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Business

Services Industry
Environment Scan 2015

Predicting change

Contents
1. Executive summary

2

2. Industry intelligence

5

3. Identified workforce development needs

21

4. Current impact of training packages

27

5. Future directions

37

Appendix A - Methodology and bibliography

42

Appendix B - Business Services Occupations in demand

48

Appendix C - NCVER data

52

The Environment Scan
Context, purpose & audience
Continuing advances in technology and
ongoing pressure on productivity are
building the demand for creative and
innovation skills with which workforces
can use Big Data, engage with complex
systems and focus on customers. With
these skills Australian industry can better
respond to the challenges of operating
in a global marketplace.
As industries continue to evolve, converge
or relocate, and as new job roles emerge
and others become obsolete, developed
economies are looking to ‘early warning
systems’ to detect the onset of economic
and industry trends. The Environment
Scans – or Escans – undertaken annually
by Industry Skills Councils report these
trends and assist governments and
industry to shape responsive vocational
training systems.
Specifically, Innovation and Business
Skills Australia’s (IBSA) Escan identifies
the factors currently having impact
on the skill needs of the workforces
of its six industries and considers how
well the national training system, its
products and services, and industry
itself are responding.
National, real time industry intelligence
is what sets the Escans apart from
other reports on the national training
system. The Escans capture data and
information from IBSA’s ongoing visits
and conversations with key industry
stakeholders, regulators and, critically,

the people doing the jobs across the
industries and who experience firsthand
the impact of change. It also draws
on a range of topical sources such
as the latest industry, enterprise and
government research, and international
developments. The Escan methodology
can be found at Appendix A.
The Escan’s formal audience is the
Department of Education and Training
– both to contribute to industry skills
needs advice and also as evidence
to support endorsement of training
package upgrades. The relevance of
the Escan however extends far beyond
and continues to be used extensively
by state and territory governments,
industry bodies, enterprises and many
other stakeholders involved in skills and
workforce development.
As a document limited in size, the
Escan does not seek to capture every
issue within each industry, rather it is a
snapshot of a continually developing
picture that is intended to alert and
inform a wide audience and enhance
their capacity to act.
The Escans are part of Industry Skills
Councils’ broader role in gathering
industry intelligence and undertaking
high quality analysis of the skills needs
and profile of current and future industry
workforces. Escan 2015 has been
produced with the assistance of funding
provided by the Australian Government
through the Department of Education
and Training.

Business Services

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CHAP TER 1 Executive summary .

These issues all affect the future skill needs of the workforce. for which detail is provided in Chapter 3. The six sectors combined generatedsan income of $66 billion in 2013. with the legal services sector being the largest. and • communication and marketing. employing more professionals. the following trends are in play and will affect most sectors in coming years and the health and shape of the industry for which detail is provided in Chapter 2 under Industry Outlook: • End of the mining boom • Tighter government budgets • Continued offshoring • Mobile technologies • Deeper global engagement. as the economy strengthens and the outsourcing trend continues. including advertising agencies. distributing decision making more widely. an increase of about $10 billion on 2012. such as strategic and technical advice. specialising in niche areas. The legal services and employment services sectors dominate the industry in terms of revenue generated. This outsourcing has enabled firms across the economy to lower the cost of ancillary services and better focus on their core activities. recruitment and administrative services. WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES These industry trends along with other social changes mean that the Business Services Industry faces a number of workforce development challenges over the coming years. INDUSTRY TRENDS While the Business Services Industry is highly fragmented. Business services are responding to these trends by forging business partnerships.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 CH AP TER 1 Executive summary Companies in the Business Services Industry provide professional assistance to other businesses. legal services and communications and marketing sectors. specialist business services have increasingly been contracted to undertake activities previously conducted inhouse. and it is difficult to accurately predict how it will fare in the future overall. Since the early 1990s. advertising. It is estimated there are approximately 56. • Improving customer engagement The Business Services Industry has benefited from long periods of growth and. This Environment Scan (Escan) focusses on six key sectors within the industry that are heavy users of the vocational education and training (VET) system: • employment services (permanent and temporary) • legal services • management consulting • contact centres • data processing and analytics. if a little subdued due to softer general economic conditions. . An array of businesses can be classified as business services. getting closer to customers through data and harnessing the contingent workforce. public relations and market research and statistical services. accounting for about a third of businesses. although definitions of the industry vary. the two year outlook for the industry is positive. 2 | Chapter 1 Executive summary with growth mainly occurring in the employment services. and • Full end to end services.154 businesses in the industry.

Predicting change • Achieving healthy (and changing) workplaces • Supporting the rise of the professional • Cost and convenience of training • Diversity driving innovation • Using social media literacy • Computational thinking. and • Achieving environmental sustainability. and • Training package use by other industries. Business Services | 3 . Business services are responding to trends by forging business partnerships. getting closer to customers through data and harnessing the contingent workforce. to take account of the industry trends and workforce development challenges identified in this Escan and reported in detail in Chapter 4 under Outlook for training: • Building communication skills • Data analysis skills and computational thinking • Heightened management skills • Higher level skills for professionalisation • Skills to support sustainability. training in the Business Services Industry will be focusing on its priority training issues. IMPLICATIONS FOR SKILLS DEVELOPMENT • Stronger digital skills In the next 18 months to two years. employing more professionals. specialising in niche areas. distributing decision making more widely.

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CHAP TER 2 Industry intelligence .

1 For information about the outlook for ICT and financial services see www. and • communication and marketing (primarily advertising. Since the early 1990s. and information about the outlook for rental. brand recognition and customer service are critical for differentiating services. and employment levels. eg IT and accounting. as significant sectors in their own right.2 billion in 2013. with about two thirds or more of businesses being located in New South Wales and Victoria. This outsourcing has enabled firms across the economy to lower the cost of ancillary services and better focus on their core expertise. and because business services rely on the level of outsourcing of other businesses. 6 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence There are other professional services that businesses buy in. the fortunes of each of these sectors are strongly linked to the state of the economy and business confidence. management consultants and advertising services each account for around a fifth of businesses. an increase of nearly $10 billion on 2012.org. The main exceptions are contact call centres which are increasingly being hosted in Queensland with 25 percent in 2014 up 2 IBISWorld (2014) M6900 Business Services in Australia May 2014 . All business services depend strongly on the quality of the people they employ to provide the services and retain clients. An array of businesses can be classified as business services.ibsa.154 businesses in the industry.au. structure. cpsisc.au/environmentscan-escan. This Escan focusses on six sectors within the industry that are heavy users of the vocational education and training (VET) system: • employment services (permanent and temporary) • legal services • management consulting • contact centres • data processing and analytics. Similarly the rental hiring and real estate services are often included in definitions of the Business Services Industry. there are also common features. The legal services and employment services sectors dominate the industry in terms of revenue. legal and advertising services sectors.1 The six sectors in the Business Services Industry vary significantly in terms of size.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 CH AP TER 2 Industry intelligence THE BUSINESS SERVICES INDUSTRY Companies in the Business Services Industry provide professional assistance to other businesses. with the legal services sector accounting for a third of these. they are covered by separate IBSA Escans – Information & Communications Technology and Financial Services respectively. see Figure 2. with growth occurring mainly in the employment. advertising and recruitment and administrative services. although definitions of the industry vary.2 The six sectors in the industry combined generated an income of $65. specialist business services have been increasingly contracted to undertake activities previously conducted inhouse. The industry is mostly made up of small firms hiring less than 20 people and many sole proprietors or partnerships. see Figure 1. but these businesses are covered in an Escan prepared by the Construction and Property Services Industry Skills Council. such as strategic and technical advice. however. It is estimated there are approximately 56. hiring and real estate services see www. while employment services. These sectors are also strong users of the VET system. Larger players are purchasing medium size firms resulting in a two tier industry. public relations and market research and statistical services segments of what is generally often described as the marketing industry). comprising a small number of very large and many very small businesses.com. however. Geographically the businesses tend to be concentrated in the capital cities.

1 0 Perm. customer relations and digital engagement. M6941 Advertising Agencies in Australia. broadly in line with the population share in each state and territory. positioning. the wider communications and marketing sector includes strategic marketing. 2013-14 Temporary employment Employment placement and recruitment Employment services Legal services Management consultants Market research Advertising Communications and marketing PR Call centres Data processsing 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Source: IBISWorld 2014 Industry Reports – NZ294 Call Centre Operation in Australia. the wider communications and marketing sector includes strategic marketing. M6931 Legal Services in Australia. N7212 Temporary Staff Services in Australia. M6950 Market Research and Statistical Services in Australia. positioning. sales management. positioning. customer relations and digital engagement. M6931 Legal Services in Australia. and temporary staff businesses being more widely spread across the country. employment Temp. 2013-14 1. 2014 823 Figure 3: Business Services sectors: annual employment growth (%). M6950 Market Research and Statistical Services in Australia. N7212 Temporary Staff Services in Australia. M6962A Management Consultants in Australia. see Figure 3. M6962B Public Relations Services in Australia. Figure 2: Business Services Industry: number of businesses. brand development and management. M6941 Advertising Agencies in Australia. M6941 Advertising Agencies in Australia. M6962B Public Relations Services in Australia. L7211 Employment Placement Services in Australia.725 4 Call centres 11. Over the last year employment growth has been strongest in the call centre sector. Business Services | 7 . the wider communications and marketing sector includes strategic marketing. however. logistics and channel management. brand development and management. product development. M6962A Management Consultants in Australia. sales management. largely noticeable due to slowed or reversed growth in other sectors. J5921 Data Processing and Web Hosting Services in Australia Note: this and figures following are based on IBISWorld data. however.089 8 7 6 Note: this and figures following are based on IBISWorld data. L7211 Employment Placement Services in Australia.550 11.717 5 Percent 18. product development. N7212 Temporary Staff Services in Australia. J5921 Data Processing and Web Hosting Services in Australia 2 Management consultants Source: IBISWorld 2014 Industry Reports – NZ294 3 Data processing 12. logistics and channel management.250 Source: IBISWorld 2014 Industry Reports – NZ294 Call Centre Operation in Australia. brand development and management. J5921 Data Processing and Web Hosting Services in Australia Note: this and figures following are based on IBISWorld data. employment Legal services Advertising -2 Public relations -1 Market research Call Centre Operation in Australia. product development. however. M6962B Public Relations Services in Australia.Predicting change from 17 percent in 2011. Employment in Figure 1: Business Services sectors: revenue generated ($b). customer relations and digital engagement. the management consultants sector has also been strong. Employment services is the only sector which reduced staff numbers in the last year. M6950 Market Research and Statistical Services in Australia. L7211 Employment Placement Services in Australia. logistics and channel management. M6962A Management Consultants in Australia. sales management. M6931 Legal Services in Australia.

temporary placement services and placement of apprentices and trainees. extra hands during busy periods. in particular. has become particularly relevant for small firms. 4 Management consultants providing data analysis services have been increasing in demand. The general trend towards outsourcing non-core activities. demand from the resources industry. personal injury work and international markets will provide growth. While clients will be expecting value for money. data are drawn from the latest IBISWorld industry reports.specialist skills. 4 Source (2014) Trends shaping the consulting industry over the next 12 months . in both the private and public sectors. Legal services The legal services sector includes solicitors and barristers (public and private) and legal aid services. Job vacancies and new hiring will increase over the coming years as the economy continues to steadily grow. Growth in the Asia Pacific region. has fuelled strong growth in the temporary staff services segment. Management consulting Management consultants provide advice and assistance to organisations on management issues. unless otherwise referenced. There are 18. As the economy improves and unemployment remains relatively low. However. There are now over 11. The expansion of major operators into new service areas. will help drive industry growth. leading to increased competition and constraining profit growth.550 businesses in Australia offering legal services. . which account for over three quarters of the businesses and the temporary staff services segment.3 The products and services and economic outlook for each sector are discussed in more detail below. conveyancing and patent services offered by lawyers. Demand from healthcare and social assistance agencies. allowing them to capitalise on areas of critical skills need. revenue growth in the employment 3 8 Manalo & Orsmond (2013) The Business Services Sector | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence placement and recruitment services segment is expected to strengthen in 2014-15. Currently. outsourcing lower skilled jobs to developing economies will negatively affect employment in the sector in Australia. and a greater level of outplacement services. as will the end of the cooling of resources activities. with specialisation and online presence becoming increasingly important. coupled with the deeper analysis of revenue streams and profitability. businesses and governments have employed an increasing number of consultants. such as HR and payroll consulting. and support in planning and running large projects. particularly China.000 management consulting businesses in Australia and over 37 percent of industry revenue is currently derived from financial. A recent report on the global consulting industry compares client motivation for using consulting firms. rising over time. including the United States and countries in the rapidly growing Asia Pacific region. as outsourcing has become a typical business practice. independent validation of decisions. is expected to drive further demand for these services. Improved economic conditions bring demand for one on one career coaching and permanent placements. Clients are also demanding audit and other accountancy services. Outsourcing of advisory services and other sporadically required work has also become a recognised means of cutting core costs and stimulating growth. outsourced human resource functions encompassing recruitment. including strategic workforce and organisational planning. Businesses will turn to recruitment companies to help them find the right applicant for jobs as competition for workers heats up. Employment services The employment services sector comprises the employment placement and recruitment services segments. Since the late 1990s. rather than hourly rates. administration. mining companies and financial services firms is expected to continue to grow. The sector is large and growing. business and professional services. marketing and human resources.while the remaining third relates to corporate consulting such as responding to regulatory change. Over the next five years revenue and profits are expected to improve for this sector. help with implementation. A greater number of smaller and specialised providers have been entering the industry. Value has become a greater priority for clients and rising demand for value based fee structures. the most trade-exposed part of the industry is the professional services with exports and imports of legal and consulting services. Many major firms have been looking overseas for growth opportunities and a number have merged or formed alliances with overseas firms.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Compared with other service industries – such as tourism and education – Australia’s Business Services Industry is generally trade exposed. The types of services in demand in this sector are sensitive to the economic environment. workplace safety and strategy. Legal firms have increased outsourcing and social media use over the past five years. The employment services sector provides recruitment and screening of candidates for executive and general jobs. Roughly two thirds of all consulting work is motivated by factors relating to individuals . including online providers. During periods of economic weakness employment agencies provide more general resumé and networking assistance to applicants. as firms aim to track consumer preferences and other information to support operating efficiencies. fuelling growth in business services’ revenue. financial planning. These firms now have greater access to international markets. as well as contract and labour hire services. Temporary staff agencies can build their training operations. with most firms neither exporting nor facing a high degree of import competition. training. as well as notary.

The major clients for the sector are organisations within the telecommunications. digitising and processing data from various sources. billboards and the internet to promote a client’s products or services.6 Economic conditions are expected to be stronger over the next five years. In 2013-14. such as customer management solutions and product 5 Buchner (2013) Five top trends for call centres and the pricing dilemma The general trend towards outsourcing non-core activities. and other data types. these often operate by having ‘marketers’ deeply integrated into their businesses. Market research companies conduct opinion polls and qualitative and quantitative 6 Information week (2014) IBMs predictions: 6 big data trends in 2014 Business Services | 9 . particularly when the Australian dollar is strong. energy and resources. Most of the revenue in the sector comes from customer care or relationship management. or provide information. All three segments are concerned with helping businesses understand and communicate better with their clients. positioning. as businesses are investing more in ensuring customer concerns are dealt with effectively. Many firms struggle to interpret and process the abundance of data they now capture and find it easier to outsource this role to data specialists.6 percent over the five years through to 2018-19 and to be worth $9.000 businesses and then the much smaller public relations segment with about 400 businesses. Major clients tend to come from high transaction sectors such as financial services and insurance. has fuelled strong growth in the temporary staff services segment. and ICT services. and new cognitive capabilities’ for transactional. Data processing has generally expanded in the last five years in line with increased internet usage and improved availability of data. technology advances mean the industry will continue to compete on a global basis and Australian firms may find it harder to compete on price with low cost international firms. solicit contributions. health and medical services. Over the next five years. These industries require a high level of customer interaction. recommendations.7 percent. particularly major clients in the banking and finance institutions. Data processing and analytics Data processing encompasses capturing. Communications and marketing The communications and marketing sector combines three segments. dashboards and planning. However.5 Australian based contact centres face a high level of competition from international providers. both pre and post-sale of their products and services. leading to industry expansion. Analytics are used to improve business efficiency. The largest is advertising agencies. As a result contact centres have improved the level of reporting on statistics and identifying actionable insights from their call activity.Predicting change The sector is forecast to grow by an annualised 3. Contact call centres Contact centres interact with customers or the general public on behalf of clients via telephone or another technology interface. Australia’s communication and marketing sector is concentrated in New South Wales and Victoria where clients’ corporate and head offices tend to be located. logistics and channel management. According to a survey report released by the International Data Corporation in 2013. The improvement in IT infrastructure has increased the reliance on expert data analysis where. The trend for businesses to outsource data processing is expected to continue.3 billion. They may be engaged to promote products and services. With the rise of big data. the sector is expected to continue feeling pressure from offshore contact centres able to operate with lower wage costs. strengthening business confidence and leading to higher demand. product development. there has been increased focus on customer engagement. social. followed by market research and statistical services. revenue was estimated to rise by 9. including ‘reporting. more demand for process outsourcing from Australian businesses and a weaker trade weighted index are expected to assist contact centre performance over the next five years. healthcare and government industries. Emerging technologies will enable a wider range of analytics. particularly the more labour intensive data processing activities. Other segments include strategic marketing. with about 3. many domestic businesses will look to provide high value added services. Retailers are also increasing their use of contact centres with the transition to online shopping resulting in a growing need for customer service support. historically it may have been an inhouse function. mobile. Operators in Australia are also beginning to prioritise service quality over labour price in response to changing client expectations.000 businesses. predictive analytics. Advertising agencies have tended to use broadcasting and print media. comprising about 8. customer satisfaction. Stronger business confidence. customer relations. about 80 percent of Australian businesses have either implemented big data analytics or planned to use big data analytics in the following 12 months. digital engagement. in both the private and public sectors. upselling. technical assistance or other forms of customer support. sales management. The government sector is also a major client group in areas such as education. and data analytics. To compete with contact centres based in countries such as India and the Philippines. brand development and management. finance and insurance.

and some of these factors have been important for an extended period while others have been more recent phenomena.003 – Labour Force. There is a growing view that mass media advertising is a high cost method of communicating with customers and that the message may be diluted or lost among the myriad of other advertisements. and technology developments. the increased use of outsourcing by firms to acquire business services. video sharing and social networking websites have become a key avenue for PR communications. Online advertising tends not to generate as much revenue unless it is part of a larger cross platform campaign. WORKFORCE CHARACTERISTICS AND EMPLOYMENT TRENDS Employment growth over the last four years has been particularly strong in the sectors that employ high numbers of professional staff ie management consulting and legal services. while employment has declined in communications and marketing and employment services. although. May 2014. Some sectors require varying levels of education. According to the Reserve Bank of Australia. Those who interview and input data tend not to require tertiary 7 Manalo & Orsmond (2013) The Business Services Sector Figure 4: Employment level and four year change to May 2014 in Professional Services within the Business Services Industry (000s) Legal services Management consulting Employment services Communications and marketing Contact centres Employment level 2014 Employment change 2011-2012 Data processing -50 0 50 100 150 000s Source: ABS.7 The impact of these factors on specific industries within the Business Services Industry has varied. such as market research and statistical services.0. the last year has seen high employment growth. Most employees in this Industry have either graduate or postgraduate qualifications. Quarterly. SuperTABLE E06 – Employed persons by Industry (ANZSIC group). public appearances. press releases. the increase in the demand for the output of skilled labour within the economy. IBISWorld 2014 Industry Report. employment trends within the broader Business Services Industry reflect four interrelated factors: the growth of the mining sector.55. This is driving the move towards diversified marketing communications companies. A key challenge for all sectors has been increasing media fragmentation driven by digital and new media and faster internet connections. Revenue in the advertising segment will steadily increase with greater business confidence. web pages.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 research to help clients understand the opinions of targeted consumer groups. as noted earlier. Marketing and public relations firms have found ways to fill the gap at a lower cost than advertising companies. The PR segment is likely to grow at the highest rate over the next five years as public and private organisations look for new ways to reach their audience and influence key people and customers. Public relations (PR) firms manage the communication between a client and its stakeholders in a way that promotes the client’s image and interests. Employment numbers in contact centres have remained generally stable. Detailed. the sector is expected to further reinvent its services in line with advertising and media fragmentation. social media and special events. The market research segment will also grow steadily as demand for analytics increases. see Figure 4. Australia. 10 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence . including through media monitoring. Over the five years through to 201819. discussion forums. Contact Centres in Australia. Social media such as blogs. Growth in this segment is expected to be particularly strong in 2016-17 with the release of the Census data likely to trigger government and business demand for research analysis. It is also threatening advertising revenues. 6291.

55. Detailed. particularly the two largest cities of Melbourne and Sydney. Employment in professional. This reflects many business services having offices in Figure 5: Business Services employment by sector and state or territory (000s). The impact of the mining sector is evident in Western Australia. marketing and communications and management consulting. Detailed.0.Predicting change services’ sector jobs are located – compared with an 11 percent population share. SuperTABLE E06 – Employed persons by Industry (ANZSIC group) Business Services | 11 . May 2014.003 – Labour Force. scientific and technical services in Western Australia has increased by 27 percent in the last five years and employment in administrative and support services has increased by 25 percent. SuperTABLE E06 – Employed persons by Industry (ANZSIC group) Legal employment estimates for States and Territories are likely to be less accurate than those for total Australia as the percentage of employment that relates to the Legal sector in a particular State or Territory may be different to that for Australia Figure 6: Persons employed in Business Services Industry by sector by gender (000s).003 – Labour Force. May 2014 140 120 100 000s 80 60 40 Female 20 Male er ls ga tc en em Le on su l ta nt vi ce s s s vi ce er en ts oy m M an ag pl Em an d M ar ke tin g O th er ad m in ist ra t iv e se rv ic e co m m un ica tio ns s 0 Source: ABS. where 13 percent of employment qualifications. 2014 45 40 NSW 35 Vic 30 Qld 000s 25 SA 20 WA 15 5 NT 0 ACT s rv se er iv e ts oy m m in ist ra t en co t en pl em O th er M ad an Em ag an d M ar ke tin g ic e vi ce g ns ul tin co m m un ica tio ns vi ce er ls ga Le s Tas s 10 Source: ABS. Australia. Quarterly. likely due to the demand for these services by government agencies. Employment in the industry shows that by state or territory.55. but analytical work generally requires a background in statistics. May 2014. The ACT has more than its share of employment in other administrative services.0. Quarterly. 6291. New South Wales and Victoria have more than their population share across most sectors. 6291. This reflects the heavy use of these services. Australia.

Twenty years ago clerical and administrative workers were on par with professionals. most remain male dominated. The managers group is smaller again. apart from office managers and HR managers. temporary staff services. All sectors.000 and 187.2 percent. clerical and administrative workers make up 14. However. engineering transport and construction companies. see Figure 6. management and organisation analysts and most types of managers. except for management consulting. higher level VET will then be accessed by a similar number of professionals as is accessed by the clerical and administrative workers and managers occupational groups. by mining. including barristers.8 VET has a role to play in educating workers in each of these occupational groups shown in Figure 7. The Business Services Industry is highly feminised. Department of Employment. have had negative employment growth. currently 15 percent of employed professionals have a VET qualification. 2014 2 PROFESSIONALS 4 MANAGERS 10 30 15 35 73 31 6 CLERICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE WORKERS 21 43 30 Bachelor degree or higher qual Certificate III or higher VET qual No post school qual Other Sources: ABS Labour Force.9 percent of occupations.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 office administration services and other non-defined administrative services. which require lower levels of education. Business services employ large numbers of managers. with growth projected in the group. while professionals and managers have grown by 308. ‘other administrative services’ comprise call centre operations at 21. a breakdown by occupation shows that of the higher paying professions in the industry. comprising 12. Today. while professionals are the largest occupational group accounting for 22.3 percent of national employment. oil and gas.4 percent of national employment. clerical and administrative workers and professionals.600 workers respectfully. Over the last five years clerical and administrative workers. Figure 8 shows the projected increase in numbers of workers with higher level 8 Department of Employment (2014) Australian Jobs 2014 Figure 7: Occupational group employment by level of education (%). have an overrepresentation of female workers.5 percent as well as document preparation services. 12 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence . Note that in Figure 6. credit reporting and debt collection services. about a third of both clerical and administrative workers and managers require a Certificate III or higher VET qualification. Employment Projections. Most new jobs have been created in occupational groups for which post school qualifications are commonly required. being the largest two occupational groups with each accounting for 17. while the lower paying jobs such as receptionists and contact centre workers remain occupied mostly by women. ABS Survey of Education and Work. Given the large numbers in the professionals occupational group it is likely that.

Together. 6291.2 1311 Managers. these five occupations employ 770.4 68. by occupational group (‘000) 600 500 400 300 200 2013 100 Projected 2018 0 Clerical and administrative workers Managers Professionals Sources: ABS Labour Force. Office Office Managers 128.5 84.0 71.2 Source ABS.3 128.8 69. Program and Project Administrators Contract. SuperTABLE E08 – Employed persons by Occupation (ANZSCO occupation) Business Services | 13 .1 178.3 229.7 153. Employment Projections.6 65.9 2713 Solicitors Solicitors 59.003 – Labour Force. May 2014. assuming share of qualification levels between occupational groups remains the same.Predicting change Figure 8: Number of workers with Certificate III or higher VET qualification. they are employed in high numbers in many industry sectors. Detailed.4 5121 Managers. advertising and sales managers and contract program and project administrators.7 124 131.6 196.7 66 5412 Clerks.4 127.5 129.6 5911 Clerks.6 56.9 63. Table 1: Total persons employed in Business Services occupations. Advertising and Sales Advertising.1 66.55.3 66.3 86.5 5421 Receptionists Receptionists 168.5 113. by number employed. ABS Survey of Education and Work. Department of Employment. Public Relations and Sales Managers 122. and projected for 2018. Quarterly. However. Australia.8 213.000 people across the economy. General General Clerks 183. VET qualifications in five years.9 99.4 5111 Contract.9 5321 Keyboard Operators Keyboard Operators 76. Other large employing occupations in the industry and shown below are office managers. these occupations are not just employed in the Business Services Industry. Inquiry Information Officers 63.9 5212 Secretaries Secretaries 73.6 175.9 166.0.8 56. Program and Project Administrators 96.3 60. Table 1 shows that general clerks and receptionists dominate the Business Services workforce. May 2011–May 2014 ANZSCO Business Services Occupation Title (DoE) Employment size order Occupation Title (ABS) May 2011 May 2012 May 2013 May 2014 ‘000 ‘000 ‘000 ‘000 5311 Clerks. Purchasing and Supply Logistics Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 82.6 62.7 85.6 114. 2013.

2 24 2343 Scientists.7 11.9 16.4 1335 Managers.7 2253 Public Relations Professionals Public Relations Professionals 17. Corporate Services Corporate Services Managers 9. Human Resource Human Resource Managers 44.8 5994 Clerks.8 5411 Call or Contact Centre Workers Call or Contact Centre Workers 34.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 ANZSCO 14 Business Services Occupation Title (DoE) Employment size order Occupation Title (ABS) May 2011 May 2012 May 2013 May 2014 ‘000 ‘000 ‘000 ‘000 5211 Personal Assistants Personal Assistants 58.1 55.4 46.1 16.4 26.2 1324 Managers.1 11.4 39.9 38.7 66.3 6393 Telemarketers Telemarketers 10.3 56.2 8.4 4 4. Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers 14.7 6.0 7. Policy and Planning Policy and Planning Managers 24.5 9. Supply and Distribution Supply. Environmental Environmental Scientists 20.7 58. General General Managers 42.5 40.6 24.1 7.5 12.9 21.4 17. Other Other Information and Organisation Professionals 17.8 54.2 39. Contact Centre and Customer Service Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers 36.7 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence .2 11.9 53.5 5991 Conveyancers and Legal Executives Conveyancers and Legal Executives 12.1 35.3 2212 Auditors and Company Secretaries Auditors.9 3126 Safety Inspectors Safety Inspectors 3.8 20.5 57.8 1336 Managers.1 56 54.9 1492 Managers.2 1321 Managers. Practice Practice Managers 13. Other Other Clerical and Office Support Workers 8.8 2513 Environmental and Occupational Health Professionals Occupational and Environmental Health Professionals 27 29. Payroll Payroll Clerks 35. Distribution and Procurement Managers 29. Call.2 18.5 7.8 8.4 29.2 19.3 33.5 4.7 7.3 32.5 37. nfd Managers.2 22.6 16.8 12.6 25.3 18.4 9. Production Production Managers 53.3 19.8 50 1323 Managers. Human Resource Human Resource Clerks 12.3 13.5 51.9 53.3 7.1 2711 Barristers Barristers 7.3 12. nfd 15.6 24.1 5992 Clerks.2 21.1 19.1 47.7 34.9 48.5 22. Specialist nfd Specialist Managers.5 27.8 2244 Intelligence and Policy Analysts Intelligence and Policy Analysts 16.1 18 5122 Managers.1 10 12.7 17.7 54.5 34.9 1112 Managers.1 5619 Clerical and Office Support Workers.9 2247 Management and Organisation Analysts Management and Organisation Analysts 46.8 9 5.5 5513 Clerks.6 55.0 30.7 17.1 36.7 1000 Managers.3 12. nfd 5.5 10.2 56.3 28. Court and Legal Court and Legal Clerks 11.4 47.7 2251 Advertising and Marketing Professionals Advertising and Marketing Professionals 48.7 10.2 1300 Managers.6 25.4 51.2 2231 Human Resource Professionals Human Resource Professionals 59.1 45.9 2249 Information and Organisation Professionals.

10 Despite the fragmented nature of the Business Services Industry future trends expected to affect most sectors and the health and shape of the Industry overall include: • End of the mining boom – the economy is in a transition period as the mining boom which has been sustaining the economy for several years slows. Business services. according to the Australian Industry Group (AIG) CEO survey. as well as advances in communication technologies and skill shortages. and to help target and tailor customer interactions. and employment is reduced. need capacity through partnering with specialised services.5 times. The size of China’s economy has expanded nearly ten times in that period and India’s has grown 5. With an expanding middle class in Asia. Mobile devices as business tools. nearshore to New Zealand. both in purchasing power and parity terms. in the contact centre. from contact centres to employment services and management consultants. and • flexibility of industrial relations – 11 percent. CEOs of almost three quarters of services expected sales revenue to have risen in 2014. • Offshoring – the continuing drive for increased efficiency in the face of strong competitive pressures. relative to 2013. Contact centres are focused on more user friendly navigation and stronger customer service skills. software that integrates social media in daily business processes will enhance and extend internal and external collaboration. and advertising services are using neuroscience developments to better understand customers. to allow distributed decision making. in turn. The top five growth concerns among services’ CEOs for 2014 were: • wage pressures –19 percent • customer demand – 17 percent • regulatory burdens – 16 percent • skill shortages – 12 percent. The general business outlook is somewhat subdued. The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) predicted that overall. Further. lead to stronger Business Services | 15 . in Australia have underpinned longer term efforts to shift parts of the internal operations of some business services firms offshore or. is directly tied to the health of the economy. particularly the temporary employment services sector which currently attracts 16 percent of its revenue from the resources industry. process style jobs offshore while keeping higher skilled.9 Slowing of the mining boom. China and India have more than doubled their share of the global economy. This particularly affects management consultants. Voice recognition is becoming a standard approach within contact centres. • Government budget cuts – tight Australian and state and territory government budgets will reduce demand for a range of business services as projects are cancelled or put on hold. • Deeper global engagement – larger business services firms are already working closely through partnerships and collaborations with overseas companies. • End to end services – business services are increasingly about providing full solutions for their customers rather than focusing on single elements of the business with clients looking for total business solutions to manage all aspects of design. Advertising is working with new media and below the line approaches to capture customer attention. Nevertheless.Predicting change INDUSTRY AND WORKFORCE OUTLOOK Industry outlook The major challenge faced by this industry is spending commitments of companies to purchase services from business service providers. in time. data processing and legal services sectors that are continuing to shift back office. In the next few years. Management consultants and market researchers and statistical services are developing big data specialities. which has dominated investment for several years sees consumers being hesitant about spending and businesses reluctant to employ. • Customer engagement – efforts to stimulate demand and business sustainability by enhancing customer engagement is a key theme across all sectors. employment services and market researchers. particularly in Asia continuing to create new opportunities in emerging markets.11 Business services that have been reaping the benefits of the boom. This trend affects larger firms. will be looking to other industries for business. implementation and monitoring. increasingly. 9 RBA (2014) Statement on monetary policy February 2014 ‘Economic Outlook’ 10 AIG (2014) CEO Survey ‘Business Prospects in 2014’ mining investment is expected to decline further as large projects are completed. supported by Australian policy to integrate more with Asia. This. As the concept of customer centricity gains momentum. Over the past 20 years. The Cloud is 11 ibid increasingly used as businesses become confident their data are safe. more complex jobs in Australia. Big data analytics help businesses understand their clients and forecast more accurately. particularly in China. growth is likely to have strengthened a little in 2014. yet only to a pace that is still a little below trend. and 41 percent of respondents plan to hire more employees and 24 percent expect to cut employment. business services are applying technology and analytics to help client businesses gain greater insight into their customers. the services sector remains relatively positive. Workforce and employment outlook The expectation of a gradual strengthening of economic growth should. governments are cutting back on their spending as they seek to get their budgets onto a more sustainable footing. and unemployment is rising nationally. • Working with new technologies – each sector continues to embrace new technologies. vertically integrating services and reorganising governance arrangements. Strong interpersonal skills and customer care are vital to the work of a management consultant. new markets are being created for business services.

360 4. sector are highlighted below.400 3.500 122. apart from contact centres. M6950 Market Research and Statistical Services in Australia.2% Temporary staff services 299. says CEO David Thodey – ABC News 19 August 2014 14 Department of Employment (2014) Australian jobs 2014 15 ibid. but particularly in key markets such as finance and insurance.800 10. While growth for clerical and administrative workers will be on the low side.895 5.713 7. The additional 41.14 Of the professionals working in the Business Services Industry.400 13.15 Indicators of some of the key workforce trends affecting each business services 12 RBA (2014) Statement on monetary policy. Staff will increasingly be expected to have skills in designing. 2013-19 Sector Employment 2013-14 Forecast employment 2018-19 Forecast employment growth 2013-2018 Management consultants 36.063 44. mining. sales. productive and competitive into the future.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 demand for business services labour but.000 new workers. quality data analysis is becoming central to success for employment services. IBISWorld forecasts indicate all sectors. Employment services workers who also bring healthcare specialities will be highly sought after. M6962A Management Consultants in Australia . M6962B Public Relations Services in Australia.800 2.8% Advertising agencies 9. The employment numbers for the temporary staff services sector are high but these numbers reflect the staff firms employ for use by other industries.000 workers recorded on the books of this segment will be employed across the economy. L7211 Employment Placement Services in Australia.N7212 Temporary Staff Services in Australia.823 10.325 29.900 11. the unemployment rate is likely to remain elevated before it slips in 2016.4% Market research and statistical services 25. marketing and public relations professionals and legal.2% Public relations 4. will increase their workforces.8% Data processing 4.12 The Business Services Industry itself is however expected to pick up some of the slack in the labour market. finance and human resource professionals. M6941 Advertising Agencies in Australia M6931 Legal Services in Australia. professional jobs are expected to be most in demand in the next five years. Workplace health and safety expertise has also become more important to ensure Table 2: Forecast employment growth in Business Services sectors. Legal services will also employ nearly 8. Employment services The heathcare sector is already the largest user of employment services due to the high number of people working in the sector. extra jobseekers will be in the labour market for some time and wage growth is expected to remain low.000 contact centre staff over the next five years13 is consistent with the figures showing a decline in employment in this sector. large numbers of new jobs are still expected to be created for the role of general clerk and even small changes in this segment have a large impact numerically with a total of 220. while business. increasing by 23 percent or over 8.6% Legal services 98.970 106. as companies place a higher value on mitigating the risk and cost of claims.260 7.400 26. including what types of attributes the workforce will need to support businesses to become more efficient. As noted in Figure 9 in IBSA occupations. accounting for just under one in every six new jobs. August 2014 13 Fraser (2014) Telstra call centre jobs ‘will not exist in five years’.9% Employment placement services 119. social and welfare professionals will all experience above average growth. Organisations will be looking for staff with the capability to conduct sophisticated workforce forecasting and planning.800 341.3% Source: IBISWorld 2014 Industry Reports – NZ294 Call Centre Operation in Australia . A legislative focus has seen an increase in demand for employee relations specialists.7% Contact centres 29.452 23. Around one in every three new jobs is expected to be in the professionals’ occupational group. with growth expected to be below trend over the year ahead. oil and gas and education and healthcare.900 workers across the economy. There is also a growing emphasis in the sector on using metrics to determine the quality of placements.000 new workers. Demand from this sector is growing quickly. it is expected that information professionals numbers will see the strongest growth. 16 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence . Like most other business services. Management consultant numbers are expected to expand quite dramatically in the next five years. News that Telstra will be losing about 5. interpreting and analysing data. and the extensive use of part time and casual staff. The managers group will also grow strongly.243 -0.

1% 1.7% 32. Organisations will always be looking for effective communicators who can manage rapid change and influence workforces to adapt quickly. The demand for this expertise is expected to grow in coming years. Advertising and marketing professionals with SEO (search engine optimisation) and SEM (search engine marketing) skills will be sought to manage online campaigns. 23 Hays op cit Business Services | 17 .17 Despite the increasing reliance on technology. According to recruiters.8% Machinery operators and drivers Labourers Source: Department of Employment.20 16 Hays (2014) Salary guide As technologies for video production.19 Social media marketing is becoming more mature with a focus on smarter and more careful approaches being applied. metrics in marketing and communications are increasingly being applied to measure success. Nov 2013 – Nov 2018 (% of total growth) 3. Visual media will begin to dominate the market.22 Insight and analytic experts will also be in demand as companies try to better understand their customer to gain a competitive advantage. including social shares.21 Individuals with strong skills in engaging customers via these new media will be in demand. As in employment services.7% 19. and apps such as Instagram. indicating people are reading less and watching more. augmented reality.3% Community and personal service workers 8.3% Professionals 8.23 B&T magazine 21 Institute for the Future (2011) Future work skills 2020 17 ibid 19 ibid 22 ibid 18 Robert Walters (2014) Global Salary Survey Australia 20 Chau (2014) 10 digital marketing trends for 2014.3% 10.18 Marketing and communications In this sector. become ever more sophisticated and widespread. Digital media is no longer a specialisation but is part of the mainstream communications mix.8% Managers Technicians and trades workers Sales workers Clerical and administrative workers 15. Roles centred around social media with names as diverse as brand and product managers. a new ecosystem will take shape around these areas. digital animation. YouTube views and online conversions. digital media is the key focus for the foreseeable future. personal qualities such as these will be at least as important as specific skill sets in coming years. This will be particularly important for sectors where restructuring and redundancies are anticipated. Robert Walters. Organisations want marketing and communications staff to work in conjunction with technology teams to provide deeper customer insights. gaming and media editing. Employment Projections employees understand their legislative responsibilities. digital market researchers and mobile advertising mangers are emerging.16 Hays has also noticed an increasing demand for Diversity Consultants and Managers as more companies develop strategies to achieve equality and diversity in their workplace. with the massive growth in popularity of infographics. Metrics are used to measure online engagement.Predicting change Figure 9: Share of employment growth by occupational group. soft skills remain critical in this industry.

According to the latest Global Contact Centre Benchmarking Report. processes and customers. as support systems lag behind customer expectations and user needs. government.27 Work life balance has become an issue in the legal sector. In Australia. more effort will need to be put into measuring use and costs.web. More demanding and price driven clients are driving the rise of smaller. Much of the work being outsourced was historically done by legal clerks. Contact call centres Understanding and making the best use of technology will continue to be important for the contact centre workforce. The increase in self help options for customers means contact centre workers will be receiving a proportionately higher number of complex and emotive enquiries. Virtual law firms are emerging as an alternative method of practising law. to education. Employees in the management consulting sector need to maintain their knowledge of recent technology advances so they can provide up to date advice to clients. particularly the simpler functions. Growth in the industry is coming from the entry of small businesses . Service specialisation can build business for consultants. This will reduce customer satisfaction and drive an increase in customer contacts. end to end solutions. social media. mainly large corporations and public sector organisations. to lower the cost of contracted services to clients. quality solutions within the agreed budgets. As customers’ needs become more refined.26 High competition means strong results and experience will be key to securing jobs for new entrants. indepth knowledge of industries is increasingly prized over general sales and marketing experience. Legal firms are looking to social media tools to accomplish a variety of legal tasks. This will offer legal firms the opportunity to transfer and settle property with no paper documents or certificates of title. apps etc. This 30 Teasdale. paralegals and entry-level lawyers. no bank cheques and no physical attendance at settlement. as business pressures build to do more with less. but low labour cost. Analytics professionals are being sought to help unlock value by providing data based insights to a wide variety of industries from banking. Data firms need a workforce that can 27 Ginanne (2014) Ready to take the electronic plunge 24 Robert Walters op cit 25 IBIS World (2014) Industry Report Management Consultants in Australia 26 Boxell (2013) Outsourcing hits home for law grads 18 | Chapter 2 Industry intelligence 28 Ginnane (2014) The future of law firms 29 Institute of Analytics professionals Australia (2014) Survey: Huge demand for talented analytics professionals in Australia driving salaries upwards deliver customer focused. Flexibility relates to an ability to understand the client’s business environment. agents will provide incorrect. transportation. is a strong selling point for management consulting firms. countries such as China and India. Another workforce trend is the international outsourcing of some functions to highly skilled. niche legal firms able to provide a quality service at an attractive price. K. Without these systems. Workforce training and quality management will be vitally important.28 Data processing and analytics The business analytics field is still relatively young and developing. e-conveyancing is expected to take off in 2015.32 There has been a campaign for many years to improve contact centre conditions. however significant demand for analytics professionals is being driven by the increasing pervasiveness of digital systems having impact on organisations’ costs. utilities and insurance. This usually requires employees who have worked in the target country and been exposed to the local business culture.24 Management consultants Technology developments are having a key impact on the management consulting sector too. There is concern this work will reduce and potentially put further pressure on the already tight legal graduate market. SMS.30 A key concern for workers and managers is having up to date knowledge management systems. their perception of the agent experience will have a direct impact on the business outcome of the interaction. are increasingly engaging data scientists to perform both data processing and analysis tasks inhouse. as stress is one of the major problems for call centre staff. The report also found that the expanding roles of contact centre agents are becoming more interesting but tougher to perform. 32 ibid . A key component of being part of this skill and knowledge intensive industry is the ability to devote considerable resources to ongoing training. including locating and researching witnesses and interacting with clients. and being able to offer timely.25 Legal services Several large legal firms have been experimenting with legal process outsourcing (LPO).less than 20 employees – specialising in niche areas. health. (2013) Four challenges for customer self-service 31 Dimension data (2014) 2013-14 Global contact centre benchmarking report. inconsistent or outdated information to customers. which involves sending simple legal work to companies in low-cost jurisdictions such as India as a cost saving measure. especially China.29 These functions may not always be outsourced to data firms. permitting flexible work hours and a better work life balance. Flexibility in implementing customised services has increased in importance in the past five years.31 With the increase in channels used by contact centres . frontline staff cannot keep pace with transaction complexity.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Recruiters advise that specialist. Specialist knowledge of developing countries. As computer technology becomes simpler to use and the value of analytics becomes more widely accepted clients.

willingness to engage with multiple disciplines is still essential. 35 Institute of the Future (2011) Future work skills 2020 36 ibid 37 Hays (2013) Top 10 Talent Trends for 2013 38 Deloitte (2011) The Contingent Workforce Business Services | 19 . making decisions on whether to fill a role or skill need with a contingent worker or a full time employee.37 The Business Services Industry is beginning to rely more on contract and freelance workers and consultants to meet their business goals and respond to skills gaps and a changing economic environment. operator says Australian call centre industry doing well’. which have not traditionally been present in all parts of the industry. In fact. its employment trends and its workforce. see patterns in data. global connectivity and technology innovations. attempts to focus on core specialties have opened up opportunities for partnerships with other specialist firms to provide end to end solutions for clients. but have the capacity to converse in the language of a broader range of disciplines. (ASU) 34 Bushell-Embling (2014) NZ emerging as key nearshoring location for Australia of at least one field.34 KEY IMPACTS FOR THE WORKFORCE Considering the changes occurring in the individual sectors. significant effects expected for the business services workforce include: • Specialisation and partnerships – each of the business services sectors is seeing more specialisation in response to having a better understanding of the niche needs of customers. • Data analysis skills – there is now a general need for business services employees to have data analysis skills. IBSA polling found 83 percent of its industry stakeholders plan to increase operational partnerships with other businesses. workers will increasingly require abilities to interact with data. Occupations and job roles reported as in demand in the Business Services Industry at IBSA’s Escan 2014 industry consultations and validation were: • frontline supervisor • organisation and workforce development specialists • customer service and frontline inquiry officer • general administration officer • quality and compliance auditor • manager business development strategy • HR administrator and manager (including diversity specialist) • OH&S manager • sustainability manager • manager and advisor social media. This list contributes to workforce development and planning strategies highlighted in Chapter 3 and also presents a clear relationship to training packages.36 • Harnessing the extended labour force – more than 30 percent of Australian based employers already regard temporary workers as a key component of their long term staffing strategy and 54 percent of employers see temporary workers as an ideal way to bring a particular expertise on board.38 OCCUPATIONS IN DEMAND A list of Occupations in Demand is provided in Appendix B. But it is suggested that the ideal worker of the future be T-shaped – to bring deep understanding 33 Hall (2013) ‘Despite offshoring. Specialisation does not mean abandoning generalist skills. processing power and volumes of data now available on all aspects of business. there is an increased need for specialisation by the small firms. make data based decisions. complex regulatory environments and international markets all offer opportunities for business services providers to specialise in niche. New media channels. Specifically. high value products and services. knowledge and information manager.Predicting change is partly due to having to deal with ‘abusive and aggressive customers’ dissatisfied with their experience.33 Offshoring and nearshoring – offshoring to a location near the point of production – is reducing employment numbers in the call centre sector in Australia.35 • Increasing demand for professionals – more and more jobs are being created at the professional level in the Business Services Industry. all sectors need to make the most of data to get closer to their customers and target services appropriately. Businesses increasingly want to employ workers with higher level VET and degree qualifications. As a result. The list is collated from industry intelligence presented in this Escan on the industry. and how to implement integrated workforce strategies that make the most of the benefits and reduce the risks of using a contingent workforce. With the massive increases in sensors. and use data to design desired business outcomes.understanding what skills and services contingent workers can provide. as attempting to cover too large a market leaves businesses exposed and with no competitive advantage. These workers may be based locally or overseas. and • data. Organisations face challenges in . New Zealand is emerging as a key nearshore contact centre location for Australian businesses due in part to a cost discount of up to 30 percent. reflecting a deepening of skills and knowledge required to perform functions. records.

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CHAP TER 3 Identified workforce development needs .

3 percent of new jobs in the next five years being in this group. IBSA stakeholders also highlighted the challenges involved in mapping qualifications when each university has its own differently structured requirements and expectations. or pathways and articulation arrangements with universities. Occupations involving high job demands.40 Recently. The Department of Employment confirms professionals will play the strongest role in contributing to overall employment growth with over 32. Staff turnover is estimated to cost employers up to $1 million per annum. On the other hand. time pressure. Dwyer C & Blacker J (2012) Articulation: A clearer picture or a new view . and maternity and paternity.39 Supporting employees at all levels to achieve work life balance can pay a handsome dividend and is central to retaining and developing people and achieving service commitments. a structural relationship develops that allows the partners to engage with industry and more effectively meet skills shortages. Research suggests this area needs attention with a focus on the major structural barriers between the two sectors. there has been a focus on depression in the workplace. Managing these risks and skills in regulating workloads is critical to mitigate health risks. Lower level qualifications are a critical 41 Paez D. THE RISE OF THE PROFESSIONAL Business Services Industry sectors are requiring more knowledge and skills from their workers. is essential to ensuring the workplace is able to move with changing needs and expectations. compliance and partnerships and broking are needed to Chapter 3 Identified workforce development needs support the Industry. Management approaches also need to adjust to accommodate a variety of new work environments.41 The growth in demand for higher level skills should not be at the expense of lower level qualifications. healthier workplaces and to retain talent. low control. ageing and retirement. IBSA consultations highlighted a skill deficit among business services in effectively managing outsourced contractors. Jackson A. Employment and Direction Survey 22 | long hours and shift work are associated with depression and other ill health. contingent workers and virtual teams. when articulation pathways involve collaborative relationships between VET and higher education. including training team members in using technology and navigating the human resources implications of flexible employee arrangements. Managers need to consider how to engage and motivate a physically dispersed group.000 a year for every 100 people employed. to ensure the industry has the requisite skill base. reducing churn by just 5 percent could result in a saving of $280. 39 Hays (2013) Top 10 Talent Trends for 2013 40 LMA (2013) Leadership. higher level qualifications. Allowing a flexible and adaptable approach in dealing with family. The Business Services Industry may need to look at new.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 CH AP TER 3 Identified workforce development needs HEALTHY – CHANGING – WORKPLACES A number of business services may need to consider how to improve staff satisfaction and work life balance to create happier. Outsourcing HR functions means many employee management functions once handled by the HR department are now falling to the line manager. while providing opportunities for career development. Byrnes J. IBSA stakeholders indicated that higher level skills in business development.

There are also risks with social media that users need to be aware of. discussion boards. and leveraging social media for key business functions. backed by gap training provided on the job • qualifications delivered within 3 months. COST AND CONVENIENCE OF TRAINING Offering training options that are cost effective and convenient is becoming more important to employers as the pace of technology. understanding the cultural and behavioural impact of social media.45 Global management consultants McKinsey & Co has identified a number of personal skills required. It thereby short circuits established hierarchies and traditional lines of communication. Organisations increasingly see diversity as a driver of innovation. Increased fees or reduced subsidies. for courses are also said to have impact on students’ ability to pay for their own training. Creating and managing diversity will therefore become a core competency for business service organisations over the next decade. YouTube channels. Further consideration is needed on the role of lower level VET qualifications. which includes business services sectors such as employment services. beginning to use new tools such as wikis. Stakeholders also highlighted that non-accredited training can be delivered at a lower cost and therefore can be more desirable for employers in this high change environment. call centres. with the introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme beginning in 2016. and 42 ABS (2013) Labour market mobility • RTOs to collaborate to deliver customised training options. As more user friendly production tools are developed. business innovation and regulatory change increases. These are valuable tools. capitalizing on global trends 44 Institute for the Future (2011) Future work skills 2020 46 Institute for the Future (2011) Future work skills 2020 47 Mckinsey and Co (2013) Six social media skills every leader needs Business Services | 23 . ABS data show that Administrative and Support Services. as pathways to higher qualifications and skills in the Business Services Industry.44 SOCIAL MEDIA LITERACY Many organisations have naturally been responding to the social media revolution. disciplines and working and thinking styles that members bring to the table. DIVERSITY DRIVING INNOVATION Leading companies around the world are finding better ways to tap into underutilised sources such as the female labour force and older workers. Twitter and Facebook to build brand awareness. Employees working within diverse teams need to be able to identify and communicate points of connection. skills. values. training investments need to be targeted to yield productivity returns before employees move on. at 27 percent per year. Also.43 In Australia. McKinsey highlights a number of capabilities required at the strategic or organisational level to respond to the rise of social media. as the rate of workforce turnover increases. aligned to business needs. video language will become part of the common vernacular. storytelling and artistic vision • technical skills – especially video production • understanding of cross platform dynamics and what causes messages to go viral • an ability to build and sustain a body of social followers • capacity to create resonance via selective replies and linking. creating a new talent pool for business services. shared goals. encourage global conversations and engage with and motivate staff. Social media encourages horizontal collaboration and unscripted conversations that travel in random paths across management hierarchies. Research now tells us that what makes a group intelligent and innovative is the combination of different ages. has one of the highest staff turnover rates.47 45 Mckinsey and Co (2013) Six social-media skills every leader needs 43 PWC (2014) Annual Global CEO survey: Fit for the future. including foundation skills. Fluency in visually stimulating forms of communication and presentation of information is a key skill that all social media workers will need. as well as unemployed people. including balancing vertical accountability with horizontal collaboration. making some skills and knowledge quickly redundant. but require sophisticated skills to be used effectively to engage and persuade audiences.46 As well as these operator level skills. and • an ability to make sense of the noise through intelligent filtering. priorities. including: • top up training. blogs. particularly those from low socioeconomic backgrounds. particularly by leaders. lower cost training options.42 Some IBSA stakeholders believe the value of qualifications is diminishing because the rate of job change requires chunks of learning rather than longer courses. many people with disabilities who have had difficulty accessing the workforce will be better supported to do so. particularly in relation to compliance issues • recognition of prior learning (RPL). to capitalise on the transformational potential of social media.Predicting change entry point for large numbers of learners. and other administrative services. Consultations indicated employers want more flexible. It has been suggested that the next generation of workers will need to critically read and assess video content in the same way we currently assess a paper or presentation. which transcend their differences and enable them to build relationships and work together effectively. including: • creative competence – authenticity.

data modelling. data abstractions and simulations and formulating problems such that computers may assist in problem solving. statistics and IT training are increasingly important.au  Identified workforce development needs . CT is a problem solving process that involves analysing and logically organising data. There is increasing demand in large businesses and governments for individuals who can coordinate sustainability practices. clean up. ‘Defining Computational Thinking for K-12’. compensation. or conserving water.50 48 Stephenson.51 Business leaders need to understand what sustainability practices would be effective in their business and plan how to put them into practice. Sustainability skills units and learning resources have been developed to train business managers.48 Many more roles will require computational thinking skills to make sense of volumes of information. knowledgeable and engaged workers who perform consistently to deliver quality products on time • reduced waste disposal and trade waste costs • improved processes and efficiency • avoiding or reducing the number of incidents. and • the ability to communicate and work with others to achieve a common goal or solution. small and micro businesses and other staff in sustainability practices. non-technical staff will be required to organise and interpret data and simulate scenarios for planning and decisions making. 51 Manufacturing Skills Australia (2014) sustainabilityskills. energy use and the business advantages of sustainable practices. staff engagement and gaining a competitive edge. collecting and recycling waste materials. which currently value applicants who are familiar with basic applications. rehabilitation. and • opportunities in green markets – estimated to reach a value of $US2. particularly as the effects of climate change become clearer. Chris. will shift their expectations and seek out resumes that include statistical analysis and quantitative reasoning skills.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 COMPUTATIONAL THINKING (CT) ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Data are being used and processed at a rate never seen before. maths. businesses are expected to minimise their environmental impact. environmental mitigation • improved profile and reduced risk of negative public opinion. Increasingly. and big data move from the realm of data scientists to everyday business transactions. whether it is using less paper or electricity. Sustainability practices also have benefits for businesses in cost savings. including: • confidence in dealing with complexity • persistence in working with difficult problems • tolerance for ambiguity • the ability to deal with open ended problems.49 In this context. Sustainability coordinators and environmental managers require a deeper level of understanding about waste. emergencies or injuries • reduced risks of costs from legal proceedings. CSTA Voice 7 ( 2): 3–4 49 Institute for the Future op cit 50 International Society for Technology in Education and the Computer Science Teachers Association (2011) Operational definition of computational thinking 24 | Benefits reported by businesses include: • a whole of business view that supports innovation and improvement ideas from all levels in the enterprise • reduced energy and fuel costs • skilled.net. big data can provide enormous opportunities for value creation for business services organisations. such as the Microsoft Office suite. If leveraged properly.7 trillion per year globally by 2020. It is predicted that HR departments. Valerie Barr (2011). But people need supporting core skills that are essential dimensions of computational thinking. As the language of analytics permeates organisations. energy efficiency.

There is increasing demand in large businesses and governments for individuals who can coordinate sustainability practices. .

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CHAP TER 4 Current impact of training packages .

28 | Small Business units and qualifications will also be reviewed to ensure the Package not only encourages the creation of small and micro business. They will assist consideration of trends in the uptake and use of publicly funded VET in IBSA’s Training Packages. These factors may result in an overreporting of enrolments and underreporting of completions. school councils and not for profit organisations. The tables and figures should be read with an understanding that significant amounts of training also occur outside the publicly funded VET system including: • fee for service training in national qualifications provided by private training providers • inhouse training in national Chapter 4 Current impact of training packages qualifications delivered by enterprise RTOs. for those wishing to advance their learning in this area. these data report publicly funded training and fee for service VET provided by public institutions. to assist human resource professionals and emerging leaders to successfully innovate using workforce diversity. Continuous improvement in 2015 will look at the changing Marketing and Advertising sectors to ensure units of competency and qualifications meet industry’s requirements. As a result. Business Services Training Package – enrolment characteristics The Business Services Training Package remains the most heavily used of all IBSA Training Packages for publically funded VET. the Package now has forty new units of competency. and • completions are not uniformly reported. accounting for over .IBSA Environment Scan 2015 CH AP TER 4 Current impact of training packages BUSINESS SERVICES TRAINING PACKAGE (BSB) A new suite of qualifications in the Leadership and Management stream has been developed. as well as the corporate sector. and • non-accredited training conducted inhouse or by external providers. The governance stream will be considered in 2015 to make sure it reflects the needs of local sporting clubs. and • a Graduate Certificate and four Skill Sets in Diversity are included. five new skill sets and seven new qualifications. ie some jurisdictions only report completions when they award a certificate (rather than a Statement of Attainment) and this is only done when requested and paid for by the completing student. which reflect industry and enterprise skill requirements. which include a restructure of the Advanced Diploma and the introduction of a Graduate Diploma. but also supports the skill needs of the many small business owners and operators. as well as local and international trends. Uptake of training packages The following data are reported from the annual NCVER VET Provider Collection and the quarterly Apprentice and Trainee Collection. which includes many of the soft skills industry requires: • two new qualifications in Project Management. Attempts to directly correlate tables of commencement and completion should be avoided because: • an enrolment is recorded for each year the course is active – multiple enrolments are recorded when a course is undertaken over more than one year. to better align the training package qualifications with the standards of the major industry bodies.

Low funding levels and changes to incentives have had a negative impact on Business Services enrolments. extracted on 16/07/2014. see Figure 10.edu. Changes to state based funding arrangements and Commonwealth incentives for apprentices and trainees have had an impact on enrolment data. Enrolments in Certificate I was very low (about 1.7 percent between 2010 and 2013 while completions data for 2013 show they were much lower than those for 2012.862 2010 25. extracted on 16/07/2014 2013 completions provided by NCVER on 29/07/2014 will be revised upwards from time to time.683 2010 26.137 222.1% 2011 2012 2013 Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.edu. while enrolments in Certificate IV and higher level qualifications increased from 2010 to 2012 then declined in 2013. Other reasons for the decline may include competition from uncapped higher education places along with increased VET fees. The highest enrolments in 2013 were in Certificate IV.251 65.367 71. 2010-13 263.5% -19.114 82. and the removal of incentives for training existing workers.ncver.600) and decreasing.1% 16.ncver.7% -25. greater use of skills sets of specific units. Figure 11: Business Services qualifications completed and annual percentage change. Enrolments in Certificate II and III decreased between 2011 and 2013. Growth had already slowed by 2012 after strong growth in the years 2010-2011.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>. Business Services qualification enrolments declined in 2013 for all qualification levels.8% 4. 2010-13 96.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>. Qualifications completed in Business Services had an average annual increase of 2. down 19 percent on 2012. Figure 10: Business Services enrolments and annual percentage change. However. rather than full qualifications. 2013 saw significant reduction in enrolments.328 275.Predicting change half of all IBSA training activity in 2013. Business Services | 29 .495 207.9% 2011 2012 2013 Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.

000 2011 40.000 2012 2013 0 Certificate I Certificate II Certificate III Certificate IV Diploma or higher Source: VOCSTATS <http://www. extracted on 16/07/2014.000 80.000 40.000 100.000 2010 2011 20.000 60. Figure 13: Business Services enrolments by student remoteness region.000 2013 0 Major cities Inner regional Outer regional Remote and very remote Overseas and unknown Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.000 120. Note: Data for 2010 is based on the Student Remoteness Region 2006 (ARIA+) while data for 2011 to 2013 are based on the Student Remoteness Region 2011 (ARIA+). 2010-13 120. 2010-13 200.000 160. 30 | Chapter 4 Current impact of training packages .au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Figure 12: Business Services enrolments by qualification level.000 140.ncver.000 2010 60.000 180.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.000 80.ncver.edu.000 120.edu.000 2012 20. extracted on 08/08/2014.000 100.

Figure 14: Business Services enrolments by participants’ previous highest education.315) • Certificate IV in Business (15. 2010-13 60.533) Just over half the people who enrol in a Business Services VET qualification do not have any other post school qualification.1 percent of total course enrolments in the BSB Training Package. extracted on 08/08/2014.edu.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>. extracted on 08/08/2014.000 2011 10. • Certificate IV in Frontline Management (16. Figure 15: Business Services enrolments by age group. Most Business Services enrolments by a factor of between two and three.ncver.924) • Certificate II in Business (22. The age group with the most participants in these qualifications is the 30 to 39 years. while around 8 percent already have a degree or higher qualification. Business Services | 31 .ncver.Predicting change For 2013.085) Figure 13 shows enrolments in Business Services qualifications decreased in 2013 for all regions from major cities to remote locations. the five qualifications with the highest enrolments represented 46. These qualifications are listed below with the total number of enrolments in 2013 in brackets. • Certificate III in Business Administration (26. see Figure 14.000 50.000 2012 2013 0 19 years and younger 20to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 39 years 40 to 49 years 50 to 59 years 60 years and over Source: VOCSTATS <http://www. 2010-13 6% 8% 23% Bachelor degree/Higher degree level (8%) 2% Advanced diploma/Associate degree (2%) Diploma (6%) 6% Certificate IV (9%) Certificate III (15%) 9% 29% Certificate II (2%) Certificate I (0%) 15% Year 12 (29%) Year 11 or below (23%) Unknown or misc (6%) 2% Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.000 2010 20.000 40.edu. come from students in major cities. Enrolments in all age groups dropped in 2013.629) • Diploma of Management (21.000 30.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.

ncver. Table 3 shows the percentage of students enrolling in Business Services qualifications who identify as Indigenous is similar to the overall percentage for all IBSA qualification enrolments.9% 3.2% 35. The vast majority of Business Services qualifications are undertaken part time. with only 16 percent being undertaken undertaking courses online or remotely increased from 12 percent in 2011 to 19 percent in 2013.3% Percentage of all IBSA enrolments by Indigenous students 4.9% % Male 70.edu. however. Table 3: Percentage of enrolments by Indigenous students in Business Services and all IBSA qualifications.428 2010 2011 2012 2013 Female Male Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.4% 4.504 93. Indigenous people made up most of the student group in the Certificate IV and Diploma of Business (Governance). 2010-13 Business Services 2010 2011 2012 2013 Percentage of BSB enrolments by Indigenous students 4.9% 4. the number of learners Figure 17: Business Services enrolments by delivery mode.583 78.534 99.5% 35. extracted on 09/08/2014. College or campus based delivery is still the preferred option. Figure 16: Business Services enrolments by gender. 2013 10% College/Campus based 18% Online/remote access 53% Employment based Other 19% Source: VOCSTATS <http://www. 2010-13 36.2% 32 | Chapter 4 Current impact of training packages . Highest numbers of Indigenous people were enrolled in Certificate II in Business and Certificate III in Business.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Women still outnumber men in Business Services qualifications by a factor of 2 to 1. This has not changed significantly over the past four years.0% 4.2% 3. full time. extracted on 09/08/2014.edu.2% 33.ncver.0% 4.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.

Completed. Notes specific to Apprenticeship and Traineeship statistics: Figures are based on date of effect rather than the date of processing. analysis of the employment profile for clerical and administrative occupations requiring BSB skills shows these workers are employed in large numbers in sectors outside the Business Services Industry.ncver. 2011 Census of Population and Housing.000 15.Commenced and In Training . public administration and safety and professional.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/> extracted on 7/8//2014. Figure 18: Apprenticeships and traineeships in Business Services qualifications by training contract status (Commenced. Completed and Cancellations/Withdrawals are full year figures.000 75. receptionists. Figure 19: Persons employed in IBSA Business Services Clerical and Administrative Worker. These industries are particularly heavy employers of general clerks. Cancellations/Withdrawals and In Training). office managers and program and project administrators.edu. Completed training contracts also decreased in 2013. Due to lags in reporting and processing. One digit ANZSIC by four digit ANZSCO BUSINESS SERVICES SKILLS EMPLOYMENT PROFILE It is important to note that individuals trained in skills delivered through the Business Services Training Package are employed in high numbers across the economy. Consistent with the drop in enrolments generally. Numbers for Commenced. For example. the most recent figures (generally those for the last 7 quarters or 2 years) are estimates and are subject to revision. see Figure 19.000 45. Census 2011 Healthcare and social assistance Public administration and safety Professional.in Business Services qualifications between 2012 and 2013. Business Services | 33 .000 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 Source: Apprentice and Trainee Collection from VOCSTATS <http://www.000 60.Predicting change Figure 18 shows Apprenticeship and Traineeship activity in Business Services qualifications between 2010 and 2013.000 30. Numbers for ‘In Training’ relate to apprentices and trainees whose training contract status was ‘In Training’ at the end of each calendar year. scientific and technical services Manufacturing Education and training Construction Wholesale trade Retail trade Transport. scientific and technical services industries. Postal and Warehousing Financial and insurance services 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 140000 160000 Source ABS. They are most prevalent in the healthcare and social assistance. 2010-13 Commenced Completed Cancellations/Withdrawals In Training 90. there has been a large decrease in the numbers of Apprentice and Trainee training contracts .

means the industry now needs more people with higher order skills. telemarketers and call or contact centre workers. The BSB Training Package needs to be responsive to changes and perspectives in these industries. data abstractions and simulations will become a core rather than specialised skill. • Environmental sustainability skills – increasingly. particularly as the effects of climate change become clearer. means both managers and workers need to be able to collaborate. Figure 20: Inquiry Clerks. these occupations are employed across a wide range of industries and are particularly heavily used by Governments. and improvements in technology allowing business services customers Chapter 4 Current impact of training packages to access self help for more simple advisory services. see Figure 20. process jobs offshore. • Communication skills – while training packages have recently been updated to include a greater 34 | focus on soft skills. by focusing on the priority issues: • Digital skills – Business Services Industry sectors need to have the digital and social media skills to effectively engage customers and motivate staff. means line managers have more complex people management responsibilities. 2011 Census Central government administration Other administrative services Telecommunications services Local government administration Banks Health and general insurance State government administration Tertiary education Auxilary finance and investment services Motor vehicle retailing 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 Source: ABS. all businesses are expected to minimise their environmental impact. • Management skills – the new Graduate Certificate and Skills Sets on Diversity Management respond to an unmet need in the HR area. However. this area will need a continued focus. Outsourcing HR functions. different styles of working and a focus on healthy workplaces. healthcare and financial and insurance services. Banks. in critical thinking. Video design. Other Administration Services (which includes call centres). other areas of management may also need attention. production and interpretation is likely to be a key area requiring skill development in coming years. the ability to analyse and logically organise data and undertake data modelling. Call or Contact Centre Workers or Telemarketers highest employing Industries. . analysis and complex problem solving. However. Telecommunications Services and Insurers. Demand for individuals with the skills to coordinate organisations’ sustainability practices will increase. from training and stress management to building high performing virtual teams. the BSB Training Package delivers skills to workers in the three most common occupations in the contact centre sector – inquiry clerks. • Data analysis skills and computational thinking – with more and more data available. Three digit ANZSIC by four digit ANZSCO OUTLOOK FOR TRAINING In the next 18 months to 2 years.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Similarly. training in the Business Services Industry needs to take account of the workforce trends identified in this Escan. reading social cues and conducting transparent communication. • Higher level skills – moving simple. Different ways of working and a greater requirement for strong skills in customer service and building partnerships. • Training package links with other industries – business services skills are utilised across the economy and in high numbers in government. 2011 Census of Population and Housing.

.

.

CHAP TER 5 Future directions .

Business services are responding to these demands by forging business partnerships. and harnessing the contingent workforce. changes in needs and expectations of customers and deeper global engagement. Table 4: Workforce development challenges Workforce development challenge: Availability and use of large volumes of customer data Impacts: Critical future skills: All businesses • Language of analytics • Mathematics. government budget restraints. These issues all impact the shape and skills of the business services workforce. if a little subdued. storytelling and artistic vision) • Technical skills (especially video production) • Social media dynamics • Ethics and risk management 38 | Chapter 5 Future directions . as the economy strengthens and outsourcing trends continue. The following table summarises the workforce development challenges in this industry. getting closer to customers through their information and data. statistics • Computational thinking • IT – strategic and operational • Cyber security • Written and verbal communication skills The emergence of social media as a key business tool All businesses • Creative competence (authenticity.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 CH AP TER 5 Future directions The Business Services Industry has benefited from long periods of growth and. The industry will need to gear up for a number of challenges on the horizon including the continued quietening of the mining boom. specialising in niche areas. the two year outlook is positive.

. in future adjustments. control and reporting SUPPORTING A RESPONSIVE NATIONAL VET SYSTEM In supporting industry skilling the following could be considered for the national skills system: • Encourage the university sector and the VET sector to work together to create better articulation pathways in Business Services Industry sectors • Encourage business services employers to: –– provide management skills to new managers. . VET providers and universities • Critical thinking • Business literacy • Problem solving • Specialised skills within high-value niche areas Drive for environmental sustainability All businesses PRIORITIES FOR IBSA TRAINING PACKAGES The following priorities could be considered for the Business Services Training Package: • Integrate data analysis skills into relevant qualifications in the Package • Consider adjustments to the BSB Training Package to respond to emerging industry skill needs for skill sets in: risk. to gain and retain clients . business services’ fortunes are strongly linked to the state of the economy and business confidence. including mentoring and coaching –– take up new skill sets and qualifications in managing diversity. • Environmental management. including public administration and safety. • Engage with industry to achieve greater provision of cost effective training. and –– provide general training to all staff on the language of analytics and making the best use of customer data.Predicting change Workforce development challenge: Impacts: Critical future skills: Changing workplaces. including RPL and gap training • Ensure use of accredited training and fees are not a disincentive for employers and students All business services depend strongly on the quality of the people they employ. government. healthcare and social assistance and financial services. Business Services | 39 . including focus on healthy workplaces to retain workers All businesses • Situation (frontline) management • Industrial relations • Communication and interpersonal skills • Mentoring and coaching • Promoting and supporting diversity • Using technology for communication and staff engagement Demand for high-level skills and professionals All businesses. change management and integration. and • Specifically consider the skills needs of high volume BSB Training Package users. and use of big data by business managers.brand recognition and customer service are critical .

.

Appendices .

Further input into this Escan was gathered from industry stakeholders via a series of consultation forums held in 2014. Melbourne.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 APPEN D IX A Methodology and bibliography METHODOLOGY AND STAKEHOLDER INPUT Statistical information for this report was gathered through a desktop research process from a range of sources as indicated in the bibliography. Sydney. Canberra. including advice on occupations in demand. Forums were held in Adelaide. The following organisations have made valuable contributions to this Escan: 3-AAA Training & Consulting Pty Ltd Academy IT ACAE Adult Education and Vocational Training Institute (AEVTI) Animal Industries Resource Centre Arts Centre Melbourne Arts Communications Finance Industries and Property Services ITAB NSW Arts NT Association of Accounting Technicians Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA) AUCTUS Business Training and Consulting Ausdance NSW AuSQ Australian Adelaide International College Pty Ltd Australian Broadcasting Corporation Australian Business Academy Australian Community Logistics Australian Computer Society (ACS) Access Training Centre Acropolis Now Pty Ltd Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) Adelaide College of Technical Education Australian Council for Private Education and Training (ACPET) 42 | Appendix A Methodology and bibliography Australian Directors Guild Australian Entertainment Industry Association Australian Financial Markets Association Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI) Australian Industry Group (AiG) Australian Industry Trade College Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA) Australian Institute of Management Australian Institute of Technology Transfer Australian Library and Information Association Australian Manufacturing Workers Union (AMWU) Print Australian Maritime Safety Authority Australian Medical Association (WA) Australian Pacific College Australian Professional Skills Institute (APSI) Australian Services Union . Brisbane. Perth. and a webinar gathered views from regional stakeholders. Survey tools were used at each forum to gather information from participants. This Escan was validated by IBSA’s Sector Advisory Committee in October 2014. Hobart and Darwin.

CSH&E Training Council. C Y O’Connor Institute Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) Captain Cook College Career Lounge Cemons Skills Centre Heritage Bank Business Services | 43 . WA Goodstart Centacare Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD). Producer Guildhouse CEO Tasmania DOME Association Hargraves Institute Challenger Institute of Technology Durban International College Pty Ltd Chamber of Commerce NT Edutainer Health Consumers Action Group WA Inc. WA CTQ Cultural Infusion Culturally Make a Difference Curtin University CWU Australia Fourth Force Pty Ltd Fuji Xerox Australia Pty Limited FuturePrint Futures Now. SA Great Southern Institute of Technology (WA) (GSIT) Central Coast Community College Department of Industry (DOI) Greencross Vets Central Institute of Technology Diane Appleby Jewellery Group Training Australia (SA) Centre for Adult Education Dixi Joy Bankier. Administrative and Professional Services Training Council Incorporated COTÈ Software and Solutions Fire & Rescue NSW Crown Institute of Business and Technology Flex Training Services Corridors Training Inc.Predicting change Australian Skills Quality Authority Charles Darwin University Entropy Enterprises Australian Vocational Education & Training Academy (AVETA) CHARTTES Cultural. The Salvation Army Box Hill Institute BRACE Education and Training Bridge Business College Brown’s Mart Arts Ltd BSA Limited & BSA Advanced Learning Bunyip & Associates Pty Ltd Business Foundations Inc. NT B Trained Baking Industry Training Australia Chemene Sinson. Business Planning Pty Ltd – representing Australian Marketing Institute Business SA Business Skills Viability Business Solutions and Consulting Business Transformation Solutions Concept Training Australia Executive Assistant Network Federation University Finance Sector Union Finance Sector Union (FSU) Corrugated Iron Youth Arts Financial. Consultant Chisholm Institute Evocca College Evolution Evolve Training Solutions Excel Training Baptist Care Cisco Networking Academy ANZ and Pacific Islands Barrington Training Services CITT Betterlink Group City of Unley Blended Learning International College of Design and Social Context BMC College of Lifelong Learning Pty Ltd Bookkeeping Institute of Australia Pty Ltd Combined Team Services Financial Administrative and Professional Services Training Council WA Commercial Manager TIS Financial Planning Association Australia Communicare Academy Financial Services Academy Community College Gippsland Financial Services Institute of Australasia (FINSIA) Booth College. Recreation & Tourism Training Enzumo Australis Institute of Technology and Education (AITE) Advisory Council. WA Futurum Australia FYI Training Darwin Entertainment Centre Game Developers Association of Australia (GDAA) Darwin Festival Global Business Training DDLS Gold Coast Institute of TAFE Department of Culture and the Arts.

Entertainment & Arts Alliance 44 Service Skills Australia Appendix A Methodology and bibliography Spec Training Spectrum Organisations Spirelight Brand Media Management . NT Mentor Education Precision Group (Australia) Pty Ltd Merage Global Institute of Technology Print NZ Metropolitan Fire Brigade Printing Industries Association of Australia Hunter TAFE Illawarra ITeC Independent Schools Victoria Industrial Foundation for Accident Prevention (IFAP) Insources Institute for Civic Leadership Institute of Certified Bookkeepers Institute of Project Management Institute of Public Accountants Insurance Australia Group Milcom Communication Montague Consulting Murray College of Health Education Music Council of Australia Musicians’ Union of Australia National Association for the Visual Arts National Corporate Training Pty Ltd National Training and Solutions Provider Pty Ltd Productivity Partners Pty Ltd Progressive Training (WA) Pty Ltd PTA Queensland Performing Arts Centre Queensland Police Service Radio Adelaide Ramsden Telecommunications Training Ratio National Training Organisation. Open Colleges | Service Skills SA SKILLED Group Training Services Skills Strategies International Skills Tasmania Optimi Digital Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers Outpost Consulting Sorco Vocational Services Ozford College of Business South Western Sydney Institute of TAFE Pathways Training & Placements Pty Ltd Southern Cross Education Institute (SCEI) Personal Injury Education Foundation Pilbara Institute Pinnacle Learning Institute of Australia Media. Consultant Judy MacGraw Consulting Kaplan Professional Kate Hanson Training and Assessment Kingston International College Kondinin Group Industry Training Lifetimes & Milestones Lightmare Studios Live Performance Australia Loans Cafe Locher and Associates Mancino Catering Services Marine Rescue NSW Master Electricians Australia Mastermind Group Matlin Professional Development Media Makeup Office of Training and Skills Commission Open Channel Co-Operative Ltd.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 Holmesglen Institute Melissa Mahoney Legal College Polytechnic West Human Services Training Advisory Council. Contract Trainer. Assessor Royal Life Saving Society SA Ness Cotton Designs Rubric Training Solutions New Horizons Safety Institute of Australia News Limited Salmat Newskills Limited Sanity Productions North Coast TAFE SAS Group Northern Centre for Contemporary Art Screen West Koolat Safety Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE (NMIT) Self-Managed Superannuation Funds Association Kormilda College Northern Sydney Institute TAFE Serco Global Services Australia Lane Print Group Northwest Pty Ltd Leap training NT Writers’ Centre Service Industries Training Advisory Council. NT Learning Options Oceania Polytechnic Institute of Education Irene Coleiro. Consultant Jasmine Education group Pty Ltd Jenard Training John Dwyer. NSW River Murray Training Natwide Personnel RMIT University Neale Price.

au Strathfield College Super Retail Group Swinburne University Sydney Business College Sydney Community College (ACE) Sydney School of Business Technology (SSBT) TAFE Illawarra TAFE NSW TAFE QLD TAFE SA TAFE Western Tas TAFE Technorama Telstra The Australian and New Zealand Institute of Insurance and Finance (ANZIIF) The Smith Family Thiess. Services Division Think: Education Group Tim Dein @ Associates TKM Institute Total Business Services & Training Training and Skills Commission. Inc (WAITI) Windsor Institute of Commerce Wisdom Learning Pty Ltd Wise Education Group Women in Film and Television Workforce Blue Print YWCA of Canberra Vet Prep Australia Pty Ltd Victoria University Business Services | 45 .Predicting change SSMI Group (Consultant) St George Institute of Studies St Peter’s Institute Star Training & Assessing State Theatre Centre of Western Australia Sterling Business College StoryProjects.com. SA Training Connections Training Th@t Works Trainme4work Trainsmart Australia Transport for NSW Unique International College University Preparation College Vanguard Visions VET Development Centre VET Network Australia Victorian Curriculum & Assessment Authority (VCAA) Victorian WorkCover Authority Virtu Design Institute Viva College Vocation Vocational Resources Australia WA Department of Training and Workforce Development (WADTWD) Walkley Foundation for Journalism West Coast Institute Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) Western Australian Institute of Translators and Interpreters.

htm#. com.com.html Hays (2013) Top 10 Talent Trends for 2013. Hays (2014) Salary guide 2014.pdf Chau (2014) ‘10 digital marketing trends for 2014’.au/portal/binary/com.ibisworld.com/view/ en_GX/global/services/consulting/ human-capital/hr-transformation/ journey-to-hrt/89cdda0699bc3310V gnVCM3000001c56f00aRCRD. http://www. servlet. operator says Australian call centre industry doing well’.au IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) M6962A Management Consultants in Australia www. 12 July 2013.0.au/it-pro/business-it/ call-centre-demise-exaggerated20130727-2on9q. L. http://www. 28 July 2014. http://www.com/ technology/1153/Big-DatainAustralia:-Statistics.au/australian-jobspublication IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) M6941 Advertising Agencies in Australia. servlet. Cat No 6291.com. http://www. (2014) NZ emerging as key nearshoring location for Australia. http://www. http://www.ibisworld. aigroup. Ui6OThYxGRk IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) L7211 Employment Placement Services in Australia. 6 July 2014. www.hays.com.au/marketing/10-digitalmarketing-trends-for-2014 IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) J5921 Data processing and web hosting services in Australia. epicentric. au/content/it-management/article/nzemerging-as-key-nearshoring-locationfor-australia-458184718 Business Review Australia (2014) Big Data in Australia: statistics. University of Phoenix Research Institute. https:// employment. http://www. A. www.au IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) N7212 Temporary Staff Services in Australia. http://www.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 BIBLIOGRAPHY Abetz.-Facts-and-Trends 46 | Ginnane (2014) The future of law firms Hallis (2013) ‘Despite offshoring.au IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) M6962B Public Relations Services in Australia. D. www.au Australian Industry Group (2013) National CEOs Survey.dimensiondata. net.informationweek. www. www. says CEO David Thodey – ABC News 19 August 2014. Institute of Analytics professionals Australia (2014) Survey: Huge demand for talented analytics professionals in Australia driving salaries upwards .au IBISWorld (2014) M6900 Business Services in Australia May 2014.com. Palo Alto.ibisworld.abc.com.au Deloitte (2011) Contingent Workforce. facts and trends. https://fonolo.ibisworld.ibisworld. com/big-data/big-data-analytics/ ibms-predictions-6-big-data-trendsin2014-/d/d-id/1113118 Institute for the Future (2011) Future work skills 2020. http:// www.pdf Australian Industry Group (2014) CEO Survey ‘Business Prospects in 2014’.ibisworld.ContentDeliveryServlet/ LIVE_CONTENT/Publications/ Reports/2012/10767_ceo_survey_ report_technology_web.deloitte.gov.gov.pdf Fonolo (2014) Top 12 Contact Center Trends for 2014.com/2013/09/ call-centres-pricing-model/ Ginanne (2014) Ready to take the electronic plunge Bushell-Embling.com/ blog/2014/01/top-12-contact-centertrends-for-2014/ Boxell.contentmanagement. E. Sydney Morning Herald. www.com. Technology Decisions.com. B&T magazine.epicentric. Customer Service Blog.au Dimension data (2014) 2013-14 Global contact centre benchmarking report.com/p/national/ legal_affairs/outsourcing_ hits_home_for_law_grads_ IJqzZwNH9kh5qFSCd2tM6N Fraser (2014) Telstra call centre jobs ‘will not exist in five years’.au IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) NZ294 Call Centre Operation in Australia.au. www.au/abetz/new-employmentservices-model-drive-stronger-joboutcomes ABS (2013) Labour Force. https://ministers. & Hartsyker.contentmanagement. gov.com. http://technologydecisions. Press Release.hays.abs.au Information week (2013) IBMs predictions: 6 big data trends in 2014.employment.com. (2013) ‘Outsourcing hits home for law grads’ Australian Financial Review.ibisworld. 27 July 2013.ibisworld.au/salary-guide/ request-copy/ Appendix A Methodology and bibliography IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) M6931 Legal Services in Australia.com.au IBISWorld Industry Report (2014) M6950 Market Research and Statistical Services in Australia. http://www.afr.au/news/2014-08-22/telstracall-centre-jobs-will-not-exist-infiveyears/5690964 Buchner (2013) Five top trends for call centres and the pricing dilemma. www.003.ContentDeliveryServlet/ LIVE_CONTENT/Publications/ Reports/2014/ceo_survey_slowly_ changing_gears%2520FINAL.au Department of Employment (2014) Australian Jobs 2014. com. California.55. Quarterly. http://www. www.com.ibisworld.com.aigroup. www.au/portal/binary/ com. www.com. Australia. Trinity P3. smh. Detailed. (2014) ‘New employment services model to drive stronger job outcomes’ Minister’s media centre.trinityp3. businessreviewaustralia.com. com/Global/Downloadable%20 Documents/2013_14_ benchmarking%20summary%20 report.ibisworld.com. bandt. http://www. May 2013.

au/content/ ngv52236 PWC (2014) Annual Global CEO survey: Fit for the future. RBA Bulletin March Quarter. Jackson A. sustainabilityskills.au/publications/smp/ robertwalters.gov.pdf Leadership Management Australasia (2013) Leadership.html Source for Consulting (2014) Trends shaping the consulting industry over the next 12 months. http://www. 2013.callcentre. acm. au/publications/smp/ RBA (2014) Statement on monetary policy. new challenges. Byrnes J. K.rba. Melbourne. S. com/gx/en/ceo-survey/2014/assets/ pwc-17th-annual-global-ceo-surveyjan-2014. new outlook.edu. Employment and Direction Survey: new realities.rba. https://csta. (2013) Four challenges for customer self-service. Dwyer C & Blacker J (2012) Articulation: A clearer picture or a new view.voced. Chris.org/Curriculum/sub/CurrFiles/ CompThinkingFlyer. Business Services | 47 . http://www.au/ publications/bulletin/2013/mar/1. (2014) ‘Offshoring call centres: a balancing act’.co.rba.collaw. Manalo & Orsmond (2013) The Business Services Sector.uk/ the-rise-of-customer-self-service-2/ The College of Law (2014) ‘What’s on the horizon for the legal industry in 2014?’ Insights.au Mckinsey and Co (2013) Six social-media skills every leader needs.html Manufacturing Skills Australia (2014) Skills for Sustainability.gov. ICMI call centre.pdf Stephenson. gov.pdf RBA (2014) ‘Economic Outlook’ Statement on monetary policy February 2014. Valerie Barr (2011).com/insights/high_tech_ telecoms_internet/six_social-media_ skills_every_leader_needs Munter.insidehr. http://www. http://www.net. CSTA Voice 7 (2): 3–4 Teasdale.com. edu.Predicting change International Society for Technology in Education and the Computer Science Teachers Association (2011) Operational definition of computational thinking. Leadership Management Australasia.au/offshoring-callcentres-a-balancing-act/ Paez D.sourceforconsulting. http://www. http:// www. Reserve Bank of Australia. http://www. http://www. capitalizing on global trends.au/career-advice/ salary-survey. ‘Defining Computational Thinking for K-12’.com/ files/file/Strategic%20Planning%20 Programme%202013%20-%20 Part%201_sample_report. August 2014.com. mckinsey.au/insights/whats-horizon-legalindustry-2014/ Robert Walters (2014) Global Salary Survey Australia 2014. http://www. Inside HR http:// www. http://www.pwc.

qualifications will be added as they become available. Underpinning industry intelligence and research were also incorporated into this list. Table 5: Business Services occupations in demand ANZSCO Occupation/ Job Role Training Package Qualification Business Services 149211 511112 48 | Contact centre manager Contact centre workers BSB30412 Certificate IV in Customer Contact BSB50307 Diploma of Customer Contact BSB50401 Diploma of Business Management BSB30211 Certificate III in Customer Contact BSB40312 Certificate IV in Customer Contact PSPSS00024 Operate in Customer Contact Environment Skill Set  Appendix B Business Services Industry Occupations in demand . This alphabetical list reflects demand in the Business Services Industry for occupations and job roles reported at IBSA’s Escan industry consultations and validations conducted in 2014.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 APPEN D IX B Business Services Industry Occupations in demand IBSA reports critical occupations in demand to government and industry stakeholders. The occupations and job roles in bold represent newly reported occupations in demand. Qualifications that correspond to the occupations in demand are also provided. Where a training package is newly endorsed.

Predicting change ANZSCO 511111 511112 132111 132111 Occupation/ Job Role Contract or program project manager Corporate services manager Corporate social responsibility manager Training Package Qualification BSB41513 Certificate IV in Project Management Practice BSB51413 Diploma of Project Management BSB60707 Advanced Diploma of Project Management BSB51107 Diploma of Management BSB50207 Diploma of Business BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management BSB51107 Diploma of Management BSB50207 Diploma of Business BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management 521212 Court clerk and legal support BSB40110 Certificate IV in Legal Services 5412 Customer service and frontline inquiry officer BSB30412 Certificate III in Business Administration BSB40507 Certificate IV in Business Administration BSB50407 Diploma in Business Administration BSB40812 Certificate IV in Frontline Management BSB50311 Diploma of Customer Contact BSB30412 Certificate III in Business Administration BSB40507 Certificate IV in Business Administration BSB50407 Diploma in Business Administration BSB51107 Diploma of Management BSB50207 Diploma of Business BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management BSB41013 Certificate IV in Human Resources BSB50613 Diploma of Human Resources Management BSB60907 Advanced Diploma of Management (Human Resources) BSB51107 Diploma of Management BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management 149212 133512 Frontline supervisor 5121 531111 111211 599411 132311 224711 224712 General administrative officer General manager and business owner Human resource administrator and manager Management and organisation analysts Business Services | 49 .

IBSA Environment Scan 2015

ANZSCO

224214
224999

131112
551111
225112
224113
225113

111211
131112
13112

131112
131113

Occupation/
Job Role
Manager – data
and records

BSB40212

Certificate IV in Business

BSB41707

Certificate IV in Record Keeping

BSB50207

Diploma of Business

BSB51707

Diploma of Record Keeping

BSB60207

Advanced Diploma of Business

BSB60807

Advanced Diploma
of Record Keeping

Manager and broker
– client accounts

BSB51107

Diploma of Management

BSB50207

Diploma of Business

Manager and
analyst – market
research and
big data

BSB41307

Certificate IV in Marketing

BSB51207

Diploma of Marketing

BSB60507

Advanced Diploma of Marketing

Manager business
development and
strategy

BSB51107

Diploma of Management

BSB50207

Diploma of Business

Manager and advisor
– social media

BSB50107

Diploma of Advertising

ICT10

Also see ICT Industry Escan

Manager advertising,
sales and public
relations

BSB40107

Certificate IV in Advertising

BSB40610

Certificate IV in Business Sales

BSB41307

Certificate IV in Marketing

BSB50107

Diploma of Advertising

BSB51207

Diploma of Marketing

BSB60507

Advanced Diploma of Marketing

BSB41307

Certificate IV in Marketing

BSB51207

Diploma of Marketing

BSB60507

Advanced Diploma of Marketing

BSB50407

Diploma of Business Administration

BSB50207

Diploma of Business

BSB60407

Advanced Diploma of Management

BSB60207

Advanced Diploma of Business

131114

225112

5121
5122

50

|

Training Package Qualification

Market research
analyst

Office and practice
manager

Appendix B Business Services Industry Occupations in demand

Predicting change

ANZSCO

Occupation/
Job Role

Training Package Qualification

132311

OH&S manager

BSB51312

Diploma of Work Health and Safety

BSB60612

Advanced Diploma of Work Health and Safety

BSB30712

Certificate III in Work Health and Safety

BSB41412

Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety

BSB51107

Diploma of Management

BSB50407

Diploma of Business Administration

BSB60407

Advanced Diploma of Management

BSB60207

Advanced Diploma of Business

BSB50407

Diploma of Business Administration

BSB51107

Diploma of Management

BSB51607

Diploma of Quality Auditing

BSB60407

Advanced Diploma of Management

BSB51107

Diploma of Management, including units on
Business continuity and sustainability

BSB60407

Advanced Diploma of Management, including
units on Business continuity and sustainability

BSB51207

Diploma of Marketing

BSB60507

Advanced Diploma of Marketing

251312

224712
223111

221213
221214

234312
234399

OH&S Officer

Organisation change
and workforce
development specialist

Quality and
compliance auditor

Sustainability
manager

251311
225113

Strategic Marketer

Business Services

|

51

IBSA Environment Scan 2015

APPEN D IX C

Business Services
NCVER data
The following data are reported from the National Centre for Vocational Education and Research
(NCVER) VOCSTATS data warehouse, which includes data from the national annual VET Provider
Collection and the quarterly national Apprentice and Trainee Collection.

ABOUT NCVER DATA
These collections bring together
data on publicly funded training
and fee for service VET provided by
public institutions.
The tables and figures should be read
with an understanding that significant
amounts of training in national
qualifications also occurs outside the
publicly funded VET system including:
• fee for-service training in national
qualifications provided by private
training providers
• inhouse training in national
qualifications delivered by enterprise
RTOs, and
• other nationally recognised or
non-accredited training conducted
inhouse or by external providers.
Consistent with NCVER reporting,
the tables and figures also exclude
delivery undertaken at overseas

52

|

campuses of Australian VET institutions,
credit transfer and VET delivered in
schools, where the delivery has
been undertaken by schools.
Completions data in this report
include all reported completions
regardless of whether the qualification
was reported to NCVER as Issued
or Not Issued. While the vast majority
of reported qualification completions
are reported as Issued, significant
numbers of students complete a
qualification but do not request that
their qualification certificate be
issued. Students may have to pay
a fee to have the certificate issued.
It is likely that reporting of
qualifications issued is more
comprehensive than that for
qualifications that are not issued.
While the earlier 2012 IBSA-NCVER
Escan (Appendix C) referred to
qualifications issued, that data related
to all reported qualification completions,
as did Escan 2014 and as does this

Appendix C Business Services NCVER data

year’s Escan. Hence the following data
are comparable with that included
in previous Escans but the description
has been updated to refer to
‘qualifications completed’.
Completions data are subject to
upwards revision as providers report
to NCVER.
Attempts to directly correlate or
compare tables of commencements or
enrolments and completions should be
avoided because:
• An enrolment in a qualification
is recorded for each year the
student’s enrolment is active – the
same qualification enrolment is
counted every year the student is
undertaking the course. This over
counts enrolments when compared
with completions as a completion
can occur only once for a student’s
enrolment in a qualification,
regardless of how long the student
takes to complete the qualification.

Some training organisations and jurisdictions mainly report completions when a certificate.105 35.622 BSB20112. Note: consistent with previous versions of this NCVER Data Report.922 31. BSB – Business Services – ENROLMENTS ADMINISTRATION QUALIFICATIONS WITH ZERO ENROLMENTS Qualifications with zero enrolments were reported to the national collection as having either publicly funded or feeforservice activity.309 BSB50407. BSB50601 – Diploma of Advertising 436 318 289 152 BSB60110.780 5.184 ADVERTISING         BSB40107. BSB20101 – Certificate II in Business 33. BSB51904 – Diploma of Quality Auditing BUSINESS   248     345     569   567   BSB10112. BSB50201.488 26. BSA50197 – Diploma of Business Administration 3. but did not have any enrolments in publicly funded training and fee-for-service VET provided by public institutions. BSB60501 – Advanced Diploma of Advertising 178 118 114 110 AUDITING   BSB51607. is awarded. up to the end of 2013. BSB10101 – Certificate I in Business 4.614 20.271 29. BSB40601 – Certificate IV in Advertising 526 422 392 339 BSB50107. Many qualifications take more than one year to complete. BSB30201 – Certificate III in Business Administration 27. IBSA qualifications for which enrolments have never been reported to the national VET Provider Collection by any training provider are not included in this Appendix. BSB10107. It is important to note that significant amounts of training occur outside the publicly funded VET system. There is no clear link between an enrolment figure for one time period and a completion figure for another period.994 30. BSA50100. BSB40201.629 Business Services | 53 . by at least one training organisation or jurisdiction.Predicting change • There are different expected timespans between enrolment and completion for different qualifications and there are differences in the time an individual student may take to complete a particular qualification.924 BSB40507. • Completions are not uniformly reported. BSB20107.965 12. rather than a Statement of Attainment.970 1.163 19.138 3.331 4.953 2. BSB60107. BSB30407.455 5. 2010   2011   2012   2013   BSB30412.133 22. BSA40197 – Certificate IV in Business Administration 9. Completions may thus be under reported or there may be delays in reporting to reflect delays in issuing certificates.

638 7. BSB40207. BSB20207 – Certificate II in Customer Contact 1.154 2.579 18.498 4. BSB50101 – Diploma of Business 4.085 BSB50207.428 2. BSB30907 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Education) BSB40312.835 5. BSB30207 – Certificate III in Customer Contact 8.131 15. BSB30107.451 BSB60207 – Advanced Diploma of Business 219 206 389 171 BSB30112.205 7.409 877 BSB30211. BSB30101 – Certificate III in Business BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/ SALES   BSB40610.498 16.915 14.315 .260 1. BSB30501 – Certificate III in Frontline Management BSB40812. BSB40311.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 BSB – Business Services – ENROLMENTS 2010 2011 2012 2013 16.608 18. BSB30504. BSB41001 – Certificate IV in Frontline Management 54 | Appendix C Business Services NCVER data   11     67     40   1   1.857 19.523   4.868 3.973 BSB40212.735 345 304 476 981 1.161 6.317 10.822 16.719     2. BSB40807. BSB30110.039   BSB41101 – Certificate IV in Business Management BSB50401 – Diploma of Business Management CUSTOMER CONTACT     1.700 5. BSB40307 – Certificate IV in Customer Contact BSB50311. BSB50307 – Diploma of Customer Contact FRANCHISING   BSB50507 – Diploma of Franchising FRONTLINE MANAGEMENT BSB31207.061 74 33 11 0 BSB30912.570   64 12 0 0 304 79 19 0         BSB20211.286 6. BSB40101 – Certificate IV in Business 7.608 430 29 12.483 13.414 9. BSB40607 – Certificate IV in Business Sales BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (see also Frontline Management) 1. BSB41004.

410 3. BSB51007.086 30. BSB41207. BSB50901 – Diploma of Business (Governance) HUMAN RESOURCES 2010       79 21 24 20 215 138 155 140 16 15 14 36         BSB41013.514 1. BSB30607.678 5.922 21.401 404 412 523 397 BSB60907.013 31.138 1.198 BSB40110. BSB30804 – Certificate III in International Trade 131 103 65 74 BSB41107. BSB52004 – Diploma of International Business LEGAL BSB31012.266 3.261 4.319 4. BSA50200 – Diploma of Legal Services 178 199 256 386 Business Services | 55 .824 5. BSB50801 – Diploma of Human Resources Management 4.581 2. BSB42004 – Certificate IV in International Trade 687 933 850 602 1. BSB60301 – Advanced Diploma of Management (Human Resources) INTERNATIONAL TRADE         BSB30612. BSB41907 – Certificate IV in Business (Governance) BSB50710. BSB31007.289 1. BSB40801 – Certificate IV in Human Resources 4. BSB41007.499 BSB50613. BSB50707.298   BSB40907. BSA40200 – Certificate IV in Legal Services 466 528 813 891 BSB50110.024 4. BSA30200 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Legal)         1.277 1.008 883 BSB50807.271 1. BSB40901 – Certificate IV in Governance BSB41910.533 2.Predicting change BSB – Business Services – ENROLMENTS BSB51004.824 6. BSB51001 – Diploma of Business (Frontline Management) BSB51107 – Diploma of Management BSB60407 – Advanced Diploma of Management GOVERNANCE 2011 2012 2013 200 117 37 5 19. BSB50607.

BSB60601 – Advanced Diploma of Marketing MEDICAL   BSB31112.614 6.593   BSB30307 – Certificate III in Micro Business Operations OH&S. BSB41507.850 12.561 BSB51312. BSB30704 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Medical) MICRO BUSINESS 3. BSB51504 – Diploma of Project Management 4. BSB31107.306 2.040 2. BSB40701 – Certificate IV in Marketing 2.859 BSB60612. BSB41407. BSB41504 – Certificate IV in Project Management Practice 3.460   806   4.026 2.080 1. BSB51404 – Diploma of Purchasing 117 162 203 153 56 | Appendix C Business Services NCVER data .223 1.237 4.025 4. BSB41604 – Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety 7.462 BSB41412. BSB30707.485 9. BSB51307.580 2. BSB61004 – Advanced Diploma of Work Health and Safety 256 244 309 243 PROJECT MANAGEMENT         BSB41513. BSB41404 – Certificate IV in Purchasing 182 97 129 100 BSB51507. BSB60607. WHS     3.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 BSB – Business Services – ENROLMENTS MARKETING 2010   2011   2012   2013   BSB41307.753 BSB51413.209 1. BSB50701 – Diploma of Marketing 2.303   BSB30712.856   872     4.151 4.779 5.847 4.998 BSB51207. BSB51407. BSB31606 – Certificate III in Work Health and Safety 909 1.366 5.874 3.933   902   1.087 598 585 521 494 BSB60507.819 BSB60707.229 9.055 2.669 7. BSB51604 – Diploma of Work Health and Safety 2. BSB60904 – Advanced Diploma of Project Management 145 356 460 202 PURCHASING         BSB41607.

705 BSB50407.246 10.673   BSB41807.364 3. BSB60107.060 1. BSA40197 – Certificate IV in Business Administration 2. BSA50197 – Diploma of Business Administration 1.Predicting change BSB – Business Services – ENROLMENTS RECORDKEEPING 2010   2011   2012   2013   BSB30807. BSB30201 – Certificate III in Business Administration 8.998 BSB40507.123 1. BSA50100. BSB40301 – Certificate IV in Recordkeeping 73 69 76 77 BSB51707.865 8. BSB40401 – Certificate IV in Small Business Management UNIONISM   9. BSB60501 – Advanced Diploma of Advertising 104 83 59 69 Business Services | 57 .200 ADVERTISING         BSB40107. BSB50601 – Diploma of Advertising 173 156 169 87 BSB60110.048     9.455 9.edu.ncver. BSB30401 – Certificate III in Recordkeeping 146 140 79 78 BSB41707.896   3 11 0 Source: VOCSTATS <http://www.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>. BSB50201. BSB41804 – Certificate IV in Unionism and Industrial Relations   8.151 10. BSB50301 – Diploma of Recordkeeping 27 30 41 28 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT   BSB40407.667   3 9. extracted on 16/07/2014 BSB – Business Services – COMPLETIONS ADMINISTRATION 2010   2011 2012   2013     BSB30412. BSB30407.508 4. BSB40601 – Certificate IV in Advertising 166 125 153 98 BSB50107.549 2. BSB40201.

BSB40307 – Certificate IV in Customer Contact 287 984 1. BSB40311. BSB30107.261 BSB30112.291 5.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 BSB – Business Services – COMPLETIONS AUDITING 2010   BSB51607.747 2.431 7.883 BSB50207.673 BSB60207 – Advanced Diploma of Business 48 30 131 77 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/ SALES BSB40610. BSB10101 – Certificate I in Business 2012   302   206     867 990 879 410 BSB20112.378 28 6 8 0 BSB30211. BSB40207.673 8.418 1. BSB51904 – Diploma of Quality Auditing BUSINESS 2011   67 2013   211   BSB10112. BSB30110. BSB20207 – Certificate II in Customer Contact         885 957 1. BSB20101 – Certificate II in Business 8. BSB50307 – Diploma of Customer Contact 58 | Appendix C Business Services NCVER data . BSB30907 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Education) 137 116 234 440 BSB40312.367 BSB30912.947 1. BSB30101 – Certificate III in Business 5.891 5.797 4.992 BSB40212. BSB50101 – Diploma of Business 1.761 3.476 1. BSB40101 – Certificate IV in Business 2. BSB10107.501 1.430 7.185 6. BSB40607 – Certificate IV in Business Sales         309 647 684 652       BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (SEE ALSO FRONTLINE MANAGEMENT) BSB41101 – Certificate IV in Business Management   41 7 5 0 BSB50401 – Diploma of Business Management 104 18 8 0 BSB60201 – Advanced Diploma of Business Management 139 1 2 0 CUSTOMER CONTACT BSB20211. BSB30207 – Certificate III in Customer Contact BSB50311. BSB20107.602 3.495 2.058 448 2.827 3.

BSB30501 – Certificate III in Frontline Management 2012 2013   7     5   0   461 631 270 1 3.173 BSB40812.918 7. BSB30607. BSB50607. BSB50707.723 1.215 1.660 BSB60407 – Advanced Diploma of Management 1. BSB41001 – Certificate IV in Frontline Management BSB51004. BSB40901 – Certificate IV in Governance 22 1 8 10 BSB41910.985 10.401 1.434 8.402 1.140 181 187 234 171         61 44 20 33 BSB41107.998 5. BSB41004. BSB50801 – Diploma of Human Resources Management BSB60907. BSB51001 – Diploma of Business (Frontline Management) GOVERNANCE         BSB40907. BSB40807.271 1.383 42 18 0 1 BSB51107 – Diploma of Management 5. BSB30804 – Certificate III in International Trade       989 1.061 11. BSB52004 – Diploma of International Business 568 623 370 244 Business Services | 59 .133 1. BSB42004 – Certificate IV in International Trade 255 342 238 196 BSB50807.115 1.331 5.Predicting change BSB – Business Services – COMPLETIONS FRANCHISING 2010   BSB50507 – Diploma of Franchising FRONTLINE MANAGEMENT 2011   0   BSB31207. BSB41907 – Certificate IV in Business (Governance) 75 43 37 41 BSB50710. BSB30504. BSB60301 – Advanced Diploma of Management (Human Resources) INTERNATIONAL TRADE BSB30612. BSB50901 – Diploma of Business (Governance) 12 17 3 19 HUMAN RESOURCES   BSB41013. BSB41007.682 1. BSB40801 – Certificate IV in Human Resources BSB50613.086 1.

BSB50701 – Diploma of Marketing 850 910 845 686 BSB60507. BSB31107. BSB61004 – Advanced Diploma of Work Health and Safety 131 145 128 95 60 | Appendix C Business Services NCVER data . BSB31007.105   399     1.813 2.118 1. BSB41407. BSA50200 – Diploma of Legal Services 122 99 109 169 MARKETING         BSB41307. BSB40701 – Certificate IV in Marketing 959 749 762 597 BSB51207. BSB41207.416   435   513   BSB30712. BSB41604 – Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety 2.878 3. BSB30704 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Medical) MICRO BUSINESS 974   BSB30307 – Certificate III in Micro Business Operations WHS     1. BSB51604 – Diploma of Work Health and Safety 949 1.363   392   1.235 1. BSA40200 – Certificate IV in Legal Services 154 177 210 206 BSB50110.IBSA Environment Scan 2015 BSB – Business Services – COMPLETIONS LEGAL 2010   2011 2012     2013   BSB31012.066 BSB60612. BSB30707.706 BSB51312. BSB51307. BSB60607. BSB60601 – Advanced Diploma of Marketing 415 469 306 197 MEDICAL   BSB31112. BSB51007.320 2. BSA30200 – Certificate III in Business Administration (Legal) 427 419 410 341 BSB40110. BSB31606 – Certificate III in Work Health and Safety 115 193 342 294 BSB41412.

BSB51504 – Diploma of Project Management 2.075 3.658   2. BSB41507.539 1. BSB40301 – Certificate IV in Recordkeeping 18 41 27 31 BSB51707.286 BSB60707.248 2. BSB41504 – Certificate IV in Project Management Practice 1.798 2. Business Services | 61 .102     2. BSB60904 – Advanced Diploma of Project Management 45 152 231 106 PURCHASING   BSB41607.au/wps/portal/vetdataportal/data/menu/vocstats/>.138     3.475   BSA20100. BSB50301 – Diploma of Recordkeeping 5 10 13 10 BSB60807 – Advanced Diploma of Recordkeeping 0 4 0 0 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT   BSB40407.Predicting change BSB – Business Services – COMPLETIONS PROJECT MANAGEMENT 2010 2011   2012   2013     BSB41513. BSB51407. BSA20197 – Certificate II in Business (Office Administration) 26 1 1 0 BSA30100. extracted on 16/07/2014 Completions data are subject to upward revision as providers report to NCVER.265 2. BSB40401 – Certificate IV in Small Business Management MISCELLANEOUS   3.843 BSB51413.202 3.edu. BSB30401 – Certificate III in Recordkeeping 34 64 41 38 BSB41707. BSB51404 – Diploma of Purchasing RECORDKEEPING       102 45 88 37 32 49 89 35         BSB30807.ncver. BSA30197 – Certificate III in Business (Office Administration) 14 4 3 0 Source: VOCSTATS <http://www. BSB41404 – Certificate IV in Purchasing BSB51507.

.

.

While IBSA aims to provide high quality content. it does not guarantee the accuracy of this information and therefore will not be liable in any capacity for damages or losses to the user that may result from the use of this information. IBSA has produced this Environment Scan as a resource for its stakeholders without any form of assurance.Acknowledgements The 2015 Environment Scan has been produced with the assistance of funding provided by the Australian Government through the Department of Education and Training. .