innovator

Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1

Legacy of Leadership
School of Education univErSity of Michigan

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Cshpe: A legACy leAdership
Jeff mOrTimer

CSHPE doctoral students in front of the School of Education (left to right): Carmen McCallum, Geisce Ly, Janel Sutkus, James Barber, and Christopher Shults. Photo by Mike Gould.

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An Honor Roll of donors to the School of Education during the fiscal year 2005-2006 comprises the Annual Report in a separate section at the end of Innovator.
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sChOOl news

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C O n TA C T i n f O r m AT i O n :
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we wAnT TO heAr frOm yOu!

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Dean’s Note A Commitment to Excellence

Although anyone who works in a university or college works in higher education, here in the School of Education we study it. We seek to understand and develop solutions to problems of higher education, across this country and elsewhere in the world. We examine trends in student enrollments, experiences, and outcomes, and we ask how different programs and policies affect the quality of postsecondary education and the institutions that house them. Among the issues on which we focus are the success of minority students, rising costs and their effect on institutions, faculty, and students, and the ethical imperatives of public higher education. We identify programs and approaches that make a difference. There is no better place to study and work on these problems than here at the University of Michigan. Because we are one of the finest public research universities in the world, this campus provides a remarkable laboratory in which to investigate, innovate, and seek to solve critical problems of higher education. This can be done in settings right here on our own campus – in the mathematics department, in engineering, in the residence halls. Moreover, the University of Michigan is devoted not only to education in the core humanities and the social and scientific disciplines, but also in professional education. Here we are able to study and compare how different professions train first-rate practitioners. Quite appropriately, you can see why the University of Michigan is the place where formal study of higher education was born. This year we proudly celebrate 50 years of the formal study of higher education here at Michigan.

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his issue of Innovator features our work on higher and postsecondary education.

Dean Deborah Loewenberg Ball

In 1957, the School of Education received one of three grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to establish a Center for the Study of Higher Education. As you will read in this issue, the early emphasis was on training administrators to manage the rapidly expanding colleges and universities of the postwar era. Two decades later that growth had reached its peak and the Center’s emphasis shifted to the scholarly study of higher education. Today the Center’s faculty lead the way in research on major societal factors that affect postsecondary education around the world. We on campus have already begun honoring the Center’s 50th birthday, but in January 2007 the official public observance begins. We invite you to join us in celebrating A Legacy of Leadership; A Commitment to Excellence.

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CSHPE 50th Anniversary A Legacy of Leadership
By Jeff Mortimer

Fifty Years of Leadership
he University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education is both a reflection and a major strand of the history of American higher education.
Until well into the 20th century, most American colleges and universities drew their administrators from the ranks of faculty who had only on the job and usually limited experience. The increasing complexity of the job made it clear that more specialized preparation was necessary. This process accelerated after World War II, as the GI Bill profoundly altered the higher education landscape.

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graduates, led to the extensive postwar growth both in the numbers of students and of institutions. After 1950 there was a virtual higher education tsunami that would continue for the next two decades. The other sea change in the wake of the war was universities’ increasing dependence on federal funds for research, with their complex reporting requirements. All of these pressures spurred an urgent need for trained administrators, as well as a rethinking of the purposes and policies of higher education. Thus, in 1957, the Carnegie Corporation of New York funded the establishment of three centers for the study of higher education, one of them at the University of Michigan intended to prepare leaders for the new playing field and find ways to create a more scholarly, structured and professionalized approach to higher education: in effect, to found a discipline.

GI Bill Sparks Transformation
The GI Bill, combined with the 1950 recommendation by the Truman Commission on Higher Education that higher education should be made available to all secondary

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Training Higher Education Scholars and Executives
The first director of the Center for the Study of Higher Education (“Postsecondary” was added in 1982) was Algo Henderson, an experienced higher education president and national policy leader, who served until his retirement in 1966. Although Henderson’s primary emphasis was on “executive training” for postdoctoral fellows who would move quickly into executive positions in the rapidly expanding institutions, he also expanded a nascent doctoral program, encouraged the faculty’s formulation of higher education as a field of study, and used a Kellogg Foundation grant to establish a leadership program specifically for the rapidly emerging community college sector. Henderson insisted that the Center’s program have a strong scholarly component, a commitment to excellence, and that it shoulder social responsibilities beyond the requirements of its mandate. The seeds of the future had been sown. The field of higher education grew, in large measure due to the Center’s influence, and its mission grew as well. By the mid 1960s, the focus was shifting from post-doctoral to doctoral education. Under the leadership of James L. Miller, who directed the Center from 1966-1970, and Joseph Cosand, who directed from 1971-1976, the Center’s program gave greater emphasis to external and governmental affairs—both state and national level, to the changing nature of higher education, and to fostering faculty research projects. Miller, who had been in a policy leadership role as director of the Kentucky Higher Education Committee, brought a strong emphasis on state politics and engaged students in trips to and studies with state level leaders. Cosand had been the found-

ing president of the St. Louis Community College system, and was the first community college president to be elected president of the American Council on Education. “ He had a constant parade of national leaders on campus, and always involved faculty and students with them,” recalls Marvin Peterson, who succeeded Cosand when he left to become Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education in the Ford Administration. “He made the Center the locus of discussion about national issues on campus, in the state, and on the national scene. He valued good research and pressed faculty to make their scholarly activities meaningful in the real world. I benefited greatly from his assistance and guidance.”

Getting Strategic About Research
Shortly after he took the Center’s reins in 1976, Peterson began a discussion among faculty, staff and alumni to strategize its future direction. “We concluded that one of the Center’s past strengths in executive development and professional in-service training should be de-emphasized in favor of greater emphasis on more rigorous graduate training for degree students (especially at the doctoral level) and of more concern for research and conceptual development in the field,” he says. “We also concluded that our highest priorities should be strengthen-

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CSHPE 50th Anniversary A Legacy of Leadership Fifty Years of Leadership ( Continued... )
ing the academic and scholarly nature of the PhD program, expanding a nascent masters program and obtaining research funding.” In the first 19 years of its existence, the Center received 12 grants, many quite large, but 11 of them were training and development grants. In the five years between 1976 and 1980, its seven core faculty received 18 grants from four different government agencies and five different foundations. All were either research-oriented or supported doctoral students. The emphasis on research to match the Center’s high quality doctoral program and training was now being fully realized. “There have been some key points in time when the Center has kind of reinvented itself,” says Janet Lawrence, director from 1996 to 2000, “not in the sense of a complete metamorphosis but in making some very critical changes which have kept it on the cutting edge of centers of our type in the nation. For example, when Joan Stark [who had been dean of the School of Education from 1978 to 1983] returned to the Center, she led in the development of a large scale, longterm grant proposal. In 1985, the Center won the federal government competition and established the National Center for Research and Improvement on Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, a government funded research and development center focused on teaching and learning in higher education.”

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Opening Doors to Diverse Learners
While it may not have been a “reinvention,” a study directed by Peterson shortly before he became director was certainly a harbinger of what has become one of the Center’s principal foci. Just as the aftermath of World War II had reshaped higher education, so did the civil rights movement of the 1960s, with its insistence that, among other goals, the academy become more inclusive of those who had been historically underrepresented therein. Its most spectacular manifestation at Michigan was the Black Action Movement strike in the spring of 1970, which shut down the University for four days. In 197, Peterson and two colleagues, Zelda Gamson and Robert Blackburn, received a National Institute of Mental Health grant to study the universities’ response to these pressures. “It was an attempt to understand what happened when predominantly white campuses significantly increased their African-American JosePH Cosand beComes student enrollments, which

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many had done in the early 1970s,” says Peterson. The study eventually resulted in numerous dissertations and articles, as well as an influential book, Black Students on White Campuses: The Impacts of Increased Black Enrollment. The study set a tone. In the years that followed, minority students and faculty became part of the Center community, courses that focused on this area were added and research that addressed it would continue. Almost 30 years later, the research of Associate Professor Eric Dey,

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He gladly acknowledges the effects on his own work of both Peterson and others’ JaneT lawrenCe suCCeeds PeTerson as early research and the direCTor climate at Michigan, which, he says, “ has long been interested in trying to open the doors to people who have marvin PeTerson suCCeeds Cosand and been unable traditionally to pass through will serve as direCTor for 20 years the front gates.” Positive, life-changing outcomes, spread as widely and deeply as possible, are the ultimate and finest fruits of the Center’s many enterprises, and the breadth and depth of its ever-expanding influence in the higher education field cannot be exaggerated. The Center has been consistently ranked as the top program in higher education in the country. Higher education in America — indeed, in the world — would look much different today had the Center never been invented.

sylvia HurTado beComes

Sylvia Hurtado and other university colleagues on the educational value of diversity was cited by the U.S. Supreme Court when it upheld the use of affirmative action in college admissions. “Basically we found that we can nearly universally demonstrate that students in diverse learning environments have better cognitive development. They become more interested in solving social problems and they become more prepared for what we assume will be a continuing increase in diversity in democratic society,” Dey says. “The really astounding part is the pervasive effects that diverse learning environments have on just about every outcome that we looked at,” Dey adds, “and that they also extend beyond college. It’s really almost lifechanging.”

Addressing Emerging Social Problems
Its graduate programs, research efforts and professional development activities have served as models for the many fine programs and centers founded at other universities. Its faculty members have helped shape new professional associations in the field, and taken leadership roles in several other higher education associations and

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CSHPE 50th Anniversary A Legacy of Leadership Fifty Years of Leadership
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Message from the CSHPE Director
I think of anniversaries as times of celebration, but also times of reflection. In reflecting on the history of the Center, I realize that I am part of this history. I have been Director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE) for a little more than a month as I write this, and perhaps future histories will include a footnote about my service as Director CSHPE Director, Deborah of the Center (dare I hope that Faye Carter the footnote will say positive things?), but as an alumna, I feel a distinct connection to the Center’s past as well. I believe that my perspective as a graduate of this program will inform my leadership of the Center over the next three years. While we begin the formal celebration of CSHPE’s 50th Anniversary, the Center welcomes new people and continues to look toward the future in planning our next directions. We had a new cohort of master’s and doctoral students who joined us this Fall term. By all accounts, the students are energetic and passionate about their educational interests and we all look forward to working with them. We also welcome Dr. Phillip Bowman to CSHPE. Most recently a Professor and Director of the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy at the University of Illinois, Chicago, Bowman has a joint appointment in CSHPE as Professor of Education and is the inaugural Director of University of Michigan’s National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID). Dr. Bowman’s role at NCID will provide additional opportunities for the Center to collaborate with others on important issues of research and practice related to diversity. The Center faculty and students continue work on issues that are important to national and international higher education policy. We are also working with individual colleges and, closer to home, exploring ways in which CSHPE’s research and scholarship can enhance the quality of education at the University of Michigan. All of our work honors our legacy of excellence in the study of and preparation of leaders for higher and postsecondary education. I look forward to this year of celebration for the Center and the planning that is taking place for future directions of the Center!

been influential in research and training that addressed many of higher education’s most vexing issues. Its graduates have provided leadership as administrators in higher education institutions, as policy makers in governmental and policy agencies dealing with higher education, as heads of professional associations, as researchers exploring new issues and challenges to higher education, and as faculty shaping new programs. Its boundaries, in all forms, have continued to expand. The scope of its interests as well as the makeup of its population are far more diverse than they were half a century ago. Its doctoral students not only become administrators themselves, but also enrich the body of scholarship available to administrators and other practitioners. And in the last decade it has become an increasingly global institution: several of its faculty are engaged in training administrators and helping to reform institutions and national systems in over a dozen countries, most recently China, where higher education is growing as dramatically as it did in the U.S. during the post-World War II era. It has, in short, helped define the study of higher education, even as it continues to define itself. “The Center was founded in order to address emerging social problems,” says Professor Patricia King, director from 2003 to spring 2006. “That’s where we started. Where we are now is trying to find ways to improve and strengthen those contributions.”

On the Internet
Learn more about the Center and its programs at:

http://www.soe.umich.edu/cshpe
Show your support and link to the School of Education or the Center’s Web site.
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By Jeff Mortimer

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Higher Education Center Tells Story of Democratization
New Visions of Leadership
For example, she says, “higher education provides paths to career success, and it’s certainly an important training ground for professionals in our society. It’s sometimes, but not always, valued for providing critiques of society. And then you have the ‘on the other hand.’ Not all graduates get good jobs. Employers are sometimes dissatisfied with the skill level of the graduates. The cost is prohibitive for large portions of the population. There are questions about what is a relevant curriculum, the quality of teaching, research integrity, and the perceived discrepancy of values between the academy and society.” All these questions and criticisms are voiced in an environment vastly more complicated than that of half a century ago, in part because of such concerns. Just as the Center’s founding charge was to prepare administrators to manage the post-World War II population explosion in higher education, it now is called to respond to new demands placed on colleges and universities arising from changes both inside and outside the academy. “We want to build on our legacy of addressing pressing social and national problems by really making some progress in addressing those issues,” says King, “and using the occasion of our anniversary to provide a springboard for bringing serious national attention to them.” The three subthemes that have been identified as a focus for the National Conference — contributions to economic development, preparing students for an increasingly diverse society, and advancing knowledge and improving its application — also reflect

t’s not always easy to see the connection between what happens in the academy and the fortunes of the larger society it serves, but the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education was founded in 1957 as an explicit part of that connection. It has a compelling story to tell, and it plans to spend much of its 50th anniversary year telling it.
The celebration’s official theme — “Understanding and Strengthening the Contributions of Higher Education to a Changing Society” — sets the stage for the narrative. “We frame it by looking at the American public’s love-hate relationship with higher education,” says Patricia King, former Center director. “While the public is understanding of its value, it has a lot of questions about higher education’s structure, processes and priorities.”

Themes for National Conference, March 22-25, 2007 Contributions to economic development

Preparing students for a diverse society

Advancing knowledge and improving its application

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both the urgency of the challenges and the breadth of the work that is done through the Center. “The School of Education prepares people to take on a variety of roles in educational settings,” King says. “Teacher education is a very important role, but it’s only one role. There are many kinds of educational problems we aspire to address. Higher education has a broader context, and you can see it through those three conference strands.” These strands are discrete but complementary. While each merits separate study and attention, none can be fully understood without considering its relationship to the others. And the overall relationship of higher education to society is the core concern of the National Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good, which is housed in the Center.

Current CSHPE facuty

nity members throughout the state of Michigan in dialogues on the issues of access and quality in higher education. “We’re organizing discussions in neighborhoods, in churches, in schools, in nonprofit settings,” says Burkhardt. “That kind of activism is inherent to the new kind of leadership that’s going to be important if higher education is going to maintain its influence in our society. It won’t be enough to simply operate institutions effectively or to claim resources from public sources.” He believes defining the nature of leadership is just as important as defining the purpose of the institutions that are led. “The Center has traditionally been about developing leaders for higher education,” he says, “and the work of the National Forum in some ways challenges a prevailing sense of what constitutes good leadership within the academy. What we’re demonstrating is a different kind of leadership, one that’s engaged with the public in many different ways.” The Access to Democracy project is directed toward the grass-tops as well as the grassroots, resulting in a productive cross-fertilization. Much of the information gleaned from the community dialogues has been provided to Michigan Lt. Gov. John Cherry’s Commission on Higher Education and Economic Growth to inform policy decisions throughout the state. On a national scale, research conducted by Center faculty played a key role in the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark affirmative action ruling in 2003. In upholding the Uni-

The Role of Higher Education in Democracy
“It’s really about what higher education needs to be if it’s to maintain its transforming relationships within society,” says Clinical Professor John Burkhardt, the Forum’s Director. “A lot of things that are part of the higher education environment are critically important for democracy to continue to function, including social mobility and the opportunity for diverse people to come together and learn together.” One of the Forum’s key initiatives is the Access to Democracy project, designed to engage students, civic leaders, and commu-

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versity of Michigan Law School’s use of race as a factor in admissions, the Court cited evidence from a study directed by Associate Professor Eric Dey and Sylvia Hurtado, then the Director of the Center, that diverse educational environments led to improved outcomes for all students, not just the traditionally excluded. Dey and his colleagues are continually expanding their scope. “We’re doing work on how diversity affects people in terms of their life choices,” he says. “Our research shows how people end up in different kinds of neighborhoods and have different friendships and different types of jobs if they go to a more diverse college. We’re also doing some research with colleges to figure out how we can do more than just open our doors to be more inclusive. How do we structure educational programs so students really learn from one another? How do we actually make some progress in a couple of decades so we have a more positively functioning system, instead of needing these compensatory sorts of things?”

hallmarks. For the last five years, more than 70 senior administrators from colleges and universities in China have taken workshops conducted by Center faculty as part of a program coordinated by Associate Professor Janet Lawrence. The initiative grew out of a U.S. State Department project Lawrence led to help scholars and administrators from universities in Kyrgyzstan, one of China’s neighbors, deal with major organizational transformations in their higher education system. “During my tenure, we started to move toward more of an international dimension in our work,” says Lawrence, the Center’s director from 1996 to 2000. “All of us had been doing consulting work overseas, but we began to think more systematically about what was going on globally in higher education. In addition to hiring faculty in new areas and running professional development programs for higher education administrators from other countries, we started growing student and faculty participation in conferences and research having to do with international issues.” The professional development program, in particular, has spawned opportunities for cross-fertilization. “It became a hotbed of a lot of different ideas that are just taking off now,” Lawrence says.

Globally Engaged Scholarship and Service
Along with diversity, and in many ways its corollary, a growing international involvement has been one of the Center’s recent
UM president, Mary Sue Coleman, and former UM president, Lee Bollinger, outside the Supreme Court in 2003 .

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“The administrators that came here are asking if some of our doctoral students would like to come over and work with them on some of the changes under way on their campuses, and our doctoral students are fascinated with it.” Ultimately, the most telling barometer of the Center’s utility is how its work affects the quality and value of students’ experiences, and what sort of citizens those students become. “A primary purpose of CSHPE’s 50th anniversary celebration is to strengthen the contributions of higher education to a changing society,” says Patricia King. “One way to do this is to improve educational practices on college campuses in ways that improve student learning, so that college graduates are better able to contribute to society as professionals, as leaders, and as citizens.” Toward that end, King heads the Michigan portion of the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, funded by the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College. “This is one of the most comprehensive national studies of the effects of American higher education on student learning and development ever conducted,” she says. “We are examining
CSHPE Students Samantha Carney, Kristen Korevec, & Quinton Walker at a student event

and interpreting students’ learning experiences with an eye to understanding the kinds that enable students to best serve in these roles.” The eight-year longitudinal phase of the national study, which begins this fall, will follow approximately 5,500 students through their undergraduate careers and into their early post-college years. Researchers will examine a broad range of both students and institutions, including liberal arts colleges, regional universities, research universities, and community colleges. The fundamental goals are nothing less than to identify the teaching practices, programs, and institutional structures that support liberal arts education, and to develop faculty-friendly and institutionally-useful methods of assessing it. That the Center is still around for its 50th anniversary is a tribute both to its adaptability and its consistency. “It really does go back to the values that were implicit in our founding as a center,” says John Burkhardt. “It came at a time when higher education was not only growing dramatically in terms of the number of people involved, but also making a transition from an institution that was largely reserved for the wealthy to a far more democratic model.” “We’re still at it.”
CSHPE students Samantha Carney, Jimmy Brown, Mary Dwyer, Najla Mamou, & Jenny Small talk about organizational change in John Burkhardt’s class.

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CSHPEA50th Anniversary Legacy of Leadership
By Janel Sutkus and James Barber

CSHPE Anniversary Plans
Distinguished Scholar Lecture Series
“The Future Scholarly Directions in the Study of Higher Education” Fall, 2006 Murray Cartter Chair in Higher Education at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California-Los Angeles. He is also Professor of Sociology at UCLA and an Affiliated Scholar with the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI). Dr. Allen is cited for distinguished achievement in “100 Years of Change,” Special Issue of Black Issues in Higher Education (1999). Dr. Walter Allen Dr. Allen’s research interests include comparative race and ethnic relations, comparative family studies, and higher education desegregation. He is currently the Co-Director of CHOICES, a longitudinal study of college access and attendance among African Americans and Latinos in California. Throughout his career, Dr. Allen has authored over 80 publications, and most recently served as a co-editor for a volume titled Higher Education in a Global Society: Achieving Diversity, Equity, and Excellence. Dr. Allen is no stranger to Ann Arbor, as he served as Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan before accepting a position

he Distinguished Scholar Lecture Series will reflect the three concentration areas of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE) – Academic Affairs and Student Development, Organizational Behavior and Management, and Public Policy. The CSHPE faculty identified four scholars on the cutting edge of higher and postsecondary education theory or research to serve as Distinguished Scholars for the lecture series. The Distinguished Scholars will spend two days on campus, during which time they will present an open lecture that addresses new theories, approaches or issues that will likely shape future scholarly work in each concentration area. Each lecture will be published as part of an edited volume of all presentations given throughout the 50th anniversary year. The Distinguished Scholars will also participate in seminars and will meet with graduate students and faculty while at the Center. They will also participate in the National Conference to take place at the University of Michigan March 22-24, 2007.

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Academic Affairs and Student Development Lecture
“We, Too, Sing America: Race, Citizenship, and Higher Education Opportunity” Thursday, September 21, 2006 Dr. Walter Allen is the Distinguished Scholar for the Academic Affairs and Student Development Lecture. Dr. Allen holds the Allan
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at UCLA. In addition, Dr. Allen has held teaching appointments at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Howard University, Duke University, University of Zimbabwe and Wayne State University.

Public Policy Lecture
“Moral Reasoning and Higher Education Policy” Thursday, October 5, 2006 Two Distinguished Scholars have been named for the Public Policy Lecture, Dr. Michael S. McPherson and Dr. Morton Owen Schapiro. Dr. McPherson is President of The Spencer Foundation, and Dr. Schapiro is President of Williams College. Prior to joining The Spencer Foundation in 2003, Dr. McPherson served as President of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota for seven years. A nationally known economist whose expertise focuses on the interplay between education and economics, McPherson spent the 22 years prior to his Macalester presidency as Professor of Economics, Chairman of the Economics Department, and Dean of Faculty at Williams College in Dr Michael S. McPherson Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he first collaborated with Dr. Schapiro. Morton Owen Schapiro became the President of Williams College in 2000. Before assuming the presidency, he served as Chair of the Department of Economics, Dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and Vice President for Planning at the University of Southern California. Prior to his tenure at USC he was a member of the Wil-

liams College faculty from 1980 to 1991, as Professor of Economics and as Assistant Provost. Dr. Schapiro is among the nation’s premier authorities on the economics of higher education, with particular expertise in the area of college financing and affordability, and on trends in educational costs and student aid.

Dr. Morton Owen Schapiro

Drs. McPherson and Schapiro are longtime colleagues and collaborators. They are widely regarded as experts on the economics of higher education, and utilize their training as economists and experience as both university executives and policy analysts to investigate topics related to financial aid policy and the affordability of higher education in the U.S. Schapiro and McPherson each have substantial publications individually, and have co-authored several articles, chapters and books, including The Student Aid Game: Meeting Need and Rewarding Talent in American Higher Education, and Paying the Piper: Productivity, Incentives and Financing in Higher Education (which they co-edited with Gordon Winston), which was published by the University of Michigan Press.

Organizational Behavior and Management Lecture
“Organizational Studies in Higher Education: Insights for a Changing Enterprise” Monday, December 4, 2006 Dr. Patricia Gumport has been named the Distinguished Scholar for the Organizational Behavior and Management Lecture. Dr. Gumport is Professor of Higher Education at Stanford University and serves as the Director of the Stanford Institute for Higher Edu-

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cation Research (SIHER). She has received several honors, including the 2006 American Educational Research Association’s Higher Education Exemplary Research Award in recognition of her outstanding scholarly contributions to the field of higher education. Through sociological analyses of American higher education, Dr. Gumport has illuminated the organizational, political and intellectual interests that redefine the content, structure and relative legitimacy of academic fields. She has examined the tensions arising during academic restructuring under budgetary constraints, the structural and normative strains in graduate education, and the impact of statewide academic planning initiatives on public higher education. She and Dr. Michael Bastedo (assistant professor, CSPHE) published their recent work on academic stratification in Higher Education and the Review of Higher Education. Dr. Gumport has two forthcoming Dr. Patricia Gumport books — Sociology of Higher Education: Contributions and Their Contexts and Academic Restructuring: The Ascendance of Industry Logic in Public Higher Education — both with Johns Hopkins University Press.

Inaugural Event
“The Emerging Challenges to Higher Education” January 12, 2007

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he Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education will mark the beginning of its anniversary year with a special event that focuses on the emerging challenges to higher education. A distinguished panel of current and former university presidents, all with ties to the University of Michigan, will speak to this theme with special attention to the public purposes and social dividends associated with higher education. Each speaker will have the opportunity to address a topic related to this theme, followed by breakout sessions in which members of the audience will discuss the remarks. This event will conclude with the panel reconvening to share reactions to one another’s presentations and to address specific challenges that have been raised throughout the day. The speakers include:
•Dr. Mary Sue Coleman, President, U-M •Dr. Nancy Cantor, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University and former Provost and Executive Vice-President for Academic Affairs, U-M •Dr. James J. Duderstadt, Professor of Science and Engineering and President Emeritus, U-M •Dr. Charles Vest, former President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and former Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, U-M •Dr. B. Joseph White, President of The University of Illinois and former Dean of the Business School and Interim President, U-M

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National Conference
“Understanding and Strengthening Higher Education’s Contributions to a Changing Society” March 22 - 25, 2007

Alumni Celebration
“The Contributions of the First Half-century and Our Commitments to the Second Half” May 31-June 2, 2007

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he National Conference will bring together scholars, researchers, and practitioners from within and outside of higher education. The conference will begin with a keynote address on the general ways in which higher education can contribute to a changing society. Specific topics – economic development, citizenship in a diverse society, and the advancement of knowledge – will be discussed in individual thematic sessions. Each session will feature a keynote address by a national speaker, a panel of respondents from the University of Michigan and Ann Arbor communities, and a series of breakout sessions led by CSHPE faculty. The closing session will synthesize the discussions and ideas from each of the thematic sessions into an overarching role for higher education in the future.
Featured speakers will be: •Dr. William G. Bowen, Senior Research Associate and President Emeritus, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation •Dr. William (Sandy) Darity, Research Professor of Public Policy Studies, African and African-American Studies, and Economics, Duke University and Cary C. Boshamer Professor of Economics, UNCChapel Hill •Dr. John Seely Brown, former Chief Scientist and Director of the Palo Alto Research Center, Xerox Corporation

he final event of the anniversary year will be an early summer Alumni Celebration. All alumni, former faculty and visiting scholars, and current students will be invited to remember the Center’s past and look ahead to its future. Events will be held on- and off-campus and will include cohort receptions, faculty- and student-led panel discussions, campus tours, social events, informal gatherings, an evening of dinner and dancing, a silent auction of CSHPE memorabilia, and more. Alumni-from the first class to the most recent class-are invited to help us celebrate 50 years of shaping higher education leaders.

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On the Internet
Keep up with the Center’s 50th Anniversary happenings on the Web at:

http://www.soe.umich.edu/cshpe/50th
Get the word out by linking to the 50th Anniversary Web site from your Blog, profile page, or Web site.

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innovator 37:1 fall 2006

Profiles Alumni
By Jeff Mortimer

Paul Lingenfelter

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aul Lingenfelter says there are two initiatives he’s been involved in since becoming Executive Director of the national organization of State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) in 2000 that are the most significant of his tenure. One was the creation in 2004 of the National Commission on Accountability in Higher Education. The other is the publication of an annual survey of state higher education finance.
Accountability and finance have been major concerns for Lingenfelter throughout his career, and his interest in them had its roots in what he calls “a very formative moment” when he was working as director of the Bursley Hall residence on North Campus while a doctoral student in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education. It was the spring of 1970, and the Black Action Movement (BAM) at the University of Michigan had asked the University to commit to enrolling in its freshman class the same percentage of African Americans that graduate from high school in Michigan each year. “The Regents agreed to the goal,” he recalls, “but said that without legislative concurrence, they could not commit to the necessary budget for financial aid and supporting services, about $1 million per year. The students shut down the University for four tense days until the President met with the deans of the schools and colleges to negotiate an agreement to reallocate one percent of the University’s state appropriated budget to generate $1 million. It was clear that the University community wanted to achieve the goal, but it had to overcome its own

Paul Lingenfelter

inertia to do so, a very difficult task. It took a four-day strike to mobilize the effort to reallocate one percent of the appropriated funds budget.” Much of his graduate course work was in political science and public policy — his dissertation was an analysis of the politics of higher education appropriations in Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin — but the BAM experience made it clearer than ever to Lingenfelter how profoundly important, and profoundly difficult, the issues of finance and accountability are. After completing his work at Michigan, Lingenfelter spent 11 years at the Illinois Board of Higher Education, the last five as deputy director for fiscal affairs, then worked at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation from 1985 to 2000 before receiving “an opportunity to return to my first love, which was higher education public policy,” at SHEEO.

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Profiles Faculty
By Jeff Mortimer

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Marvin Peterson
arvin Peterson has fashioned a career of rare distinction.
At a chance meeting with University of Michigan Professor Robert Kahn, who was on sabbatical at MIT, he learned that he could study both higher education and organizational behavior in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education’s relatively new doctoral program. That was in 1966. Michigan has now been his intellectual home for 0 years, half of them as Director of the Center where he earned his doctorate, but the last thing he could be called is “set in his ways.” “Outspoken” is closer to the mark. Although he was one of the first to earn a higher education PhD and a leader in developing the field itself, he now decries hiring only faculty with such degrees. “If you take a look at executive officers these days, you find almost none of them read the higher education literature. A lot of the problems that institutions and leaders have to deal with are broader and more complex than the research can really address in a timely manner.”

For someone whose work in higher education has been largely focused on organization, administration and planning, Peterson’s own career has been, as he himself puts it, serendipitous. The strapping farm boy from rural Illinois majored in engineering and math at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., because they were subjects he did well in and enjoyed. After completing his bachelor’s degree, he then enrolled in Harvard Business School. Ironically, his experience there eliminated a business career from contention. While fascinated by planning, management, personnel administration and the like, “I never found an area of business in which I wanted to make my life work,” he says. Perhaps because, as he puts it, “they did not want to have an unemployed graduate,” the school offered him a position as Assistant to the Dean. Within a year, he was an Assistant Dean, deeply involved in activities that had barely been named: institutional research, advancement, strategic planning.

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Marvin Peterson and Patricia King with MA alumnus37:1 fall 2006 innovator Masamichi Inoue

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Profiles Faculty

Although recognizing that new areas of concentration and research have evolved as the field has matured, he now expresses concern over what he sees as its fragmentation. “There is a difference,” he says, “between differentiation which adds to our understanding yet is still part of our comprehensive study of the field, and fragmentation which makes these new areas specializations that are only loosely connected to that comprehensive understanding.” The scope of his own interests continues to broaden. He urges more consideration of how higher education’s responses to such external forces as globalization, information and communications technology, and diversity are moving it toward a postsecondary knowledge industry. “Institutions need to be willing to consider redesigning themselves by redefining the industry in which they operate and the role they want to play,” he says. “We are now 25 years into a postsecondary era that expanded the definition of institutions which delivered and learners who sought education beyond high school. Clearly, traditional institutions still serve the bulk of students attending directly from secondary school, but there is a huge world of postsecondary education to which our programs, our research and our professional association give little attention.” He has been a visiting faculty member or consultant to the government in Brazil, Qatar, China, Hungary, Portugal, Russia, Uruguay, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and Kyrgyzstan, enriching his work on the relationships between governments and institutions. “When our interest broadened from traditional higher education to post-secondary, it was all within the North American context,” he says. “Now there’s a great deal of interest in what’s happening in higher education outside the U.S., kind of an internationalizing.” His eyes have always been on the big pic-

Marvin Peterson

ture, whatever his role at any given moment, but there was one occasion when he manifestly, even historically, missed it. “The year I was finishing up at Harvard, they initiated a new program, asking small companies to campus to interview,” he says. “I got invited to Palo Alto, and since I had never been west of Iowa City, I went and spent the day wandering about this little series of brick buildings around a dirty quadrangle. At the end of the day, they gave me $100 to go to San Francisco for dinner and an extra night on the town.” Two weeks later, he got a letter offering him a job. It was signed by a Mr. Hewlett and a Mr. Packard. “The only information was the title and the salary,” he says. “I decided it was a sort of fly-by-night operation, and declined the offer.” In this case, the serendipity flowed in the other direction. H-P’s loss was U-M’s gain.

On the Internet

Learn more about Marvin Peterson at: http://www.soe.umich.edu/faculty/peterson
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www.soe.umich.edu

Profiles Staff
By Eve Silberman

he phones don’t ring nearly as often as they did eighteen years ago, when she first started working at the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, says Senior Administrative Assistant Linda Rayle. Not because the Center is less busy—hardly!—but because most people now e-mail. Another change she’s observed is that as the Center’s reputation has grown, more of its graduate students come from out of state and from overseas. “We get a lot of exceptional people applying to our programs,” emphasizes Rayle, who staffs the admissions committee.
Her “favorite part of the job” is working with the students, says Rayle, who gives them advice on everything from how to sign up for classes to where to buy a watch. She keeps a busy schedule: assuming the job a year ago, she took the place of two people. Rayle’s arrival was good news to people who knew her, like Professor Marvin Peterson. “She had the reputation of someone who learned new things fast,” e-mails Peterson. “I think I speak for the other faculty in

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Linda Rayle
saying we have not been disappointed.” Rayle is highly visible in the Center, in contrast to her previous job at the former Consortium for Community College Development, where for fifteen years she was “tucked away in a part of the building where we didn’t get any traffic at all.” Still, Rayle had her work cut out as the organization grew from a membership of 18 community colleges to, at its peak, 160. Rayle possesses a “rare mix of people skills and financial acumen,” says her former boss, Professor Richard Alfred. “We couldn’t afford to have things dropping through the cracks. And with Linda there, nothing did.” A native of Detroit, Rayle received her degree from U-M in 1972, marrying her husband, Roger Rayle, when she was still an undergrad. Rayle smiles when she recalls that she met him early in her freshman year, at a mixer at the Mosher Jordan dorm where Roger had brashly gone to recruit female students to his off-campus party. “Being the cautious type,” Rayle recalls, she consulted
Continued on page 19

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Linda Rayle assists a student at the 2006 Fall Connection

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School of Education News
Awards & Recognitions
Richard Alfred’s most recent book “Managing the Big Picture in Colleges and Universities: From Tactics to Strategy” (ACE/Praeger Series on Higher Education and Greenwood Press) received the Alice Beeman Award for Published Scholarship sponsored by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The award was presented in New York City on July 10, 2006. Deborah Loewenberg Ball, Dean of the School of Education, was named by President George W. Bush to the National Mathematics Advisory Panel (NMP). The NMP, modeled after the National Reading Panel, will examine and summarize the scientific evidence related to the teaching and learning of mathematics, with a specific focus on preparation for and success in learning algebra. The panel will also provide policy recommendations on how to improve mathematics achievement for all students. Hyman Bass has been awarded the YuehGin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics by the Mathematical Association of America. This is the most prestigious award made by the Association; the two-page citation of Hyman’s accomplishments includes recognition for his groundbreaking contributions to the field of algebra, for his “legendary” service to the mathematics community through leadership roles in U.S. and international professional organizations as well as in editorial work on publications, and for the vital role he is playing in linking the mathematics and education communities through his work in mathematics education. Percy Bates, director of the Program for Educational Opportunity, was honored May 12, 2006, for his 0+ years of service to the School of Education.

Linda Rayle (Continued)

her resident advisor before she and several other girls “squished into my future husband’s Corvair” and drove to his party. After she graduated, Rayle received a library science degree from U-M but couldn’t find work near Ann Arbor, where she and Roger, who works in computers, settled. A few years later she received an M.B.A. from U-M, with a concentration in marketing. She then bought car parts for Ford but disliked the “high-pressure atmosphere” and quit after less than a year, moving to a computer company. Eventually, after taking several years off to raise

her two children, she started at the Center as a research secretary, and, when grant money for her job ran out, moved on to the Consortium. Her ties to U-M have only strengthened, says Rayle, since her daughter, Lisa, graduated from the university and her son, Michael, is now a junior. Although she has started to ponder retirement, she acknowledges she’s not sure what she’d do with her time. That’s never been a problem at the Center. “I’ve enjoyed all my jobs here,” she says. “I’ve never been bored.”

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School of Education News Awards and Recognitions (Continued)

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Claire Cameron, doctoral student in the Combined Program in Education and Psychology, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for the 2006-2007 academic year. Kim Cameron, Professor of Management & Organization, Ross School of Business, and Professor of Higher Education, School of Education, had four books published this year: Kim S. Cameron and Robert E. Quinn (2006) Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Edward Hess and Kim S. Cameron (2006) Leading with Values: Positivity, Virtues, and High Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press. Kim S. Cameron, Robert E. Quinn, Jeff DeGraff, and Anjan Thakor (2006) Competing Values Leadership: Creating Value in Organizations. New York: Edward Elgar. Kim Cameron and Marc Lavine (2006) Making the Impossible Possible: Leading Extraordinary Performance-The Rocky Flats Story. San Francisco: Berrett Koehler. Tabbye Chavous-Sellers has been selected as one of five fellows of the National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan (and located in the School of Education building). Tabbye chairs the SOE Social Justice Initiative. The funding that she has been awarded will help support collective work on issues of diversity and equity in the School. Jane Coggshall, 2006 PhD graduate from Educational Studies, won the Lester W. Anderson Memorial Award for best dissertation in the field of secondary school administration for her doctoral dissertation entitled, High School Teacher Assignment and the New Governance of Teacher Quality.

Seán Delaney, doctoral student in Educational Studies, has been named an International Institute Individual Fellow. He will be conducting a project in Ireland, entitled A Study of the Relationship between the Culture of Teaching Mathematics and the Knowledge Required for Teaching. Stephen DesJardins, Associate Professor in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, was named Associate Editor of Economics of Education Review. See this URL for details about the journal. http://www.elsevier.com/wps/ find/journaldescription.cws_home/743/ description#description Barry Fishman, Associate Professor of Educational Studies and Learning Technologies, was the keynote speaker at the Hong Kong International Technology in Education Conference in February 2006. He has also been named an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences. Eric Fretz, doctoral student in the Combined Program in Education and Psychology & Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education, was awarded a Navy Commendation Medal by Vice Admiral Patrick Walsh (Commander US Naval Forces, Central Command), whom Fretz worked for during his recent six-month mobilization to active duty in the Persian Gulf. He qualified as a Battle Watch Captain in the Fifth Fleet Command Center and used his SOE training to design and execute an interview/research project to gather lessons from the Pakistan earthquake disaster relief efforts. Hala Ghousseini, doctoral student in Educational Studies, has been awarded a Barbour Scholarship for the 2006-2007 academic year.

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School of Education News

News Events
Matthew Gillery, (Educational Studies) has been awarded a Martin Luther King Jr. Spirit Award. Vicki Haviland, research assistant with Anne Gere in the Teachers for Tomorrow program, was selected for the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Promising Researcher Award for her paper, “’Things Get Glossed Over’: Rearticulating the Silencing Power of Whiteness in Education.” She will present this paper in November 2006 at the NCTE conference in Nashville. Jennifer Lutman, doctoral student in English and Education, was named a 2006 Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor. Lauren McArthur, doctoral student in Educational Studies, was named a 2006 Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor. Allen Menlo, Professor Emeritus of International Education, was given the Lifetime Achievement Award by the International Studies Special Interest Group of AERA. Dr. Menlo originated an international team of researchers that conducts parallel studies in a number of countries. The SIG recognized his contributions to the field over a period of more than 30 years. Vilma Mesa, Assistant Professor and Research Scientist, gave an invited video presentation in March 2006, about her research on texts as part of the “Thinking about Mathematics Education Series” at the University of Haifa, Israel. The name of the presentation was: “What Counts as an Answer? Contrasting Undergraduate Calculus Textbook Content.” Rebecca Murphy, who is working toward a Master of Arts degree in education with certification as a reading specialist, was
named to “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.” She was a fifth-grade teacher in Shreveport (LA) at Claiborne Elementary Fundamental Magnet (spring 200) and Sunset Acres Elementary (200-05) before moving to Michigan and attending graduate school.

Annemarie Palincsar has been named an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor. This program is designed to honor those tenured faculty whose commitment to and investment in undergraduate teaching has had a demonstrable impact on the intellectual development and lives of their students. Two doctoral students in CSHPE have won awards from the American College Personnel Association (ACPA): Mark Garrett from CSHPE received the “Outstanding Doctoral Student Award” from the American College Personel Association (ACPA) College Student Educators International’s Standing Committee for Graduate Students and New Professionals. Penny Pasque received the “Research and Scholarship Award” from the American College Personel Association (ACPA) College Student Educators International’s Standing Committee for Women. Laurie Sleep, doctoral student in Educational Studies, was named a 2006 Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor. Janel Sutkus, doctoral student and Assistant, CSHPE 50th Anniversary Events, Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, was recently elected to a three-year term as a Board Member for the Admissions, Orientation, and First-year Experience Directorate of the American College Personnel Association.

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School of Education News
Grants Announced Since April 2006
PI Phyllis Blumenfeld John Burkhardt John Burkhardt John Burkhardt John Burkhardt Patricia King Joseph Krajcik Joseph Krajcik Magdalene Lampert Valerie Lee Sponsor Spencer Foundation Kettering Foundation National Assoc. for Equal Opportunity Mott Foundation National Assoc. for Equal Opportunity Wabash College Michigan State University/NSF National Science Foundation Spencer Foundation Project Title Longitudinal Student Outcomes in a Scaling Urban Inquiry-based Science Intervention Investigating the Relationship Between Public and Higher Education Institutions Case Studies and Best Practices for HBCU Institutions Technical Assistance in Support of the Bridges to the Future Program in Genessee County Promoting Best Practices in Leadership within Historically Black Colleges and Universities Liberal Arts and the Development of Wise Citizens Project Period 7/1/2006-6/30/2008 3/30/2006-3/31/2007 10/1/2005-7/31/2006 4/1/2006-3/31/2007 5/15/2006-6/30/2007 7/1/2006-6/30/2010 Amount $351,900 $25,000 $22,050 $56,160 $14,500 $1,230,000 $162,348

Developing a Research-based Learning 9/1/2005-8/31/2007 Progression for the Carbon Cycle: Transformations of Matter and Energy in Biogeochemical Systems A Workshop to Identify and Clarify Nanoscale Learning Goals Learning Complex Performance in, from, and for Practice: Implications for Teaching and Teacher Education A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Effects of District-Wide High-School Curriculum Reform on Academic Achievement and Attainment in Chicago Adolescent Literacy Development in Out-of-School Time: A Practitioner’s Guidebook Developing an Integrated Assessment and Support System for Elementary Teacher Education Ready to Learn School Implementation Study The Great Lakes East Comprehensive Center (GLECC) The National Comprehensive Center on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) -- Evaluation Plan The Great Lakes West Comprehensive Center (GLWCC) - External Evaluation Building Capacity to Evaluate Group Level Interventions Manchild in the Promised Land: Problems and Prospects of College Opportunity and Attainment of African-American Males in an Urban Setting 2/1/2006-1/31/2007 9/1/2006-8/31/2007

$122,418 $47,725

University of Chicago /USDOE/IES

7/1/2006-6/30/2010

$467,159

Elizabeth Moje Pamela Moss Susan Neuman

Carnegie Corporation National Science Foundation Corporation for Public Broadcasting

2/1/2006-9/1/2006 7/1/2006-6/30/2011

$23,097 $1,985,992

9/15/2005-9/14/2010 10/1/2005-9/30/2010

$5,306,355 $882,260

Brian Rowan, Learning Point Carol Barnes & Associates/USDOE Diane Massell Brian Rowan Brian Rowan Brian Rowan with Stephen Raudenbush Larry Rowley Learning Point Associates/USDOE Learning Point Associates/USDOE Univ. of Chicago /WT Grant Lumina Foundation

2/1/2006-6/30/2010 1/1/2006-6/30/2010 1/1/2006-12/31/2006

$1,193,439 $62,000 $50,639

9/1/2005-8/31/2007

$140,000

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School of Education News
School Updates
Medical and Professional Education Concentration
A new concentration for Master’s level students in the higher education program in medical and professional education begins with the addition of a new course: “Introduction to Medical and Professional Education.” The inspiration for the new concentration came from two young faculty members in the Medical School, Emory Collins and Caren Stalburg, who were pursuing master’s degrees in higher education and saw a need to combine the fields. The students in the course will explore professional education in the U.S., including medicine, dentistry, law, business, nursing and pharmacy. Underlying theories and practices related to education in specific disciplines will be presented by experts in each of the fields. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the disciplines that comprise professional education, and to the educational methods and the current management, legal and policy issues within each of the disciplines. The instructors for the course come from the University of Michigan Health System: Casey White, Ph.D. is Assistant Dean for Medical Education and Assistant Professor of Medical Education. Hilary Haftel, M.D., is Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases. Kenney to coordinate our secondary teacher preparation programs. The School is currently searching for a new faculty member who would be the Director of Teacher Education. The Director will work with the faculty leaders to coordinate the teacher preparatioin programs.

Provost Sullivan Visit

Lesley Rex

New University Provost, Teresa Sullivan, spent June 30 in the School of Education as part of her “getting acquainted” tour of the programs on campus. Dean Ball designed the day to be a sort of “field trip” where, rather than just meeting people, Sullivan could get a sense of some of the School’s current work. Consequently, she spent the day participating in various meetings, and having lunch with students. The purpose was to help her learn more about the work that is going on in the School. Dean Ball served as “tour guide” for the day, going with her on all her stops and talking with her afterwards about what she had seen and heard, and setting that in context. The School of Education was one of Sullivan’s first stops in her effort to learn more about the University. This is the first time in over seventy years that the University has appointed a provost who was not a member of the UM faculty, so orienting her to the campus and to the initiatives of each school or college was an important agenda. “She was enthusiastic all day long and made many comments,” said Dean Ball. “Of course there is more for her to learn; the design I created for her visit did not allow her to learn about all of our programs or research. But this set a foundation for our work with our new Provost. We were delighted that Provost Sullivan spent an entire day in the building with us so soon after stepping into her new role on campus.”
Elizabeth Moje (center), Amy Jeppsen, Emily Douglas, Melissa Stull and Deanna Birdyshaw present their preservice teacher research project to Provost Teresa Sullivan (upperleft) and Dean Ball.

New Coordinators of Our Teacher Education Programs
Cathy Reischl has agreed to assume the role of faculty coordinator for the elementary teacher education programs for 2006-07. Lesley Rex will take on this role for the secondary teacher education programs. This represents a next step in the development of a new leadership plan for our teacher education programs, where faculty members will take turns in the role of “faculty lead/coordinator.” Reischl will work with Sara Constant and Stuart Rankin to coordinate our elementary teacher preparation programs. Rex Cathy Reischl will work with Charlie Peters and Pat

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School of Education News
Development Notes
ome philanthropic contributions to the School of Education go to scholarships and to particular academic endeavors. Some patrons choose to support aspects of the School that are usually overlooked as possible targets for giving.
One such recent generous gift came from the support of Vernon and Judith Istock. The Istocks’ gift underwrote a portion of the cost to refurbish the first floor of the School of Education building. Our building has great historical value as a representation of the work of early-20th century architects, Perkins, Fellows and Hamilton. It also housed the University elementary and high schools, as well as the lab school. Many of the historic architectural elements of this earlier era remain, such as lovely Pewabic tile, but they need restoration and enhancement. In addition, the building needs such ordinary but necessary elements as good signage and information displays. With the help of the Istocks’ gift, the work of reviving the historical features and creating a better way-finding environment has already begun. This work on the building coordinates beautifully with other design work now underway on the print and web materials that represent the School. We plan to have many of these enhancements completed in time for the major events of the 50th anniversary celebration for the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education in 2007.

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On the Internet
Keep up with the latest events, donate online, or update your contact information at:
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http://www.soe.umich.edu/alumnidevelopment
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School of Education Classnotes
Classnotes
Mary Louise Hook Allen (BS 1951) is the author of her father’s biography, Fightin’ Frank, about Frank Hook, the 12th District of Michigan’s only Democratic Congressman. Allen herself taught for 3 years in secondary school, followed by seven years in higher education. She says, “Without my undergraduate years at UM, I would never have been in Who’s Who in American Education,” and received numerous other awards and recognitions for her career in women’s sports and teaching. Nancy Craik Beights (BS 1972) After teaching mathematics for over 31 and a half years, Beights has now been chosen as the District Mathematics and Computer Science Coordinator for Collier County Public Schools in Naples, FL. Babette M. Benken (Cert. 2000; PhD 200) has become an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and California State University-Long Beach. David Churchman (MA 196) writes, “I have just returned from a Fulbright (my second) to Ukraine, during which my latest book, Why We Fight: Theories of Human Aggression and Conflict, was published. I am dividing my time among Internet teaching for California State University (from which I retired in 2003), writing, traveling, and volunteering at the Shakespeare Festival in Ashland OR where we now make our home.” Melon (M. Ellen) Dash (MS 1980) has owned and run a swim school exclusively for adults afraid in water since 1983. She recently published her book, Conquer Your Fear of Water: An Innovative SelfDiscovery Course in Swimming. The book is available from the Transpersonal Swimming Institute, LLC http://www.conquerfear.com. Arnold Engster (BS 1963) has been a Whittemore-Prescott (Iosco, MI) Board of Education member since 199. He is running for reelection this year. George Falkenhagen (MS 1990) is seeking a third term in Oscoda (MI) school board service. He served a twoyear term ending in 2003, then ran again and was elected to his current term in 200. Falkenhagen taught in Oscoda schools for 31 years and currently is the coordinator at Alpena Community College’s Huron Shores Campus, as well as an adjunct instructor in biology and computer science. Antonio R. Flores (PhD 1990) received the 2005 Hispanic Magazine Achievement Award for his work as president of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Since he took office in 1996, the organization has more than doubled its membership. Today HACU serves more than two-thirds of the nearly two million Hispanic students in higher education. Matthew Francis (BA 1996) was hired by the Ann Arbor Fire Department in December of 2005. His duties include protecting University of Michigan property and providing emergency medical care to students. He comments, “It is great to be back in Ann Arbor.” Edward A. Gallagher (BA 1959; PhD 1968) recently completed four years as president of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. The Academy began in 189 to promote research and publication in a variety of academic and professional fields. Membership is open to all UM School of Education alumni.

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School of Education Classnotes Classnotes (Continued)

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Michael Paul Goldenberg (MS 1997) has accepted a full-time faculty position with the School of Education at University of Michigan-Flint beginning May 2006 to teach mathematics for teachers and mathematics education courses. Darryl B. Goncharoff (MS 1977) recently retired from Walled Lake (MI) schools. He was an educator in Walled Lake and Dearborn Heights for 31 years and now teaches part time as an English instructor at Schoolcraft Community College in Livonia (MI). Alice Irwin Gordon (MA 1963; EdS 1968) a retired reading specialist from Kalamazoo (MI) schools recalls with pleasure the advisor/advisee relationships she enjoyed with Dr. Warren Ketchum and Dr. Donald E.P. Smith. She says that she loves being a member of the School of Education Alumni Board. Kendra Hearn (Cert. 1993) earned her Doctor of Philosophy degee in Curriculum and Instruction from Wayne State University (2005). She currently works with the West Bloomfield School District (MI) as the Director of Curriculum. J. Downs Herold (MA 1968) Retired from “U of M after 35 wonderful years of administrative work in Adult Education (Extension Service), Community Liaison (Industrial Development Division), and Technology Transfer (College of Engineering).” He is making and selling UM and MSU commemorative dinnerware as well as custom orders for customers from througout the country. (www.collegiatechina.com). He says, “President Coleman took our plates to China to use as gifts.” Marlisa Johnson (MA 1997) director of Mathtopian Preparation, a private tutoring firm based in Los Angeles, was recently appointed to the Advisory Board of the Central Cities Affiliate of the CA Association for the Gifted. She also

serves as the 2nd District Representative of the Los Angeles County Community Action Board.

Lauri E. Kallio (AB 1961) published a book, Confess or Die: The Case of Bill Heirens. The book resulted from her service on a committee of lawyers, forensic experts and Heirens’ biographer to determine whether Heirens had actually committed any of the three Chicago northside murders to which he had confessed in 197. She is also involved in the Peace Action movement and at present chairs the state level organization. Roland (Ron) Lehker (MA 1951; PhD 1963) was featured in an article in the Muskegon (MI) Chronicle on the occasion of his 80th birthday in March 2006. He wa recognized for his work in bringing Steele Middle School students to Washington, D.C. for educational tours of the Capitol, White House, and other government centers. Lehker was principal of Steele Middle School from 1971 to 1986. Susan Lipson (Cert. 198) has just published her second book, Writing Success through Poetry, a writing instruction program for teachers of grades -8. The book features poetry prompts to elicit vivid writing in all genres. It is available from Prufrock Press (www. prufrock.com) or Amazon.com. Mary Melvin (MA 1963) has been recognized by the Orava Association, Slovakia¹s national education association, for her longstanding contribution to improvement of education in Slovakia. Melvin lived in Nitra, Slovakia, working with the Orava Project from 1997 to 1999 to help teachers prepare students to be active citizens in a democratic society. As the work of the Orava Project spread to other countries, Melvin volunteered and served in Albania, Armenia, Bulgaria, Kosova, and the Ukraine.

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School of Education Classnotes

Seth Oppenheim (BA 1999) has been selected as a Fulbright Scholar to France. He will be assigned to the Division of Cultural Heritage at UNESCO in Paris to work on cultural heritage legal issues. Previously, he was in Vienna as a Fulbright Scholar to Austria. Mark Thompson (BA 1967) ELL teacher at Como Park (MN) Elementary, receives a “thumbs up” from staff, students and families during a school assembly in his honor in September 2006. Mark received the Minnesota’s American Star Award of Teaching from the Bush administration. Those in attendance included U.S. Senator Norm Coleman,Assistant Secretary for planning with the U.S. Dept. of Education, and Saint Paul’s new superintendent, Dr. Meria Carstarphen. Complete stories can be found at: http://www.startribune.com/1592/story/680396.html Michael Weiskopf (BS 1995) has achieved national board teacher certification in adolescent and young adult mathematics. He is one of only five teachers in Michigan to have earned this certification. He is in his eleventh year teaching mathematics at Walled Lake (MI) Western High School. Naama Yaron (BA 2005) says, “I am very much enjoying my first year of teaching and thankful for the wonderful education I received at U of M!”

In Memoriam
Leonard W. Brumm, Jr (BS 1950), or “Oakie” to those who knew him, a former University of Alaska Fairbanks hockey coach, athletic director, and men’s basketball coach, passed away on January 17, 2006, in Racine, Wisconsin, after battling an aggressive form of cancer. His obituary can be found at: http://www.uscho.com/news/id,11775/ Raymond Madigan (1968 PhD) former superintendent of South Lyon Community Schools, passed away March 1, 2006 at the age of 83.
Madigan was born in Detroit and spent much of his early educational career in the Detroit Public Schools. In 1970, after earning a doctoral degree in education from the University of Michigan, he became director of instruction in South Lyon. Eleven years later, Madigan retired as superintendent. To view the obituary, go to: http://www.hometownlife.com/apps/ pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006603090868

Link Up Campaign
Show your support of the School by linking to the School of Education Web site at: http://www.soe.umich.edu . Do you have a Blog, a personal space on a social networking site or a personal Web site? If you do, please link to our Web site and the program you graduated from. This will help make the School more visible on the Internet and help spread the word of all of the great things going on here. Thank you for your support!

On the Internet
Let us know what you are doing by filling out the update form on the last page of this edition of the Innovator or you can submit your update online at:

http://www.soe.umich.edu/classnotes

www.soe.umich.edu

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School of Classnotes Education In Memoriam
Edwin J. McClendon, Professor Emeritus of Education and Health Education at the University of Michigan, died January 21, 2006, in Ann Arbor. He was 8.
As an educator and administrator, Edwin J. McClendon devoted his life to the promotion of education and public health awareness. “He had a keen grasp of how education about health should be carried out in local schools and he had a very considerable impact on Michigan, particularly in Michigan schools,” said Scott Simonds, professor emeritus of health behavior and health education at the UM School of Public Health and a former colleague of McClendon’s. Prior to joining the UM faculty in 1972, where he held joint appointments in the School of Public Health and the School of Education, McClendon worked in public schools as a teacher, high school principal, director of secondary education, and school superintendent. He spent more than a decade with the Wayne County (MI) Intermediate School District as an education health consultant and later served as assistant state superintendent of education for the Michigan Department of Education’s Comprehensive Health Programs. McClendon was also instrumental in the development of Schoolcraft College in Livonia. “His extensive work in Michigan enabled him to contribute extensively to the continuing education of teachers throughout the

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univErSity of Michigan

state and to the development of improved curricula and policies at district levels,” said Simonds, “and his experiences in Michigan were adopted elsewhere through his leadership in national organizations and through several consultations with and for the World Health Organization.” Born in Troy, Oklahoma, McClendon was part Choctaw Indian. During World War II, he served in the Navy and attained the rank of lieutenant. He moved to Detroit in 1955. During his tenure at Michigan, from 1972 until his retirement in 1992, McClendon produced over 50 monographs, articles, and research reports, and he wrote or co-authored seven books, including Healthful Living for Today and Tomorrow (1978) and Health and Wellness (1987), a text widely used in high schools. He was chair of the university’s Native American Studies sequence in American Culture and represented Native Americans on the University Minority Affairs Council. McClendon also served as a consultant to the World Health Organization. A resident of Plymouth, Michigan, McClendon was a member and president of the Plymouth-Canton (MI) Board of Education for 1 years. In his honor, the school administrative center was renamed the E. J. McClendon Center in 1993. McClendon is survived by a son, Edwin Jr.; daughters Melody Lang and Joy McClendon; two brothers; four sisters; and four grandchildren.

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innovator 37:1 fall 2006

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Annual Report Message from the Dean
Dear School of Education alumni and friends,
As this issue of Innovator hits the press, the School of Education has reached 93% of our original campaign goal of $30,000,000. We are grateful to all of you for your generous support of our work. Thank you so much! On the following pages are the names of donors whose generosity helps us support students through scholarships, provides seed money for research, improves technical and building services, and permits us to recruit outstanding faculty. As vital as these contributions have been, however, the need for outside support continues to grow. The University of Michigan School of Education is among the best in the nation, as evidenced by U.S. News & World Report rankings and such recent reports as Arthur Levine’s Educating School Teachers (The Education Schools Project, www.edschools. org). But the times call for strategic investments in people, programs, and facilities in order to exercise the leadership in education of which we are capable. Here are five different areas in which we need your help: Student Support It is crucial to our agenda that we be able to attract and support a diverse student body. The total cost for a Michigan undergraduate is nearly $20,000 per year and out-of-state students pay approximately $30,000 per year. For graduate students the cost is even higher. Scholarships and fellowships enable us to compete successfully for outstanding students at all levels by offering financial aid packages commensurate with those of other universities. Endowed Professorships Named professorships enable the School to reward exceptional performance among current faculty members and attract leading scholars to join our faculty. One of the most powerful incentives we can offer is an endowed professorship that offers both professional recognition and research support. Facilities Improvements In order to accommodate our programs, technologies, techniques, and research, the School has embarked on a series of carefully planned renovations. Our goal is to create flexible and hospitable classrooms, lecture halls equipped with state-ofthe-art technology, improved spaces for collaborative work, updated laboratories, and new facilities such as a digital library and archive. Upon completion, our refurbished building will enable us to view and study settings far from campus, work
Dean Deborah Loewenberg Ball

with others at distant institutions, and continue to extend the Michigan tradition of collaborative, interdisciplinary work. Professional Development Fund In our continuing drive to make a difference in the world of education, we must extend our reach into K-16 classrooms nationwide. Currently, many of our faculty offer professional development as a component of their research. However, a separate, freestanding Professional Development Fund will enable us to focus more intently—and channel resources directly—into non-degree professional programs for a wide range of educators and educational leaders. Fund for Excellence We deeply appreciate gifts of any size. Raising money is a collective endeavor, and together our supporters and donors make the difference to our work. No gift is too small to be significant. The Fund for Excellence is a crucial fund that permits us to support new initiatives, help a student in a crisis, organize special events, or produce targeted materials. In general, the Fund for Excellence allows us the flexibility to be opportunistic and strategic in contributing in a timely way to solving the pressing problems on which we focus our efforts. These are just a few of the ways in which the School needs your continuing support. We also need your ideas, your enthusiasm, your suggestions, and your spreading the word about our programs, our research, and our contributions to practice and policy. As we reach the midpoint of the Capital Campaign (October 20), we invite you to look to the future with us, and to help ensure that the University of Michigan School of Education is a “leader and best.” Sincerely,

Deborah Loewenberg Ball Dean and William H. Payne Collegiate Professor in Education

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Annual Donors Report
GIFTS OF $100,000 OR MORE
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Verne G. Istock W.K. Kellogg Foundation Lumina Foundation for Education Mrs. Pasqualina E. Miller Ms. Louise R. Newman Spencer Foundation

GIFTS OF $1000 TO $2499
Abbott Laboratories Fund Mr. Charles J. Andrews Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Angood Ms. Anna W. Angus Col. and Mrs. Arthur D. Barondes Stephen and Mary Bates Mrs. Guido A. Binda Dr. and Mrs. Douglas B. Brown Dr. and Mrs. John W. Brubacher Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Burleigh Dr. Joy B. Carter Mrs. Margaret I. Gardner Christiansen Diane D. Coxford Miss Janet E. Diehl Mark F. Duffy Mrs. Irene D. Eanes ExxonMobil Foundation Ms. Barbara V. Grinke Margene Henry Warren A. Ketcham Estate Martin and Terry Klitzner Sarah and John Lawser Mr. and Mrs. Sander Lehrer Miss Charlotte B. Lewis Mrs. H. Hillard Libman Ms. Frances E. Lossing Helen L. Mamarchev, Ph.D. Jerry A. and Deborah Orr May Mrs. Lila A. McMechan Dennis D. and Kathleen Lowe Mele Dr. and Mrs. Allen Menlo Mr. F Herbert Neuman Michael and Eleanor Pinkert Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Rees Jo Anne and Ralph Rydholm Thomas and Alison Samph Dale and Caryl Schunk Gus and Andrea Stager Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Subar Trinity Health Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Van Deusen Stephen and Susan Schwartz Wildstrom James Williams Dr. June S. Wilson

GIFTS OF $10,000 TO $99,999
Carnegie Corporation DaimlerChrysler Corporation Fund Mr. Dennis Gross Donna and Eugene Hartwig David L. Huntoon and Mari J. Arno Roger and Carolyn Johnson Loretta B. Jones Estate William M. and Judy H. Krips John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Mrs. Joan Nelson Neil North Shore UM Alumni Club Dr. and Mrs. Deobold Van Dalen The Wallace Foundation Miss Nancy Jane Wolf

GIFTS OF $2,500 TO $9,999
John and Terese Austin Esther B. Ayres Estate Baker Group Janet and C. J. Buresh John and Janis Burkhardt James E. and Wendy P. Daverman Roberta Dunlap Estate Linda and Martin Frank Mrs. Kathleen Taylor Garrett Goodrich Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Hodgson Dennis M. and Marise A. Hussey Jim and Judy Kamman Knafel Family Foundation Barbara E. Lewis Estate Michigan Health & Hospital Association Mr. and Mrs. William T. Muir Mrs. Waltraud E. Prechter Langley and Karen Shook St. Joseph Mercy Hospital King and Frances Stutzman Bruce A. and Janis A. Work

GIFTS OF $500 TO $999
E. Joyce Adderley Hope and Noah Alper Timothy and Kathleen Andersen Dr. and Mrs. Todd W. Areson Lee P. and Marguerite P. Berlin Melinda and Mark Bowles Lawrence and Valerie Bullen

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Jack and Marian Burchfield Stuart Cohen and Susan Hartman Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Cronin Miss Barbara Jo Davis Mr. P. Gordon Earhart Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Evanson Drs. Gary Fenstermacher and Virginia Richardson Mona and Thomas Fielder Ford Motor Company Fund Donald S. and Laurie M. Gardner Mr. and Mrs. Brewster H. Gere Dr. Judith I. Gill GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Ms. M. Jane Goodrich Mr. William Leo Gregg Mrs. Mary Ann Greig Dr. Patricia L. Griffin Ms. Trudy Gross Kathy and Stephen Hampshire Donald and Dagny Harris Mr. and Mrs. James T. Hegenbarth Edward J. and Ruth Heinig Joan Pereles Heller Bob and Marguerite Higgins William and Rebecca Horvath James and Wendy Fisher House Dr. and Mrs. James F. Hyla Ruth E. Kallio, Ph.D. Emily and Robert Kemnitz Kristina and James Kunz David and Joanne D. Laird Charles and Elizabeth Lee Mrs. Ann Thuma LeVeque Elizabeth and John Moje Guy and Linda Murdock William H. Nault Dr. Joseph S. and Ann R. Newcomb Mrs. Cornelia H. Norton Ms. Barbara G. Oddy John H. and Catherine H. Ogden Charles and Betty J. Ortmann Christine J. Oster Judith and R. Douglas Petrie L. Norris and Helen Stegeman Post Prudential Foundation Patricia and Perry Remaklus Ms. Winifred H. Rome, M.B.A. Dr. Laura J. Roop Mrs. Lenora and Dr. James Ross Karen and Glenn Saltsman Elise C. Schepeler Carol and Alfred Schrashun Mrs. Josephine W. Sebben Margo and Michael Siegel Mary Phyllis and Allan R. Sieger Alma Simounet-Bey and Wilfredo Geigel Richard E. and Patricia Skavdahl Mr. and Mrs. R. Eugene Slough Robert and Elizabeth Staley Nancy and Fred Stanke Ralph and Mary Stevens Russell C. Still Nancy and John Strom Mr. and Mrs. W. Richard Summerwill

Dorothy and James Symons Nelda Taylor The Rev. and Mrs. Mark C. Thompson Bernard and Gloria Vinson George A. Wade, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Ward M. Wheatall Donald L. Williams Dr. and Mrs. James D. Yates John and S. Suzanne Zinser

GIFTS OF $250 TO $499
Jean R. Aimonovitch Dr. Barbara and Mr. Irwin Alpern Neal H. and Elizabeth A. Ardahl T. Gregory Barrett Roger and Nancy Battistella Mr. and Mrs. Jerry P. Baugh James and Patricia Beadle Ms. Carita H. Bergelin Amy and David Bloom Susan and David Bloom Mr. and Mrs. Peter N. Blount Mr. John P. Bradarich Mary and Paul Brown Paul and Elaine Brubacher Jean and Earl Bryant Mrs. Nettie Calhoun Jack Stanley Carberry Dr. Deborah F. Carter Mr. and Mrs. George C. Caruso Margaret and Stanley Cheff Mrs. Mary Jo Coe Dr. George L. Cogar Dolores and Grady Cole Computer Associates International, Inc. Paul and Laurie Cook Mrs. Eileen M. Courter Joann and William Crawford David and Marilyn Cummins Margaret P. Curtin Mrs. Elizabeth A. Cutter Hickman Mr. and Mrs. Arlan Danne Miss June Deal Susan J. Devencenzi Karen and Kenneth Dickinson Dr. Lahna Faga Diskin Robert B. and Sara T. Evans Dr. Colleen M. Fairbanks Mrs. Bettysue Feuer Dr. and Mrs. Bradford S. Foster Ms. Victory E. Frantz Dr. Leeann L. Fu Theresa and Steven Furr Mr. Lorne G. Gearhart Ms. Cathleen L. Gent Gregory and Cynthia Goss Mr. and Mrs. David M. Griffin Bev and Jim Haas Robert and Karen W. Hahn Marguerite Hammersmith Dr. Barbara J. Harris Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Harris Mrs. Myra Levine Harris

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Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1 Janet Phlegar and Robert Vierling Mr. Paul Chester Pinto Richard E. Popov Jerry and Lorna Prescott Dr. Laura I. Rendon Mrs. Sally R. Ricker Dr. and Mrs. Gerald and Gertrude Rigg Fred and Janet R. Rolf Ms. Maria Prado Romo Dr. Leslie W. Ross Mrs. Irene S. Roth SBC Foundation Joan and Roger Schlukebir Scripps Howard Foundation Jon and Diana Sebaly James M. and Sue M. Sellgren Howard and Nancy Serlin Mr. Steven R. Shatto Thomas W. and Myrtle J. Shultz Skillman Foundation CharylAnn Skowron-Maas and William Maas John S. and Virginia C. Slavens Leonard and Nancy Smith Roger Floyd Smith Miss Adele Evelyn Sobania Staples, Inc. Mrs. Betty B. Steen Florence and Joel Steinberg Sue Corless Stern and Jonathan Stern Dr. Clarence L. and Mrs. Oretha H. Stone Ronald P. and Janet S. Strote Lawrence C. and Jean E. Sweet Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Tassie Ann Shenefield Trees Edward J. and M. Jade VanderVelde Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Vest Margaret Walker-Stevens and H. Stevens Kathy and Otis Walton James and Bonnie L. Watson Mr. and Mrs. David E. Weiss Mr. and Mrs. Timothy A. Westerdale W. Scott Westerman, Jr., Ph.D. George and Patricia Williams Carol E. Willman, Ph.D. Richard V. Wisniewski Michael W. and Marcia W. York

Kathleen A. Hart, Ph.D. Mary Ellen Heilbrun Dennis and Alyce Helfman Diane and Jay Herther Dr. James T. Heydt Patricia and Thomas Hill Judith and John Howard Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. Howard Mr. Jarrett Theophus Hubbard Shirley B. and Charles E. Hurwitz Ms. Joan Lee Husted Robert and Gretchen Ilgenfritz Intel Foundation Stephen and Debra Jackson Louis P. James, Ph.D. Ms. Elsie M. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Jolliffe Mr. James B. Jones Shirley and Irving Kaplan Barbara and David Karpinski Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kastner C. Philip and Julia Kearney Howard and Mary Kirchick Jim and Barbara Knight Michael S. Kornfeld Kevin and Karen Kraushaar Dr. William E. Lakey Clifford and Gloria Larsen Diane Larsen-Freeman and Elliott Freeman Lisa R. Lattuca Rory P. and Martha R. Laughna John and Barbara Leppiaho Marshall Katzman and Sarah Lewis Paul and Lynn Lieberman Charles E. and Madelyn P. Litz Mr. and Mrs. James R. Lozelle Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Catherine Wollenberg & Richard MacDonald Bruce and Bertie Mack Mr. and Mrs. Monroe D. Macpherson Ashley and D. Scott Maentz Marathon Oil Company Foundation Cynthia A. Martinez-Harner Drs. John H. and Margaret S. Matlock May Department Stores Co. Foundation Kenneth and Lisa McCaman McGraw-Hill Companies Henry Meares and Paula Allen-Meares Merck Company Foundation Lawrence and Phyllis Miller Drs. Jeffrey and Barbara Mirel Sue and Cecil Miskel Ms. Shirley A. Mogil J. Michael and Barbara Moore William and Bernice Morse Dr. Helen M. Morsink Samuel A. Muller Alina and Stephen Muther Joan and Carl Nelson Mark J. Neveaux, Ed.D. Patricia Nicholas and Guy Eigenbrode Jonathon P. Niemczak Alan and Emelia J. Osborne Dr. Marvin W. Peterson Pfizer Foundation

GIFTS OF $100 TO $249
Susan and Lawrence Aaron Georgia and Kevin Abbey Robin and Andrew Ackerman Kathryn and James Ackley Betsy and Bradford Allen Cynthia and J. Norman Allen Kathryn A. Allingham Dr. Richard C. Alterman Dr. and Mrs. Martin E. Amundson Donald F. Anderson Dr. Lynn W. Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Anderson Rosalind and Carl Andreas Susan Anspach, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Gerard A. Antekeier

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Mrs. Constance J. Armitage Mr. and Mrs. Brent Auer Lawrence H. and Margaret A. Ault Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Aurand Ann Austin-Beck and John Beck Lenore and Stuart Bacher Susan Trubey Bahl Bob and Nancy Bain Dean A. Baird Mr. and Mrs. M. Dana Baldwin II Bonnie and Gary Ballard Dr. and Mrs. Albert G. Ballert Marilyn and Joel Bamford Dr. Cheryl D. Barkovich Dr. Joan Boykoff Baron Janet L. Bartelmay John M. and Margaret Bashur Dr. Michael N. Bastedo Robert H. Bates Charles and Joanne Bath Jane and Donald Batton Kathryn and Philip Bayster Charles D. Beall Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Beam Mr. William S. Beaman Thenora Hill Beard Virginia Walcott Beauchamp, PhD. Marcia G. Bednarsh Mrs. Mary Katharine Behe Jane and David Belew Frances Gurwin Bell John and Anne Belvedere Susan C. Benes, M.D. Mrs. Carolyn Ann Benson Mr. and Mrs. Dennis C. Benson Dr. Rose Marie Berberian Karl A. and Nancy F. Berg Jacqueline C. and Jay E. Berkelhamer Adele and Barry Berlin Elizabeth and Sherwood Berman Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey W. Berno Mary and Thomas Berry Ms. Margaret L. Bertelli Roger R. Bertoia Ronald and Elizabeth Betzig Mr. and Mrs. Alan G. Billings Henrietta and Jack Billings Deanna and Eural Birdyshaw Mr. and Dr. Bishop Nikki and William Black Richard A. and Audrey E. Blanzy Boeing Company Timothy and Angelique Boerst H. Tom and Dorothy Bogosian Joan E. Bolling Dr. David James Bonnette Mr. and Mrs. John C. Bow Ms. M. Victoria Bowes Douglas A. Boyce Ms. Susan B. Boynton Marek J. and Frances Craig Bozdech Thomas and Kathryn Bradford Dr. and Mrs. A. Paul Bradley, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Carl I. Brahce Judith and James Braid

Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Brammer Ms. Katharine L. Brand Lori and Robert Bratzler Ms. Frederica S. Brenneman Mr. Daniel M. Bridges Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Brimacombe Dr. Lois F. Brinkman Mr. and Mrs. Albert K. Brock Mary Lee and Anthony T. Bronzo Arthur P. Brooks Dr. George Brown, Jr. Dr. Margaret C. Brown Thorne J. Brown Mrs. Vivian Brown Dr. and Mrs. William Brownscombe Shelley and Gary Bruder Mr. David M. Bruhowzki BTM Capital Corporation Pauline and James Buchanan Dana and Edward Bucknam Ms. Beverly Jean Budke Mrs. June J. Burchyett Susan A. Burda Arthur W. and Alice R. Burks Burlington Resources Foundation Robert and Anne E. Burns Dr. Sandra Kay Burrus Mr. Lauren Bussey Ms. Kathy Butlin Frank and Mary Butorac Mr. Thomas A. Butts Ms. Shannon K. Byrne Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Campbell Joellen and Larry Campbell Mrs. Marsha Rogers Canick Mr. Peter John Canzano Karen and Bryan Capanyola Matthew and Karen Caputo Mr. Theodore A. Caris Robert W. and Susan Carling Kevin and Karen J. Carney Emanuel and Joan Carreras Dr. Robert Carrier and Linda Carrier Ms. Priscilla S. Carroll Timothy and Janis Casai Cara and David Cassard Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Cecchini Donovan and Loraine Chamberlin Mrs. Joy R. Chance Ms. Jean M. Chapman Dr. Marsha L. Chapman Marilyn R. Chasteen Kristin Good Chatas Diane and Richard Cheatham Joyce W. and Richard M. Chesbrough ChevronTexaco Miss Alice J. Chindblom Ms. Carole J. Cholasta Therese and Richard Chouinard Charles Chrystal and Lenore Luciano Ki-Suck and Hae-Ja Chung Andrea and Joseph Clare William A. and Catherine B. Clark Mrs. Lottie Ritz Clark Mrs. Olga Susan Clark

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Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1 Dr. and Mrs. David G. Drake Jeffry Alan and Lydia Drelles Sandra and Francis Drinan Jane Baker Drotos & Julius Chip Drotos DTE Energy Foundation Charles and Cheryl Duggan Mr. and Mrs. David D. Dunatchik Henry W. Dunbar Kyle and John Dunbar Michele and Peter Duncan Mr. Jesse L. Dungy III Karen and Douglas Dunn Mrs. Florence D. Dunning Mrs. Barbara K. Dursum Robert Henry Dutnell Dr. and Mrs. Craig R. Dykstra Mr. and Mrs. George C. Earl John D. and Ruth B. Edick Marsha Katz Edison Margaret M. and Stuart L. Edmonds Allan and Doris Edwards Katherine and J. Robert Effinger Barbara K. Eggleston Rosanne and Edward Ehrlich Dr. John Eisner Kathleen and Lawrence Elias Sophia Holley Ellis Mr. and Mrs. Eric S. Emory Hollie and Matthew Eriksen Pascual Escareno Mr. Craig M. Evans Mr. and Mrs. James H. Evans Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Evans Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Evans III Ms. Linda I. Evans Paul L. Evans Dr. and Mrs. William J. Evans Paul and Dr. Tsila Evers Dr. and Mrs. William K. Facey Ms. Susan M. Farber Marianne and Donn A. Fasbender Robert and Patricia Fedore Mr. Lloyd C. Ferguson Paul Fiduccia and Lily Chang Albert and Barbara Finch Dr. and Mrs. A. Lawrence Fincher Mr. and Mrs. Richard O. Fine Robert Fine and Deborah Pierce Richard and Kathleen L. Fink Mr. and Mrs. Norman E. Fischer Patricia and Richard Fischer Donna and Andrew Fisher Lois and James Fitch John and Jacqueline Fletcher Dr. Kathlyn E. Fletcher Dr. Jeanette G. Fleury Miss Linda E. Flickinger James and Nancy Flugrath Freeman and Frances E. Flynn Cassandra M. and Richard W. Foley Mrs. Edith L. Foley Cecil R. and Rita M. Foote Mr. and Mrs. Gary Forquer Joanne and Edwin Foster William and Shirley Foster

Dr. and Mrs. Bruce D. Clayton Ms. Mary Evelyn Clelland Linda Cobb-McClain and John Mclain Dr. and Mrs. Terrence G. Coburn Dr. George T. Cody Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Coffey Kathleen Cohan and Kenneth Burrell Dr. Edyth B. Cole Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Cole Glenora and Archer Collins Mr. William S. Collins Mrs. Margaret Colony Amy and Kenneth Colton Mr. and Mrs. David R. Comfort Lucianne and Daniel Conklin James and James Conklin James P. Conroy II Constellation Energy Group Dr. Lynne Harris Cook Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Cooper Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Cope Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Corcoran Jr. Dean W. Coston Gary and Myra Court Sandra E. Cox Miss Marjorie Ann Cramer Rose W. Crandell Paula and Ronald Creed Mr. Wallace T. Cripps Miss Carolyn L. Crosby Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Curry Sue and Del Danielson Dr. Patricia J. Daugert Roscoe and Mary Jo Davidson James and Beverly H. Davies Ms. Catherine M. Davis James E. and Joanna Young Davis Ms. Dorothy Diane Day Miss Marybeth Dean Edward D. and Joanne B. Deeb Robert and Kathleen Degange Mr. and Mrs. John W. DeHeus Mrs. Sandra Lou Deline Dr. Delmo Della-Dora Kathleen M. Delnay, M.D. Mrs. Helen V. DenBesten Ms. Rita M. Des Armier John A. DiBiaggio, D.D.S. Mrs. Linda S. Dickerson Kathyrn L. Dierstein Betty Jordan Dietz John J. Dietz Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Dixon Joan and Douglas Dodge Eleanor A. Doersam Lois Ann Dohner Dr. Charles A. Dominick Virginia and Robert Donald Richard C. Donley Harold C. Doster, Ph.D. Dr. Donald E. Douglas Leonard and Melody Douglas Dow Chemical Company Foundation Dow Corning Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Carserlo Doyle

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Howard and Margaret Fox Winifred and James Fox Anadel Schmidt Fox Dorothy and Thomas Fraker Arthur and Marlene Francis Mr. and Mrs. Paul Tobias Frey Judith and David Frey Martha Frey and Robert T. Collins Dr. Ann Byrne Fridrich Ms. Rondi Sokoloff Frieder Miss Eileen M. Friedman Gail and Philip Fu Paul A. and Anne K. Fuhs Virginia Duenkel Fuldner Mr. William L. Furstenberg Peri and Patty Gagalis Dr. Kent and Margaret Haskins Gage Judith and Dennis Gage Claire and Asher Galed Dr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gallagher Ethan C. and Patricia W. Galloway Miss Elaine M. Galoit Mr. Edgar A. Gaskill Mrs. Genevieve Arlene Gay Mr. Thomas Gazella GE Foundation Mrs. Martha J. Gearhart Dr. Wendy A. Gee General Motors Foundation Larry and Nicoletta Gess Dr. Quentin H. Gessner Mrs. Jayne E. Giffin Mrs. Nancy J. Gifford Erica Gilbertson and Matthew Hall Mrs. Kay H. Gill John Douglas Gillesby Ms. Carolyn M. Glair Mrs. Matiana Glass Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Glazier Dr. and Mrs. Stewart E. Gloyer Louis and Kimberley Gomez Penelope Patton Gordon Mr. and Mrs. Ronald N. Grabois Ms. Inta Mednis Grace Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Graham Rodney J. Grambeau, Ed.D. William T. Grant Foundation Elmer and Grace Green Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Green Carolyn and Hugh Greenberg Dr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Greenberg Mr. and Mrs. Emerson F. Greenman Mrs. Paula C. Gregg Mrs. Mary L. Gregory Mrs. Shirley Z. Grekin Ms. Fern A. Griffin Mrs. Elizabeth A. Griffiths Mrs. Sally K. Griswold Dr. Norman E. Gronlund Mary and David Grossman Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Guerin Janet E. Gumenick, M.S.W. Mr. Raymond P. Gura Mrs. Marilyn F. Gushee Dr. Carl H. Haag

Dr. Heather J. Haberaecker Marc and Andrea Haidle Dr. Constance A. Hall Mrs. Mary L. Hallock Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Halpern Joanne and Lindsey Halstead Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Hamilton Jeffrey and Ilze Hammersley Dr. and Mrs. Ira M. Hanan Dr. and Mrs. William C. Handorf Dr. Bill M. Hanna Ms. Barbara A. Hansen Rev. Olga J. Hard Mr. and Mrs. Orvid I. Harju Mrs. Dorothy R. Harmsen Jane Harrell and William Lurkins John and Mary Harrison Robert W. Harrison Richard W. Hawkins Thomas White Hawkins Mrs. William F. Hawkins Gerrard and Edna Haworth Mr. and Mrs. Garnett L. Hegeman Donald G. Heidenberger Kenneth R. Heim Claudia Heinrich Helene and Charles Helburn Cathy and Robert Helton Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Helzerman Maxine and Peter Henning Vicky Henry and John Kerr Mrs. Patsy L. Herbert Janice M. Herbst Dr. and Mrs. Robin I. Herman Michelle and Roger Herrin Jeanne L. and James C. Hess Callie and Clarence Hester Ms. Kimberly M. Heydt Dr. Charles B. Hicks Dr. Fred W. Hicks III Dr. and Mrs. Christopher C. Higgins Margie Green Higgs Daisy Carroll Hill Joan and Peter Hill Dr. Thomas Peter Hillman Miss Dorothy V. Hitsman Dr. Donna Lynn Hodge Betty and William E. Hodson Mr. Dennis G. Hoffer Ann Greenstone Hoffman Miss Nora Martha Hoke Niles and Shirley Holland Janice H. Hollett Janet L. Hooper Roderick and Betty Hooper Rodney and Christine Hosman Miss Lois Jane Hosmer Carl and Betty Hostrup Mrs. Frances K. Houchard Teresa A. Hubbell Catherine A. and Michael J. Hudak Ms. Cheryl B. Hudson Mr. and Mrs. Elwin Leigh Hulce Christine and Nathan Hult Dr. Ann D. Hungerman

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Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1 Dr. and Mrs. Norman Hai-Ming Koo Liz and Tim Kraft Dr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Kramer Mrs. Walter A. Krause, Jr. Marcia and Barton Kreger Paul A. Krieger Mrs. Marjorie Jane Kucher Edward J. Kuhn Margaret A. Kunji David and Cathie LaBeau Ronald D. and Patricia M. LaBeau Mrs. Marjorie S. Laird Mr. and Mrs. George E. Lancaster Katherine Coate Land Susan and Lee Lane Susan Lapine and Donald Mroz David and Helen Lardner A. William and Judith A. Larson Prof. Emer. Myra A. Larson, Ph.D. Dr. William F. Lasher John Arden Lawson Ellie and Bruce Lederman Janet Johnston and Arthur Lee John Thomas and Anne Fiske Lee Ms. Stephanee A. Leech Mr. Thomas Nathan Leidell Jacqueline and Donald Lelong Sydney Solberg Lentz, Ph.D. Mr. Gerald R. LeRoy Barbara and Elliott Levitas Howard J. Lewis Mark Frank Lewis Mr. Frederick B. Li Mrs. Doris M. Libman Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. Lichter Lilykate W. Light Wanda Lincoln and Richard Chadwell Dr. Janice B. Lindberg Piet W. and Jane M. Lindhout Dr. Paul D. Lindseth Janet and Roger Linn Mr. Lee S. Littlefield Barbara and Carrol Lock Dorothy A. Locy The Rev. William S. Logan III Dr. Karen A. Longman Samuel LoPresto and Charlotte Koger John P. and Connie D. Loventhal Mrs. Anne K. Lucas Douglas and Ann Lund Ralph Q. and Elsa Lund Joan and Nathan Luppino Drs. Carla and Gordon Lyon Dr. Theresa B. MacLean G. Parcells and Norbert T. Madison Eleanor and Donald Maentz Mrs. Melissa B. Maghielse Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Malte Miss Mary Lou Manor Daniel R. Manthei Dr. Theodore J. Marchese John F. Marcum, Jr. Mr. John T. Marcusse Milan and Zelma Marich Mr. and Mrs. Richard V. Marks Arland F. Martin

Peyton and Betty Hutchison Dr. John W. Huther Robert A. and Marjorie E. Hyde Lori and Joseph Hymes Dr. and Mrs. Howard M. Iams Roberta and Paul Ingber Mr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Inman Mrs. Margie R. Irick Mr. Charles E. Irvin Carol Ivory-Carline and Jan Carline Gloria Jean Jackson Ms. Mary F. Jackson Mrs. Priscilla R. Jackson Mrs. Julia H. Jacobson Gail and Carl Janensch Ms. Carol Janssen Paula and Harold Jarnicki Mrs. Katherine P. Jeannotte William and Carol L. Jenness Robert and Elinor Jereau Nooralee and David Jobe Mr. and Mrs. Tom E. Jobson Edward and Beth Johnson Ernest D. Johnson Judiann and Richard Johnson Kelly and Robert Johnson Ms. Leslie M. Johnson Ms. Marlisa R. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. William D. Johnson Venna and Harry Johnson Howard A. Jolcuvar Ms. Diane C. Jones Lani Jordan Ms. Janice Anne Kabodian Ms. Dolores A. Kaczmarczyk Don L. and Nancy L. Kaegi Denise and Frederick Kalt S. Olof Karlstrom and Olivia P. Maynard Dr. and Mrs. David W. Karp, Jr. Glenn and Phyllis Karseboom Ms. Melissa A. Kasprzyk Dr. Katherine M. Kasten Mrs. Ellen N. Kay Mr. Charles P. Keeling Bruce M. Keeshin Katherine M. Kehoe Mr. Allyn R. Kehrer Jacqueline and Ernest Kell Mr. and Mrs. Michael V. Kell Mrs. Mary J. Kellogg-Bladecki Shirley Anne Kelly Dr. Ann M. Killenbeck Ms. Elizabeth S. Kimmel James and Tina Kinzel Mrs. Elaine Kirshenbaum Dr. and Mrs. R. David Kissinger Stephen G. Kitakis Emery I. and Diane J. Klein Mrs. Dorothy P. Klintworth Stanley and Dennae Knepp Donald and Dotty Knodle Ms. Barbara J. Knutson Ronald R. Kocan Adam C. Komar Mr. Arthur W. Konarske

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univErSity of Michigan

Mrs. Elizabeth Martin Mrs. Marilyn I.B. Martin Suzanne and Richard Martinsky John and Kathryn Mathey Carol and Gene Mattern Robert and Linda Matthew Judythe and Roger Maugh William and Jan Maxbauer Charlotte and Gerald Maxson Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mayer Mr. Paul and Dr. Lynne Supovitz Mayer Dr. Harriette P. McAdoo Aileen and J. Joseph McCabe Mrs. Carol J. McCarus Johanna and Richard McClear Carolyn and Walter McDonald Ms. Elizabeth W. McDonald Kathleen and Kenneth McGowan Virginia and Wilbert McKeachie Miss Jane C. McKee Mrs. Clarice J. McKenzie Reginald McKenzie Warren D. McKenzie McKesson Foundation Mr. John C. McMillan Dr. Charles H. McNelly David L. Meadows Mrs. Marian A. Meier Ms. Gail A. Mejeur Dr. and Mrs. Glen D. Mellinger Ms. Marion Charvat Melody Ann A. and John A. Meranda Cameron W. Meredith, Ph.D. James R. and Sandra M. Stone Meyer Ann M. and Jeffrey J. Meyers Julie and Ely Meyerson Beth Hammond Mignola M. Beth Mihlethaler John and Grace Mikulich Pamela C. and John E. Miley Mrs. Doris Miller Dr. James L. Miller, Jr. LaMar and Deborah Miller Michele Rosanne Miller Dr. Wayne E. Miller Sandra and Thomas Millman Dr. Elizabeth M. Mimms Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Q. Minert Mrs. Thomas J. Miskovsky Anita T. Mitchel Mrs. Maryann P. Mitchell Ms. Eileen M. Moloney B. Michael Momany J. Roger and Kathleen Moody Carol and Michael Moore William and Elizabeth H. Moore Mr. John B. Morgan, Esq. Bonnie V. Morihara, Ph.D. Dr. E. A. Jackson Morris Barbara and W.J. Morrison Gail Edith Morrison Kenneth and Jean Morse Judith and Dean Morss Karen and John Motz Van and Mildred Mueller

Katharine I. Mullaney Evelyn and William Munson Ms. Emma C. Murphy Mr. Preston G. Murray Ms. Mary E. Musat Ms. Patricia A. Muthart Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Myers Ms. Lori G. Nava Dr. Nancy H. Navarre Jean and Hilton Neal Mrs. Patricia Nederveld Robert and Evelyn Nelson Dr. and Mrs. Louis Nemser Neoforma, Inc. Wendy Jo and Douglas New Norman and Maryann Niedermeier Mr. and Mrs. James M. Nield Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Niffenegger John G. Nikkari, Ph.D. Jennifer and William Noble Mrs. Ellin J. Nolan Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Norpell Cecil and Virginia North Northwestern Mutual Life Foundation John Novak and Janet Dettloff Dr. Emily F. Nye Jon M. and Diana K. Oatley Martin E. Obed Dr. and Mrs. Frederick C. O’Dell Patricia M. Odgers Riva Jean Okonkwo Clare and James Okraszewski Barbara and Peter Olsen Thomas R. and Marilyn M. Ossy Mr. and Mrs. James G. Otto Mary G. B. Pace Dr. Lawrence and Marsha Pacernick John Padjen, Jr. Frederick V. Pankow Richard L. and Nancy S. Pantaleo Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Pappas Mrs. Patricia P. Parker Mrs. Sally F. Parsons Elizabeth and Todd Pascoe Lou Ann and James J. Pate Mr. D. Duncan Paterson Marilyn L. Paull Mr. Gus A. Paulos Dr. Mark G. Pavlovich Dr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Payne Penelope and Paul Pease Lee Stanley Peel Barbara Perlman-Whyman and Andrew Whyman Mrs. Mildred Stern Perlow Mr. Donald B. Peterson, Jr. Ms. Janet R. Peterson Mrs. Mae Cora Peterson Norman Olav Peterson Dr. Russell O. Peterson Vern and Monica Peterson Mr. Dennis J. Pfennig Mrs. Marjorie Patterson Pflug Dr. Marianne R. Phelps Joan A. Philipp, Ph.D. Dr. Richard M. Philson

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innovator

Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1 Heidi Ross and George Monaghan Judith and Samuel Ross Sara E. and David W. Ross Terry and Thomas Ross Mrs. Alyce E. Rossow Mary and Howard Roth Dr. Rodney W. Roth Mrs. Phyllis M. Rowland Jennifer and Thomas Ruehlmann Julie Rule and Eric Goins Donald and Elizabeth Runck Estate Dr. and Mrs. Gordon C. Ruscoe Mr. Peter A. Rush Don and Melissa Rutishauser Lawrence and Lori Rutkowski Marshall E. Rutz Edwin J. Salesky, J.D. Stephen and Linda Salzman Arnold Sameroff and Susan McDonough Lynda M. Samp Kirby and Karen Sams Lynn Ann Sandmann Ms. Mary Ann Sanford Mrs. Jane S. Santman Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Sargenti Paul and Debra Sarvela Miss Margaret P. Sauer Dr. Shari L. Saunders Mr. and Mrs. John P. Savage Hon. and Mrs. George Schankler Mrs. Marilyn A. Scheer Judith and Richard Schiff Dr. Brian T. Schiller Mark and Frances Schlesinger Harriet and Daniel Schlesinger Dr. Wallace C. Schloerke Ms. Margaret H. Schmidley Mrs. Joan E. Schmidt Dr. and Mrs. Ronald S. Schmier Charles E. Schmoekel Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. Scholtens James H. and Darlene Schoolmaster Dr. Robert A. Schuiteman Mr. Dan Schulz Erich and Suzanne Schulz LeRoy C. Schwarzkopf Rosalia Ann Schwem, Ph.D. Cynthia and George Scott Douglas W. Scott Thomas and Maryellen Scott Barbara R. and Wayne Scott Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Sebestyen Charles Seigerman, Ph.D. Jack C. Seigle Mr. Michael H. Seltzer Mrs. Gertrude J. Sharpe Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence M. Shaw Mrs. Sybil K. Sheinberg Ivan G. and Judith Sherick Carol and Patrick Sherry Dr. Nancy L. Shiffler Sylvia K. Shippey Jill A. Shure Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Sibery Gary and Claudette Sickels

Dr. and Mrs. Frank M. Pichel David Pifer and Jacqueline Irland Dr. and Mrs. Henry S. Pinkney Karen and Alan Pizzimenti Mrs. Carolyn Cooper Plumb Dr. David Ponitz and Dr. Doris Ponitz Carolyn and Richard Pope Ms. Nancy J. Popp Mr. Roy J. Portenga Mrs. Jean M. Porter Shirley and Ted Poulton Barry K. and Yolan M. Powell Judith and Michael Preville Dr. Sylvia C. Price Patricia and Michael Priest Mr. and Mrs. Russell Prince Wallace and Barbara Prince Mr. and Mrs. Victor F. Ptasznik Mrs. Carol Gajar Pullen Susan R. and Jack S. Putnam Thomas and Christine Pyden Dr. and Mrs. George J. Quarderer James Howard Quick Mrs. Rose S. Rabin Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Race Dr. and Mrs. Louis J. Radnothy Mr. and Mrs. Lee S. Randall Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Rankin Joan and John Rapai Mrs. Karen Rodensky Rassler Mr. Arthur F. Raymond, Esq. Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Rebar Ann Hibbard Redding Carolyn and David Reid Harriet and Harry Reinhardt Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Reiter Renee Remak Ziff and William Ziff Beverly and Richard Renbarger Ms. Sandra Renner Donald and Patricia Rennie Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Rentschler Ruth-Ann Rest-Sivers Dr. Lesley A. Rex Ms. Mary C. Reyes Kent S. Reynolds Michael J. Reynolds Mary L. Rhodes Mary and Melvin Rhodes Allen R. Rice Cynthia and Joseph Richardson Dr. Selma K. Richardson Ms. Carol E. Rigg Kathleen and Stephen Riggs James M. Ripple Miss Louise Ritsema Sarah R. and John C. Robbins Dr. Mary Frances Robek Mrs. Barbara A. Robinson Donna L. Robinson Kenneth R. Rohland Michael and Cecilia Rohrer Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Rose Drs. Jo Ellen and Mark Roseman Leslie K. Rosen Ms. Anne Rosewarne

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Annual Report

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univErSity of Michigan

Kristine Siefert and Kalyan Dutta Stephen and Lyn Sills Ms. Meegan M. Simpson Wallace W. Skinner Ms. Jeanette E. Skow Paul and Paul Slate Mrs. Donna Sporn Slatkin Miss Ann C. Sleight Ms. Barbara A. Smith Dr. Christine C. Smith Mr. Donald B. Smith Donald Lipp Smith Geoffrey A. Smith James and Joyce Smith Dr. Kris M. Smith Lewis O. Smith III Margaret and Charles Smith Susan and Charles Smith Wayne F. Smith Marga and Mark Snyder Society for Prevention Research Dr. Sheldon and Sydelle Sonkin Mrs. Diana Ascione Sonnega Susan and Frank Sonye Dr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Spadafore Mrs. Colleen B. Spangler Mrs. Cathy D. Spano Dr. Dennis C. Sparks Mrs. Rebecca S. Sparschu Ambassador Leonard Spearman Carolyn and Virgil Spears Janet G. Spencer Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Sperling Dr. James L. Spillan Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Spink Mr. and Mrs. John R. Spittler Ann and Steve Spurlin Mr. James Michael Squier Mrs. Alice M. Stadler Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stakenas Dr. and Mrs. Donald E. Stanbury Steve and Constance J. Stanford Dr. Richard L. Stanger Dr. Eileen M. Starr Dr. Teressa V. Staten Mary and Melvyn Stauffer James M. and Leona Burton Stearns Mrs. Margaret A. Steel Robert T. Steffes Gary Stelzer and Nancy Frushour Mary and Harry Stephen Mr. and Mrs. Gordon E. Stermer Dr. Erma F. Stevens Cynthia J. Stewart, M.P.H., Ph.D. Helene and Daniel Stewart Harold E. and Annette Dieters Stieg Raymond W. Stiles William J. and Jane D. Stocklin Ms. Elizabeth A. Straka Bill and Sheila Sikkenga Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Strauch Leone and Deloit Strickland Carol and Theodore Striker Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Struck Dr. David and Karen Stutz

Mr. Shigeki J. Sugiyama Mr. and Mrs. James R. Suits Ms. Carol Ann Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Robert O. Sutch Mrs. Carolyn L. Sutton Margaret Hyde Sutton Susan C. and Thomas F. Sweeney Ann G. and Charles E. Sweet Mr. and Mrs. John M. Sweet Michael Francis Synk Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Tajer Earl and Jo Ann Taylor Dr. James and Dr. Erin Fries Taylor Susan and Kenneth Teague Joanne and Roger Tedlock Elizabeth Whitney Telfer Mrs. Helen S. Thomas John B. and Margaret Ann Thomas Ruth E. Thomas Kenneth R. Thomasma Mr. and Mrs. James W. Thomson Elaine and Norman Thorpe Lillie and William Thurman William and Hanna Thurston Ms. Helen Beers Tibbals Jean and Ronald Tidball Mrs. Nancy J. Tighe Mrs. Carole J. Tinker William and Jean Toombs Mr. and Mrs. Jack G. Tornga Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Tosto James and Margaret Totin Bruce E. Towar Deborah Townsend, Ph.D. Frederick and Alycemae Townsend Barbara A. Trapp, Ph.D. Dr. Rita A. Traynor Mrs. Carolyn Treakle Mr. and Mrs. John M. Tringali Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Trow Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Trytten Tyco Electronics/Amp Inc. Mrs. Joseph R. Uhlman Miss Thelma J. Ullrich Mr. Stephanas Vafeas Verna and William Valley Mary and Willard Valpey Mary Vanbeck-Voelker and Robert Voelker Ms. Karen E. Vance Donna and Claude Vanderploeg Roger VanderPloeg Laurel and Michael VanderVelde Doris J. Vander Zee Janice Porter VanGasse Donald and Rosemarie VanIngen Ms. Alicia P. VanPelt B. W. VanRiper and Madelon Leech Lori VanRiper and Mark Weaver Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Vasiu Mrs. Mary Ellen Vaydik Ms. Janice G. Veenstra Gertrudis Vela-Koska and Robert Koska Dr. and Mrs. William J. Venema Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Verhake Verizon Foundation

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Fall 2006 Vol. 37 No. 1

Mary E. Vogel Phyllis and Frank Vroom Wachovia Foundation Sally Waisbrot and Steve Sauter Margaret and Michael Walbridge Loretta and Martin Waldman Dr. Edward S. Wall Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Wall Mr. Harold J. Walper Marian and Denis Walsh Patricia and Charles Walton John T. Wangler Jill S. Rau Ward Patricia and Robert Ward Ms. Sally J. Ward Mrs. Lynne F. Waskin Hannelore L. Wass, Ph.D. Peggy and Don Waterman Dr. Barbara J. Watkins Judith and William Watson Robin and Willie Watson Steven J. Weage Barbara Weatherhead Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Wehmeier Richard C. and Lucinda G. Weiermiller Mrs. Marjorie S. Weil Marjorie and Richard Weiler Ms. Lois N. Weinberg Ms. Anna Josephine Weiser Michael and Lisa Weiskopf Margaret and Jonathan Weiss Steve and Karen Weiss Dale Westfall Sandra R. Wexler Merton H. and Mildred R. Wheeler John and Juliana White J. Patrick White, Ph.D. Susan and Dennis White Jean and Wilson Whittier Ms. Mary R. Widrig Mrs. Maureen H. Wilberding Mrs. Chris R. Wilhelm John G. Wilhelm Diane and Tony Wilkey Dr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Wilkis Mr. Chris L. Willard Dr. Margaret K. Willard-Traub Dr. Susan Popkin Willens Lt. Col. Eldridge F. Williams, Ret. Ila and John Williams Mrs. Nancy A. Willie-Schiff Howard and Jessie Willson Mary E. Wilsberg, Ed.D. Mrs. Carol Bain Wilson Ms. Karen M. Wilson Dr. Nila Wilson Dr. and Mrs. Richard F. Wilson Anita and Stephen Winer Lynn G. Winkler Miss Debbie Winokur Wisconsin Energy Corporation Foundation Ms. Millicent Woodruff Mr. Anthony E. Woods Martha Hill Woodson Roy D. Woodton

Mr. Paul C. Woosley Helen and James Wright Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Wright G. Richard and Kathryn W. Wynn Mary Anne T. Wyse Xerox Corporation U.S.A. Susan and Robert Yates Judy and J. Patrick Yoder Miss Betty E. Yonkers Prof. and Mrs. John G. Young Glen D. Young James T. Young Ms. Lauren S. Young Dr. Robert S. Youngberg Betty and Anthony Zanotti Dr. Joseph S. Zapytowski Dr. Maryann P. Zawada Seymour and Loretta Ziegelman Frances and Arthur Zimmerman Kenna S. and David M. Zorn

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Annual Report

We want to hear from you!

Keep track of your classmates. Send us news about your achievements, awards, life changes, etc., and we will include it in the next ClassNotes. If you can send along a picture (black and white or color), we’ll try to include that, too. Send the information to: Lois Hunter, Development Office, School of Education, University of Michigan, 610 E. University Avenue, Room 1123, Ann Arbor, Michigan 8109-1259, or via email at educalum@umich.edu. The form is also available online at http://www.soe.umich.edu/classnotes. Name:__________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________Email: ___________________________________________________________ Is this an address change? Yes _____ No _____ What type of address change? Home ___ Office ___ May we publish your address? Yes _____ No _____ May we publish your email address? Yes _____ No _____

School of Education Classnotes

Degrees

Please list only University of Michigan degrees and the year earned. A.B. __________ Year __________ A.M. __________ B.S. __________ Year __________ M.S. __________ ABED __________ Year __________ Ph.D. __________ BSED. __________ Year __________ Ed.D. __________

Year __________ Year __________ Year __________ Year __________

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Get Involved!

_____ I would like to be considered for the Education Alumni Society Board of Governors. Please contact me with more information about: Cash Gifts __________ Charitable Trusts __________ Gift Annuities Bequests/Will __________ __________

Credits
Dean: Deborah Loewenberg Ball Information Officer: Eugenie Potter Editors: Eugenie Potter & Laura Roop Art Director: Yvonne Pappas Writers: Jeff Mortimer, Laura Roop, Janel Sutkus, Eve Silberman & Jim Barber Layout, Design & Imaging: Christopher Myers Copy Editor: Peter E. Potter Photography: Mike Gould & UM Photo Services

Nondiscrimination Policy Statement: The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 50 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or Vietnam-era veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the Senior Director for Institutional Equity and Title IX/Section 504 Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 8109-132, 73-763-0235, TTY 73-67-1388. For other University of Michigan information call 73-76-1817. ©2006-7 The Regents of the University: David A. Brandon, Ann Arbor; Laurence B. Deitch, Bingham Farms; Olivia P. Maynard, Goodrich; Rebecca McGowan, Ann Arbor; Andrea Fischer Newman, Ann Arbor; Andrew C. Richner, Grosse Pointe Park; S. Martin Taylor, Grosse Pointe Farms; Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor; Mary Sue Coleman (ex officio) volume 37, No. 1 / 10/06

School of Education

univErSity of Michigan

www.soe.umich.edu

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

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