You are on page 1of 11

 

Home recording technology 

By Samantha Wolf 

s2699611 

Subject: Info‐Tech Arts 

Course code: 1712QCM
i    Samantha Wolf 
 

Abstract 

This paper examines the history, development and effects of home recording technology on 

musicians and music making. This paper finds that home recording technology has had, and will 

continue to have, a democratising effect on music production, due largely in part to how inexpensive 

the technology is, the influence of the Internet and the changing relationship between musicians and 

consumers.
ii    Samantha Wolf 
 

Table of Contents 

Abstract .......................................................................................................................... i 

Table of figures ............................................................................................................... iii 

Introduction .................................................................................................................... 1 

Literature Review ............................................................................................................ 2 

History and Development ................................................................................................ 3 

  Digitisation .......................................................................................................... 4 

Creator and Consumer Roles ............................................................................................ 5 

Conclusion ........................................................................................................................ 6 

Reference List ................................................................................................................... 7 

 
iii   Samantha Wolf 
 

Table of Figures 

Figure 1 – Thomas Edison .................................................................................................... 3 

 
1    Samantha Wolf 
 

Introduction 

Home music production technology has had a democratizing effect on the music industry 

and music making. From its humble beginnings at the start of the twentieth century, recording 

technology has developed to the extent that nearly everyone is capable of producing a professional 

quality recording of their own music at home. Digital technology, the internet and easy to use, 

inexpensive hardware have removed the financial and physical barriers that used to inhibit would‐be 

artists and filter the music available for consumption. This has profoundly changed the way people 

create, promote, distribute and consume music, to the extent that the roles of creator and 

consumer in today’s society have been fundamentally altered. 

 
2    Samantha Wolf 
 

Literature Review 

There is much existing literature on the impact of technology on musicians and the music 

industry. There is a general consensus that technology has, and will continue to have, a significant 

impact on music generally. However, the use of home studios is a relatively new development. 

Consequently, there is little scholarly literature written about home studio technology. However, 

there is a lot of non‐scholarly information about home studio technology available in newspapers, 

magazines and on the internet, including articles by Price and Maney.  

There are a number of sources outlining the history and development of recording 

technology in varying degrees of detail. Grove Music Online contains a detailed, yet concise history 

of the technology.  

Theberge, Taylor and Ross examine the use of music technology in a much broader social 

context, linking technology with consumer culture. Theberge goes into greater detail about specific 

technologies, while Taylor emphasises the social context. 

 
3    Samantha Wolf 
 

History and Development 

The development of recording and playback technology can be viewed as gradually lending 

more control to the listener. The earliest sound recordings were developed in the mid to late 1800s, 

and the first commercially available recording device was the phonograph, invented by Edison in 

1877. (Mumma, 2007, Grove Music Online).  

Figure 1 ‐ Thomas Edison  
Retrieved from (2009) Thomas Edison earns a Grammy. Inventor’s Digest. Retrieved May 3rd, 2010 from 
http://www.inventorsdigest.com/?p=2518 
 

Improvements on this technology facilitated the invention of the player piano, electric 

playback devices, magnetic tape, vinyl discs and cassette tapes (Mumma, 2007, Grove Music Online). 

Recording technology, along with radio, enabled people to listen to music at their leisure in the 

comfort of their homes. Because music was no longer confined to the elite concert halls, and no 

longer only accessible to the wealthy, home playback technology had a democratizing effect for 

audiences (Ross, 2007, p. 286‐7). However, music production costs remained high, and thus, the 

recording, distribution and promotion of music was still largely in the control of large, rich 

companies (Lavey, 2005).
4    Samantha Wolf 
 

Digitisation 
 

The advent of digital technology changed this forever. Digital recording technology led to the 

introduction of the compact disc (CD) in the early 1980s (Mumma, 2007, Grove Music Online). The 

CD solved all of the fidelity problems associated with vinyl records and cassette tapes, and unlike 

other recording devices, the stored signal on a CD could be copied many times with no audible 

difference in quality of sound (Mumma, 2007, Grove Music Online). Over the last few decades, 

digital recording technology has developed to the point that anyone who owns a computer can copy, 

store, edit, remix and listen to music, for little or no cost, without sacrificing the sound quality 

(Taylor, 2001, p. 5). With the development of the Internet, one can create, edit and mix their own 

music, and distribute it online, all without leaving their home (Taylor, 2001, p. 4‐5).  

As a result of this technology, many musicians are completely bypassing record labels. 

Before digital technology, if a musician wanted to produce a professional quality recording, he/she 

had to use a professional, and expensive, recording studio (Maney, 2004). Musicians relied on large 

record companies to advance the cost of hiring out the studio, which the musician would then pay 

back. Thus, success for most musicians depended on signing a record deal (Maney, 2004). Because of 

this, record companies had control of what music was recorded and promoted (Price, 2008). 

However, with today’s technology, a musician can create professional quality recordings using their 

home computer and inexpensive software (Price, 2008). This has eliminated the need for a musician 

to sign a record deal (Maney, 2004). As a result of this, record companies no longer have control 

over the music that is being recorded, played, promoted and distributed. Effectively, digital 

technology and the Internet have taken the global music industry away from record labels and 

handed it to the masses, thus democratizing the music industry (Price, 2008). 
5    Samantha Wolf 
 

Creator and Consumer Roles 

This technology has redefined the previously distinct roles of creator and consumer. 

Theberge states that ‘digital musical instruments are hybrid devices: when one uses them, he/she is 

not just producing sounds, but also consuming technology’ (pp. 2‐3). Therefore, technological 

innovations change concepts of what music is and can be, and also change the relationship between 

musical practices and consumer practices (Theberge, 1996, p. 3) For example, in any of the visual or 

performing arts, the audience receives and interprets a completed work. However, with equipment 

such as turntables, mixers and samplers, the audience can edit and remix, and thus recontextualise, 

a previously ‘complete’ work (Levay, 2005). This activity rejects the idea of individual ownership, and 

blurs the distinction between creator and consumer (Levay, 2005). Whereas the roles of musician 

and audience used to be clearly defined, with home music production technology, almost anyone 

can become a creator, as well as consumer, of music.  

Despite the democratising effect of home recording technology, as Goodwin points out, 

these new technologies aren’t ‘classless’ (p. 161). Anyone who wants to make professional quality 

recordings at home will still need to invest in equipment and software, and the amount of money 

spent will make a difference; for example, the sound of a department store Casio sampler compared 

to an expensive sampling computer in a professional studio (Goodwin, p. 161). Additionally, there is 

still some technical expertise required to operate some of this equipment. Goodwin states that 

‘there is a new generation of technicians, engineers and programmers needed to implement ideas of 

musicians who have no idea how to use the supposedly democratising technology’ (p. 161) However, 

some musicians have opted to train themselves in this new technology, especially rap and dance 

musicians (Goodwin, pp. 162‐163). As a result of this, the roles of ‘musician’ and ‘producer’ aren’t as 

clearly defined (Goodwin, p. 163). 
6    Samantha Wolf 
 

Conclusion 

The development of inexpensive home recording and production technology has enabled 

almost anyone to create professional quality recordings at home. Combined with the Internet, a 

musician can promote and distribute his/her music online to audiences around the world. This has 

allowed musicians to overcome hurdles that previously prevented them from having their music 

recorded and promoted. Additionally, home recording technology has removed the distinctions 

between the audience and the musician, and the musician and the producer, so that almost anyone 

can be both a consumer and a creator of music. Therefore, home recording technology has had, and 

will continue to have, a democratising effect on music making. (1,200)
7    Samantha Wolf 
 

Reference list 
 

Goodwin, A. Rationalization and democratization in the new technologies of popular music. In S. 
Frith (2004). Popular music: The rock era. (pp. 147‐165). London: Routledge.  

Levay, W. (2005). The art of making music in the age of mechanical reproduction: The culture 
industry remixed. Retrieved April 20th, 2010, from 
http://www.nyu.edu/pubs/anamesa/archive/spring_2005_democracy/02_levay_remix.pdf.  

Maney, K. (2004). Recording studio on your laptop could make you a rock star. In USA Today. 
Retrieved April 20th, 2010, from http://www.usatoday.com/tech/columnist/kevinmaney/2004‐08‐
24‐homerecording_x.htm.  

Mumma, G., Rye, H., Kernfeld, B., Sheridan, C. (2007). Recording. Grove music online. Retrieved April 
10, 2010 from http://grovemusic.com.  

(No author) (2009) Thomas Edison earns a Grammy.  Inventor’s Digest. Retrieved May 3rd, 2010 from 
http://www.inventorsdigest.com/?p=2518.  

Price, J. (2008). The democratization of the music industry. Retrieved April 23rd, 2010 from 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeff‐price/the‐democratization‐of‐the_b_93065.html.  

Ross, A. (2007). The rest is noise. New York: Farrar Strauss and Giroux.  

Taylor, T. (2001). Strange sounds: Music, technology and culture. New York: Routledge.  

Theberge, P. (1997). Any sound you can imagine. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England.  

Thomas Edison earns a Grammy. Inventor’s Digest. [Image]. (n.d.). Retrieved May 3rd, 2010 from 
http://www.inventorsdigest.com/?p=2518.