International Journal of Environment, Ecology

,
Family and Urban Studies (IJEEFUS)
ISSN(P): 2250-0065; ISSN(E): 2321-0109
Vol. 6, Issue 4, Aug 2016, 9-14
© TJPRC Pvt. Ltd.

INFLUENCE OF HOME ENVIRONMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL ON EMOTIONAL
MATURITY OF ADOLESCENTS
K.YASHODA1 & T.KALYANI DEVI2
1

Research Scholar, Human Development and Family Studies, Department of Home Science,
Sri Padmavathi Mahila Vishwavidyalayam, Tirupathi, Andhra Pradesh, India
2

Professor, Human Development and Family Studies, Department of Home Science,
Sri Padmavathi Mahila Vishwavidyalayam, Tirupathi. Andhra Pradesh, India

ABSTRACT
The home-environment primarily consists of the prevalent customs, codes & traditions of the community, it is at
the sametime made highly personal by the human interaction involved – Due to former fact it can safely be said that a
child first comes in contact with the mysteries of a community like as he sees it reflected in the mirror of family.
The Purpose of the study was to assess the Home environment and type of school on emotional maturity of adolescents.
Home Environment inventory developed by Dr. T. Kalyani Devi and Emotional maturity scale developed by Singh and
Bhargava was used to collect the data. Collected data was analyzed using mean, S.D. and ANOVA. There was no
significant difference on Home environment and type of school on emotional maturity of adolescents.

Original Article

KEYWORDS: Home Environment, Emotional Maturity, Adolescents

Received: Jun 04, 2016; Accepted: Jun 28, 2016; Published: Jul 05, 2016; Paper Id.: IJEEFUSAUG20162

INTRODUCTION
Adolescence may be a time of heightened bickering and diminished closeness in the parent-child
relationship. Adolescence is the period of transition between childhoods to adulthood. It is a period demanding
significant adjustment to the home environment. No human being is born with set attitude or set values. Values are
transmitted by the parents, grandparents to prepare a child to be accepted in a society. It has been observed and
experienced that family climate has a bearing upon ability, interest, achievement & attitude progress of a child.
A better family background provides stimulating atmosphere to him. He gets the opportunity to explore and
converse with parents and other family members who encourage his experiments and curiosity. It provides varied
social experiences which help in personality development through a rich variety of experiences, through discussion,
story-telling and other activities.
The image of adolescence as a time of storm and stress, intense moodiness and preoccupation with the self
has permeated both professional and lay perspectives on this developmental period. The families in general and
parents in particular, have often been deemed to be the most important support system available to the child.
The

strongest

factor

in

moulding

a

child’s

personality

is

his

relationship

with

his

parents

(Mohanraj and Latha 2005). The family in its most common forms is a lifelong commitment between man and
women who feed, shelter and nurture their children until they reach maturity. It is a primary socialization context
and is, therefore, considered to be a very important factor influencing child development (Ozcinar 2006).

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K.Yashoda & T.Kalyani Devi

Operational Definition of the Term Used
Home – Environment: Home-environment is designed to measure the psycho social climate of homes.
In this score used to measure their homeenvironment using the test, that scores is the representative of the homeenvironment of the High school students.
Emotional Maturity: The word “emotion” is derived from the Greek word “Emovere”, which means excitation.
Emotion is a stirred up state of body and mind when a person acts under emotion, the loses his mental balance.
Darwin Nelson (2005) in his research related to ‘’Emotional Maturity" says that if we want our children to be
emotionally mature, we must focus on their early childhood education, which affects certain level of social and emotional
maturity.

OBJECTIVES

To study the influence of home environment on emotional maturity of adolescents.

To find out the influence of type of school on emotional maturity of adolescents.

To examine the various dimension of emotional maturity by type of school

HYPOTHESIS
Home environment has no influence on emotional maturity of adolescents.

There is no significant differences between type of school and emotional maturity.

No significant difference on various dimensions of emotional maturity by type of school

Tools Used for the Present Study
The tools used for the present study was Home environment inventory (developed by Misra modified and cross
validated by Kalyani Devi (2005) and emotional maturity scale developed by Singh and Bhargava were used

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Results of the present study are presented below
Table 1: Mean, SD and ‘T’ Values of Home Environment By Level of Emotional Maturity
Median
Home environment
Low
176.5
Part-A
High
176.5
Home environment
Low
176.5
Part-B
High
176.5
**Significant at P<0.01 level @ Not significant

N
60
60
60
60

Mean
94.61
94.28
23.51
25.93

SD
13.38
16.17
4.46
3.29

‘T’ Value
0.12@
3.37**

The results presented in table indicates that Mean, SD and ‘t’ values of home environment part A and B.
The home environment part-A scores of low and high emotional maturity of adolescents are 94.61 and 94.28 respectively.
With regard to the part B. of home environment the mean values are 23.51, and 25.93 for low and high emotional maturity
of adolescents. Part A measures the psychosocial environment and part B measures the physical facilities available at
home. High score on home environment indicates better environment. The adolescents with high maturity have high score

Impact Factor (JCC): 3.7216

NAAS Rating: 3.63

Influence of Home Environment and Type of School on Emotional Maturity of Adolescents

11

on home environment part-B than low emotional maturity children. Significant differences are also found between these
groups at P<0.01 level. With regard to psychosocial environment, adolescents with high emotional maturity perceived the
home environment in a similar way. It is found from the results that home environment has its influence on emotional
maturity of adolescents. High score on home environments indicates better environment at home particularly the physical
facilities where the parents provide more opportunities to understand things and situations and act according to their
desires. Children received support and encouragement from parents, children rarely receive punishment and have less
restriction. This kind of environment helps the adolescents for the development of good emotional maturity.
Table 2: Mean, SD and ‘t’ Value of Emotional Maturity of Adolescents by Type of School

Emotional maturity

Type of School
Private
Municipal

N
60
60

Mean
175.20
176.08

SD
15.22
16.38

‘t’ value
0.316@

@ Not significant
Mean, SD and ‘t’ value of emotional maturity of adolescents in private and municipal are presented in table 2.
The mean scores of adolescents of private schools are 175.20 and municipal are 176.08 respectively. The ‘t’ value is
indicated that there was no significant difference (see Fig.1). Both the groups of adolescent girls received more or less
similar scores. The reason for this may be because of the similar exposure and environment in their schools and the other
reason may be much of the adolescent behaviour is influenced by the peers in the schools and the opportunity provided are
the same in both these groups. Here high score indicates the low maturity and low score indicate high maturity.

Figure 1: Home Environ ment and Emotional Maturity of
Adolescents, In Private and Municipal Schools
Table 3: Mean, SD, and ‘t’ Values of Emotional Maturity of
Adolescents for Various Dimensions by Type of School
S. No.
1
2.
3.
4.

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Dimensions
Emotional
unstability
Emotional
regression
Social
Maladjustment
Personality
disintegration

Type of school
Private
Municipal
Private
Municipal
Private
Municipal
Private
Municipal

N
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60

Mean
36.73
35.85
37.05
37.96
38.01
37.93
37.21
37.41

SD
4.21
4.22
4.12
4.47
3.68
3.82
5.08
5.37

‘t’ value
1.14@
1.16@
0.12@
0.20@

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K.Yashoda & T.Kalyani Devi

Table 3: Contd.,
Private
60
Lack of
5.
independence
Municipal
60
**Significant at P<0.01 level @ Not significant

26.18
26.91

3.75
3.20

1.15@

The results presented in table 3 indicates the Mean, SD and ‘t’ values of various dimensions of emotional maturity
of adolescents in both private and municipal schools. The dimensions in emotional maturity scale are emotional unstability,
emotional regression, social maladjustment, personality disintegration and lack of independence. Regarding the emotional
unstability of private school adolescents, the mean score is 36.73 and for municipal school adolescents is 35.85. For the
dimensions emotional regression the mean score for private school adolescents is 37.05 and municipal school is 37.96.
The dimension social maladjustment the mean score of private school adolescents is 38.01 and for municipal school 37.93.
With regard to personality disintegration the mean score of private school adolescents is 37.21 and for municipal school
adolescent is 37.41. The dimension lack of independence the mean score for private school adolescents is 26.18 and for
municipal schools is 26.91. From the ‘t’ values is found that in all the dimensions no significant differences were found.
When we look in to the mean scores, the private school adolescents received high mean score in the dimensions, i.e.,
emotional unstability, emotional regression, personality disintegration and in the remaining dimensions both the private
and municipal school adolescents received more (or) less similar scores. This means that private schools are low in their
emotional unstability, emotional regression and personality disintegration than the municipal school children

SUGGESTIONS
The investigator’s work is complete only when some positive suggestions are put forth after the analysis of the
problem. The following suggestions are worth mentioning to strengthen the finding obtained to home members:

Provide a safe and loving home environment.

Create an atmosphere of honesty mutual trust and respect.

Support and guide properly.

Do not expect unreasonable achievement.
Home environment plays an important role and the present study revealed that the increase of control at home can

cause a hindrance in their independence, as children in this age want independence and to explore the world. Parents
should provide more rewards, nurturance and permissiveness and should allow the adolescent to express his views freely.
There should be a provision of opportunities with no interference from parents, which may help in proper development of
the child. Parents should try to avoid the factors that can cause stress and frustration in the adolescents like punishment,
deprivation of privileges, and rejection etc. This implies that conditional love of parents for the child and imposing
sanctions on children by isolating them from the beloved ones or putting their (parents) expectations to comply by their
actions is in-fact detrimental for a child’s harmonious development.

CONCLUSIONS
Much of the advancement should be made in the field of influence of home environment and emotional maturity
of adolescents. They should not be placed a part from the main stream of life. As these students are given education in
hostels and schools it should promote certain skills for their all round development.

Impact Factor (JCC): 3.7216

NAAS Rating: 3.63

Influence of Home Environment and Type of School on Emotional Maturity of Adolescents

13

REFERENCES
1.

Mohanraj R, Latha 2005. Perceived family environment in relation to adjustment and academic achievement. Journal of the
Indian Academy of Applied Psychology, 31: 18-23.

2.

Murray L, Halligan S.L, Adams, G, Patterson P, Goodyer, IM. (2006). Socio emotional development in adolescents at risk for
depression: The role of maternal depression and attachment style, DW Psychopathol. 18(2): 489-516.

3.

Nelson, (2005).www.iog.wayne.edu/iog/training/pdrtpfac.html-13k-15may-2015.

4.

Ozcinar Z 2006. The instructional communicative qualificiation of parents with students. Cypriot Journal of Educational
Sciences, 1: 24-30.

5.

Pollak, S.D. Dantch, Cicchetti, Katherine Hornung and Alex Reed. A (2000). Recogniziing emotion in faces developmental
effects of child abuse and neglect, Journal of Developmental Psychology, (36), 679-688.

6.

Singh, Y., and Bhargava, M. (1988). Emotional maturity scale. Agra: National Psychological Corporation.

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