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NEW OPPORTUNITIES ELEMENTARY WEBSITE RESOURCES

Contents summary
MODULE
1 Friends

2 Personality
3 Around Town

4 Going Places

5 History

6 Telling Stories

7 Healthy Living

WORKSHEET
Grammar game: Guess the Student
Students practise writing sentences using can, cant,
have got, havent got and a variety of verbs in the
present simple affirmative and negative.
Time: 30 minutes
Grammar game: Question Wheel
Students practise present simple yes/no questions.
Time: 20 minutes
Vocabulary game: Dictrio
An optional vocabulary game to revise known words and
teach new words using the New Opportunities Elementary
Mini-Dictionary.
Grammar game: Guess the Place Practises questions and
short answers with there is/there are.
Time: 30 minutes
Writing: Punctuation Review
An activity to revise all the punctuation students should
know.
Time: 15 minutes
Internet project: History makers
An optional research project.
Time: 20 minutes in class, plus homework or research time
in school
Speaking activity: Storytelling
A group story-telling activity which encourages cooperative group work. Students also practise speaking to an
audience.
Time: One class lesson
Grammar activity: Find out More
Practises Past Simple statements, questions and short
answers.
Time: 10 minutes
Vocabulary game: Word Search
Revises food vocabulary and spelling.
Time: 15 minutes
Grammar game: Matching
Practises countable and uncountable nouns and
determiners.
Time: 10 15 minutes

8 Sport

9 Holidays

10 Cultures

11 Image
12 Celebrities

13 Volunteers

14 Shopping

15 Computers

16 Space

Vocabulary game: Pictionary


Revises sport vocabulary.
Time: 5 15 minutes
Writing and Speaking Grammar activity: Duties
Practises modal verbs of obligation, permission,
prohibition and exemption.
Time: 15 minutes
Grammar and vocabulary game: Spot the Difference
Practises the present continuous tense and vocabulary from
Module 9.
Time: 15 minutes
Internet activity: Superstitions
Time: one homework or one class period in the school
library
Grammar game: Present Tense Pyramid
Revises the contrast between the Present Simple and the
Present Continuous.
Time: 15 minutes
Reading activity and grammar game: Supplementary
activity which practises comparative adjectives.
Time: One class lesson
Grammar game: Noughts and Crosses
Oral grammar game to practise superlative forms of
adjectives.
Time: 20 minutes
Speaking activity: Class presentation using a personal
photo. Practises a variety of language.
Time: 5 minutes per student over a series of class lessons
Grammar activity: What are you going to do?
Revises be going to used for intentions.
Time: 5 10 minutes
Speaking activity: Board Game
Students have to speak spontaneously and practise a wide
range of grammar and vocabulary.
Time: 30 minutes
Vocabulary game: Calculator Talk
Fun activity.
Time: 15 minutes
Grammar game: Unique
Practises the Present Perfect to talk about experiences.
Time: 10 minutes
Reading comprehension: Flying Saucers
Time: 10 minutes in class plus homework

MODULE 1

GUESS THE STUDENT


DO NOT WRITE YOUR NAME!
Write sentences about yourself.

A sentence using can and cant


A sentence or two using have got and havent got
Two sentences using present simple affirmative.
Two sentences using present simple negative.

Example
I can play the guitar but I cant sing very well.
Ive got a computer. I havent got a pet.
I play hockey on Saturdays. I listen to classical music on
my walkman in bed.
I dont have a big breakfast. I dont watch TV.
Use verbs from this list.
collect, dance, get up, go, have, like, listen to, love, make, play, read, speak, watch

1 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a written grammar game which you can play after New Opportunities
Elementary Module 1 (Friends). Students practise writing sentences using can, cant,
have got, havent got and a variety of verbs in the present simple affirmative and
negative.
Materials: One worksheet for each student or, to save paper, students can just use
a piece of rough paper.
Time: Thirty minutes.
Step 1: Divide the class into groups of five or six and give out the worksheets (or ask
the students to get a piece of rough paper). They do not write their names on the
worksheet or paper.
Step 2: Each student writes sentences about himself/herself on a piece of paper. The
information should follow the format on the worksheet:

A sentence using can and cant


A sentence or two using have got and havent got
Two sentences using present simple affirmative.
Two sentences using present simple negative.

Demonstrate the activity via the example on the worksheet or by giving example
sentences about yourself:
I can play the guitar but I cant sing very well.
Ive got a computer. I havent got a pet.
I play hockey on Saturdays. I listen to classical music on
my mp3 player in bed.
I dont have a big breakfast. I dont watch TV.
Step 3: Students write their sentences. There is a list of verbs on the worksheet, or you
may wish to write some verbs on the board to give students ideas.
collect, dance, get up, go, have, like, listen to, love, make, play, read, speak, watch
Note: if your students know each other well, they should try to disguise their
handwriting!
Step 4: Students fold their worksheets or pieces of paper and mix them up. They then
take turns to take a piece of paper and read out the information. They have to guess who
the information is about.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

2 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is an oral grammar practice activity to practise present simple yes/no questions.
It can be done any time after New Opportunities Elementary Lesson 4 (Your Life).
Materials: One worksheet for each student.
Time: 20 minutes.
Step 1: Divide the class into groups of four. Explain how to make questions from the
diagram. Give an example if you wish sensible or silly!
Step 2: Students take turns to say questions. The others in the group answer the
questions with yes, no or I dont know!. Monitor the activity. Make a note of good
questions and questions with mistakes.
Step 3: Ask each group to say a couple of their amusing questions (e.g. Does Wayne
Rooney live in trees?). Then put up a couple of questions with mistakes on the board
and elicit correct versions.
Alternative: If youd prefer not to have students in groups, you could do the same
activity by just eliciting sentences from the whole class, correcting badly-formed
questions as they come up.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 2
NAME: ________________________________________________ CLASS: ____

Question Wheel
Work in groups. Look at the question wheel. Start in the middle and move to the
outside. Take turns to ask questions - they can be silly or sensible! The others in the
group answer yes, no or I dont know!.

MODULE 3

DICTRIO
NAME: ________________________________________________ CLASS: ____
DO NOT USE YOUR MINI-DICTIONARY!

Try to solve these dictrio puzzles.

a yellow fruit
a group of musicians
you can get money there

.
a building with old things
. M a plant you can eat
.
classical, pop, jazz, etc

a large, important town


a group of students
not dirty

.
. N
.

he/she lives near you


.
son of your sister or brother .
A planet
.

a female child
a twenty-four hour period
not alive

.
. P
.

your father or mother


area of grass and trees
the government building

.
.
.

opposite of cold
you can pay to stay here
sixty minutes

.
. R
.

showing feelings of love


the top part of a house
a flower

.
.
.

earrings, necklaces, etc


butcher, doctor, etc
run to keep fit

.
. S
.

bright and hot weather


Superman, Batman, etc
you can do the shopping
here

.
.
.

you cook here at home


part of your leg
you cut things with it

.
. T
.

short for television


degrees centigrade
a sport

.
.
.

How many words do you know? _____

Now check your answers in the MINI-DICTIONARY and find the words you
dont know. Write them in your vocabulary book.

.
.
.

3 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

DICTRIO
This is an optional vocabulary activity to revise known words and teach new words
using the New Opportunities Elementary Mini-Dictionary.
Materials: A copy of the worksheet for each student (or one between two if youd
prefer them to work in pairs). Students also need their copies of New Opportunities
Elementary Mini-Dictionary (tucked inside the back cover of the Students Book).
Time: Thirty minutes.
Step 1: Give out the worksheets and ask students to take out the Mini-Dictionary from
the back of the Students Book. Explain the game.
Dictrio is an invented word, comprising the dic of dictionary and the word trio
meaning group of three.
Each question gives three definitions. These correspond to three words which appear
consecutively in the Mini-Dictionary of New Opportunities Elementary.
Write this example on the board for words beginning with the letter A.
1 you can get on an aeroplane here
2 a special clock to wake you up
3 a creature from another world
Concentrate on one definition that you think you know. For example, 1 is probably
airport. Ask the class to look up airport in the mini-dictionary. They can see that the
two words after it are alarm clock and alien - which correspond to the definitions '2'
and '3'.
Step 2: Ask the students to put their Mini-Dictionaries away this is important!
Step 3: Ask the students to look at the worksheet and fill in all the answers they think
they know. Set a time limit for this (ten minutes?).
Step 4: After the set time, ask students how many words they think they got right.
Step 5: Tell students they can now use their Mini-Dictionaries to check their answers
and also to fill in the answers to words they didnt know. Encourage them to write all or
some of the words they didnt know in their vocabulary books.
Option: For homework, students could write their own dictrio of three definitions. In
the next lesson they can read out their definitions to the class or their group for the other
students to guess the words.

The authors would like to thank Steve Owen, a teacher at the British Council in Madrid, for the idea of
the dictrio game.

MODULE 3

GUESS THE PLACE


NOTES TEACHERS
In this guessing grammar game students practise questions and short answers with
there is/ are. You can use it after doing Module 3 of Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
A number of pieces of paper with names of places.
Time:
5 minutes
Preparation
Prepare small pieces of paper with names of different places, e.g.
restaurant school
swimming pool
supermarket
shopping mall office

railway station

zoo

club

cinema

Step 1
Divide the class into groups of four or five. Ask each group to sit in a circle. Put the
slips with names of places upside down in the middle of the group.
Step 2
One student in each group draws a slip. The others ask him/her questions with there
is/are to find out what place this is. The student gives short answers.
Example:
Are there desks in this place?
No, there aren't.
Are there tables there?
Yes, there are.
Is there music?
Yes, there is.
Is it a club?
Yes, it is.
Step 3
Students take turns to draw new slips and answer other students' questions. The game is
over when they have run out of places to guess.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

MODULE 4
NAME: ______________________________________________ CLASS: _____

PUNCTUATION
Rewrite these sentences with correct punctuation.
1 roberts penfriend is from brazil he writes in english but robert wants to learn
portuguese
___________________________________________________________________
2 we went to london in october we saw buckingham palace but we didnt go in
___________________________________________________________________
3 my birthdays on 31st march whens yours
___________________________________________________________________
4 my grandparents flat is really small but theyre happy there
___________________________________________________________________
5 im looking after susans cat its lovely its eyes are bright green
___________________________________________________________________
6 whats the capital of denmark
___________________________________________________________________
7 the new parks great theres a special childrens area
___________________________________________________________________
8 we cant take our mobiles to school theyre not allowed
___________________________________________________________________
9 our neighbours garden is nice theyve got three apple trees
___________________________________________________________________
10 i think jamess trainers are great i dont like andys much
___________________________________________________________________

4 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

PUNCTUATION
This activity revises all the punctuation students should know (capital letters for
names; full stops; question marks; apostrophes for contractions; apostrophes for
possession). You can do the activity after New Opportunities Elementary Lesson 10 (In
the Countryside).
Materials: One copy of the worksheet per student.
Time: 15 minutes
Step 1: Give out the worksheet and ask the students to rewrite the sentences with the
correct punctuation.
Step 2: Either collect the worksheets to correct yourself, or correct the sentences in
class. Ask students to exchange worksheets so they are not correcting their own. You
could ask students to come and write their answers on the board.
Answers
(You can also put a comma before but in items 1, 2 and 4)
1 Roberts penfriend is from Brazil. He writes in English but Robert wants to learn
Portuguese.
2 We went to London in October. We saw Buckingham Palace but we didnt go in.
3 My birthdays on 31st March. Whens yours?
4 My grandparents flat is really small but theyre happy there.
5 Im looking after Susans cat. Its lovely. Its eyes are bright green.
6 Whats the capital of Denmark?
7 The new parks great. Theres a special childrens area.
8 We cant take our mobiles to school. Theyre not allowed.
9 Our neighbours garden is nice. Theyve got three apple trees.
10 I think Jamess trainers are great. I dont like Andys much.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 5
NAME: _________________________________________________ CLASS: ____

HISTORY MAKERS
Your teacher will give you the name of a famous person.
Write the name of the famous person here: .
Find out about your famous person from the Internet, a library or any reference
books you have. Make notes and then write about him/her in your own words.
1 Date and place of birth.

2 Family and childhood.

3 Personal life.

4 Interesting events in his/her life.

5 If he/she isnt dead, what is he/she doing now?

6 Importance? Greatest achievement?

References
Write the website addresses or titles of books that you used.

5 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

HISTORY MAKERS
This is an optional research project which students can do after Module 5.
Materials: One worksheet per student. Students will need to use reference materials
such as the Internet, encyclopaedias and CD ROMs, either in school or at home.
Time: Twenty minutes of preparation time in class, plus homework or research time in
school.
Preparation: Make a list of some famous people in history. There should be one name
for each student in the class. Here is a suggested list. You may wish to add to it or write
your own.
Muhammad Ali (boxer); Roald Amundsen (explorer); Ludwig van Beethoven
(composer); Simon Bolivar (soldier and statesman); Maria Callas (opera singer);
Charlie Chaplin (actor); James Dean (actor); Charles Dickens (writer); Thomas Edison
(inventor); Albert Einstein (scientist); Alexander Fleming (scientist); Mahatma Gandhi
(political and religious leader); Jimi Hendrix (musician); Harry Houdini (escapologist);
Amy Johnson (aviator); Martin Luther King (civil rights leader); John Lennon
(musician); Abraham Lincoln (statesman); Marilyn Monroe (actress); Martina
Navratilova (tennis player); Florence Nightingale (nurse and reformer); Jesse Owens
(athlete); Niccolo Paganini (musician); Pele (footballer); Pablo Picasso (artist); Bertrand
Russell (philosopher); John Steinbeck (novelist); Valentina Tereshkova (cosmonaut);
Vincent Van Gogh (artist); Virginia Woolf (writer).
Make sufficient photocopies of the worksheet. Book a school library or computer room
period in advance if you want your class to research information there.
Step 1: Give out the worksheets and give each student the name of one of the famous
people from your list. Students write the name on their worksheet.
Step 2: Explain the task. Students have to find out information about the person you
have given them. Go through the required information on the worksheet. Explain they
can use the worksheet to write notes. Students can get information from library books,
encyclopaedias, CD ROMs or the Internet (in their own language if they like). They
then have to write the information in English, in full sentences, in their notebooks.
Remind students to be careful with past tenses and linking words.
Step 3: Students make notes on the worksheet. You may wish to take them to the school
library or computer room if this is possible; otherwise, set the task as homework, giving
them a reasonable time to do it.
Step 4: Collect the mini-biographies. Assess them for accurate use of the past simple
tense and for use of linking words and task achievement.
Option: You may wish to ask some or all of the students to copy their mini-biographies
onto paper with an illustration or photo for display in the classroom.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

6 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

STORYTELLING
This is a group speaking activity which you can do after New Opportunities
Elementary Module 6 (Telling Stories). It encourages co-operative group work and
students practise speaking to an audience
Materials: A box or bag of words and phrases (see Preparation below).
Time: One class lesson.
Preparation: Write words and phrases on small pieces of paper and put them in a box
or bag or large envelope. The words should include a variety of nouns, adjectives, verbs
(past simple tense) and narrative linking words from the module. You need at least as
many items as there are pupils in the class. Below are some words and phrases you
might like to photocopy and cut out, or you can prepare your own.

when

ran

dark forest one night


dead
met
really tired
enormous
head
old man

big house
green eyes
gave
very
nervous
dangerous

black cat

old woman

really
frightened
suddenly
heard
ghost
old castle

found
monster
in the end
opened
escaped

loud music

bridge

strange
noise
water
saw
bright light
phoned
the next
day
dark room

Step 1: Divide the class into groups of four students. Walk round with the box or bag of
words and phrases. Each student chooses a piece of paper from the box or bag without
looking to see what it is.
Step 2: Explain that each group now has to look at all the words and phrases they have
picked. They then have to pool their ideas and make up a coherent story incorporating
all the words and phrases. Explain they will later tell their story to the class, with each
student telling one part of the story. Give them ten or fifteen minutes to do this. Don't
allow any writing.
Step 3: The groups take turns to tell their stories to the class. When a pupil says the
word or phrase they picked out, he/she holds it up. During the storytelling, other pupils
should listen and remember which stories they liked best. They could give each story a
score out of ten. As you listen, you can make a note of good sentences and important
errors which you can point out later.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 6

FIND OUT MORE


Complete these sentences about yourself. Use the Past Simple.
1.
2.
3.
4.

____________________________________ yesterday.
____________________________________ on Sunday.
____________________________________ during the holidays.
____________________________________ this morning.

Answer the questions from other group members.


Ask about the details of what other students did.
Example
I watched a football game yesterday.
- Did you watch it on TV?
- Who played?
- What was the final score?

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

6 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

FIND OUT MORE


This is a grammar activity where students practise the Past Simple, statements,
questions and short answers. You can do it after finishing Module 6 of Opportunities
Elementary.
Materials
A worksheet for each student. Alternatively, to save paper, you can write the four time
adverbials on the board and ask the students to write the sentences in their notebooks.
Time: 10 minutes
Step 1
Distribute the worksheets or ask the students to copy the four time adverbials from the
board and tell them to write four true sentences about themselves in the Past Simple.
1.
2.
3.
4.

____________________________________ yesterday.
____________________________________ on Sunday.
____________________________________ during the holidays.
____________________________________ this morning.

Step 2
Divide the class into groups of four. In groups, students in turn read out one of their
sentences. The other students ask one question each to find out more about what
happened.
Example
S1: I watched a football game yesterday.
S2: Did you watch it on TV?
S1: Yes, I did.
S3: Who played?
S1: Barcelona played Bayern.
S4: What was the final score?
S1: 2:1 to Barcelona.
Step 3
After the student has answered the questions from all group members, the next student
reads out a sentence and the rest ask him/her their questions. The game is over when all
the statements have been read out.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

MODULE 7
NAME: ________________________________________________ CLASS: ____

WORD SEARCH

Find fifteen items of food in the game below. The words can go , , or .

C
A
R
R
O
T
S
I
F
A

A
G
C
A
T
O
H
S
I
F

For homework, add three new words to each column:

B
A
H
P
A
M
O
T
S
E

B
R
E
A
D
A
R
A
C
S

A
U
E
P
O
T
A
T
O
C

G
E
S
N
I
O
N
S
C
O

E
T
E
P
S
U
G
A
R
N

Fruit

L
A
E
R
E
C
E
P
A
I

N
E
K
C
I
H
C
E
R
O

O
M
E
L
R
L
E
M
O
N

Meat

Vegetables

7 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

WORD SEARCH
This is a popular vocabulary game to revise vocabulary and spelling. It can be done
after New Opportunities Elementary Lesson 19 (Food for Thought).
Materials: One photocopy of the worksheet per student.
Time: 15 minutes.
Step 1: Give out the worksheets and, if necessary, explain that the students have to find
fifteen items of food in the grid. The words can go horizontally or vertically and in
reverse, but not diagonally.
Step 2: After the set time (or shorter or longer if you wish), go through the answers.
Answers:
: cabbage; cheese; tomato; onion; orange
: meat, pasta
: bread; carrot; lemon; potato; sugar
: fish; cereal; chicken

C A B B A G
A
R
R C H E E S
R
A P
O
D O
T O M A T O
H O R A N
S
A T S
I
O
F
O

E L N
T A E
E E K
R C
S E I
U C H
G E C
A P
R
N I O

L
E
M
O
N

Step 3: Set the final task for homework.


Follow-up: At the start of the next lesson, elicit new food words from the class and
write them on the board. Students copy them into their vocabulary books. You may
wish to select ten for a future spelling test.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 7

MATCHING
Notes for the teacher
This competitive grammar game aims at practising countable and uncountable nouns
and determiners that can be used with them. You can do it after finishing Module 7 of
Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
- Four cue cards with: some, any, a/an and a lot of.
SOME

ANY

A/AN

A LOT OF
- A chart with twenty five words, numbered.
1 bottle

2 bread

3 sandwich

4 jam

5 steak

6 potato

7 vegetable

8 meat

9 sugar

10 pizza

11 orange

12 money

13 cup

14 pasta

15 onion

16 apple

17 biscuit

18 butter

19 banana

20 milk

21 tea

22 orange
juice

23 yoghurt

24 can

25 cereal

Time
10 to 15 minutes

Step 1
Draw a chart like this on the board. Divide the students into groups. There shouldn't be
more than five students in a group.
1

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

Step 2
Each group in turn choose a number from 1 to 25. Cross the number out and say the
word the number corresponds to in your master chart. Then show the group one of the
four cue cards (SOME, ANY A/AN, A LOT OF), randomly selected. The students
make a sentence with their word and the cue they've got.
Example:
bottle
SOME
Student: I bought some bottles of mineral water yesterday.
If it is not possible to match the cue with the word (e.g. money +
should say that one can't make a correct sentence.

A/AN ), the group

Step 3
Give one point for each correct sentence. If a group makes an incorrect sentence, elicit
the correction from the class. The game is over when you've run out of the words. The
winner is the group that scored most points.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

8 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

PICTIONARY
This is a vocabulary game that revises sport vocabulary. You can play the game during
or after New Opportunities Elementary Module 8 (Sport).
Materials: A set of Word Cards (see photocopiable sheet below).
Time: Anything from five to fifteen minutes. You can use it as a warmer at the
beginning of the lesson or as a filler at the end of a lesson.
Preparation: Photocopy the sheet of words and cut it up into word cards. You may
wish to enlarge the copy so the words are bigger. You can add more word cards if you
wish.
Step 1: Demonstrate the game yourself. Put the word cards face down on your desk.
Explain that on each card is a word it may be the name of a sport or a word connected
to sport. Choose one, illustrate it on the board (this can be amusing!) and the students
have to guess what the word is.
Step 2: Students take turns to come to your desk and choose a word card. They are not
allowed to look at them first. They do a drawing on the board to represent the word.
They are not allowed to speak or write any words. The others guess the word.
Option: You can play the game with two teams. Players from each team take turns to
do drawings. The opposing team must stay silent. If the team playing doesnt guess the
word within a fixed time (thirty seconds?), the opposing team can have a guess.
Note: The game can be played with any level and any lexical set. With higher levels, of
course, the words should be more abstract and could include phrasal verbs or even
idiomatic phrases.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

Word Cards for Pictionary Game


basketball

goal

diving

boots

tennis racket

golf

baseball bat

hang gliding

mask

flippers

horse riding

hockey stick

skateboard

ice hockey

rugby

ice skating

judo

motor racing

skiing

referee

crowd

water skiing

whistle

shorts

javelin

boxing

swimming

windsurfing

boxing gloves

track suit

weightlifting

cycling

MODULE 8

DUTIES
Use the words from the table to make FOUR true sentences about yourself.
I can
I can't
I have to
I don't have to

1.
2.
3.
4.

wash up
go cycling
learn
sleep long
take a shower
go cycling
watch TV
go to the cinema
play computer games
think about school

every day.
at the weekend.
in the morning.
all the time.
at night.

________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________

Walk around the class and find out about four other students. Fill in the table.
HAVE TO
learn all the time
Pat, Lisa

DON'T HAVE TO

CAN

CAN'T

8 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

DUTIES
This writing and speaking grammar activity is aimed at practising modal verbs of
obligation, permission, prohibition and exemption. You can do it after finishing Module
8 of Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
A tasksheet for each student.
Time
15 minutes
Step 1
Distribute the task sheets and ask the students to write four sentences about themselves
using the expressions from the table. They can use any modal verb as many times as
they like.
Step 2
Students walk around the class, read their sentences out to other students and collect
information about four of them. Explain how they can make notes in their table.
Example
HAVE TO
learn all the time
Pat, Lisa

DON'T HAVE TO
wash up every day Pat

CAN

CAN'T

watch TV all the


time Mary
sleep long at the
weekend Mike, Pat,
Lisa

Step 3
Students report on their findings to the class. They don't have to talk about everybody,
they can select the most interesting information.
Example:
Pat and Lisa have to learn all the time.
Mary can watch TV all the time.
Step 4
Ask the students to look at their tables again to see in which column they've got most
information. You can comment on the answers, e.g.:
HAVE TO answers prevail the students may be too preoccupied with their duties and
see life in terms of obligations
CAN'T answers prevail many students are frustrated by thinking too much about
what is forbidden or impossible
CAN answers prevail a very healthy attitude where people concentrate on what is
possible and not on what is compulsory or forbidden

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

MODULE 9

Sport the Difference


PICTURE A

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PICTURE B

9 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a grammar and vocabulary game to practise the present continuous tense and
vocabulary from the unit. You can do the activity after New Opportunities Elementary
Module 9 (Holidays).
Materials: Enough Pictures A for half the class and enough Pictures B for the other
half.
Time: Fifteen minutes.
Preparation: Photocopy the picture sheet and cut the copies into Picture A and Picture
B.
Step 1: Divide the class into pairs, Student A and Student B, and give each student the
appropriate picture. Explain the game if necessary. Students must not look at their
partners picture. They take turns to say sentences about their own picture and their
partner either agrees or says how his/her picture is different. There are eight differences.
Step 2: Walk around and monitor the activity, noting any serious errors which you can
correct with the class afterwards.
Step 3: When one or two pairs have finished, stop the activity and elicit the eight
differences from the whole class.
Solution
Picture A
Through the tent entrance you can see
it is raining outside.
The blond boy is holding a can of cola.

The dark boy has got his Mp3


headphones in his ears.

The blond boy is wearing trainers.


The dark boy is wearing a wooly hat.
The blond boy is talking on his mobile
phone.
There is a lamp hanging in the tent.
The blond boy is in shorts.

Picture B
Through the tent entrance you can see
it is not raining outside.
The blond boy is holding a can of
orange.
The dark boy isnt listening to his
Mp3; the headphones are round his
neck.
Both boys are wearing boots.
The dark boy isnt wearing a hat.
The blond boy is looking at a text
message on his mobile phone.
There isnt a lamp in the tent.
Both boys are in jeans.

Option: If you dont want the class divided into pairs, you can give all the students
Picture A and yourself a copy of Picture B. Students take turns to say a sentence about
their picture and you tell them if your picture is the same or different.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 10
NAME: ________________________________________________ CLASS: ____

SUPERSTITIONS

Do these actions bring good or bad luck? Write G (good) or B (bad) in the
boxes.

1 walking on a crack in the pavement


2 putting a horseshoe above your door
3 finding a four-leaf clover
4 walking under a ladder
5 putting new shoes on a table
6 seeing three butterflies together

Now match the actions on the left (7-14) with what they mean on the right (ah).

7 you break a mirror

a) a visitor is coming

8 your ears are burning

b) and have good health in the winter

9 a bee enters your home

c) seven years bad luck

10 you dream about a lizard

d) you are going on a journey

11 your right foot itches

e) you have a secret enemy

12 you put a horse-shoe in your bedroom

f) you never see them again

13 you catch a falling leaf on the first day


of autumn

g) and have no bad dreams

14 you say goodbye to a friend on a bridge h) someone is talking about you

10 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This activity can be done for homework or in the library. Students can use reference
books, CD-ROMS or the Internet. It can be done after New Opportunities Elementary
Module 10 (Cultures).
Materials: One photocopy of the worksheet per student.
Time: One homework or one class period in the school library.
Preparation: Photocopy the worksheet. If you want to take your class to the school
library, its a good idea to find some relevant library books in advance to check that the
task is possible!
Step 1: Explain some key vocabulary if you wish (crack, pavement, horseshoe, clover,
ladder, lizard, itch). If you prefer your students to use dictionaries, ignore this.
Step 2: Give out the worksheets and explain the two tasks. If students are doing the
tasks at home, tell them they can use any available source to find out the information
books, CD-ROMS or the Internet. If students are doing the task in the school library, it
might be a good idea for them to do the activity in pairs to ease the demand for relevant
books.
Step 3: In the following class after you set the homework, or at the end of the library
lesson, elicit answers from the students and tell them the information they couldnt find
out.
Answers
Ex A: 1 B, 2 G, 3 G, 4 B, 5 B, 6 G.
Ex B: 7 c, 8 h, 9 a, 10 e, 11 d, 12 g, 13 b, 14 f.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

10 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

PRESENT TENSE PYRAMID


With this competitive grammar game you can revise the contrast between the Present
Simple and the Present Continuous. You can do it after finishing Module 10 of
Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
None
Time
15 minutes
Step 1
Draw the pyramid below on the board.
learn English
have lunch

sleep
smoke
snow

have a good
time
think about
work
grammar
play a game
stand

speak English

wear trousers

eat a sandwich

listen to music

rain

Step 2
Divide the class into three or four groups. Explain that the task is to get from the bottom
to the top of the pyramid as quickly as possible. You can move up or sideways (but only
to neighbouring 'stones'). In order to move, the group has to select the 'stone' and make
two correct sentences about the people in the class, one in the Present Simple and one in
the Present Continuous, using the expression on their stone.
Example:
learn to ski
Maria isn't learning to ski because she can ski very well.
We learn to ski every winter.
The same stone can be 'stepped on' by many groups, provided they make a completely
new pair of sentences (which is sometimes difficult).
Step 3
The groups in turn select their 'stones' and make sentences. If they fail to produce a
correct pair of sentences, they have to stay where they are. In the next round, they have
to choose a different stone.
The winner is the group that gets to the top first.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

MODULE 11
NAME: ________________________________________________ CLASS: _____

What is the difference between an alligator and a crocodile? Tell the class what
you think. Then read the text to find out.

DID YOU KNOW?


Crocodiles and alligators are very similar. We can't simply say that one is
bigger or heavier than the other, but there are a few differences.
When a crocodile closes its mouth, you can see one tooth on each
side, but with an alligator no teeth show.
An alligator's nose is wider than a crocodile's nose.
Crocodiles are more common than alligators. They live in all
tropical parts of the world, but alligators (apart from a rare Chinese type)
only live in North and South America.

Work in groups. Take turns to say sentences using comparatives. Compare


people, clothes, animals, TV programmes, pop singers, books anything! Use
the adjectives in the box. You cant repeat an adjective. You get a point if the
group agrees with your sentence!

Examples
Reebok trainers are more popular than Nike.
Annas hair is darker than mine.

big blond boring bright cheap cold colourful comfortable


dangerous dark expensive famous fast formal funny good
good-looking healthy intelligent interesting long narrow
new old popular practical rich serious small strong
sunny tall trendy wide young

11 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a supplementary reading and grammar practice activity. You can do it after
New Opportunities Elementary Module 11 (Images).
Materials: One photocopy of the worksheet per student.
Time: One class lesson.
Step 1: Before you give out the worksheet, ask the class the question: What is the
difference between an alligator and a crocodile? Accept all suggestions.
Step 2: Give out the worksheet and ask students to read the text to find out the answer
to your question. Elicit the answers.
Step 3: Divide the class into groups of four. Students take turns to say sentences using
adjectives from the box in the comparative form. If the others in the group agree with a
sentence, the student gets a point. Monitor the activity and note down any serious
mistakes.
Step 4: When students have finished (i.e. when they have used all the adjectives) ask
who the winner is from each group. Elicit one or two sentences from each group. Go
over any serious mistakes you heard during the activity.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 12

Noughts and Crosses

Work in pairs. Decide who is Os (noughts) and who is Xs (crosses).

Play the game with another student. Take turns to choose a box and make a
sentence using the superlative form of the adjective. If the sentence is correct,
you get your O or X in the square.

The winner is the player with three Os or Xs in a line.

boring

funny

cold

hot

exciting

short

trendy

cheap

nasty

Play another game. First take turns to choose words from this list to put in the
squares:

boring, bright, casual, cheap, colourful, comfortable, cold, exciting, expensive,


fashionable, formal, friendly, funny, good, good-looking, helpful, hot, long, narrow,
nasty, noisy, practical, short, smart, talented, trendy, useful, warm, wide

12 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is an oral grammar game to practise superlative forms of adjectives. You can
play the game after New Opportunities Elementary Module 12 (Celebrities).
Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet (one between two students) or to save paper
students can copy a grid, three squares by three.
Time: Twenty minutes.
Step 1: Copy this grid onto the board:
bright
helpful
talented

fashionable
good
comfortable

long
useful
wide

Step 2: Demonstrate the game. Divide the class into two teams called 0s (noughts) and
Xs (crosses). Students from each team take turns to choose a square. They have to say a
sentence using a superlative structure. If the sentence is grammatically correct (and the
sentence makes sense!), put a nought or a cross in the appropriate square. If it is
incorrect or doesnt make sense, put nothing in the square and another player can
choose that adjective/square again if they want. The aim of the game is to get three
noughts or crosses in a straight line (vertically, diagonally or horizontally) before the
other team does.
Example answers for the above grid might be:
My shirt is brightest in the class.
Nike trainers are the most fashionable trainers.
Sues hair is the longest in the class.
My sister is the most helpful person I know.
Arsenal are the best team in Europe.
I think mobile phones are one of the most useful inventions.
Nicole Kidman is the most talented actress in Hollywood.
This is the most comfortable chair in the house.
These are the widest trousers in the shop.
Step 2: When you have played the demonstration game with the class, divide the class
into pairs. Either give out the worksheets or ask each pair to copy an empty grid on to a
piece of rough paper. They put adjectives into each square, choosing from this list on
the
worksheet.
Step 3: Students play their own games in pairs. If there is any disagreement about
whether a sentence is valid, they should consult you. If they finish quickly they can start
another game with different adjectives.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

13 NOTES FOR TEACHERS

A CLASS PRESENTATION USING A PHOTO


This is a speaking activity to practise a variety of language. You can do it anytime
during New Opportunities Elementary Module 13 (Volunteers).
Materials: None.
Time: Five minutes per student over a series of class lessons.
Preparation: Find an interesting photo of yourself. For example, it may have been
taken at a special event or at a special time in your life. Enlarge it on a photocopy
machine or scanner if you can.
Step 1: The best way to explain the activity is to give a demonstration yourself. Hold up
your photo then pass it round the class. Talk about the photo. Say who took it, when it
was taken, what occasion it was, what you were doing, what you remember about it,
how you felt, any other details or interesting information, etc. The talk need only be
couple of minutes. At the end of your presentation, the class can ask you questions
about the photo and the occasion.
Step 2: Ask the students to find an interesting photo of themselves to use for a class
presentation. Decide when students will give their presentations. Its a good idea to fix a
timetable for this, for example, six students in Tuesdays class, another six in
Thursdays class, etc.
Note: While a student is giving his/her presentation, ask the others to listen carefully
and try to think of a question to ask, for example, How did you feel?, What did you
do after that? etc. Use the opportunity to assess the students speaking level.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

Example presentation from a co-author of New Opportunities


In this photo I was about five years old, I think. There
was a big shop in the town centre and on the top floor,
in the toy department, was Father Christmas. There
was an enormous queue of children waiting to talk to
him. I think you had to pay some money. I waited
patiently and had a word with him. He asked if I was a
good boy and what present I wanted for Christmas. I
cant remember what I asked for. He gave me some
sweets and a little plastic car. After I saw him, we
bought this photo. I told my mum and dad that Father
Christmas was called George. They asked me how I
knew. I told them that while I was talking to him, a
shop assistant gave him a cup of tea and said:
Heres your tea, George.
David Mower

13 NOTES FOR THE TEACHER

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO?


With this grammar activity you can revise be going to used for intentions. It can be
done after finishing Module 13 of Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
A set of situation cards.
You are sleepy.
You are very hungry.
You have no more classes today.
You are very angry with your brother/sister.
Your dog is sitting in front of the fridge.
You have a maths test tomorrow
Your trousers have oily spots on them.
There is nothing to eat at home.
You feel cold.
You feel hot.
It's your best friend's birthday tomorrow.
Your room is a mess.
You feel depressed.
Your little brother/sister is crying.
Time
5 to 10 minutes
Step 1
Prepare the situation cards (see Materials).
Step 2
Divide the class into groups of three. Put the situation cards upside down in the middle
of the group. Students take turns to draw one and react to the information by saying
what they are going to do about it.
Example:
You feel tired. I'm going to have a long bath.
Alternative
You can do this activity with the whole class if you want control the language students
use.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 14

BOARD GAME
1

2
SING A
SONG!

Next
Weekend

10
Music

Pets

A Good Book

21

19

14
A Celebrity
I Admire

Next Summer
Holiday

23
PULL A
FUNNY
FACE!

6
My Hobby

TELL A
JOKE!

18

22
My House and
Neighbours

13
DO A
DANCE!

5
My Holiday
Last Summer

12

GIVE
SOMEONE
A BIG
KISS!

4
A Good
Film

My Birthday

When I
leave school
...
20

2050

My Best
Friend

My Family

11

17
Britain

15
The BEST or
WORST Day
of my Life
16
Weekends

24
Things To Do
In My Town

25
My Favourite
Place

14 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a speaking activity in the form of a board game to play in groups. Students
have to speak spontaneously and practise a wide variety of grammar and vocabulary
they have learned throughout the year. They can play the game after New Opportunities
Elementary Module 14 (Shopping)
Materials: One photocopy of the board game per group; a dice and four counters per
group.
Time: Thirty minutes.
Preparation: Photocopy the board game (one per group). If you havent got dice and
counters in school, ask some students to bring in dice to play the game. You can use
coins as counters.
Step 1: Divide the class into groups, ideally four students per group.
Step 2: Explain the game. Students take turns to throw the dice. When they land on a
square, they have to talk about the topic for an agreed period of time, for example, 15
seconds - the others in the group will time this meticulously! If they stop talking, or
repeat themselves, then they miss their next turn. The game continues until one student
reaches the last square.
Step 3: Students play the game. While they are playing, walk around and listen. If you
wish, use the opportunity to assess your students, or a selected few of them.
Alternatively, you could listen for mistakes which you could go over later in the class;
dont just be negative, though point out to the class examples of good English that you
heard and praise the students.
Note: Board games are easily prepared for any age or level. They can encourage
practice of particular structures or freer speaking practice. Squares could contain
sentences with errors for students to correct, or sentences to transform into another
structure (e.g. active to passive). Squares can contain simple topics such as My family
for younger students, or more complex topics such as The drug problem for older
students, and you can ask students of higher levels to take longer turns.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 15
NAME: ___________________________________________ CLASS: _____

CALCULATOR TALK

Do these calculations on your calculator and then turn it upside down to find
the words in the sentences!

1 (2,669 x 2) __________ make honey.


2 Dont (1,169 x 3) __________ your ticket!
3 What time does the (4,382 + 3,356) __________ go?
4 Water (19,036 x 3) __________ at 100C.
5 Her (26,271 + 26,774) __________ have got high (57,472 - 138) __________.
6 We collected some (115,469 x 5) __________ on the beach.
7 The (770 x 4) __________ is a wind instrument.
8 Dont tell (10520 - 5203) __________!
9 He paid the (2546 + 5172) __________ in the restaurant.
10 I have to (67 x 5) __________ my (1377 x 4) __________ tomorrow.

15 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a fun vocabulary activity. You can do it during or after New Opportunities
Elementary Module 15 (Computers).
Materials: One photocopy of the worksheet per student. Students also need pocket
calculators to do the activity.
Time: Fifteen minutes.
Step 1: Ask the students to key in the number 07747 (the decimal point is important,
otherwise the trick doesnt work) on their calculators and then turn the calculators
upside-down. They will see the word hello.
Step 2: Give out the worksheets. Explain that there are ten sentences with gaps.
Students find the missing words by doing the calculations on their calculators and
reading the screen upside-down.
Step 3: Check the answers with the class. Students can put new words in their
vocabulary books.
Answers
1 bees, 2 lose, 3 bell, 4 boils, 5 shoes, heels, 6 shells, 7 oboe, 8 lies, 9 bill, 10 see, boss

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.

MODULE 15

UNIQUE
NOTES FOR TEACHERS
This grammar game can be used to practise the Present Perfect to talk about
experiences. You can do it after finishing Module 15 of Opportunities Elementary.
Materials
None
Time
10 minutes
Step 1
Ask the students to think of the most unusual achievements or things they have done.
Each student writes three sentences saying what they have done in their lives.
Encourage them to write about things that other people in class haven't done. Use your
own experience to give examples.
Example
I've eaten shark meat.
I've been to Machu Picchu.
I've been to a Michael Jackson concert.
Step 2
Students take turns to read out their sentences and the other students say if they have
done the same thing or not.. The student scores one point for each thing nobody else in
the class has done. The winner is the student who has had most unique experiences.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska

MODULE 16
NAME: __________________________________________________ CLASS: ____

FLYING SAUCERS

Read the text and then answer the questions.

Many people say they have seen UFOs. However, many people also admit
that they have played tricks to make people think that UFOs exist. Clare
Robson investigates.
In 1967, two students in the UK made six flying saucers, each with a
diameter of 15 metres. They made beeping noises and the students left
them in some fields near their university. Some people reported the alien
spaceships and the police came and took them away. When scientists saw
them, they knew immediately that it was a trick.
This is just one example of the many tricks people have played. I spoke to
some people who have played tricks and also to some of their victims.
First, a victim, Julie Sweeney from California, USA: I was a victim of a
UFO trick. I was in my car at night and I saw a group of lights moving
around in a circle above some trees. It was like a flying saucer going round
and round. I drove closer and then could see it was a trick. There was a big
balloon with lights hanging from it. Two teenagers were standing below,
turning it round! A silly joke, really, but quite effective.
Tony Marr, a student from Derby in England, has also played UFO tricks:
A few months ago, a friend and I made a crop circle in a field of corn
near my house. Weve done this before, but this one was really good and it
was in the newspapers. He told me how to make a crop circle. First you
find a field with vehicle tracks in it. Next, you walk along the tracks to the
centre of the field. One of you stands in the centre holding a ball of string
while the other walks away holding the end of the string. Then the second
person walks around, holding the string tight, to make a circle. Finally, you
both press the corn down flat with a stick we use big brushes. And there
you are a crop circle, obviously made by a UFO! Its funny when you
see experts giving their opinions about it!
There have been thousands of reports of UFOs. However, there is no
evidence that they exist. What do you think?

1 Are these statements true or false, according to the text? Write T or F in the
boxes.
In 1967, two students made some flying saucers and then phoned the police.
It was dark when Julie Sweeney saw some lights above some trees.
The two teenagers in California were in a tree.
Tony Marr describes the first time he played a UFO trick.
There are no photos of real UFOs.
2 What do the words in italics refer to?
a) They made beeping noises
b) the police came and took them away
c) When scientists saw them
d) they knew immediately that it was a trick
3 Draw three diagrams or pictures to show how to make a crop circle.
Enter the field, like this:

Draw the circle, like


this:

Press the corn flat, like


this:

16 NOTES FOR TEACHERS


This is a supplementary reading activity. You can do it after New Opportunites
Elementary Lesson 46 (Alien Life).
Materials: One photocopy of the worksheet per student.
Time: Ten minutes in class plus homework.
Step 1: Explain some new vocabulary students will need to understand the text.
balloon, crop, diameter, effective, expert, stick, string, tracks, trick, vehicle, victim
Step 2: Give out the worksheets and make sure students understand the tasks.
Step 3: For homework, students read the text and do the tasks.
Step 4: Check the answers in the next class.

Michael Harris, David Mower & Anna Sikorzynska.