Summary Sheet for Assignment 2

:
Differentiated Learning Experience
Name & Student Number: Domagoj Bosnjak / 2109683
Curriculum (Learning) Area of Lesson or Learning Task: History (Ancient History)
Specific Topic of Lesson or Learning Task: Greece, Rome, Egypt & China.
Year Level/s: 7
NOTE BEFORE: This is NOT a follow-on lesson from Assignment One.

Differentiation Choices
Mark the appropriate box/es

1. For this assignment, I have chosen to design a differentiated:
 Learning Menu or Agenda
 Choice Board
 RAFT
 Summative Assessment Task for Unit of Work
 Lesson with Specific Adjustments for Students with Special Needs
 Series of Tasks for Learning Centres or Stations
 Learning Task or Lesson with Innovative Use of Technology to Support Differentiation
2. My lesson or learning task is differentiated to address differences in student:
 Readiness
 Interest
 Learning profile preferences

Lesson Context
This lesson is the second within an upper primary investigative history unit, focused on Ancient Societies. It is
connected to the broader strand of the Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) curriculum, “Investigating the Ancient
Past.” The initial lesson involved students watching short documentary film snippets which I have compiled from the
National Geographic’s series on Ancient Civilisations. At this stage, there were 6 civilisations to consider for this unit.
The purpose of this lesson was to introduce students to the topic of Ancient Societies, giving them a brief background
into each society. This was followed by an informal discussion, where they asked brief questions, discussed what they
found interesting and explained what they already knew. Following this, information pertaining to ethical investigation
and multi-modal presentations was addressed. Towards the end of the lesson, exit cards were handed out – these
were collected at the end of the period. The exit cards asked students to state the top four Ancient Societies (from the
documentary snippets) they were interested in learning about, as well as some additional information which assisted
me in creating the choice board for the investigation. This will tap into the students’ interests which contributes to a
student’s sense of competence, self-determination and engagement in the topic being covered (Tomlinson, et al.,
2003). There will be a few lessons, as well as homework nights, allocated to completing the investigative research
and producing a multi-modal presentation about their chosen Ancient Society. The amount of time given to students
may be altered if it becomes evident that they take longer (or shorter) than initially expected. The final lesson (or two)
will consist of students presenting their investigations and findings.
The class consists of 23 grade 7 students, of which 1 is from an Indigenous Australian background. This student will
be offered the opportunity to focus the unit around Aboriginal peoples’ history, as opposed to Asian or Mediterranean
history. The student will be given this opportunity as Harrison (2011) suggests that Indigenous Australian students
learn best when the learning intentions relate to their culture or heritage.

Page 1 of 6

Learning Objectives (ACARA, 2015)
- key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law) (ACOKFH003)
… this will be achieved by choosing one of the following groups:
- The physical features of ancient Greece (such as its mountainous landscape) and how they influenced the
civilisation that developed there (ACDSEH003)
- Roles of key groups in Athenian and/or Spartan society (such as citizens, women, slaves), including the influence
of law and religion (ACDSEH035)
- The role of a significant individual in ancient Greek history such as Leonidas or Pericles (ACDSEH130)
OR
- The physical features of ancient Rome (such as the River Tiber) and how they influenced the civilisation that
developed there. (ACDSEH004)
- Roles of key groups in ancient Roman society (such as patricians, plebeians, women, slaves), including the
influence of law and religion. (ACDSEH038)
- The role of a significant individual in ancient Rome’s history such as Julius Caesar or Augustus (ACDSEH131)
OR
- The physical features of ancient Egypt (such as the River Nile) and how they influenced the civilisation that
developed there (ACDSEH002)
- Roles of key groups in ancient Egyptian society (such as the nobility, bureaucracy, women, slaves), including the
influence of law and religion (ACDSEH032)
- The role of a significant individual in ancient Egyptian history such as Hatshepsut or Rameses II (ACDSEH129)
OR
- The physical features of China (such as the Yellow River) and how they influenced the civilisation that developed
there (ACDSEH005)
- Roles of key groups in Chinese society in this period (such as kings, emperors, scholars, craftsmen, women),
including the influence of law and religion. (ACDSEH041)
- The role of a significant individual in ancient Chinese history such as Confucius or Qin Shi Huang (ACDSEH132)

As a result of engaging with the lesson, students will:
understand that
- ancient societies/civilisations differ from modern western societies/civilisations
- ancient societies/laws/morals/classes influenced modern societies/laws/morals/classes
- learning history provides us with the opportunity to create a better future, not repeating historical flaws/mistakes

Know

be able to (do)

- information (pertaining to chosen ancient society)
such as rule of law, social classes, religion,
physical features and notable individuals
- how to conduct investigative research
- what is a multi-modal presentation

- explain the way in which ancient civilisations differ and
influence modern societies.
- conduct investigative research and represent findings
through multi-modal presentations

Essential Questions
- How can history (negatively & positively) influence the outcome of the future?
- How have ancient societies differed and influenced modern society?

Pre-assessment to understand student interests
Sousa & Tomlinson (2011, pp114) note that differentiating by student interest can manifest through content, process
and product. This lesson exemplifies differentiating content and product based on student interest through use of exit
cards.
These exit cards (Refer Appendix 1) will assist in gauging the interests of the students, as well as assisting in any
alterations to the unit which may become necessary.

Page 2 of 6

Resources needed for lesson: (borrow/book all from library in advance)
1 x laptop / iPad trolley (with internet access)
National Geographic – Ancient Civilisations DVD Box Set
Encyclopaedia Box Set

Lesson Plan
Lesson Sequence
1. Introduction (5-10mins)
Once students have been gathered and have given you
their undivided attention, refocus on the topic of Ancient
Civilisations. Commence a discussions: who can
remember what Ancient means? What are civilisations
and societies? Name some examples of ancient
civilisations. Go through the lesson structure and what
we will cover today.

2. Explanation (10mins)
Explain to students that this will be an individual activity.
This time will be spent rediscovering the processes of
“Ethical Research/Investigation” and “Multi-modal
presentations.”
Students have learnt about these concepts earlier on in
the year, however the reiteration of process and
instruction is more advantageous than harmful. Be sure
to reiterate classroom rules, such as manners and
respect because you will have to assist some students.
Hand out Choice Board instructions (Refer Appendix 3).
Be sure to go through each possible pathway so no
“interest group” is left out. Explain to the students that
their collective choice (gauged by the initial exit card)
was the sole consideration for deciding the four ancient
civilisations which are to be investigated.
3. Discovery – Investigation time (30-45mins)
The time limit for this section of the lesson may be
altered based on the concentration and engagement
presented by students. This will be the first time where
students can begin to research, read, watch, think about
and contemplate their chosen topic (multimodal). Assist
students when necessary and take the opportunity to
implement brief, effective teaching moments in order to
provide students with the best possible strategies and
pathways to completing this investigative project.
4. Conclusion (share/reflect) (10-15mins)
After giving students the opportunity to begin their
investigations, gather students back into their original
classroom group tables. Have each group summarise
key ideas pertaining to how they commenced their
research. This will assist in developing ideas and
techniques for students who struggled in this lesson.
Each group will be expected to explain their summarised
points to the class.
Have another discussion, raising the Essential Questions
(if any students have begun their journey to answering
either of them), as well as anything else that the students
had learnt or found interesting.
If you (the teacher) can see that enough work has been

Explanatory notes
I believe it is important to have a small run-through (discussion)
of my expectations, what we are about to learn as well as a
recap on what we have covered in previous lessons. It assists in
refocusing students, particularly after something like PE or lunch.
Be sure not to only ask the students with high-end readiness
(Abler, 2011).

Repetition of standards and expectations will bring forth an
environment where students understand and learn to respect the
expectations of the teacher – this in turn produces a rich learning
environment (Saville, 2011).

The use of “their choice” makes the topic more relevant to them,
in turn engaging students in the learning process (Jarvis, 2013).

Opening up opportunities for contemplation to arise enables
humans to use their minds more effectively, compared to the
mundane conventions of modern education (Hart, 2004).

Multimodal forms of information are provided to students so that
information can be accessed by every student, regardless of
their learning/comprehension difficulties or limitations (Hassett &
Curwood, 2009).

A concluding discussion is implemented in order to establish the
key learning objectives, as well as provide an opportunity for
students to discuss what they learned, enjoyed and found
challenging (Doubet, 2012).

Page 3 of 6

achieved, give students the exit cards which you
produced earlier (Refer Appendix 2). They will now have
a few minutes to complete these, put their names on it,
and hand them back to you. If this initial lesson did not
seem as productive as initially expected, do not stress,
as these exit cards can be used throughout the
investigative unit, whenever, to measure growth and
understanding.

The implementation of exit cards is a useful way to assess
ongoing learning and can also be used as a means of engaging
students in future lessons by assessing their interests and what
they might still be struggling in (Doubet, 2012).

Check for Understanding
As the students are working, the teacher should be walking around, interacting with students, and making note of
each child’s progress. Evidently, there is not enough time to circulate thoroughly around the whole classroom – this is
where an additional set of exit cards become necessary (Refer Appendix 2). These cards contain questions similar to
the Essential Questions, as well similar probes which will assist in evaluating their progress as well as my unit
structure. This will assist in checking for understanding and progress. Additionally, the exit card has a section which
asks whether or not there are any aspects confusing them or something that was of further interest to them in this
area. This could serve as an additional form of pre-assessment which would help engage students in the next lesson
of the unit.

Explanation:
Differentiation is an educational approach utilised by teachers as a proactive response to the differences that learners
bring to the classroom (Le Lant, 2016).These differences include aspects such as the students’ individual readiness
level, individual interests and individual learning profile. This lesson is an example of differentiating instruction by
student interest as topic selection derives from four different Ancient Societies which were chosen by the students
with the help of exit cards. Exit cards are often applied in differentiated classrooms due to literature suggesting that
the amount of information which can be retrieved from the utilisation of them is vast (Doubet, 2012).
Sousa & Tomlinson (2011, pp113-114) suggest that addressing student interests generates student engagement,
motivation, achievement and productivity, as well as promoting a positive connection between student and teacher, in
turn making learning a rewarding process.

References
ACARA. (2015). History – Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum by rows. The Australian Curriculum v7.5. Retrieved from:
http://v7-5.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanities-and-social-sciences/history/curriculum/f-10?layout=1#level7.
Alber, D. (2011). Are you tapping into prior knowledge often enough in your classroom? Edutopia. Retrieved from:
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/prior-knowledge-tapping-into-often-classroom-rebecca-alber.
Doubet, K. J. (2012). Formative assessment jump-starts a middle grades differentiation initiative: A school focuses on
formative assessment to support its efforts to differentiate instruction. Middle School Journal, 43(3), 32-38.
Harrison, N. (2011). Aboriginal ways of learning. In N. Harrison, Teaching and learning in Aboriginal education (2nd ed.,
pp. 39-56). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.
Hart, T. (2004). Opening the contemplative mind in the classroom. Journal of transformative education, 2(1), 28-46.
Hassett, D. D., & Curwood, J. S. (2009). Theories and practices of multimodal education: The instructional dynamics of
picture books and primary classrooms. The Reading Teacher, 63(4), 270-282.
Jarvis, J. M. (2013). Differentiating learning experiences for diverse students. In P. Hudson (Ed.), Learning to teach in the
primary school (pp.52-70). Port Melbourne, Vic.: Cambridge University Press.
Le Lant, C. (2016). Module 1: Feb 18-19 (Intensive Day). Lecture, 9:00 AM Thursday 18 February 2016 (EDUC 1.01).
Saville, K. (2011). Strategies for using repetition as a powerful teaching tool. Music Educators Journal, 98(1), 69-75.
Sousa, D. A. & Tomlinson, C. A. (2011). Differentiating in response to student interest. In Differentiation and the brain:
How neuroscience supports the learner-friendly classroom (pp. 111-134). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press Inc.
Tomlinson, C. A., Brighton, C., Hertberg, H., Callahan, C. M., Moon, T. R., Brimijoin, K.& Reynolds, T. (2003).
Differentiating instruction in response to student readiness, interest, and learning profile in academically diverse classrooms: A
review of literature. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 27(2-3), 119-145.

Page 4 of 6

Appendix 1
Exit Card to gauge to student interest (pre-assessment)
Please number your top 4 Ancient Societies you would like to investigate out of:
China, Rome, Greece, Egypt, India, Mesopotamia.

1 ___________________
2 ___________________
3 ___________________
4 ___________________
Please state the aspects you found most interesting in the short documentary snippets.

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Please state the aspects of ancient civilisation you would personally like to investigate.

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Appendix 2
Exit card to assess progress / understanding
State 2 new facts/ideas you have learnt today through your research:

1_________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
2_________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
How can history influence the outcome of the future?

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
How have ancient societies differed from modern society?

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________

Page 5 of 6

Appendix 3
Choice Board
Students are to choose one of the civilisations below. Next, students will ethically investigate and research
the key questions in each table according to its civilisation. This will be followed by creating and
completing a multi-modal presentation in front of their peers.

ANCIENT GREECE

ANCIENT ROME

 Investigate the physical features of ancient Greece. How did this
influence and develop the people that lived there? (ACDSEH003)
 What were the roles of key groups in Athenian OR Spartan
society (such as citizens, women, slaves)? What was the
influence of law and religion? (ACDSEH035)
 What was the role of a Leonidas OR Pericles in ancient Greek
history? (ACDSEH130)

 Investigate the physical features of ancient Rome. How did this
influence and develop the people that lived there? (ACDSEH004)
 What were the roles of key groups in ancient Roman society
(such as patricians, plebeians, women, slaves)? What was the
influence of law and religion? (ACDSEH038)
 What was the role of Julius Caesar OR Augustus in ancient
Roman history? (ACDSEH131)

ANCIENT EGYPT

ANCIENT CHINA

 Investigate the physical features of ancient Egypt. How did this
influence and develop the people that lived there? (ACDSEH002)
 What were the roles of key groups in ancient Egyptian society
(such as the nobility, bureaucracy, women, slaves)? What was
the influence of law and religion? (ACDSEH032)
 What was the role of Hatshepsut OR Rameses II in ancient
Egyptian history? (ACDSEH129)

 Investigate the physical features of ancient China. How did this
influence and develop the people that lived there?
(ACDSEH005)
 What were the roles of key groups in ancient Chinese society
(such as kings, emperors, scholars, craftsmen, women)? What
was the influence of law and religion? (ACDSEH041)
 What was the role of Confucius OR Qin Shi Huang in ancient
Chinese history? (ACDSEH132)

ANCIENT ABORIGINAL PEOPLES
 Investigate the physical features of ancient Australia. How did this influence and develop the people that lived there?
 What were the roles of key groups in ancient Indigenous Australian society (such as the men, women, children, elders etc)? What was
the influence of law and religion/faith?
 What was the role of dreamtimes in Aboriginal history?

Page 6 of 6