1    

Plan  Bee  Now!   A  Field  and  Classroom     Workshop  
 

Andrena  Mining  Bee  on  Groundel,  Senecio  sp  

 

 

How  to  Manage  Bee  Decline     in  Our  Cities,  Farmlands   Road  Sides  and    Natural  Areas    
 

“Bee  decline  is  real  and  merits  immediate  attention.     Problems  facing  the  honey  bee  industry  are  becoming  more   complex  and  losses  of  honey  bee  hives  continue  to  happen.”    
Canadian  Pollination  Initiative  (CANPOLIN)  researchers  www.uoguelph.ca/canpolin/  

Plan  Bee  Now!  
Contact:  Ted  Leischner,  Keremeos,  BC,  V0X  1N2   Ph.  250-­‐499-­‐9558  Email:    tleisch(at)telus.net     www.planbeenow.ca  (under  construction)  

   

2    

Why  the  decline  of  native  bee  diversity  and  the  loss  of   honey  bees  important?    

 Imported  European  Honey  Bee  Apis  melifera    

 

1. It  reduces  agricultural  productivity  and  increases  costs  to   producers  and  consumers.  

APPLES   $10.00   EACH  
   

2. Silent  spring  and  hand  pollination  is  a  reality  in  China!    
Sichuan  Provence,  China.    All  bees  have  been  killed  by  pesticides  requiring   pollination  of  fruit  crops  to  be  pollinated  by  hand.  It  takes  20  man  days  to   hand  pollinate  2  hectares  of  apples  costing  $722  per  tonne  of  apples.  

 

 

 

 

 

     

3.  Loss  of  plant  species  and  ecosystem  health.     WHAT  HAPPENS  IF  HONEY  BEES  DISAPPEAR?  
Answer:  NATIVE  BEES  TO  THE  RESCUE!  

 

  BC  has  40%  of  all  the  native  bee  species  in  Canada.  400+  species  live  as  solitary  bees  which  nest   in  underground  tunnels,  old  logs,  snags  and  old  mouse  nests  in  diverse  habitats.  They  are  not   hive  bees  that  make  honey  but  are  critical  pollinators  in  agricultural  and  eco  systems.  Research   is  showing  that  native  bee  species  can  replace  the  function  of  honey  bees  in  pollinating  fruit   and  vegetable  crops.    Our  workshops  present  their  natural  history  and  how  to  conserve  them.  

   

3    

NESTING  HABITS  OF  OUR  400+  SPECIES  OF  NATIVE  BEES  IN  BRITISH  COLUMBIA     70%  are                                          10%  are                                 20%  are     Ground-­‐nesting  Bees                          Bumblebees                                                Cavity-­‐nesting  Bees    
             

             

   

             

   

                     

                                                                                                                                            Bumble  Bee  on  Clover                                              Orchard  Mason  Bee                                              on  paper  nesting  tubes  

                         Long  Horned  Bees    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why  Native  Bees  are  Special  
 

Stem  Nesting   Small  Carpenter  Bee     on  Buttercup  

   

“Every  seed  holds  the  magic  of  creation”.       The  pollination  services  of  our  400+  species  of  native  bees    enable  seed  set  for  hundreds  of  different  kinds  of   flowers  in  the  valleys  and  fields  in  BC  so  that  we  and  all  creatures  can  enjoy  life  in  abundance.    Our  native  bees   pollinated  these  plants  for  10,000’s  of  years  before  the  introduction  of  honey  bees  from  Europe.    They  can   continue  to  do  so  if  we  give  back  what  they  need  to  fill  in  for  honey  bees  that  are  disappearing.   They  range  in  size  from  our  small  carpenter  bee  (6  mm)  to  our  largest  bumble  bee  (30mm).  Seventy  per  cent   (70%)  nest  in  underground  tunnels  excavated  by  the  mother  bee.  Twenty  percent  (20%)  nest  in  old  tree  snags  or   rotten  logs  (e.g.  the  orchard  mason  bee).  Five  percent  (5%)  are  bumblebee  species  that  nest  in  abandoned   mouse  burrows,  grass  clumps  or  similar  places.    

 

       

Working  with  our  400  species  of   native  bees  is  our  best  insurance   policy  for  sustainable  pollination   services,  biodiversity  conservation  and   environmental  health.    

4    

WORKSHOP  DESCRIPTION  
 
This  workshop  describes:       a. How    native  bees  are  better  adapted  for  pollination  than  honey  bees   b. The  importance  of  our  native  bees  relative  to    food  security,  food  prices  and   environmental  health  and  life  support.     c. The  technology  and  methods  of  using  and  conserving  native  bees  to  lessen  the  impact   of  loss  of  honey  bee  hives  due  to  colony  collapse  disorder.   d. How  we  can  integrate    of  the  use  of  native  bees  and  honey  bees  for  commercial     pollination  using  the  ‘natural  pollination  guild’  concept.     Each  participant  will  learn:     • What  is  causing  Honey  bee  colony  collapse  (CCD)  and  bee  pollinator  decline     • How  pollination  deficit  will  impacts  our  life,  price  of  food  and  the  health  of  our  planet   • To  see,  use  and  protect  our  400  kinds  of  native  bees  should  we  lose  the  honey  bee   • The  names  of    plants  that  can  increase  populations  of  native  bees  in  your  backyard,   park,  farm,    woodlot  through  each  part  of  a  growing  season   • How  to  integrate  honey  bees  and  native  bees  to  build  ‘pollination  power’  to  assure   sustainable  pollination  services  for    food  production  and  ecological  health.     Activities:       1. Collect  and  observe  native  bees  and  naïve  bees,    tunnelling  if  we  are  lucky,     2. Assess    native  bee  presence,  cavity  nesting  bees  using  traps  or  insect  nets     3. Build  Bumblebee  and  cavity  nesting  bee  homes   4. Design  a  bee  garden  for  a  particular  setting  and  location  or  make  a  garden  more  bee   friendly   What  to  Bring:   1. Camera   2. Pictures  of  your  garden   3. Plant  list  of  your  garden     4. A  yard,  park  or  farm  plan  

WORKSHOP  COSTS,FEES    
  Individuals  at  the  door:    $60.00   Non-­‐profit  groups:  Expenses  plus  negotiable  honoraria   Private  Bookings:  $500  per  day  plus  expenses   Payment  by  cash  or  cheque  to  Plan  Bee  Now.  No  credit  or  debit  cards  at  this  time.  

5    

 

Who  benefits  the  Most  
Any  citizen  or  land  owner,  6  to  106  years  old,    who  wants  to  save  our  bees  and  reverse  bee   decline  and  put  pollination  capacity  back  on  our  land–  especially  gardeners  and  food  producers!   All  land  owners    /    Green  Building  Developers  /  Ecology  Centres  and  Ecovillages         Youth  Group  Leaders   /  Artists  and  Writers   /  Environmental  Engineers  /   University  Students  /   Landscape  Architects      /  Green  Educators  and  Teachers  /  Permaculture  Designers      /     Biodiversity  Conservation  /    Food  Security    Local  Food  Groups  /  Sustainable  Development   Designers  /  Urban  and  Rural  Planners  /  Urban  Agriculture  Initiatives  /  Ecology  Literate  Farmers       Mothers’  of  the  Earth    

 

What  you  will  be  able  to  do  after  the  workshop  

  You  will  be  able  to  return  to  your  home  or  business  and  know  exactly  what  you  need  to  do  to   protect  and  conserve  all  bees  in  your  region.    Restoring  bee  pollinators  in  a  community   increases  capacity  for  sustainable  green  living,  food  production  and  environmental  health.      

About  the  Instructor:     Ted  Leischner  B.Sc.,  Plan  Bee  Now!    

 

 

Focused  on  people  and  earth  systems  care  and  ecological  restoration,  education  and  practice   (permaculture);  permaculture  bee  gardens  design  and  landscape  retrofit  to  better  care  for  our  native   bees  and  to  put  back    the  capacity  of  our  Earth  for  Life  support.       Education:  B.Sc.  Biol.  Calgary;  Agric.Production  Dipl.  Olds  College;  BC  Instructors  Dipl.  VCC;  PTT   certificate,  PDC.  Corresponding  member  of  the  Canadian  Pollination  Initiative     Ted  is  from  Calgary,  AB  now  living  in  Keremeos,  BC,  Similkameen  Valley.       Life  long  earth  systems  naturalist;  bee  pollinator  conservation  activist;  permaculture  teacher  and   designer.     Retired  agricultural  college  instructor,  special  crops  field  man  and  consultant;  master  beekeeper  with   commercial  experience  (500  hives);  with  extensive  farm  and  horticulture  business  enterprise  planning   experience.

   

 

6    

  Is  this  a  honey  bee?    
Answer:  No,  it  is  one  of  400+  species  of  native  bees  in  BC,  our  insurance  policy  for  pollination.  
Honey  bees  are  only  one  species  of  more  than  20,000  species  of  bees  in  the  world  responsible  for   pollination.  We  need  all  species  to  of  bees  to  pollinate  and  sustain  the  life  cycle  of  the  plants  that  live   on  the  planet.    

Metalic  green  solitary  digger  bee  (Agapostemon  virescens)  on  Beggars  Tick  Flowers   at  the  Gristmill  Heritage  Site,  Keremeos,  BC  

 

If  you  see  this  bee  burrowing  in  your  lawn   Call  Me  Right  Away!  

 
Sign  up  for  a     Native  Bee  Conservation     Training  Workshop     Today  

 
Everything  you  wanted  to  know     to  Save  Our  Native  Bees  to  Insure   Food  Security,  Quality  Green  Living   and  Environmental  Health  

 

Plan  Bee  Now!  
Keremeos,  BC,  V0X  1N2   Contact:  Ted  Leischner   Ph.  250-­‐499-­‐9558  Email:    tleisch(at)telus.net     www.planbeenow.ca  (under  construction)