54. and his 56.04 50.98 6 56. 3.90 4 51.18 56. with four throws each over 53m. with 51. 1 Aug 1932 1.90 1 47.61 50.81 50.25 49.07 x 49.70 54.55 56.75 48.79 4 49. which F. O’Callaghan was untested. his arms swept round from low right to high left and the hammer departed.19 48.59 x 52. 31 Jul 1948 (Competitors: 14.04 54.20 46e 48.01 51.95 5 x 54. M. and was considered the least likely of the three to win.67 47. Connor placed only fourth in the US Trials.83 with 54. 5.48 53. O’Callaghan was still second as he came up for his last throw. and consequently he could not defend his title.56 to give an idea of his capabilities. After the qualifying stage.76 53. his season’s best was only 52. Los Angeles.08 52. Way ahead was Skiöld with 51.08 51. who ended the season as the number two and three performers after the Hungarian.16 56. 6.82 x 52.27 52. 7.96 46. was the favourite.39 x 48. 5.32 48.44 x 51. Finalists: 25) Series Csermák Storch Németh Dadák Redkin Wolf 1 58.54 H T 3 x x 54.73 52. Pörhölä. 2. principally Karl Storch and reigning champion Karl Hein. 8.12 48.55 53.33 44. 2.94 54.79 46.53 52.04.03 51. Németh saved his best till last.98 50.49 2 57.30 54.53 50. and of the rest only Zaremba was able to exceed 50m. 2.02 45. the season’s best throw.25 2 52.77 x 45. 6.12 x 5 51. Countries: 9. 7.37 ★ O L Y M P I C 6 ? x x The pre-Olympic lists were topped by Connor. (9) (7) (1) (5) (12) (4) (11) (10) Imre Németh Ivan Gubijan SRB Robert Bennett Samuel Felton Lauri Tamminen Bo Ericson Teseo Taddia Einar Söderqvist HUN YUG USA USA FIN SWE ITA SWE 56.25 48.48 (Competitors: 25.04 52.34 The path to gold for Imre Németh was made easier by the suspension of German throwers.01 50.29.29. and Fred Warngård.49 56.08 x x 6 53. Countries: 16. 8. to win Ireland’s first Olympic gold medal.75. which he improved by a metre in the next round. and the battle for the medals was between the two Germans. his left leg stiffened to form the immovable fulcrum for the throw. However five of the previous six hammer titles had gone to Irish-born athletes. 3. The world list was topped by Henry Dreyer (54.71 O’Callaghan was a member of an athletic association in Ireland which was not the IAAF-recognised federation for that country.74 51.49.81 x x 47. Though the Irishman led the world before the Olympics. so Skiöld. 4.74 56.R I O Series O’Callaghan Skiöld Black Poggioli Connor 1 ? 48. 8.27.61 x x 47.98 3 60.08 56.30 53.33 47.78 50. Hein was in second placed. 7.41 .36 42. improving the national record more than 5m to 54.91 51.72 53.80 57.74 55.27 50. The following year he threw 59. 52m was attainable by only the two top men from the previous year.85 in the fifth round. Finalists: 10) Series O’Callaghan Pörhölä Zaremba Skiöld McDougall Kleger Jansson Poggioli F I N A L S / M E N ’ S 56.68 58.34 56. Karl Hein Erwin Blask Fred Warngård Gustaf Koutonen William Rowe Donald Favor Bernhard Greulich Koit Annamaa GER GER SWE FIN USA USA GER EST Series Hein Blask Warngård Koutonen Rowe Favor Greulich Annamaa 1 52. Webester described in Great moments in Athletics as follows: “The spikes of Dr Pat’s left boot drove hard into the cinders. 3.83 51.61 50. 8.90 49.05 x 51.29 51. Finalists: 13) Series Németh Gubijan Bennett Ericson 1 53.79 O’Callaghan and Pö