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1 Steel fasteners

– DIN EN ISO 898-1,
Mechanical Properties of Fasteners of Carbon Steel
and Alloyed Steel, Part 1: Screws/Bolts
– DIN EN 20898 Part 2 (ISO 898 Part 2),
Mechanical Properties of Fasteners, Part 2: Nuts

1.1 Materials for fasteners
The material used is of decisive importance for the quality
of the fasteners (screws/bolts, nuts and accessory parts).
If faults occur in the material used, then the fastener
manufactured from that material can no longer meet
the requirements placed on it.

These standards define the material to be used, the
marking, the properties of the finished parts and their
testing and test methods.

The most important standards for screws/bolts and nuts
are:

Different materials are used for various property classes.
These are listed in the following Table 1.

Property
class

Chemical composition
(% by mass)
(piece analysis)

Material and heat treatment
C

3.6 b)
4.6 b)
4.8 b)
5.6
5.8 b)
6.8 b)
8.8 c)

9.8

10.9 e) f)
10.9 f)

12.9 f) h) i)

a)

b)

c)

d)

MWF - 07/05 - 09137 - © •

e)

Carbon steel

Carbon steel with additives (e.g. boron, Mn or Cr),
quenched and tempered
Carbon steel, quenched and tempered

Table 1: Excerpt from DIN EN ISO 898 Part 1

max.

P
max.

S
max.


0.20
0.55

0.05
0.05

0.06
0.06

0.13

0.55
0.55

0.05
0.05

0.06
0.06

0.40

0.035

0.035

0.55

0.035

0.035

0.35

0.035

0.035

0.25
0.15 d)

0.55
0.35

0.035
0.035

0.035
0.035

0.25
0.20 d)

0.55
0.55

0.035
0.035

0.035
0.035

0.20
0.28

0.55
0.50

0.035
0.035

0.035
0.035

0.15

d)

0.25

Carbon steel with additives (e.g. boron, Mn or Cr),
quenched and tempered
Carbon steel, quenched and tempered
Carbon steel with additives (e.g. boron, Mn or Cr),
quenched and tempered
Carbon steel, quenched and tempered
Carbon steel with additives (e.g. boron, Mn or Cr),
quenched and tempered
Alloyed steel, quenched and tempered g)
Alloyed steel, quenched and tempered g)

The boron content may reach 0.005%, provided that the non-active boron is
controlled with titanium and/or aluminum additives.
For these property classes, machining steel with the following maximum
percentages of phosphorous, sulfur and lead is permissible: sulfur: 0.34%,
phosphorous 0.11%; lead: 0,35%.
For nominal diameters over 20 mm, it may be necessary to use a material
selected for the property classes 10.9 in order to ensure a sufficient
hardenability.
For carbon steels with boron as an additive and a carbon content under 0.25%
(melting analysis), a manganese content of at least 0.60% for the property
class 8.8 and 0.70% for the property classes 9.8 and 10.9 is required.
For products of these steels, the marking of the property class must be underlined (see Section 9). 10.9 must achieve all properties specified in Table 3 for
10.9. However, the lower tempering temperature for 10.9 results in a differing
stress relaxation method at higher temperatures.

min.

0.15

f)

g)

h)

i)

d)

TemperThe
ing tem- most important
perature
steels
B a)
max.

°C
min.


Q St 36-3,
Q St 38-3
Cq22, Cq35

425

0.003

Cq22, Cq35
19Mn B4,
22 B2, 35 B2,
Cq45, 38 Cr2,
46 Cr2,
41 Cr4

425
340

35 B2, 34 Cr4,
37 Cr4, 41 Cr4
35 B2, 34 Cr4,
37 Cr4, 41 Cr4

425
380

Cr4, 41 Cr4,
34CrMo4,
42 Cr Mo4,
34 Cr Ni Mo 6,
30 Cr Ni Mo 8

The material for these property classes must be sufficiently hardenable in
order to ensure that a martensite share of approximately 90% is contained in
the core structure in the thread section in the hardened state before tempering.
Alloyed steel must contain at least one of the following alloy components in the
specified minimum quantity: chrome 0.30%, nickel 0.30%, molybdenum 0.20%,
vanadium 0.10%. If two, three or four elements are specified in combination
and have lower alloy shares than specified above, then the limit value to be
applied for the classification is 70% of the sum of the individual elements specified above for two, three or four elements concerned.
For the property class 12.9, a metallographically determinable white layer
enriched with phosphorous on surfaces subjected to tensile loading is not permissible.
The chemical composition and the tempering temperature are currently being
examined.