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SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

The imprint
of Owen Bardzilowski
The 14-year-old Princetonian who took
his life Sept. 14 inspires love
and awareness in the midst of tragedy
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Nedret Ozdemir shows off some Turkish coffee at Cultural Exchange Night in Hinds Plaza. For more
photos, please see page 17.

On the night of Sept. 14, Owen


Bardzilowski, a 14-year-old freshman at Princeton High School,
took his own life. Some wondered
why or how it happened, but what
was most poignant in the community after his passing was that
Owen was loved and continues to
be loved.
In front of the Bardzilowski
home, a memorial blossomed in
support of the familys loss and in
celebration of Owens life. In the

Breath of fresh AIR: Creating


mental health awareness

Shedding insight on tradition


From South Africa to Italy, Denmark to Mexico, Cultural Exchange
Night show and tell in Hinds Plaza was cause for celebration

By ERICA CHAYES WIDA


The Sun

By ERICA CHAYES WIDA


The Sun
The sky cast pink shadows
on white tents in Hinds Plaza.
International flags were draped
above a multi-cultural crowd
there to celebrate diversity, to

celebrate Princeton and to celebrate each other. Cultural Exchange Night, organized by
Princeton Human Services as
part of Welcoming Week, inspired an evening of show and
tell, dance and festivity.
Princeton residents stood or

sat at their booths displaying


various heritage artifacts and
chatting to interested passersby.
Countries represented ranged
from South Africa to Italy, Mexico to Poland, Turkey and Denplease see EVENT, page 15

midst
of
tragedy,
the
compassion
and kindness
Owen showed
his
friends,
family
and
community is
just a shadow
in the imprint
he leaves beBARDZILOWSKI
hind.
After Owens peers learned of
his suicide the following mornplease see FAMILY, page 18

In the wake of
Owen
Bardzilowskis passing and in the
wake of September being National Suicide Prevention Awareness
Month, many people in the
Princeton
community
are
prompted to question, learn

about and create awareness


around mental health disorders
and suicide prevention.
Its not suicide. Its death from
a disorder. You dont commit cancer, said Kurtis Baker, who cofounded Attitudes In Reverse
with his daughter Katelyn and
please see WITH, page 12

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


PrindieFest returns
More movies on schedule
this year. PAGE 4

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

2 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

A closer look into the work of Mark and Martha


Princeton Public Schools science teachers Mark Eastburn and Martha Friend prove just how excellent
they are as state finalists for Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
Princeton Public Schools elementary science teachers Mark
Eastburn and Martha Friend discovered their sparks for science
at different times and in different
ways. Eastburns love for animals, ecology and the great outdoors was cemented when his
parents bought him a goldfish
and two mice at only 4 or 5 years
old. Friends was perhaps rooted
in explorations of her backyard
stream on Harrison Street or in
her fathers Princeton University
lab, but did not fully blossom
until her college years.
Regardless of their paths to science, Eastburn, who teaches at
Riverside Elementary School,
and Friend, at Littlebrook Ele-

mentary School, have mastered


their craft and have proven so by
becoming two of five state finalists for the Presidential Awards
for Excellence in Mathematics
and Science Teaching, the highest
honor in K-12 math and science
education awarded by the U.S.
government.
Up to 108 teachers from all 50
states are awarded every year for
their contribution in the classroom. Presidential Awardees receive a certificate signed by the
president of the United States, as
well as a trip for two to Washington, D.C., and a $10,000 award
from the National Science Foundation.
Eastburn, who teaches all
grades at Riverside Elementary
School, is married with two children, ages 12 and 15. Other imme-

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The Sun file photo

Martha Friend works in the Littlebrook science lab.


diate family members, most of
whom he rescued, include two
dogs named Rocky and Frodo,
three rabbits named Ziggy, Felipe
and Estrella, two tortoises named
Leo and Josephine and a small,
but internationally famous lizard
named Green Fruit Loop. (After
this green anole was discovered
in a Riverside kindergartners organic tatsoi and made his home
as Eastburns science class mascot last school year, videos of him
went viral.)
In addition to teaching, Eastburn loves to read, spend time in
nature, explore technology and
computer programming, write
and practice photography his
photos can be seen on his Instagram
@markeastburn
and
@markeastburn.pps. He recently
published a childrens book called
Earning My Spots, which is a
tale of adventure with an environmental twist about a boy who
can shapeshift into a hyena.
What most people would consider work are activities that I
would do anyway, and I really
enjoy just about everything that I
do, Eastburn said.
Friend has three children, 15,
13 and 11, and a husband whose
contagious energy, she says,
oozes joy from their home.
When she is not educating little
ones at Littlebrook or spending
time with her family and squirrel-chasing rescue dog, Ripley,

Friend is carving a path to remedy social issues.


Im passionate about racial
justice and affordable housing for
all, Friend said. I believe that if
you dont work to make the world
a better place, then move over to
allow others the space to do it.
Simple gestures matter, and life is
finite, so there is not time to
waste.
To read more about what
drives these two Princeton Public
Schools educators, check out the
Q&As below.

Martha Friend
The Sun: What was it like growing up surrounded by the academic grandeur of Princeton
University? Do you think the elite
elements of the university made
an impact on your hunger for education, or was it the gritty, rawer
scope into science and labs that
influenced you?
Friend: Im not sure if it was the
academic environment having
postdoctoral students over for
holiday meals, spending so much
time in my dads lab and around
his research, having so many
friends whose parents were also
academics or simply because of
the value that wonder had in
my household. Dinner conversations inevitably went to a discussion of parasites or something
else equally inappropriate in
other homes. It was a test for any

potential suitor for one of the siblings (I have four) could they
handle sitting through our dinner
discussions?
The Sun: What is something
that has defined you and perhaps
the way you teach?
Friend: My life changed when I
was 9 years old as my mom died
suddenly while riding her bike
home from Riverside School. Im
not sure I truly understood the
definition of community before
she died, but our family of five
was surrounded and cared for
throughout that tragedy.
Losing my mom defined me for
a very long time.
She was an amazing human
being and beloved in this community. I continually strive to live up
to her standards of humanity. I
think teaching science lab at Littlebrook allows me to walk in her
shoes each day as she loved the
wonder of an autumn leaf or new
spider web. She found wonder in
everything even a pregnant tick,
yes, tick, which she kept in a container so we might amaze at the
birth of the many many baby
ticks. She simply loved life.
The Sun: How do you feel education is evolving, either personally for you as a teacher or in general?
Friend: No longer is it teaching
content to students. The Next
Generation Science Standards
that will be implemented K-12
over the next two years are about
supporting students as they create their own meaning about the
world around them. Its about celebrating their sense of wonder
and providing tools for them to
make their own understanding.
Its about applying their new understanding of the world to the
next idea and building on their
questions.
My work is about acknowledging the wealth of experience and
understanding students bring to
the classroom and supporting
their efforts to understand the
world around them. Memorizing
please see EASTBURN, page 16

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 3

Police: Cell phone stolen from table at Nassau Street business


The following report is provided by the Princeton Police Department.
On Sept. 18, a victim reported
that while inside a business on
the 100 block of Nassau Street, an
unknown person stole her cellular telephone from a table. The in-

vestigation was turned over to


the Detective Bureau for followup.

Sept. 19
Subsequent to a motor vehicle
stop for driving with a suspended
license, a 47-year-old Princeton
male was arrested on an active

warrant issued by the Bordentown Township Municipal Court.


Bail was set at $389. He was transported to police headquarters
where he was processed and released after posting bail.
Between Sept. 16 and 19, an unknown individual stole a 3' x 4'

wooden engraved company sign


off the front of a building on the 100 block of
Nassau Street. The investigation was turned
over to the Detective
Bureau for follow-up.

known males entered a business


on the 100 block of
Nassau Street on Sept.
10 and paid for merchandise with fraudulent travelers checks.
The investigation was

police
report

It was reported that two un-

please see OBJECTS, page 9

4 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

Wilson-Apple Funeral Home

Sara McDermott Jain brings more movies


to Princeton in PrindieFests second year
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun

# """ "

Last September, Sara McDermott Jain debuted a dream on


screen at Princeton Garden The-

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arent a good fit.
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but these games are not meant for children. For more tips, information,
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Must be 18 or older to buy a lottery ticket. Please play responsibly.


If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, call 1-800-GAMBLER.

atre. After having a baby boy, the


screenwriter and filmmaker transitioned from making movies to
honoring them and launched the
first-ever Princeton Independent
Film Festival, which she dubbed
PrindieFest. One year later, the
film fest is moving forward at full
speed and has some exciting new
developments.
The turnout for the first year
was good with about 100 viewers.
The response from the audience
was fantastic, McDermott Jain
said. People were coming up to
me saying, This film changed by
life. It was a really rewarding experience. I think everybody had a
great time.
The festival will run this
Thursday and Friday at the Nassau Inn in a conference roomturned 60-seat theater. With a traditional opening night occurring
on Friday, McDermott Jain also
decided to make Thursday night a
sort of soft opening so she could
feature as many films as possible.
McDermott Jain sifted through
the 80 submissions, which
she said were on steroids, in talent.
Last year, we had our two
blocks at Princeton Garden Theater with opening night at Nassau
Inn. This time, the films are just
not going to stop all day. Itll be
great, she said.
The early opening on Sept. 29
at 6:30 p.m. will highlight a theme
of familial relationships. It will
kick off with a short film called
Paper Wrap Fire about a single
immigrant mother with a terrible
secret and her son struggling
with sexuality and identity in
New York City. The feature film is
a documentary about family relationships called Daddy Dont
Go, which profiles low-income
single fathers over the course of
two years.
As part of PrindieFests official
opening night on Sept. 30 at 8:30
p.m. is a short film in 3D by the
Oscar-nominated Virgil Widrich

called Back Track.


The film includes clips from
old black and white movies that
get strung together to create a different story. Visually, its a beautiful film to watch, McDermott
Jain said.
Back Track will be followed
by another short, Foreign
Sounds, about a couple listening
to domestic abuse next door, the
different reactions they each have
and what ensues in their own relationships because of it. The
opening night feature will be
Some Freaks, a weird but
cool flick about young love and
identity.
I feel like the submissions
went up to a whole other level
than last year. Going into the second year, theres been more of a
community around it and more
people getting involved, McDermott Jain said.
Directly following opening
night will be the awards party in
the same event space. The party is
free to festival-goers. Filmmakers
will be honored with trophies for
best films in various categories.
The best short film will be honored with a large trophy and $100,
and the best film of the festival
will be honored with a larger trophy and $500.
McDermott Jain has also put
together a new still image contest, where anyone who submitted this year or last can submit a
still from their film and win $50.
We have gotten 600 votes already way more than I expected.
Its been really exciting, people really care and it shows were really
getting a following, McDermott
Jain said.
Tickets for the film festival can
be purchased at the door or ahead
of time on PrincetonIndependentFilmFestival.com for $10 per
block. A festival pass to see all
nine blocks is $75. To cast your
vote for favorite still image, click
on Still Image Contest on the
website.

Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 5

A Case for Anyone


Princeton Child Development Institutes adults
with autism program partners with Christines
Hope for Kids to sew and donate pillowcases
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
Autism awareness is something that has permeated the
landscape of fundraisers, educational centers and the medical
profession in recent years. According to Kristen Dabrowski, director of marketing and development at the Princeton Child Development Institute, however, the
focus is often on children with
autism. But children grow up,
and the resources to help them
thrive as adults remain just as important. The funding for such programs, however, often wanes.
On Sept. 20, PCDI was given the
opportunity to empower one of
its programs for adults with
autism with a donation of $1,000
from Christines Hope for Kids.

We are really excited,


Dabrowski said by phone the
evening before PCDI hosted a ceremony to accept the grant. All
donations to our adult program
are critical. This population is
underfunded and growing. PCDI
remains committed to providing
the highest level of care for the
adults in our life and job skills
programs. In addition, it's a wonderful way to celebrate the
artistry and hard work of the
craftsmen and women involved in
the program.
Christine's Hope for Kids is a
local organization founded in
honor of Christine Gianacaci a
young woman who lost her life
while helping children in Haiti in
2010. Since then, the Gianacacis
please see GOAL, page 14

Hand Washing
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6 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

in our opinion

Enjoy fall at a farm

145 Witherspoon Street


Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245

Tourism in New Jersey isnt just about the Shore


Richard Donnelly

hen you think about


tourism in New Jersey, the
first thing that pops into
your mind, most likely, is the Shore.
And why shouldnt it be? There is so
much focus on our coastline, and so
much of our lives here revolve around
the summertime rush to the beach.
But there is so much more our state
has to offer, and these other offerings
are on display front and center during
October.
Farms in New Jersey are popular
places for what has come to be known
as agritourism a booming industry
that involves any agriculturally-based
operation or activity that brings visitors to a farm. New Jersey is the Garden State for a reason, and there are
multiple farms in many places

Your thoughts
Do you plan to visit a farm in New
Jersey this fall? Share your pictures of
pumpkin and apple picking, corn mazes
and more with The Sun!

throughout our state, both in more


rural places and in not-so-rural places
as well.
According to the state Department
of Agriculture, New Jersey ranks
ninth in the nation in agritourism,
bringing in more than $18 million per
year.
As farms look for new ways to grow
revenue, they not only look for secondary crops but also toward runoff revenue streams from traditional
tourism areas such as apple and
pumpkin picking to hayrides, corn

mazes and farm tours.


October in New Jersey is one of the
best months to visit a farm. Apples are
ready to be plucked off the trees and
eaten raw or baked into delectable
pies. Pumpkins and gourds are ready
to be picked from the ground and used
as decorations for Halloween-inspired
themes inside and outside houses.
And farm stands are vibrant with fall
wreaths, hay, scarecrows and apple
cider.
Farming is such an important sector of our states economy and our
states image. So put on a pair of jeans,
grab a hoodie and head to a local farm.
If you havent experienced agritourism in New Jersey yet, October is
the best month to do it. Enjoy the season!

Jewish Family and Childrens Service hosts backpack drive


More than 70 of Jewish Family and Childrens Service of Greater Mercer Countys
youngest clients got ready to go back to
school thanks to the generosity of Hill Wallack, Mercer County Synagogues and personal donations. The JFCS teen mitzvah
brigade sorted donated school supplies and
loaded each bag to ensure that children
started school prepared.
Our clients struggle with food insecurity and extra items, like school supplies, do
not always fit into their budgets, said Lara
Wellerstein, director of community programs and services. Providing backpacks
and school supplies helps the children not
only succeed in school but also gives them
a boost in self-esteem that is so vital to
their development.
This year, JFCS was happy to receive donations from corporate partner Hill Wallack, area synagogues, including The Jewish Center, Beth Chaim and Beth El,
Shalom Club East Windsor and Village

ceo oF NeWspAper MediA Group

Tim Ronaldson

Joe Eisele

executive editor

publisher

MANAGiNG editor

Kristen Dowd
Erica Chayes Wida
AdvertisiNG director Arlene Reyes

seNior priNcetoN editor

The Sun is published weekly by


Newspaper Media Group, 145
Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ
08542. It is mailed weekly to select
addresses in the 08542 and 08540 ZIP
codes. If you are not on the mailing list,
six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99.
PDFs of the publication are online, free
of charge. For information, please call
609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@theprincetonsun.com.
For advertising information, call
(609) 751-0245 or email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from
readers including any information
about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look
for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Include your name, address and phone
number. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at 609-7510245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too.

Special to The Sun

The JFCS teen mitzvah brigade sorts through donations and organizes backpacks for
children.
Grand Hadassah and many local residents.
JFCS is a community service agency that
strengthens individuals and families in the
community by empowering people to care
for themselves and each other. JFCS offers

a wide range of quality, client-centered behavioral health, advocacy and support services for individuals and families. For more
information, visit www.jfcsonline.org or
call (609) 987-8100.

The Princeton Sun reserves the right to


reprint your letter in any medium
including electronically.

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 7

letter to the editor

We strongly support the candidacy of Liz Lempert as mayor of


Princeton. We have a general interest in the fiscal health of the
town and the quality of its services. Our specific interests are
parks and open spaces, and in
special education, particularly
autism education and treatments.
Pamela has served on the towns
Environmental Commission and
on its Shade Tree Commission. In
addition, she has served as president of the Marquand Park Foundation. Roland has served as in-

vestment director of the state for


more than 20 years and finally as
State Treasurer, retiring in 2001.
From time to time, we have
brought our concerns to Liz, in
her capacity as mayor, and she
has always been open and attentive, and has always made positive recommendations.
She has been directly involved
with the care of Marquand Park,
and she attended special occasions at The Princeton Child Development Institute, a school our
family founded in 1970. She provides intelligence and commitment at the highest level to the
citizens of Princeton.
Roland and Pamela Machold

PSA

PSA

Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline

Safe Haven for Infants


in New Jersey

(800) 843-5437

(877) 839-2339

Re-elect Liz Lempert


as Princeton mayor

PRINCETON DAY SCHOOL

opportunities

Open House Dates


 
   4
Thursday, October 6, 9:00 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday November 15, 9:00 11:00 a.m.
  
 5 8
Tuesday, November 1, 9:00 11:00 a.m.
 
  9 12
Sunday, November 20, 1:00 4:00 p.m.

www.pds.org

of a lifetime. every day.

609-924-6700 x1200
An independent, coeducational school for students from PreK through Grade 12.

CALENDAR

PAGE 8

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

WE FIX ALL MASONRY PROBLEMS

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 28

ITS OUR PASSION!


Repair | Rebuild | Restore
Steps Walls Patios Pillars
Concrete Loose Railings
Blue Stone Specialists
Basement Waterproofing
Brick Driveways Belgian Block
Walkways and Patio Construction
Replacement of Cracked Limestone Steps

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LIFETIME WARRANTY ON ALL WORK WE DESIGN AND BUILD NEW PATIOS!

609-751-3039
www.ReNewMason.com

October 30, 2016


at 3:15pm parade,
3:45 trick or treat

Crafting Your College Essay: Learn


what to write on a college admissions essay and hear how admissions officers react when they
read essays. The session features
Shelley Krause of Rutgers Prep.
Intended for students and adults.
Princeton Public Library, 7 p.m.

WANT TO BE LISTED?
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 145 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Or by email: news@theprinceton
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.theprincetonsun.com).

THURSDAY SEPT. 29
Princeton Farmers Market: Seasonal produce from local farmers,
flowers, crafts and a variety of
edibles are available through 4
p.m. at this weekly event. Live
music from 12:30-2:30 p.m. Hinds
Plaza, 11 a.m.
Mercer County ID Program: All
Mercer County residents are eligible for the community ID card, a
photo identification card providing personal identifying information, medical risk factors and
emergency contact information.
The card is issued by the Latin
American Legal Defense & Education Fund, a nonprofit advocacy group. $10 per card/$5 youth
under 21 and seniors over 65. For
additional information, visit
www.laldef.org. Princeton Public
Library, noon 2 p.m. and 5:30
7 p.m. Also Sunday, Aug. 7, 2 4
p.m.
LEGO: Children in grades one to five
are invited to participate in a noncompetitive community-based
LEGO session, including building
time and round-table discussion.
DUPLO blocks will be available
for younger children outside the

Story Room. Princeton Public


Library, 4 p.m.
Princeton Independent Film Festival: Early opening. Blocks of films
debuting in various genres all
day. Check PrincetonIndependentFilmFestival.com for scheduling and film information. Tickets,
$10, for sale online or at the door.
Nassau Inn.
Lecture, Anne Morrow Lindbergh:
Author, Wife, Pilot, and Radio
Operator: Smithsonian Curator
Dorothy Cochrane will present a
lecture on the First Lady of Aviation. Tickets are $25 per person,
$20 for Friends of Morven. To
register, visit www.morven.org.
For more information, call (609)
924 8144, x102. Morven Museum and Garden, 7 p.m.

FRIDAY SEPT. 30
Job Seeker Sessions: The library
and Professional Services Group
of Mercer County sponsor ses-

sions for professionals who are


seeking new employment and
contracting
opportunities
throughout the region. Please
check the librarys website for
specific topics. Princeton Public
Library, 9:45 a.m.
Acting Out: Students in kindergarten through third grade are
invited to engage in dramatic
activity including discussions,
games, and other fun activities.
No experience necessary. Princeton High School drama aficionados will lead the sessions. Princeton Public Library, 4 p.m.
Princeton Independent Film Festival: Early opening. Blocks of films
debuting in various genres all
day. Check PrincetonIndependentFilmFestival.com for scheduling and film information. Opening
night and reception party at days
end. Tickets, $10, for sale online
or at the door. Nassau Inn.

please see CALENDAR, page 10

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SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 9

Object thrown
at Witherspoon Street
building window
OBJECT
Continued from page 3
turned over to the Detective Bureau for follow-up.

Sept. 18
Subsequent to a pedestrian
stop on Prospect Avenue, a 21year-old
Massachusetts male was arrested for possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was transported to police headquarters where he was processed
and released with a pending court
date.

An unknown individual threw


an object at a window of a building on the 100 block of Witherspoon Street. The investigation
was turned over to the Detective
Bureau for follow-up
Sometime between Sept. 1 and
15, an unknown individual stole a
vehicle cover and scratched the
vehicle with an unknown object
while it was parked on
the first block of Quarry Street. The investigation was turned
over to the Detective
Bureau for follow-up.

police
report

A victim reported that on Sept.


18, an unknown individual stole
his bicycle that was locked to a
pole on the 200 block of Nassau
Street.

Sept. 15

Subsequent to a motor vehicle


stop for maintenance of lamps
and failure to inspect, a 26-yearold Trenton female was arrested
on an active warrant for $2,000 issued by the Trenton Municipal
Court. She was transported to police headquarters where she was
processed and released with a
pending court date.

During the overnight hours, an


unknown person broke a window
to gain entry into business located on the 300 block of Alexander
Street and stole cash. The investigation was turned over to the Detective Bureau for follow-up.

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10 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.

CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8

Princeton Sun

SATURDAY OCT. 1

ROSSEN MILANOV
Music Director

LEILA JOSEFOWICZ, violin

Classical Series Edward T. Cone Concert

VIENNESE REFLECTIONS
Sunday October 9 Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University
3pm Pre-Concert Talk / 4pm Concert
ROSSEN MILANOV, conductor
LEILA JOSEFOWICZ, violin; JULIAN GRANT, guest composer
JULIAN GRANT / Is it enough? Perhaps it is*, After J.R. AHLE and J.S. BACH
ALBAN BERG / Violin Concerto, To the Memory of an Angel
FRANZ SCHUBERT / Symphony No. 9 in C Major, D. 944, Great
*World premiere, commissioned by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra

princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020


Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change.
This program is funded in part by the NJ State Council on the Arts/Department
of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Knit for Others: The library is collecting hand-knit and crocheted


items through the end of December as part of its seventh annual
Knit for Others program. Donated
items will be displayed on a
clothesline behind the Welcome
Desk and distributed to local
organizations. Items of all kinds
may be dropped off at the Welcome Desk and will be gratefully
accepted. Through Saturday, Dec.
31. Princeton Public Library, all
day.
Fall Festival Weekends: Fall Family
Weekends continue every fall
weekend through Oct. 30. Every
weekend there are opportunities
at Terhune Orchards to pick your
own apples and pumpkins, listen
to some good old-fashioned
country music, paint pumpkins
and take part in lots of childrens
activities on the Mount Familys
200-acre farm. Food, wintetasting and farm store available. $8,
ages 3 and older. Terhune
Orchards, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
Meditation, Kirtan, Bhakti yoga,
Bhagavad-gita - Hidden Treasure of the Sweet Absolute: Enjoy
a discussion, meditation and Indian vegetarian luncheon at the
institute of spiritual culture and
science. Every Saturday. Bhakti
Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau St.
#116, 2 p.m.

SUNDAY OCT. 2
Unruly Sounds Music Festival: This
celebration of original music
from Princeton University's versatile graduate music program
features a broad variety of postclassical/contemporary grooves
by Florent Ghys with Bonjour,
Pascal LeBoeuf and Pascals Triangle, Matt McBane and Annika
Socolofsky. Also featured are
popular local artists such as
Damsel, Bitter Bloom, Matt Trowbridge and Owen Lake and the
Tragic Loves. Princeton Public
Library, 12:30 p.m.
Fall Festival Weekends: Fall Family
Weekends continue every fall
weekend through Oct. 30. Every
weekend there are opportunities
at Terhune Orchards to pick your
own apples and pumpkins, listen
to some good old-fashioned
country music, paint pumpkins
and take part in lots of childrens
activities on the Mount Familys
200-acre farm. Food, wintetasting and farm store available. $8,
ages 3 and older. Terhune
Orchards, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.

MONDAY OCT. 3
Letra Pequea: Through engagement with books, activities and
crafts, these sessions are
designed to help children and
adults improve Spanish language
skills. Sessions are conducted in
Spanish and are intended for parents/caregivers to attend with
babies and toddlers. Princeton
Public Library, 11 a.m.

Continuing Conversations on Race:


Members of Not In Our Town, the
Princeton-based interracial and
interfaith social action group,
facilitate these discussions of
race-related issues of relevance
to our community and nation.
Princeton Public Library, 7 p.m.
Genty y Cuentos: In discussing Latin American short stories in
Spanish, participants recount
their personal experiences and
how they relate to the characters
in the story. Princeton Public
Library, 7 p.m.

TUESDAY OCT. 4
Chess: Children can learn to play
and practice chess at these weekly drop-in sessions led by Princeton High School Chess Club members. Princeton Public Library, 4
p.m.
"Democracy is a Design Problem":
Whitney Quesenbery from the
Center for Civic Design talks
about how the centers work is
changing how we think about
designing for elections, an area
of government that blends
extreme service design with
bureaucratic constraints. The
center's user-centered approach
follows the voter journey from
deciding to register to vote to
learning the results of an election. Look at how better design of
ballots, voting systems, voter registration, voter guides, web sites
and other election materials
works better for voters. Princeton
Public Library, 7 p.m.

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 11

Nassau Hockey
kicks off new season
Nassau Hockey, the largest
youth hockey program in the
Greater Princeton area, kicked
off its 2016-2017 season with participation in the Eastern Junior
Elite Prospects League showcase
Aug. 26 through 28.
The Nassau Hockey Peewee, U12, Futures Silver team started
the season at Oaks Center Ice in
Pennsylvania with games against
the Brewster Bulldogs, Greater
New Haven Warriors, Rhode Island Jr. Blues and NJ Titans. Nassaus U-12 team had three players
making their travel hockey debuts and faced some very tough
competition out of the gate. Despite losses against strong teams
from Brewster, Greater New
Haven and Rhode Island, the
team battled hard and showed improvement in every contest. Its
perseverance was rewarded with
an 11-2 win over the NJ Titans in
the final match on Sunday morning, where they applied the lessons learned earlier in the weekend to cruise to victory.
Nassau Hockey, U-14, Bantam
Silver Futures Team gained some
valuable experience and displayed a good amount of grit in
the face of adversity during its
opening four games of the season
during the EJEPHL showcase
held at the Revolution Ice Gardens in Warwick, PA. Without a
full lineup and faced with injuries
right out of the gate, the team
was unable to notch a win, but it
played hard until it just ran out of
gas.
As a wise man one said, Our
greatest glory is not in never
falling, but in rising every time
we fall.

Nassau Hockey, U-10, Squirt


Silver Futures Team played four
games at Igloo Ice Arena in Mt.
Laurel in the opening showcase
weekend of the EJEPHL 2016-2017
regular season. The team went 31 with victories over the Greater
New York Stars, Long Beach
Lightning and the New Jersey Titans. The team fought hard with
the Bayonne Rangers but came
up just short with their only loss,
7-5. The team scored an impressive 34 goals for and 11 against
the lowest in the tournament
thanks to Blake Echternacht,
who also recorded his first
shutout of the season.
The Nassau Hockey, U-11, Pee
Wee Diamond squad played four
games at Hollydell Ice Arena. The
team went 4-0 with victories over
Coney Island's Greater New York
Stars, Brewster NY's Bulldogs,
Long Island Arrows and New Jersey's Pro-Tec Ducks. The team
boasted a hearty 40 goals for and 5
against the lowest in the tournament thanks to goaltending duo
of Daniel Prokoshin and Nickolas
Chetti.
Great work, kids. The Nassau
Family salutes you!
Nassau Hockeys house league
program starts this fall and is
open to players of all abilities. At
Nassau Hockey, our mission is to
create an atmosphere that is highly competitive and challenging
for our young hockey players
while maintaining a balanced
and fun approach to ice hockey
which helps build player confidence, sportsmanship, and lasting friendships.
Visit www.nassauhockey.com
to learn more.

PSA

PSA

New Jersey Disaster


Mental Health Helpline

Gambling Addiction
Hotline

(877) 294-4357

(800) 426-2537

12 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

With more discussion, the more


lives will be saved, co-founder says
WITH
Continued from page 1
wife Tricia after their son, Kenny,
ended his life at 19. Its a really
complicated situation, but we
have to normalize this. People
who die by suicide dont want to
die; they want to end the pain.
Death is a symptom of their disorder.
The concept of Attitudes In Reverse was formed after Katelyn
and her family faced the discrimination which followed her brothers death. At the time, she attended West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School North.
Katelyn felt AIR embodied the
idea of a mental health disorder
because it is invisible. Like air,
the disorder exists even if you
cant see it.
Its terribly difficult to deal
with death, let alone the death of

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a child. Then, theres this stigma


attached to [mental illness]. People talk about it in a certain way,
Baker said. The parents didnt
cause this. Some people think
there must have been some impact made.
Since Kennys death in 2009,
AIR has expanded nationally and
seeks to educate students, teachers and other individuals to prevent suicide and to educate so
that everyone, no matter what biological-based brain challenge
they are dealt, are treated with
kindness and respect.
According to Baker, the biggest
resistance to an open dialogue on
these topics is driven by the fear
that the truth will be a contagion
if you talk about the subject,
you will lose more students.
The bigger concern, here, is
not having a constructive conversation. If not, most kids are very
likely to get advice from their
peers, which is not always the
best answer. We need to provide
them with real information,
Baker said emphatically. We
often bring someone to speak to
kids who has dealt with their own
mental health disorder. And the
kids know whether youre real or
not they read right through us.
The key is to give hope that they
can get better.
According to Baker, one in five
youth and one in four adults face
a mental health disorder. Though
once help is sought, 70 percent to
90 percent of cases see improvement, and Baker feels the arena of
solving mental health disorders
is only evolving.
When the Bakers were asked to
present to a middle school, they
proceeded cautiously toward
their young audience. However,
when asked if they or someone
they knew has or had dealt with
suicide or the thought of harming their self, nearly every hand
went up.
It is so easy to be living in this

fantasy world where you think,


My kid doesnt have issues, they
have a boyfriend or a girlfriend,
theyre doing well in school, they
play sports. Our son had all of
that. He was on top of the world
as a freshman. He connected with
others well, he was kind and loving, as many are with anxiety or
depression. Theyre empathic because they understand a lot of
mental pain, Baker said.
Baker remembers the little
quirks his son had. In retrospect,
he sees how these were fueled by
anxiety, which led to depression
and pain. Once Kenny was diagnosed, they always knew he was
at risk and did everything in their
power to help alleviate his issues.
Theres only so much you can
do physically unless you want to
lock the child up and not let them
live their life. Thats the problem
with mental health: Since it
comes from the brain, so many
other things are affected, Baker
said.
Baker feels the more this issue
is discussed, the more lives will
be saved.
I think it is really important
that we dont hide from this. If we
get in front of this on the ground
floor, well solve a ton of issues
from incarceration to homelessness, addiction, teen pregnancy
and bullying, Baker said.
In addition to AIR seminars,
the Bakers participate in teaching Mental Health First Aid,
which he believes should be taken
by anyone who works or is a parent to youth. While the Bakers are
not clinicians, their goal is to
raise awareness and demonstrate
when and if someone needs help.
Resources for peer support and
suicide
prevention
include:
NJhopeline.com; 1(800) 273-TALK;
trinitycounseling.org, (609) 9240060; princetonpsychologicalcenter.com, (609) 658-0368; goodgrief.corg, (609) 498-6674; and jfcsonline.org (609) 987-8100.

$FOUSBM4DIFEVMJOH





Send us your Princeton news

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Drop us an email at news@theprincetonsun.com. Fax us at 856-4270934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 13

obituary
Owen Bardzilowski
Sept. 15, 2016
It is with broken hearts that we
announce the sudden passing of
Owen G. Bardzilowski, at home
on Thursday, Sept. 15 at age 14.
A lifelong resident of Princeton, he began his freshman year
at Princeton High School. Over
the years, he loved to play golf
with his dad and grandpa, was an
expert in solving various kinds of
Rubiks cubes, an enthusiastic
skateboarder and active in various youth sports programs.
Owen is survived by his parents Joe and Marie Evelyn
Bardzilowski, his siblings Miles,
Ella and Maria, maternal grandmother Marie Thomas of Plainsboro, paternal grandparents
Joseph and Julia Bardzilowski of
Clark, and Carole VillNeuve of
Las Vegas, aunt Lisa (Ron) Rapolas, uncles Charles Eddie (Carolyn) Thomas, Michael Thomas
(Northern Ireland), Mike and Jon

Bardzilowski, great uncle Leon


Bardzilowski, Dawn and Arturo
Pacheco and special cousin Evelyn Torres (Pensacola, Fla.) and
loved in life by a host of cousins,
extended family and friends.
Owen
faithfully
attended
Princeton Police Department
Youth Academy over the past few
years and this past summer was a
counselor in the program.
Visiting hours were Monday,
Sept. 19 from 2-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.
at Kimble Funeral Home, 1
Hamilton Ave., Princeton. Funeral services were private.
Since it was Owens dream to
be a Princeton police officer, in
lieu of flowers, his family requests donations to Princeton PD
Youth Academy Fund, c/o PBA
Local 130, 1 Valley Road Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge.

Finding Your Purpose...


A Day of Infinite Possibilities
This event promises to be a day
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Lunch will be served.

Register directly on my website:


http://www.fitzgeraldlifecoaching.com/schedule.html

I LOVED WATCHING THE OLYMPIC


GAMES THIS SUMMER!
From Simone Biles to Michael
Phelps, from badminton to beach
volleyball, the Olympics brought
together people of different
shapes, sizes, colors, cultures, interests and abilities. All had their own
stories and pathways to success.
For me, the Olympic Games are an
inspiration for all of us involved in
education. Much like the work we
do in schools, they are a celebration of diversity, teamwork, coaching, and accomplishment.
As we start a new school year, we
welcome a diversity of students
into our classrooms. Like the athletes from the Olympic Games,
they come with their own interests, abilities, backgrounds and
stories. They come with their own
hopes and dreams. In the days and
months ahead, we will strive to get
to know each one. We will strive to
engage them as learners. And we
will work together with families to
coach them to increasingly higher
levels of accomplishment.
With that work in mind, this school
year will be one in which we focus
on the broad themes of Differentiation and Diversity. Our goal with

differentiation will be to share, explore, and implement best practices in student-centered learning
ones that ensure students are
learning similar concepts but doing so in ways that acknowledge
their differing interests, learning
styles and readiness levels.
Our goal with diversity will be
threefold: 1) to celebrate the cultural richness of our community, 2)
to expand our outreach to ensure
all families feel comfortable accessing the resources of our school
system, and 3) to build our institutional and individual responsiveness to students and families from
a variety of racial, religious, cultural,
and economic backgrounds.
We live in a time when empathy towards others and an understanding
of different perspectives has never
been more important. I am excited
for the Princeton Public Schools to
be leaders in this effort. And I am
excited for all we will accomplish
together in the year ahead!
Sincerely,
Steve Cochrane

14 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

PSRC presents performance


by The Capitol Steps

SUN16

The Princeton Senior Resource


Center presents a performance by
the popular and timely political satire troupe, The Capitol
Steps on Sept. 30 at 7:30 p.m. at
Princeton Universitys Richardson Auditorium at Alexander
Hall. PSRCs most important annual fundraiser will also feature a
VIP reception with cast members
following the performance. General reserved seating tickets may
be
purchased
at
https://
tickets.princeton.edu/Online/.
At the event, PSRC is also offering for sale to the public three raffle packages: a two-week stay in
Ft. Myers, Fla., at the Heritage
Palms Country Club in a condo
that sleeps six; $1,200 in gift cards
accepted at numerous area
restaurants; and a round of golf

for you and friends at each of four


spectacular regional courses: The
Ridge at Back Brook, Springdale
Country Club, Cherry Valley
Country Club, and Royce Brook
Golf Club, Hillsborough. More details on raffle packages may be
found at princetonsenior.org.
Raffle tickets are for sale at
PSRCs main office behind Monument Hall in Princeton New Jersey, or by calling (609) 924-7108.
The price is $100 per ticket/per
raffle package. The drawing will
be held after the Sept. 30 performance. Winners need not be present to claim their prize.
All proceeds support PSRC. For
questions and more information,
please call PSRC at (609) 924-7108
or visit our website: princetonsenior.org.

Goal to sew 500 pillowcases


GOAL
Continued from page 5

have been working to continue


their daughters mission.
Christines Hope for Kids and
PCDI will now partner to help A
Case for Anyone, a sewing project spearheaded by one of PCDIs
students and sewing enthusiasts,
Kevin Carlin, who began sewing
some years ago as a hobby, continued to develop and sell his craft to
some local shops and taught his
PCDI teachers and peers about
sewing. Christines Hope for Kids
had caught wind of Carlins
brand, Kevs Cases, which led
them to team up with PCDI and
implement a bigger program.
We just think it's a fabulous
partnership with PCDI. These are
not just pillowcases; these young
men take such pride in their
work. The detail and professionalism that go into each pillowcase,
we were struck by it. They're
beautiful, said Jean Gianacaci,
founder of Christine's Hope for
Kids. Something special had to
be done with these pillowcases.
Each child who receives one gets
something so special to lay their

head on at night, something that's


just theirs. Together, we're all
working for the end result. The
young men at PCDI help us, and
we pass that on to help kids in
need. It comes full circle."
Now, 15 PCDI adult students
are working on A Case for Anyone and aim to sew 500 pillowcases for shelters, hospitals and
other institutions throughout
Mercer County where a clean
place to rest ones head is needed.
With its donation, Christines
Hope for Kids will help effectuate
the students good deed. The
$1,000 check will go directly to
buy a new sewing machine so
more adult students can join the
program. Once the pillowcases
are completed, they will be
shipped to their destinations in
boxes filled with other needed or
fun items such as pajamas, coloring books and crayons.
Its an honor to partner with
Christines Hope for Kids, PCDI
Executive Director Pat Progar
said. Were aware of the excellent work they do, and their support of our program will allow us
to purchase much-needed supplies and equipment for our
sewing project, allowing more of
our adults to participate and give
back to the community.

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 15

Event organizer Leticia Fraga


inspired by sons International Night
EVENT
Continued from page 1
mark. When one entered the tent,
a large map of the world was
there for visitors to place a pin or
pins on the place of their familys
origin.
Your grandmother came from
here, but your grandfather came
from here. And your great-grandparents came from here, some
parents told their children, who
stood awestruck in the conceptualization of their own histories.
Try something sweet; its part
of Polish tradition, Agneszka
Majchizak said at her booth representing Poland. We always try
to celebrate Polish culture, dance,
song. Many children may live
here but their parents or grandparents come from Poland. Its
great to teach them how Polish
and Americans live together.
Here, there are many Polish
names, Polish cities showing the
culture.
Nicola Teves and Gio Charles
placed their pins on the Philippines and Haiti, respectively.
Teves enjoys Lechon, a Filipino
tradition where a whole pig is
roasted for a special occasion.
Charles enjoys the Haitian
Mardi Gras or Carnivale that
goes on throughout the country.
One of the most memorable parts
is how bands of musicians come
together and perform in musical
rivalry.
Valeria Trujillo, Veronica Monroy and Louis Gasper sat folding
flores at a table electric in color
with Mexican folklore, tarot and
books about Frida Kahlo.
In Mexico people normally
make these flowers for decoration
PSA

Pet Friends Grief


support for pet owners

and for parties around Halloween. Its a Dios de los Muertos


tradition, Monroy said.
Local resident Leticia Fraga, a
first generation Mexican-American, put together Cultural Exchange Night after her son, Ben,
hosted International Night. She
thought it was a wonderful way to
share heritage as a community.
Demet, Jens and Marcus Olesen of Denmark moved to Princeton three years ago after living in
Switzerland. Demet is originally
from Turkey and stood with a
Turkish booth that was merged
with her husbands Danish booth.
Everybody always asks why

Denmark is the happiest country


in the world, Marcus said, wearing a shirt that boasted just that.
The reason why is because the
difference between rich and poor
is very small. Even the CEO of
the Danish Bank, the largest in
Denmark, said Do not lower
funding for the poor a bigger difference [in wealth] will only create animosity and even terrorism. I agree with this mindset.
People need a decent living no
matter what cards theyve been
dealt. People are not inherently
lazy. Those who are capable have
an obligation; its a cultural
thing.

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16 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

Eastburn: It is my duty to encourage


children to explore the unknown
EASTBURN
Continued from page 2
facts for the sake of simply knowing them is no longer enough.
What can you do with those facts?
What problems can we solve with
them?
The Sun: Which aspect of science affects you most powerfully?
Friend: I simply love learning
and figuring things out and being
perpetually astonished. Teaching
science, especially in an elementary science lab, is about being in
a constant state of wonder and reinforcing its importance to my
students.
I am passionate about teaching
and just as passionate about making life-long connections with my
students and their families.
Teaching is personal, if it isnt,
then you arent doing it right. I
have relationships with students,
and their families that I taught 20
years ago and expect the same
with my new families this year.
The Sun: Who is your favorite
leader, scientist or teacher and
why?
Friend: I was so very lucky to
student teach at Littlebrook
School and then be hired to teach
fifth grade with the amazing
Adrienne Cohen and my sister,
Sarah Schwimmer. The teachers
in this school, over the past 23
years, have been my guides
through life, my mentors in teaching and my dear friends. I raised
my children here at Littlebrook
and couldnt be more grateful.

Be social.
Like us on
Facebook!

Mark Eastburn

www.facebook.com/
princetonsun

The Sun isn't


just in print. Like
us on Facebook
for additional
photos, stories
and tidbits of
information
about your town.

The Sun: From age 22 to 25, you


served in the Peace Corps in
Panama. How did that shape you
as a young man, and in what ways
did it inspire you to devote your
life to teaching?
Eastburn: My assignment was
an agroforestry volunteer in a
mountain village in central Panama called Las Huacas de Quije,
which did not have electricity or
indoor plumbing. My assignment
was to teach soil conservation,
vegetable gardening and other
agricultural practices, but while

there, I realized that I had the easiest time working with children,
since many of the adults were already set in their ways and reluctant to change. Children, however, were always eager to learn
new things (even iguana ranching), which encouraged me to
pursue a career in teaching. Even
today, I often find that my students are much more than willing
to hold a tarantula or attempt to
write computer code than most
grownups, which fuels my continued inspiration as a teacher.
The Sun: What drew you to the
area of science? Have there been
other areas of study that were alluring to you?
Eastburn: I think that children
generally have a strong interest
in science, but some never outgrow it, or at least have enough
experiences during their childhood to continue that interest. As
the world-renowned marine biologist Sylvia Earle has said, "I'm
asked sometimes, 'How did you
get to be a biologist?' And I say,
'It's really easy. You start as a little
kid and then you never grow up."
I think that this must be why I
particularly enjoy teaching at the
elementary level. I am also interested in history and world cultures, about the movement of people around the globe especially
the histories of Africa, Asia and
Latin America.
The Sun: What is something
you value most as a teacher?
Eastburn: Above all else, I feel
that it is my duty to encourage
children to explore the unknown
and take risks, using the tools of
science, so that their generation
might walk on Mars, build robots
to mine asteroids, cure diseases,
feed a growing population, live
more sustainably, restore ailing
ecosystems and inspire future
generations to reach even more
ambitious goals.
The Sun: Which aspect of science affects you most powerfully?
Eastburn: It's that process of
continually asking questions,
seeking evidence to support, or
disprove, hypotheses and using
logic to determine what's really
happening "behind the scenes." I
also love the open mindedness re-

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Mark Eastburn with his famous


pet lizard, Green Fruit Loop.

quired for science to be successful, since one must always be willing to accept new evidence and
ideas. In its purest form, science
is impartial, free from national
and cultural boundaries and has
given us tremendous power to understand our universe in a relatively short period of time.
The Sun: Who is your favorite
leader, scientist or teacher and
why?
Eastburn: Carl Sagan has undoubtedly been a great influence
on me, since I watched his Cosmos series when I was younger
and still get goosebumps everytime I hear him narrate from
Pale Blue Dot. Robert Bakker, a
paleontologist from Bergen County and author of many books, also
encouraged my love for science
through his work. I've also gained
great inspiration from Stephen
Jay Gould and Freeman Dyson,
one of whom I've had the honor to
meet in person (Dyson) and the
other (Gould) I dared to call at his
Harvard office when I was in college.

SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 17

CULTURAL

EXCHANGE

NIGHT
Photos by Erica Chayes Wida/The Sun

Part of Welcoming Week Princeton, the Cultural Exchange Night


was held Sept. 20 in Hinds
Plaza. Clockwise from above: La
familia! Sofia Nadler, Peyton
Bess, Leticia Fraga, Diego Martinez, Ben Nadler and his father
Steven Nadler (back row) come
together to celebrate culture.
Artifacts from the Mexican tradition. The sky casts a pink glow
over Cultural Exchange Night in
Hinds Plaza. Demet, left, Jens
and Marcus Olesen celebrate
their Turkish and Danish cultures. Gio Charles, originally
from Haiti, puts his pin on the
map. Aleksandra Nieznalska
shows off traditional Polish garb.

MORE ONLINE
See more photos online at
www.facebook.com/princetonsun

18 THE PRINCETON SUN SEPT. 28OCT. 4, 2016

Family friend said Owen was one


of the best people shed ever known
FAMILY
Continued from page 1

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woden.me

ing, a Thursday shortly after the


start of a new school year, a petition for a school memorial service was circulated by a fellow
Princeton High School student,
Eric Liu. Liu said Owen was a
bright eyed kid who could make
anyones day.
Another student, Ava Rand,
shared how Owen once sat with
her for three hours when her ride
was late so she wouldnt be alone.
A close friend, Eman Shamshed,
said Owen could make anyone
smile.
Within a week, the petition had
923 supporters.
On Facebook, Dawn Pacheco, a
friend of Owens mother Evelyn,
posted that at only 14, Owen was
one of the best people shed ever
known.
His compassion for anyone
who was hurting was astounding
and the way he loved could take
your breath away, Pacheco posted on Facebook. He held each
one of my children as newborns
and was so tender and in awe of
their little lives that it always
made me weep to watch. I love
you, Owen. You will always take
space in my heart. I am so sorry I
can no longer hug you or hear
you tell me something amazing!
In addition to playing golf with
his dad, Joe, Owen enjoyed skateboarding, sports and could impress with a Rubiks cube, according to his obituary. In the past few
years, Owen joined the Princeton
Police Departments Youth Academy and served as a counselor
this summer. There, he learned
the inner-workings of the department, from arrest procedures and
first aid to crime scene investigation and building searches.
It was Owens dream to become
one of Princetons officers in
blue. During visiting hours of
Owens funeral service at Kimble
Funeral Home Sept. 19, the
Princeton Police honored him as
if he already were. Two by two, officers lined up with black bands
across their badges. They rotated

Facebook/Special to The Sun

Owen Bardzilowski shown here as a toddler took his life at 14 in


his Princeton home on Sept. 21. His compassion and love live on to
inspire others and create awareness.
and stood guard beside Owens
casket.
It goes without saying that we
in the police department are devastated by Owens passing, Chief
of Police Nick Sutter said. We
are proud to say that Owen had
joined our police family over the
past several years, and we all
came to know him as an extraordinary young man who understood the meanings of service
and community at a very young
age. This is a tragic loss that has
had a profound effect on the department and our community. We
will continue to honor Owen, his
memory and his legacy with the
Princeton Police Departments
Youth Academy.
Owens family has embraced
their community as many of its
members reach out with arms
open.
The outpouring of love from
our friends, our family and our
community have been comforting
for us, Owens father wrote publicly on Facebook. We know a lot
of people are hurting and probably shy about approaching us.
This is completely understand-

able. I just want everyone to know


that we are here for you as much
as you have been here for us. Just
like you, I have no words. But if
you need to express your grief
quietly or publicly, or if you just
want to hug one of Owens family
members, we are not being shy or
hiding from this tragedy. We as a
community need to get our heads
around this and do whatever we
can to raise awareness.
In addition to resources provided by the Princeton public school
district, others spoke proactively
for the sake of saving anothers
life.
No one knows what you are
going through or how you are
feeling until you reach out for
help, Brian Joseph said on Facebook. Please don't keep your
pain bottled up. Get help. The
world needs you to stick around.
You will be missed when you're
gone. It may not seem like it right
now, but it does get better. It really
does.
If you are the one struggling,
reach out, Jhilam Iqbal said.
There is help and someone will
take your hand.

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