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Contact
Please contact Elizabeth for any conference queries on e.vasileva@lboro.ac.uk

Registration for the conference is open here:
http://store.lboro.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=258&catid=84
&prodid=383

Accommodation
There are a number of hotels and B&Bs around town. Free accommodation can be found via
couchsurfing.com, hospitalityclub.org, bewelcome.org and others. The university is on the
edge of town so camping is also possible (showers are available in the Schofield building).

Travel
Loughborough is accessible via train from St. Pancras International in north London, or a
coach from London Victoria. The closest airport is East Midlands Airport or Luton Airport.
Tickets are cheaper if booked in advance.
The university itself is located about 45min walk from the train station. You could also take
the university shuttle bus.
If you’re hitchhiking or driving, the university is easily accessible via the M1 (exit 23).
More information here: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/about/find-us/
The university shuttle bus is free to ride within the campus limits. For a map of the university,
follow this link: http://maps.lboro.ac.uk/

Accessibility
All university buildings are equipped with ramps and wheelchair accessible toilets.
Programmes will be available in larger fonts and dyslexia-friendly.
There will be a quiet space during the whole conference with comfy sofas available to the
participants.
Based on the responses during the registration questionnaire we have decided not to offer a
crèche, but please let us know if you need assistance with child-minding and we will try to
help.
The conference papers will all be delivered in English, but we offer assistance in finding
translators from/to many spoken languages.
The conference food will be vegan; do let us know about allergies and intolerances.
The social event will be at a pub which is wheelchair accessible on the ground floor with an
accessible toilet.
Both films will be shown with English subtitles.

Safe(r) spaces
Previous conferences have not implemented safe(r) spaces policies and many people in
attendance are likely to have strong opinions about how such a process should be created and
implemented, if one is used at all. This is something we’d like to negotiate and discuss at
ASN4, with a view to developing a robust and refined approach for future conferences. As
organisers we are committed to minimising oppression and damaging power imbalances but
feel that the best way to do this is together and publically. Please get in touch if you’d like to
participate in creating proposals for this and future conferences.

Conference Schedule
All panels will be located in the Herbert Manzoni building (K1.09, K1.05, Purple Lounge) or in the
Brockington Extension (U0.05, U0.06, U1.12). Refreshments will be served between panels in the Purple
Lounge (Manzoni). There is a 15-minute extension to the 2nd and final sessions, which can accommodate
any panels in which the participants wish the discussion to run over-time.

Wednesday 14th September
9:00 - 10:30

10:45 - 12:15

Entrance and outside

Registration

Opening plenary

Language centre & kitchen

Refreshments

Refreshments

12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:30

15:45 - 17:15

Refreshments

Refreshments

K1.09 (33 cap.)

Afem histories 1

Afem histories 2

K1.05 (45 cap.)

Anarchism &
religion

Situated struggles

U0.05 (70 cap. multi-level)

Erotic politics

Conceptual approaches 1

U0.06 (72 cap. one-level)

Reflections 1

Mujeres libres

U1.12 (24 cap. one-level)

Open space*

Open space*

Brockingto
n

Manzoni Building

Day 1

Film showings at 18:00 to 19:00 in Schofield U0.05
Drinkin’ and thinkin’ from 19:30 at The Swan in the Rushes, 21 The Rushes, Loughborough LE11 5BE
10:45 to 12:15

10:45 to 12:15

Opening plenary

The plenary will be held outside Manzoni building if the weather permits or in the Purple Lounge
otherwise.

14:00 to 15:30

K1.09 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 1]

14:00 to 15:30

The body is anarchist. Historic and epistemological frame to understand the construction of intersexuality as a
disease in Colombian medical discourses of fifties (abstract: p. xx.)

Sara Lugo Márquez
Gender, neo-Malthusianism and anarchism in early 20th century Spain
Isabel Jiménez-Lucena, Carlos Tabernero-Holgado & Jorge Molero-Mesa
Ajoblanco (1974-1980). Science, gender and sexuality in the anarchist movement
Ana Macaya Andrés

K1.05 Anarchism and religion stream [Panel 1: Feminist Themes]
Anarcho-mysticism as Direct action: Women mystical traditions in mediaeval and early modern Christianity
Joana Serrado
Kartini, her peaceful struggle on three fronts and her reception by Christian anarchists
Andre de Raaij
Womanism, Nature, and Anarchy: Thoughts on the Intersections of Justice, God, and the Dirt of Daily Life
Anthony T. Fiscella

3

05 Erotic politics Convenor: Laurence Davis ReImagining the Erotic State Davina Cooper Love.05 Situated struggles Land defense.05 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 1] Convenor: Benjamin Franks. Anarchism Elena Loizidou Revolutionary Love Dr Laurence Davis U0. queer nihilism and the human strike two queer anarchist settlers from Canada Towards an anti-colonial anarchism: Re-colonization and an imperative to think critically about settler colonialism Vanessa Sloan Morgan. Italy Claudia Morini U0. their relative importance in defining and stabilising other core principles and their realisation in anarchist practices.06 Reflections stream [Panel 1] For a Revival of Feminist Consciousness Raising: Horizontal Transformation of Epistemologies and Transgression of Neoliberal TimeSpace Rhiannon Firth & Andrew Robinson (Co-author) Anti-authoritarian profeminist community knowledge co-production: Media Action Research Group (MARG) Sandra Jeppesen The Withering Away or The Revitalization of The Idea of University? Sercan Kiyak 15:45 to 17:45 K1. Law.09 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 2] 15:45 to 17:45 “A Feminist Disciple of Nietzsche”: The Case of Dora Marsden’s Unstable Anarchism Dominique Miething Anarchist women in Japan: love and resistance Luíza Uehara Marusja Nikiforova – An intersexual anarchist and a legend of the Russian Civil War Dmitry Rublev & Ewgeniy Kasakow Emma Goldman and Peter Kropotkin: radicalism and reformism (federalism) in their assessment of the Bolshevik's regime in Russia Sergey Saitanov K1. Direct Action Vicente Ordóñez Roig 4 . chair: Leonard Williams This stream utilises Michael Freeden’s conceptual analysis to explore the core concepts of anarchist thought and action. Queen’s University. U0. Kingston Mapping Love: Ethnography of migrant women squatters in Florence. The papers identify and describe important anarchist concepts looking at areas of contestation.

Adam Kossof. revolution and the Free Women of Spain. DiY Sandra Jeppesen Horizontalism Mark Bray U0. 25mins 18:00 to 19:20 The Anarchist Rabbi Dir.06 Mujeres Libres (Free Women): History and legacy Convenor: Richard Cleminson “Are we not struggling against privilege?” State. Child Care and the Improvement of the Proletariat: Mujeres Libres.05 Film screening double bill El Valor de Intercambiar Dir. Women and Reproduction Richard Cleminson 18:00 to 19:20 U0. 1936-1938 Danny Evans Sorority as emotional resistance in Mujeres Libres: A journey through the history of emotions Elena Verdegay Conscious Maternity. 45mins 5 . El Cambalache de San Cristobal de las Casas.

multi-level) Utopian sci-fi Gender & sexuality 1 Gender & sexuality 2 Conceptual approaches 2 U0. Day 2 Thursday 15th September 10:45 .12 (24 cap.) Lunch Refreshments Refreshments Creating selfreproducing movements 2 Anarchism & religion 2 Afem histories 4 Theory 1 Theory 2 Reflections 2 Gender & sexuality 3 U0. an Approximation of Property Virginia Lazaro The influence of Emma Goldman in the Italian anarchist debate Carlotta Pedrazzini K1.05 (70 cap.09 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 3] Purple Lounge Prison letter writing workshop (introduction) Who are Las Piqueteras? A study of the organisation through the lens of Argentinian feminism.17:15 Prison letter writing workshop Purple lounge Prison letter writing workshop Language centre & kitchen Refreshments Refreshments K1. one-level) Creating selfreproducing movements 1 Animal liberation 1 Animal liberation 2 Animal liberation 3 U1.15:30 15:45 .14:00 14:00 .10:30 Prison letter writing activity at 18:00 in the Purple Lounge Dinner at 19:30 at Mount Gurkha. one-level) Open space* Open space* Open space* Open space* Brockingto n Manzoni Building 9:00 . Walter Alesci-Chelini UK Suffragettes.05 (45 cap.05 Anarchist and Feminist Visions in Utopian and Post-apocalyptic Fiction Convenor: Peter Seyferth Female leadership and gender in post-apocalyptic fiction Jasmin Hammon 6 .09 (33 cap. 31 Ashby Rd.12:15 12:30 .05 Theory stream [Panel 1] Doctrine Formation and Normative Violence in International Migration Christina Oelgemoller The Feminist Critique of ‘Liberal Man’ also applies to Philosophical Anarchism Ole Martin Sandberg Practicing the theory: Analysing the language of the Syndikalistischer Frauenbund Mihael Švitek U0.06 (72 cap.) Afem histories 3 K1. Loughborough LE11 3AA (all welcome) 9:00 to 10:30 Facilitator: Black Pigeons Collective 9:00 to 10:30 K1.

A Survey of Gender Construction in Literary Utopias Dr. Fucking law’s gendering function Grietje Baars Doing Justice Without Punishment: Queer/feminist/antiracist engagements with community accountability and transformative justice Sarah Lamble Lads or fags?: Challenging the reification of masculinity in the provision of services for male survivors of sexual violence Jack Johnstone U0.? Spinrad’s A World Between Martin Wambsganß Wimmin in Anarchy.. Alessandro Froldi.” how can we bring forward analysis.05 Gender and sexuality stream [Panel 1] Queer cases unmake gendered law.06 Anarchism and animal liberation [Panel 1] Convenors: Livia Boscardin. Anarchy . Arianna Introna. or: Considering Subject Groups and the Wolf Pack in the Production of Gendered Subjectivities Chantelle Gray van Heerden U0. Patriarchy. Amy Westwell. Matriarchy. Total Liberation.or. Sacha Kahir & Kieran Curran K1. Cailean Gallagher.” how can we bring forward analysis. Will Boisseau & Richard J White For Spatial Emancipation in Critical Animal Studies: a veganarchist politics Richard J White & Simon Springer Naturism and biopolitical resistance in Brazil: a reading of Lima Barreto Nádia Farage Multi-species Commons: Walking with dogs and the development of ‘posthuman community’ Erika Cudworth Radical Animal Studies. Nocella II 7 . Arianna Introna. phil. Cailean Gallagher. Alessandro Froldi.05 Theory stream [Panel 2] Implications of Badiouian Work for Anarchist Philosophy and Activist Practice Amanda Earley Women Who Run With the Wolves.09 Creating Self-Reproducing Movements [Panel 2] Convenors: Alessandro Froldi & Arianna Introna 10:45 to 12:15 If “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social change? Speakers: Lynne Friedly. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social change? Speakers: Lynne Friedly. or. and Anarchist Criminology Anthony J..06 Creating Self-Reproducing Movements [Panel 1] Convenors: Alessandro Froldi & Arianna Introna If “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members. Peter Seyferth U0. Amy Westwell. Sacha Kahir & Kieran Curran 10:45 to 12:15 K1.

and Women: Towards the More-than-woman Catherine Oliver Including Anti-Speciesism in our Anarcha-Feminism: Towards an Ahuman Activism Aga Trzak The Third (Forgotten) Part in the Process of the dehumanisation: Animals Lex Kartane 15:45 to 17:45 K1. Cows. burn out Claire Chong U0. perform. 12:30 to 14:00 (Lunch period) Purple Lounge Prison letter writing workshop Facilitator: Black Pigeons Collective 12:30 to 14:00 14:00 to 15:30 14:00 to 15:30 K1.09 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 4] 15:45 to 17:45 Anarchism Prefigured? Mary Wollstonecraft.Challenges of Mutual Aid and Care (Work) Mike Korsonewski Feminist Politics of Non-monogamy.05 Reflections stream [Panel 2] Safer Spaces: Reflections on the Anarchist Federation’s experience Emma Segar Occupy: The making of a feminist anarchist Mary Hickok participate.09 Anarchism and religion stream [Panel 2: Non-feminist themes] Sparking the Pacifist Imagination by Depicting the Familiar as New: The Subversive Potential of Leo Tolstoy’s ‘Defamiliarisation’ Dr Alexandre Christoyannopoulos Jodo Shinsu: Buddhism Against the State in Japan Enrique Galván-Álvarez Rudolf Rocker and the Fate of the English Radical Bible James Crossley K1. Social Institutions and the Politics of Recognition Anthony Burns Gender and Revolution in the mid-19th century French-American Radical Press Hilary Gordon 8 .05 Gender & sexuality stream [Panel 2] Everyday Practices of Degrowth and Gender Justice .06 Anarchism and animal liberation stream [Panel 2] Chickens. Polyamory and the Value of Erotic Autonomy Christian Klesse U0.

06 Anarchism and animal liberation [Discussion Session] Discussants: Paul Stott & Jacqui “Has the militant animal rights movement in Britain declined?” Two perspectives on how and why… 18:00 to 18:30 Purple Lounge Prison letter writing workshop Facilitator: Black Pigeons Collective 18:00 to 18:30 9 . chair: Nathan Jun Reform Leonard Williams Revolution Uri Gordon Prefiguration Benjamin Franks U0. homophobia and liberation Maurice Schuhmann Against Political Polyamory and In Defence of Free Love Molly Uzzell U0.05 Gender & sexuality stream [Panel 3] “Queer thinking” in the early twentieth century Chinese anarchism Miha Fugina “Free love” between patriarchy.05 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 2] Convenor: Benjamin Franks. Can anarchist societies overcome white middle-class male privilege? Gender. race and class in post-1968 libertarian communities Luca Lapolla K1.

06 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 3] Convenor & chair: Benjamin Franks Freedom Nathan Jun Agency David Bates Intersectionality Surreyya 10:45 to 12:15 K1.05 (45 cap. multi-level) Anarchy Rules! workshop Theory 3 U0.05 (70 cap.05 Anarchist histories stream [Panel 1] The Texture of Politics: London’s Anarchist Clubs. if at all.14:00 Entrance and outside Language centre & kitchen 14:00 .12 (24 cap. We'll be discussing: What principles anarchists do/should advocate How. the idea of anarchy helps give content to rules (what's distinctive about anarchist rules?) What rules anarchists can agree to.) Anarchist histories 1 Radical education workshop U0.12:15 12:30 . these principles support the generation of rules How.15:30 Closing Plenary Prison letter writing workshop Purple lounge Refreshments K1.) Lunch Refreshments Anarchist histories 2 K1. one-level) Conceptual approaches 3 Anarchist geographies U1.09 Anarchist histories stream [panel 2] The ideas and activities of Kropotkin's Moscow League of Federalists 10:45 to 12:15 10 . to be clear about the way we want to live and how we want to interact with others. to help resolve disputes U0.10:30 10:45 .Day 3 Friday 16th September 9:00 .05 Anarchy Rules! workshop Facilitators: Ruth Kinna.09 (33 cap.06 (72 cap. Alex Prichard & Thomas Swann Why bother with rules when non-dominating processes support anarchist organising? We think that rules can help anarchists. if at all. 1882 1914 Jonathan Moses The Black Panthers in Britain: a History and Intersectional Anarchist Critique Carlus Hudson The Temptation of Evelyn Waugh: Portrait of the Artist as Tory Anarchist Peter Wilkin U0. to decide why some processes are better than others. one-level) Open space* Open space* Brocking ton Manzoni Building 9:00 to 10:30 9:00 to 10:30 K1.

Dr Jo Norcup Future (pre-)histories of the state: archaeology’s challenge to geography Anthony Ince & Gerónimo Barrera de la Torre 12:30 to 14:00 (Lunch period) Facilitator: Livia Boscardin 12:30 to 14:00 14:00 to 14:30 Outside Manzoni Building Closing plenary 14:00 to 14:30 Purple Lounge Prison letter writing workshop 11 . Syndicalists and the First World War Dr hist. Moscow Anarchists. Kaltefleiter More-than-Bodies in Collective Movement – Reflections on the Anarchist Pedagogies of a Cycling Machine Ferdinand Stenglein Riot Grrrl: captures and metamorphosis of a war machine Flávia Lucchesi U0. Action. Radical Education Forum and more. Chair: Dr Richard J.06 The interdisciplinary promise of anarchist geographies stream Convenors: Richard J White. Sergey Saitanov. Feminism and Geography: Luce Fabbri reading Elisée Reclus Federico Ferretti On the absence of Anarchist thought in German-speaking geography Simon Runkel Anarcha-feminism: geography. U0. Moscow Proudhon’s Anti-Feminism Alex Prichard K1. White Anarchism. Vadim Damier. Federico Ferretti & Anthony Ince. publishing and education. (R)evolution and of the Riot Grrrl movement Caroline K.05 Theory stream [Panel 3] Who Has the Microphone? Anarchy. Russian Academy of Sciences. including The Free University of Brighton.05 Radical education workshop Chair: Elizabeth Vasileva A workshop about anarchist and radical education projects and programmes. International Slavic Institute.

and of the resistances to these processes that decided to speak out. the debates in these magazines opposed the socio‐political view of the states of health‐disease. upon its reliance on eclecticism as the foundation of a socially and ideologically interested knowledge. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. where each line of thought attempted to appropriate the various scientific meanings of the eugenic concept. it has also led to the abandonment of the critical revision of sex. Therefore. . physicians legitimated new “scientific myths” about the “normal” practices of infant nurture and sexuality in general. Spain Carlos Tabernero‐Holgado. diverse ways of being have to be defended. but its domination through political technologies of the body.) Sara Lugo Márquez. Gender. Far from uniform and monolithic interpretations. If we understand the disease as a social and historical construction. which allowed the efficient application of bio‐power. Our aim is contributing to the history of scientific‐medical regulation and normalization of people around gender. academic enquiry about sexuality has been deviated from primary discussions about freedom. This was based upon a dynamics of medicalization. to re‐interpret. the process of its construction. Universidad de Málaga. re‐signify and decide the meaning of words an acts. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Today. CEHIC. Historic and epistemological frame to understand the construction of intersexuality as a disease in Colombian medical discourses of fifties (abstract: p. This research was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation Project HAR2014‐58699‐P. xx. we could propose new ways of artefactbodies that not necessarily have been moulded by medical discourses. 4) in the medical praxis regarding intersex cases is easy to trace the physicians’ moral intention to keep the sex dimorphism. Curie Postdoctoral Fellow. autonomy and the social construction of the natural. The ultimate aim of such a strategy was not the knowledge of the body. in charge of laying out. conceptualizing and managing the process healthdisease. the denaturalization of patriarchal and heteronormative scientific discourses will not only contribute to the democratization of science but also to greater freedom and inclusiveness in relation to gender diversity. according to standardization purposes to ascertain the differences among social groups. As a result. scientific ideas concerning eugenics were understood and used in quite different ways by distinct social and ideological groups. these magazines became an ideal space for discussion within anarchism. Universitat Atònoma de Barcelona Despite the fact that the gender concept has been fundamental for second wave feminism. neo‐Malthusianism and anarchism in early 20th century Spain Isabel Jiménez‐Lucena. Spain Jorge Molero‐Mesa. In Colombian medical discourses reviewed between 1930 and 1960 I could identify four epistemological categories to understand the medical process to construct the intersexuality as a disease: 1) due to the necessity of sex demystification. 3) there were reinforcing discourses naturalizing heterosexuality and. that has been a regulator of the status quo. 2) some of the symptoms that described intersexuality as a disease were normal characteristics of the Colombian race. In this article I will present some epistemological categories to deconstruct intersexuality as a disease in Colombian medical discourses. In this dialectics. a persistent and whole dependence on an overestimated expert professional medical structure. leading to alienation. race and social class. CEHIC. historically. whether hegemonic or subaltern. surveillance and control was guaranteed through the handling of bodies in order to achieve a ‘normalization’ of people’s everyday lives within a social system of hegemony/subordination. On the other hand. Marie S. Abstracts Day 1 Wednesday 14th September K109 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 1] The body is anarchist. Spain The aim of this paper is to analyze the debates about eugenics and neo‐Malthusianism that were taking place in Spanish anarchist media during the first third of the past century. as well as to understand.

Some sectors of society. unrestricted knowledge-sharing and activist purposes. 1974-1980). In my paper I shall . in the pages of which an epistemological proposition was gradually outlined. or even. In 2009 Simon Critchley proposed the notion ‘mystical anarchism’. Thus. CEHIC. and new issues were raised with regard to gender and sexuality. Therefore. but also for the questioning of those dualities related to sex. this study draws a light upon the fact that said discourse was not singular. To this end. and biblical traditions. said discourse laid the seeds for the questioning of the duality of the Gramscian categories. In this paper I expound the possibility of a feminist anarcho-mysticism. Beyond a mere tactic of authorship and societal engagement. economic and social fields. Christoyannopoulos has shown in depth the relationship between anarchist theories. medicine and psychiatry as scientific disciplines. the editors’ epistemological approach fostered the participation of other groups involved with issues related to health. as the groups enjoyed very different levels of social visibility and legitimacy. As a tentative conclusion. resulting in a critique of deterministic biopower. cultural and political transformations. But when one delves into the history of Christian mystics. In that. gender and sexuality. In that. this study also aims at demonstrating and analyzing the relativity and fluidity of positions hidden behind the categories of "subaltern" and "hegemonic. to which he alludes to the Beguine Margarete Porete and her concept of annihilation of the soul. K105 Anarchism and religion stream [Panel 1: Feminist Themes] Anarcho-mysticism as Direct action: Women mystical traditions in mediaeval and early modern Christianity Joana Serrado. the eighteenth-century Benin woman slave who was trafficked to Brazil – all these women have stepped into mystical writing and mystical direct action. sex and gender – groups whose members often advocated for new lifestyles at odds with the normalization of bodies. tensions emerged between the groups that made this subaltern whole. Machthild of Magdeburg and six seventeenth-century Portuguese religious women. mystical Christian women acquainted with a tradition solidly based on the Song of Songs and biblical female imagery. had a particular effect on women’s activity. have developed an anti-agency present in their theological and situational speech-acts. interaction was frequent with the Feminist movement. University of Oxford Mysticism is often associated with practices of interiority and contemplation. Science. On the other hand. By analyzing the texts of Beguine mystics as Hadewijch of Antwerpen. the Gay movement or the burgeoning Trans movement. to the body and the mind. Based on horizontal knowledge-building. and to the authority of biology. Ajoblanco (1974-1980). but also with the anti-psychiatry movement. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona The Spanish Transition was an era marked by social. Gordon Milburn Junior Research fellow. this piece of work focuses on the first 55 issues of major anarchist monthly Ajoblanco (published along the course of the magazine’s first era. and of the binomials health/disease or expert/non-expert. the ideal impersonated by Maria and Martha’s parable ( Luke 10:38-42). inside and outside the institution. this work shows how Ajoblanco – along with other sectors of the anarchist movement during the Transition era – gave voice to and helped for the emergence of a subalternity concerned about gender issues. new social relations of class and gender. with radical environmentalists or countercultural activists. of sexuality and gender evolved. and on the assimilability of their demands by mainstream society or by other subaltern groups. conducts or sexualities. theorists. This study aims at analyzing how the anarchist movement dealt with scientific knowledge and scientific authorities with regard to gender and sexuality during the Spanish Transition. it aims at opening up new perspectives and forging new tools for epistemological studies. where direct action is perpetrated without agency. but plural: in that. diseases. perceived the need to compromise with those who demanded new political configurations. and how these subaltern groups eventually created and promoted a unified discourse on these issues. reacting against the loss of both their discursive hegemony and their authority to name and explain reality. it was also a time when common conceptions of the body. gender and sexuality in the anarchist movement Ana Macaya Andrés. This led to both interaction and tensions in the political. In my paper I would like to discuss the anarchist notion of ‘direct action’ from a philosophical and feminist perspective. equal consideration to all kinds of wisdoms. depending on the type of society they wished for and the means of achieving it they advocated. At the very same time.

having married a man prominent in the hierarchy of indirect rule and against her will being part of a harem. Womanism. Being female was her biological fate. these largely treat gayness as identity rather . which aimed to end “all forms of oppression for all people. Can we draw on conservative Christian refusal to rethink. I explore the place of the erotic.” restore harmony between people and nature. colonial rule. and their theories of gender justice that have developed from direct experience in grassroots activism in the shadow of colonialist legacies. there has been little dialogue with or examination of womanist approaches within anarchist scholarship. Lund University In 1983 Alice Walker described womanism as “a social change perspective rooted in Black women’s and other women of color’s everyday experiences”. like for example Mary Wollstonecraft's: she died at giving birth. being a woman. letters and visions and healing practices may contribute to the experience of directness which is implied in the definition of Christian Mysticism. anarchists could not stem the tide of colonial oppression. whom Walker has consistently supported over the years. As seems to be the case in all the imperial countries. around 1900. However. there is no authority greater than self and each person is called to obey self-government in stark opposition to the governance of states. a position she keeps to this day. and the Dirt of Daily Life Anthony T. and Anarchy: Thoughts on the Intersections of Justice. This presentation aims to look at womanism. God. Fiscella. Law. this enthusiasm could not assist in furthering the emancipation of Javanese women or changing. While there is a growing literature on pro-gay policies and laws. the erotic character of the state. show concrete examples of how poetry. her peaceful struggle on three fronts and her reception by Christian anarchists Andre de Raaij Kartini was one of three sisters of a colonial. U005 Erotic politics Convenor: Laurence Davis ReImagining the Erotic State Davina Cooper. social-democrats and Christian anarchists. In the theology taught by John Africa. seven years after her death. who declared her a national hero in 1964. “native” official on Java. let alone abolish. They make up fine prose and contain a statement both against colonial rule and the “traditions” (adat) that were keeping women down. Nature.” Although these values are consistent with many anarchist approaches. away from the alignments evident in much recent critical theorising that associate the state with sexual cruelty and domination? How might the erotic help in the task of re-imagining the state? There is next to nothing written on a progressive sexual state. Her literary and political testament consists of letters written to so-called humanitarians. from formal secondary schooling she learned to read and write the colonial language perfectly. my current book project seeks to reimagine the state in ways that might support a progressive transformative politics. Being published in 1911. Focus in the presentation will be on the enthusiastic reception especially among Christian anarchists. they drew attention in these circles but not much beyond those – apart from the first president of Indonesia. Soekarno. Kartini. the edited letters as mentioned above. in progressive ways. and corporations. nature theologies such as those of MOVE. bureaucracies. Nor have scholars noted significant commonalities between Walker’s theological views and those of MOVE. University of Kent In the light of anarchist and other critiques of the state. Although barred. In this paper (which takes up one strand of the project). The project takes conservative Christian refusal to provide gay-positive goods and services as a paradoxical site from which to think in more progressive ways about what it could mean to be a state. Christian anarchism on Java itself never moved beyond a small circle of white people working the colonial machinerie. and reconcile human lives with “the spiritual dimension. of her ideas. the Philadelphia-based organization founded by John Africa. as published in Door duisternis tot licht (Through darkness to light).

is to frame love. State promotion of sexuality equality has also been increasingly critiqued for its homonormative agenda organised around the acceptable. but there can be no assurance that love will be reciprocated. She shows us the ambivalence of love and simultaneously the startling difference between the subject in love. confines love in the framework of law. Addressing this question through a case-study of conservative Christian “conscientious objection” highlights the sensual place of refusal. her falling in love with Ben Reitman. . Anarchism Elena Loizidou. 2015: 30-31). Law. For these critical lawyers we notice that the reference to love. and as a way of legitimating military and imperial action. against possessiveness. Aristodemou in Law. It is an embracing of ambivalence that may be named as lack but this lack is not the law. I give something that is truly beyond my capacity to control. was possible to propagate such a life. To question to what extent anarchism which is/was against the legalization of love. In doing Goldman shows us both the limits and the possibilities of love. Love. Goodrich’s Love in the Courts of Law (1996) contains a series of cases whereby decisions on love are made. Love as Carson puts it drawing from the poet Sappho is bittersweet. Law’s role is to stop the ambivalent movement of love. points to us that there is an eternal lack in both these spheres. Anne Carson in Eros Bittersweet offers us an account of love. unpredictability and ambivalence that Critchley and Carson point to us disappears. the challenge I want to pose is to consider what a progressive erotic state imaginary might entail. for free love. if the beloved cannot refuse love. would that it were the case. then love is reduced to coercive control. that love will not solve the limitations of law but rather reveal even more it’s limits. For Aristodemou lack becomes the law. When it comes to anarchism and love we notice through Emma Goldman’s (the notorious early 20th century anarchist) biographical experience of love. Love is decided or framed in a decision. the friction of withdrawal. to sit with the ambivalence. it might be. sexually private coupled form – an agenda exported to other nation-states. in a particular way in which its movement. Law and love I would like to argue are two very different movements that organize life. erotic love drawing on classical philosophy and literature. Literary and Philosophical writings about love draw to our attention the ambivalent character of love. Thus. more just world. Critical Legal Studies have engaged with the relation between love and law. Birkbeck College In his recent book Notes on Suicide (2015) Simon Critichley writes that love is unlike a command or an obligation: To love is to commit oneself to another not without the guarantee that love will be returned. than sexual practice. The logic of love is akin to the logic of grace. statutes and treaties.’ If this is not the case. its narcissistic nature. understood as the study of doctrine. as conditions for international funding.every decision is a decision that it fills laws need for example. and any attempt to relate love to law shows more and more their non-relation or capitulates love to the movement of law. Critichley draws for us a movement of love that contains ambivalence. the beloved can and must be able to say ‘ I love you not. but with the hope that it might be. I commit myself to it completely. If there is a desire for a different organization of life. not to ask for a resolution. Society by correlating law and love.but to sit with this turbulence. I would like to suggest that what both Goodrich and Aristodemou do. Love takes place in the subjective mood: it may be. Carson as well draws our attention to the ambivalence of love and its movement. if this is one of the aims of the critical legal project. to contractual obligation and command. moved her to such an extent as to question her political beliefs. then there may be a need for critical legal scholarship to pause and listen carefully to nuanced differences of the movements around law. inclusion and recognition. Peter Goodrich and Maria Aristodemou are two of the most prominent critical legal thinkers that worked and still working in bringing the relation of law and love to view. At any point in a love relation. Law. The anarchist subject uses the turbulence of love to question itself. and the excitements of contamination and incorporation. The contrast between these two spheres of life had multiple aims: (a) to open the discipline of law. to other disciplines and to turn it from a practical subject to an academic one (b) to demonstrate the limits of law through the sphere of love (c) to gently direct us to a better and more just organization of life. (Critchley. the anarchist subject and the subject of law. Psychoanalysis. where there is a hope for a better.

and suggests that this tension is constitutive of revolutionary love as a ‘grounded utopia’. trans and anti-capitalist) group of activist-researchers both inside and outside the university. Revolutionary Love Dr Laurence Davis. between utopian imagination and the constrained possibilities of existing reality. anti-oppression practice. resources. and indigenous people in anti-authoritarian or anarchist social movements are using grassroots media to support and report on these movements.) would not consider strictly ‘scholarly’. On the one hand. and as a feminist pedagogy which facilitates women to form an autonomous voice by going through the process of assessing experiences relative to the structuring claims about power drawn from theoretical frameworks. It constructs an argument that a new wave of CR is desirable so as to construct new forms of feminist pedagogy and activism. and potentially revolutionary. Based on radical media mixers (group interviews) with 90 media activists across Canada. It suggests that these mechanisms express different non-homogeneous temporalities. Some process of this general type is a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of autonomous subjectivities in a context of cultural submersion. University of East London Andrew Robinson (Co-author) This paper looks back on the methodology and experience of feminist consciousness-raising (CR) in the 1970s. Drawing on academic studies and participant accounts. anti-colonial. The paper will argue that contemporary feminisms would benefit from this kind of methodology. CR is conceptualised as a structural and articulative mode of knowledge creation. and subsequent one-on-one interviews. through which a standpoint is constructed. The core of the paper is an analysis of how CR works as an affective and social process. Specifically. account of love as a power both alienable and alienated. queer and trans people. we study how women. many have portrayed it as a dangerous delusion that has perpetuated patriarchy and capitalist domination. or ‘Janus-faced’. Anti-authoritarian profeminist community knowledge co-production: Media Action Research Group Sandra Jeppesen. particularly notable in anarcha-feminism. Cass School of Education and Communities. etc. The paper invites feminist pedagogy to get back to the base level of experience and unfold new theories and strategies to address the current context. studying autonomous social movement media activism in Canada and beyond. it examines the tension. inspired by anarchist epistemology and organization. akin to Freirean pedagogy and militant inquiry. the paper reconstructs the mechanisms through which participants' subjectivities and narratives are expressed and transformed. and valuing research and researchers the relevant institutions (the university. Canada The Media Action Research Group (MARG) is an anti-authoritarian. profeminist (anti-racist. U006 Reflections stream [Panel 1] For a Revival of Feminist Consciousness Raising: Horizontal Transformation of Epistemologies and Transgression of Neoliberal TimeSpace Rhiannon Firth. some have argued that certain forms of love may potentially be revolutionary. that do not rely on vanguard theory or expert knowledge of academics or professionals. developing community partnerships. On the other hand. In a critical interpretation of de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex. Feminist theorists have long been ambivalent about the transformative political potential of erotic love. and Goldman’s two-volume autobiography Living My Life. collective memory. in relation to the current re-emergence of feminism. and access will be critically analyzed with the objective of mapping out autonomous media activists’ reflections on . In this workshop we will discuss how our collective attempts to disrupt traditional university research processes by implementing a horizontal anti-authoritarian profeminist research collective model. drawing on anarchist and feminist conceptions of erotic love as a transformative political concept and a ‘grounded utopia’. the paper argues for a dual. and focusing in particular on the work of Simone de Beauvoir and Emma Goldman. queer. the funding bodies. people of colour. preliminary findings on questions of technology. either as a model for an alternative political order or as a practical source of solidarity in revolutionary social movements. Lakehead University Orillia. Department of Interdisciplinary Studies / Media Studies. University College Cork This paper develops the idea of ‘revolutionary love’. Drawing on this literature.

I pick up from this characterization and argue that the Freewoman’s mindset drew on Nietzsche’s idea of master morality. Rather. The participation of academics in large numbers in the movement for peace and for a solution to problem of rights of Kurdish minority in Turkey (and the subsequent criminalization of them) will be discussed as hinting towards a possible revitalization of university. Its editor was the young activist Dora Marsden (1882-1960). Turkey The presentation will discuss the genealogy of the main ideas and practices that form the basis of modern university institution and its later transformation into an actor in the global market. Mugla Sitki Kocman University. The Withering Away or The Revitalization of The Idea of University? Sercan Kiyak. Sociology. The presentation will start with a small genealogy section about the emergence of the modern university institution as the legitimization of the political rule and the highest expression of the cultural unity of the nation. striving for the vote because men have it makes for a poor attempt at women’s emancipation since it merely orients itself towards male standards. In other words. Moreover it will be argued that a new “idea of university” can be vitalized through fights over identity of university and its participation in wider political and economic issues beyond it. Fichte and Schelling and their implementation in the establishment of the first modern university “Berlin University” will be historicized. This period is characterized also by university radicalism and increase in reflexive thinking upon knowledge and university. Marsden equipped the Freewoman figure with the rare heroic qualities of the genius. After that it will be noted that the idea of “idea of university” itself appears to be weakened by its inability to cope up with the increasing technicality of knowledge. Freie Universität Berlin In late 1911 the radicalism of a new journal called The Freewoman caused a stir inside the feminist movement. In this context the article will discuss the current developments in Turkey and the struggle of academics for peace. choosing a title with implicitly Nietzschean qualities. an anonymous author aptly labelled Marsden “A Feminist Disciple of Nietzsche”. Research Assistant and PhD candidate. Dominique Miething. We will open up the discussion to questions regarding the (im)possibility of anarchafeminist research within the intensifying neoliberal university system. enabling anyone interested in emancipation to reach a definition of the self without relying on a binary logic: who women are. however. or who they may become. Especially after the World War II universities were reformed to be mass institutions that provide technical knowledge for the welfare regimes. Disappointed by what she perceived as the limitations of the British suffragists’ campaign for the vote. in January 1913. Marsden set out to infuse her journal with an emancipatory identity. As the discursive parts of the story the ideas of German philosophers will be mentioned from Kant. Finding inspiration in Nietzsche’s critique of language. Marsden’s careless immersion in popular Nietzschean ideas came at a price. the Freewoman also refused to base her identity on the essentialist notion of women “as such”. Thus. 15:45 to 17:45 K109 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 2] “A Feminist Disciple of Nietzsche”: The Case of Dora Marsden’s Unstable Anarchism. Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo . Both of these power vectors can be seen in the writings of Habermas at the period. should not depend on the existence of a predefined model created by men. The German philosopher not only provided the conceptual tools for the construction of the Freewoman figure but his anti-egalitarian posture also destabilized Marsden’s anarchism. worst experiences and best practices. The contemporary university appears to completely lose its founding ideas but rather become a corporate entity (Theory of Triple Helix of University) with “a discourse of excellence” (Bill Readings). The possible problems or successes that can be encountered along this path for revitalization will be discussed further with the audience. In the next part the conditions of the existence of the contemporary university will be discussed. Anarchist women in Japan: love and resistance Luíza Uehara. urging her to renounce social asceticism in favour of a free unfolding of individual desires. Despite these contestations the university after The Cold War is increasingly drawn into the advent of global market and reforms itself into a competitive institution.

She wrote anarcho-feminist texts and did not submit to the Japanese patriarchy and invented new ways of love that shook the Japanese society. He openly supported the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky. as an alliance partner and opponent of the Bolsheviks and as victims of "white terror". University of Bremen Mariya (Marusya) Nikiforova (ca. she didn't submit to justice and committed suicide. In response to the persecution of anarchists. Meanwhile. I'd like to talk here about it. There are rare studies in Russia on Peter Kropotkin's late life after his comeback to his homeland following the February Revolution. such a turn of his anarchist views did not fit into the official Soviet historiography.) A theme of feminism is not popular in Russia till this day. but was arrested and sentenced to death in 1926. how her "unfeminine behavior" was processed in the formation of myths and what this says about the handling of intersexuality within the socialist (Women) movement at that time. first of all. where she played a significant role in organizing the armed anarchist structures. the problem of feminism of anarchist Emma Goldman is researched very detailed and thoroughly on the West in our time. It wasn’t resistance seeking a return to the origin. (It was the official reason of her deportation out of the Bolshevik Russia. Emma Goldman and Peter Kropotkin: radicalism and reformism (federalism) in their assessment of the Bolshevik's regime in Russia Sergey Saitanov. For Kaneko. in no small part. or in postSoviet tradition of anarchist research in modern Russia. She found her death in the hinterland of the whites. who lived an open relationship with the famous anarchist Osugi Sakae. But nobody in our country touched the problem of assessing the power of the Bolsheviks in Russia by Kropotkin and Goldman in terms of their radicalism and reformism. However. The origin of anarchist experiences in Japan dates back to the Meiji Era. their stories and tireless struggle for life released from sexist and state powers. Marusja Nikiforova – An intersexual anarchist and a legend of the Russian Civil War Dmitry Rublev. but against new arrangements of governments about life. lived abroad a long time and returned back to russia after the February Revolution. Russian Timiryazev State Agrarian University Ewgeniy Kasakow. She was murdered and tortured with her 7 years old nephew by the Japanese police. One of these women was Ito Noe (1825-1923). Among these there is the history of a Japanese women who have just forgotten so much for being anarchists as for being women. Anarchists broke out in the early twentieth century in Japan to shake both the traditional customs as to fight against the new government that was established. It didn't matter to her the modification. 1890-1919) is known not only as a leader of the anarchists in Russia and Ukraine. there are almost no serious scientific works on Emma Goldman in contemporary Russia. escaped from prison. Supposedly her secret was revealed by their fellow inmates in a women's prison. he even headed the activities of multi-party composition of the League of Federalists. After its fall Kropotkin had hoped to return Russia to the path of becoming in it a federal democratic republic. Therefore. The opening of Japan brought not only new machinery and production development as well led struggles against the Japanese Emperor and the Western invasion. Perhaps this is due. with the Soviet tradition. the anarcho-feminist Fumiko Kaneko along with his companion tried to assassinate the Emperor. where she tried to organize underground work after breaking with the Bolsheviks. by the model of Western Europe and North America. Plunged to new documents we want to reconstruct not only Nikiforovas revolutionary career in our presentation. Since their imprisonment in tsarist prisons it was rumored that she was a "hermaphrodite". Nevertheless. To do this. was the opening period of the Japanese market to the West and the country's industrialization. but also investigate how her intersexual reputation was perceived in the revolutionary circles. It thought Goldman was radical anarchist and the enemy of Soviet power. Moscow Unfortunately. International Slavic Institute. as a collaborator of Nestor Makhno. Later the sentence was changed to life imprisonment. . Nikiforova was active in the anarchist movement since the first Russian Revolution. It is intended to present these struggles to show the persecution of anarcho-feminists. we'll try to highlight the problem stated here.

Mapping Love: Ethnography of migrant women squatters in Florence. will argue that if re-colonizing tendencies of anarchist movements oftentimes primarily driven by European/settlers are to be prevented. both contemporarily and historically. especially when operating in settler colonial spaces. calling for norm-critical. to domination and to oppression. This ethnography identifies both old patterns of subjugation disguised as love that women suffer from their partners. They emphasized the need to find new ways of connecting and forming communities instead of pink money consumerism and creating productive (trans)citizens. This thesis claims the importance of love as a political tool. Although criticism of dominant structures. analysing its manifestations in the stories of a group of migrant women squatters in Florence.are often neglected. and 2. however. It has been deconstructed by feminism in its romantic and universal facets. One visible example were the Pink Black Blocs participating in the Gay Pride parades of summer of 2015 in Finland as well as internationally. This investigation therefore manages to demonstrate why love is important in connection to migration.) what kind of spaces do queer-anarchist collectives and communities leave for non-normative gender expressions? In my paper I will make some initial remarks on the ways queer. Towards an anti-colonial anarchism: Re-colonization and an imperative to think critically about settler colonialism Vanessa Sloan Morgan. “Sisterhood”. formatted in response to the settler colonial context of Canada. must understand the nuances of place specific histories and colonial processes. However. of capitalism and sovereign state systems. The blocs combined anticapitalist black with queer pink. Anarchist movements. The ongoing medicopolitical debates on reforming the gender recognition legislation. K105 Situated struggles Land defense. and by mutual extension the capitalist system. This presentation. My aim is to trace the connections between identities and new political movements. and the rapid political changes have created new kinds of queer-anarchist co-operative projects. the land-based nature of these struggles . and their connections to wider queer-anarchist movements from an individual ́s point of view. encouragement to start thinking critically about mainstream anarchist philosophy.) how is one ́s gender expression connected to other forms of anarchist activism and political goals. as well as new patterns men’s power in love takes within the migratory experience. the intentional carnevalization and undoing of gender. revolting against repressing categories and norms. Queen’s University. interlinked and connected to individual experiences of gender non-conforming identities. Opposition to these structures of violence and hierarchy are also at the core of anti-colonial struggles that see the state. are at the core of anarchist and autonomous movements. as de-legitimate institutions of authority that ‘Other’ and colonize by way of white supremacist notions of cultural hegemony. and establish a women-only squat. and how the practice of squatting enables the women I interviewed to fight different layers of stereotypes targeting both migrant women and Muslim women. Italy. prevail. non-cis gender expressions as anarchist acts. or can be. Kingston Opposition to the state and to capitalism. Love still engenders damages as well as new kinds of fulfilment and support for women. a current fundamental geopolitical topic. Instead. and with it. as well as formulate the ways queer-anarchism can inform ideal futures. an anti-colonial anarchism that recognizes the multiple layers of hierarchy that are placed upon lands will be proposed. In my doctoral research I am particularly interested in the notion of “gender anarchy”. Utrecht University Love is one of the most important experiences in women’s lives. anarchist queer politics in their manifestoes.the actual territorial situation in which struggles take place and processes of colonialism and dispossession involved . . queer nihilism and the human strike two queer anarchist settlers from Canada Both transgender issues and anarchism have risen into mainstream media and public discussion in Finland during recent years. I will examine those non-normative. anarchist actors. often fail to account for the multiple layers of power that are at play in settler colonial contexts specifically. asking: 1. this research shows also positive manifestations of love and emotions between empowered women who find the strength to free themselves from their partners’ subjugation. trans and anarchist political goals are. Italy Claudia Morini.

to the co-emergent zines. While DIY is often studied and engaged as an anti-capitalist practice. groups and networks of these movements. news media. Media Action Research Group Anarchist principles such as collective autonomy. respectively—through campaigns and direct action. creating anarchist spaces. DIY has emerged through different cultural forms. sexism and/or transphobia. forward to the digital. with time in the discussion period to hear about the experiences of workshop participants. However these specific movements can sometimes be marginalized within anarchist and anti-capitalist movements. non-cis gender expressions as anarchist acts. the Arab Spring. such as sex work in the context of global capitalism. interlinked and connected to individual experiences of gender non-conforming identities. One visible example were the Pink Black Blocs participating in the Gay Pride parades of summer of 2015 in Finland as well as internationally. queer. as well as formulate the ways queer-anarchism can inform ideal futures. These movements can be intersectional. disability and/or anti-colonial movements. groups and networks to challenge hegemonic cultures of domination. U005 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 1] Convenor: Benjamin Franks. radio. The blocs combined anticapitalist black with queer pink. collectives. anti-racist and/or anti-colonial communities of practice Sandra Jeppesen. their relative importance in defining and stabilising other core principles and their realisation in anarchist practices. producing DIY culture to support and report on their movements. or can be. sexuality. struggling against interlocking forms of oppression. or police brutality in the context of racism. chair: Leonard Williams This stream utilises Michael Freeden’s conceptual analysis to explore the core concepts of anarchist thought and action. and 2. This includes the DIY production spaces. communal maternal practices and new forms of female multicultural cohabitation. queer. it is also widely taken up in feminist. trans and anarchist political goals are. asking: 1. antiBlack racism. They emphasized the need to find new ways of connecting and forming communities instead of pink money consumerism and creating productive (trans)citizens. The objective is to have a participatory dialogue that will help us better understand the challenges and successes of DIY culture today. and their connections to wider queer-anarchist movements from an individual ́s point of view. Black Lives Matter. At the same time we also see strong movements such as Riot Grrrl. trans. horizontalism and prefiguration are put into practice through DIY or Do It Yourself culture. tech activist and hacker cultures of today. The papers identify and describe important anarchist concepts looking at areas of contestation. DIY anarchy beyond anti-capitalism: feminist. I will examine those non-normative. and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women foregrounding these specific intersectional political issues—anarchafeminist. the intentional carnevalization and undoing of gender. from the underground comics and protest music of the 1960s and 70s counter-cultures. and Occupy. and anti-colonial sexism. and then introduce a few case studies of DIY communities of practice from an intersectional perspective. trans. gender. anarchist queer politics in their manifestoes. and the rapid political changes have created new kinds of queer-anarchist co-operative projects. This presentation will cover seven key characteristics of DIY anarchist culture. In my doctoral research I am particularly interested in the notion of “gender anarchy”. Many of these cultural forms have played a key role in radical social movements.) what kind of spaces do queer-anarchist collectives and communities leave for non-normative gender expressions? In my paper I will make some initial remarks on the ways queer. and the global punk music scene emerging in the 1980s. My aim is to trace the connections between identities and new political movements. & book publishing. particularly as it is being produced . anti-racist. revolting against repressing categories and norms. such as the anti-austerity movements in Europe. The ongoing medicopolitical debates on reforming the gender recognition legislation.) how is one ́s gender expression connected to other forms of anarchist activism and political goals. Direct Action Vicente Ordóñez Roig Both transgender issues and anarchism have risen into mainstream media and public discussion in Finland during recent years. calling for norm-critical. emerge as the rich findings of my investigation. despite the precarious and illegal aspects of living in a squat.

people of colour. In analysing this question. indigenous people. Despite the effort undertaken done by scholars from different fields in developing the field of the history of emotions. the initially widespread exaltation of these revolutionary women was gradually reversed in a process that ran parallel to the reconstitution of the Spanish Republican state. LGBTQI+ people. through a focus on the linked questions of the socialisation campaign. Indeed. 2016). So are they basically variations on the same theory of horizontal politics masquerading behind different histories and contexts? By drawing a distinction between the historical "horizontalism" of recent years and the analytical adjective "horizontal. emotional resistances contemplate two actions: resistance and reparation. U006 Mujeres Libres (Free Women): History and legacy Convenor: Richard Cleminson “Are we not struggling against privilege?” State. Women and Reproduction Richard Cleminson. In this talk I will analyse the activities of Mujeres Libres in relation to the often violent processes of Republican state re-formation in Barcelona. formed a self-organised presence in the rear-guard via which the patriarchal implications of state reconstruction would be combatted. Mujeres Libres. In light of contemporary feminist theory we now know that emotions have followed the same pattern of exclusion of women and other oppressed groups in the big narrative of history. Moreover. I will be looking at primary sources in order to explore the affective bonds between women that create spaces of resistance and reparation towards patriarchal discourse and practices that involve not only society but the libertarian movement itself where these women were active. Child Care and the Improvement of the Proletariat: Mujeres Libres. The libertarian women’s organisation. Sorority as emotional resistance in Mujeres Libres: A journey through the history of emotions Elena Verdegay. direct democracy. and the defence of self-organised spaces. emotional resistance is defined “not only like mere affective expressions but like knowledge that generates a political capital in the present” (Medina & Rosón. 2016: 2). horizontalism and anarchism are not identical. and in spite of the general consensus that emotions represent a huge revolutionary potential for social change. disabled people and/or more. this sorority can be considered as a form of emotional resistance (Medina & Rosón. 1936-1938 Danny Evans. bread queues. I demonstrate that although anarchism is horizontal. In this paper I argue that the political practices performed by the organization Mujeres Libres can be named as sorority and that. besides. Emotional resistances are non-physical spaces that challenge the privileged status of “emotional regimes” (Reddy. University of Leeds One of the most striking confirmations of the revolutionary rupture that accompanied the partial defeat of the military coup d’état begun in Spain in July 1936 was the presence in several of Spain’s major cities of women in workers’ overalls brandishing rifles. Horizontalism Mark Bray The anti-authoritarianism. University of Leeds . 2001) and their “feeling rules” (Rusell. and practiced by women. University of Hull Emotions have rarely been considered in History. from reparative history and the perspective of the reparative turn (Sedgwick. very little has been written about the aspects related to resistance and reparation in the emotional field. revolution and the Free Women of Spain. 2011) in order to create “emotional refuges” (Rosenwein. However. Ultimately. 2010) that could potentially make existence sustainable. 2003). and horizontalism is anarchistic. and federalism of the horizontalist mass movements of the past decades share a great deal with anarchist theory and politics. Conscious Maternity. founded just prior to the war." I will argue that horizontalism's anti-ideological ideology renders it susceptible to resignification in decidedly non-horizontal directions at odds with anarchism.

In the second part of the workshop (Prison letter writing workshop 2: Practice). University of Paris VIII Las Piqueteras = Women Picketers. ELF. ALF. antifascist. but it means everything to the prisoners. Let them know that they are not forgotten. except for yourself: international lists of prisoners (e.comprise a form of militant feminist activism. by the Anarchist Black Cross and Earth First!). we’ll help each other! You don’t have to bring anything to the workshop. that they’re still in our minds and hearts! Remember: They are in there for us. made up of individuals who were expelled from the left-wing parliamentary Worker’s Party in 2009 for having carried out ‘extremist actions’. certain sectors of anarchism also aimed for the improvement of workers’ health both in present society to alleviate suffering and as a means to secure a radically changed future devoid of ill health. from the economic through to the cultural. The anarchist movement in Spain was dedicated to the revolutionary transformation of all spheres of existence. we’ll introduce current anarchist. envelopes. Day 2 Thursday 15th September 9:00 to 10:30 Purple Lounge Prison letter writing workshop Letter writing to (political) prisoners Facilitator: Black Pigeons Collective “A movement that forgets its prisoners is doomed to failure” The support of political prisoners can take up a variety of forms. A letter is a small gesture for us. They argued in favour of women having children when they wanted and thought best. We’ll learn about some important guidelines to follow while writing to a prisoner. Las Piqueteras and her followers frequently organise public marches and demonstrations against the Catholic Church and state. but perhaps the simplest action you can take is writing a letter. but don’t worry. theoretical part of the workshop (Prison letter writing workshop 1: Theory). Las Piqueteras is a faction of a Trotskian group.g.. and these protests are often characterised by violence and shock tactics. Las Piqueteras reject institutionalised feminism. we are out here for them. believing it to be bourgeois in nature and that theirs is the only way to . In addition to engaging with anti-tuberculosis and anti-venereal disease campaigns. as a reaction to its history and. So let’s show them our solidarity! In the first. especially to a stranger. for example. also. if at all. This paper discusses this urge to perfectibility within Spanish anarchism with a particular focus on Mujeres Libres but also on male authors who advocated similar strategies. vegetarianism and nudism. as a product of it due to the 19th century's anarcho-feminism. writing supplies. *Until every cage is empty* K109 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 3] Who are Las Piqueteras? A study of the organisation through the lens of Argentinian feminism Walter Alesci-Chelini. and other political prisoners from all over the world. It can be a bit intimidating to write to somebody in prison. It roots such concerns partly in the overall plan of anarchism to radically alter lives and partly within the progressive “biologization” and medicalization of the movement in the early twentieth century. We can also exchange ideas on how we can continue supporting prisoners in our home towns. provided classes on maternity and child care and informed women and men when reproduction was “ill advised”. some anarchists also attempted to reform child care and the whole reproductive process. occupying its own distinctive place in Argentinian feminism’s history. PhD Candidate in Gender Studies. we’ll actually write to folks on the inside. such as when they participate at the National Women’s Meeting. and postage will be provided. Growing out of and extending Enlightenment and eighteenthnineteenth-century interpretations of human nature and the perfectibility of human beings.

UK Suffragettes. making the struggle lose strength and power in the fight against capitalism and government. The aim of this paper is to understand whether and how Emma Goldman’s ideas have influenced the anarchist debates about feminism in Italy. from very different social conditions. exactly. rights for female workers and disclosures of political paralysis to pass stronger laws in order to fight against domestic violence and trafficking. This study is complemented by a discourse analysis of Las Piqueteras – within the bounds of a social constructionist epistemology – in order to ascertain who. Las Piqueteras posit that it is the only way of women acquiring full equality of rights as in an eventual anarchistsocialist state. her thoughts keep on influencing anarchist discussions about sexual liberation and women’s emancipation. Her master’s thesis about Emma Goldman has been partially published in Italian. Their destructive impulse is originated in class and social inequality suffer. Whereas mainstream feminism visualises change within the legal framework of democracy. Las Piqueteras are marked by an advocacy of the principle of equality and the sovereignty of the female body. It is the aim of this talk to suggest that with their actions they were attacking the symbolic status which was defining their existence: the conception of bodies as property with an economical value. Thinking that it was impossible to gain social emancipation without focussing on women’s emancipation. In the Italian context. devotion to attack works of art and museums. Emma Goldman floated the idea of a new role for women in society. Suffragettes struggle was not only a question of women's suffrage but a wider claim of social reforms. As well. achieve change. who had in common not trusting anymore in the exclusive use of the word and had chosen to take action as the only possible way to demand gender equality and therefore. they are. property destruction and specifically. Emma Goldman worked towards spreading ideas of women’s freedom. analysing the presence of Emma Goldman in some Italian anarchist journals and magazines in the last decades. For the magazine A-Rivista Anarchica she edited a selection of Emma Goldman’s writings published in Italian for the first time. She graduated from Università degli Studi di Milano with a MA in Political Science and Government. Their activism includes all many campaigns in favour of decriminalisation of abortion. Emma Goldman’s anarcha-feminist ideas have been revalued in the 70s. The influence of Emma Goldman in the Italian anarchist debate Carlotta Pedrazzini Due to her effort at linking issues of anarchism to those of feminism. This opinion about the unimportance of linking anarchism to feminism lasted several years. an Italian anarchist monthly magazine founded in Milan in 1971. . birth control and the use of contraceptive devices. sexual liberation. an Approximation of Property Virginia Lazaro Suffragettes were women from different political parties and aggrupations. They persistently attacked any way of communication but also showed particular interest in official buildings. Some male anarchist militants used to consider her work for women’s liberation as a waste of time. a battle that was closely related to the general anarchist struggle for freedom and emancipation. Thanks to the revolutionary and innovative features of her thinking. For this reason Emma Goldman’s feminist ideas have been ignored for many decades and rediscovered in the 70s by the feminist movement. how the iconoclastic used these iconoclastic gestures when covering suffragettes attacks in an attempt to preserve social and political stability. social equitability. She recognised patriarchy as a source of hierarchy and authority that needed to be fought. when they started being reported in anarchist debates about feminism. In their opinion. Emma Goldman (1869-1940) is generally recognised as the first theorist and originator of anarcha-feminism. Carlotta Pedrazzini is editor of A-Rivista Anarchica. such efforts were weakening the attempt of the anarchist movement to achieve political and socio-economic goals.

which possibly empede interpersonal and polical discord. and is incapable of analyzing structural inequalities as it reduces everything to a matter of individual choice. With this acceptance come claims about democracy practices of hierarchy and authority. security. University of Iceland Feminists have criticized liberal political theory for being premised upon an abstract view of human agent as radically separated individuals seeking to realize their private preferences which are formed independent of social structures. particularly the abstract individualist and ‘philosophical’ schools which sees anarchism as merely the rejection of political authority. Secondly. Irigaray. an analysis more focused on the so-called "real world" will explore an early universe of anarcha-feminist discourse in the petri dish of the Weimar Republik. It is not merely a rejection of state authority but also of all social obligations that might endanger the sovereignty of the individual. that the equality of people explodes our imaginary that the liberal order works. exclusion and discrimination. Through mere communication we inevitably construct hierarchy. Loughborough University Sovereignty does not work as an ordering device at least not in the context of international migration. Yet. I propose a horizon for evaluation. Thereby it provides no grounds for a vision of anarchist cooperation. The starting assumption is that sovereignty claims. I will try to show their fundamental linguistic aporias. This criticism also applies to some forms of anarchism. My paper will try to examine the phenomena anarchism and feminism in two different ways: Firstly. These practices lead to domination. However. In lieu of rigid feminist and anarchist doctrines. Rather than focusing on the individual’s right to preserve his autonomy contemporary feminists emphasize our relational nature. Theoreticians like Derrida. These individuals apparently come into existence with their values fully formed and only then do they “enter” society and engage with others. because "we do not command a clear view of the use of our words" (Wittgensteins Philosophical Investigations. Laclau. A credible anarchist theory should promote a vision of non-hierarchical cooperation among people who care for each other and acknowledge their social relations and obligations. are still largely accepted. such as the EU. A special focus on the Syndikalistischer Frauenbund around Milly Witkop-Rocker shall exemplify my theoretical thoughts. Practicing the theory: Analysing the language of the Syndikalistischer Frauenbund Mihael Švitek. Robert Paul Wolff’s neokantian defense of anarchism in which authority is rejected as incompatible with personal autonomy is a prime example. K105 Theory stream [Panel 1] Doctrine Formation and Normative Violence in International Migration Christina Oelgemoller. Feminists have argued that this is an androcentric theory of the self which reinforces a traditionally ‘masculine’ worldview. people¹s actual practices often render sovereignty an illusion. their condition of possibility is the same: language. This overly individualistic model ignores the role biological and social nurture plays in the formation of human subjects. Literature and Cultural studies. With . though often problematized. Cixous. Department of Linguistic. which will hopefully not lead into a dead end. Kristeva. which offers an active ethics focussing on questions of doctrine formation and acts of normative violence to avoid sedimentation. Foucault. Thus. there is a need to expose rigid sovereign arrangements as acts of normative violence. §122). but bring us to a dialectical Aufhebung and thus to a new understanding of the conflictory linguistic categorization processes. anarchism and gender. Technische Universität Dresden Whilst the classical schools of anarchy and feminism have very different origins and goals. Bourdieu. bureaucracy and increasingly. since the 2000s. This dynamic plays out in representations and enactments of the border. The Feminist Critique of ‘Liberal Man’ also applies to Philosophical Anarchism Ole Martin Sandberg. I want to suggest a discourse ethical model of communication. Furthermore it is incapable of analyzing relations of domination which do not rest upon the claim to political authority. Critical research focused on asylum seeking has since the 1990s problematized the interplay between borders. Mouffe and Butler and academic subdisciplines like Queer linguistics and postanarchism all have in common that they battle essentialized views of language. and more broadly to discussions of Ethics and International Relations. In this paper I offer an explicit ethical critique as a contribution to the refugee literature. It is in the spaces adjacent to and outside of powerful geopolitical areas. an ethical critique has remained largely implicit.

a combination of the linguistic theory called Frame semantics with modern corpus linguistics and deconstructive insights. Peter Seyferth.g.Psych.? Spinrad’s A World Between Martin Wambsganß. every man is free. and every freeman had to be a man. Anarchy . A Survey of Gender Construction in Literary Utopias Dr. Wimmin in Anarchy. Université de Limoges (France) / Universität Augsburg (Germany) The appeal of post-apocalyptic fiction lies in the unlimited possibilities to imagine life and structure of a future human society. Spinrad sketched a society in which peacefulness meets vitality – not idealistic perfection. Patriarchy. to be honest.or. it also constructed a quite monolithic identity for its insiders. Matriarchy. . or they were defined as natural servants that really do not want manly freedom (e. but where women and men just live together largely in peace and with equal rights and opportunities – and get problems (so much for the suspense driven plot) with radicals from either side: a matriarchal dictatorship and a patriarchal elite of scientists. I will try to give an theoretically informed critique of the positions and opinions at that time and their impact on the generation of the German student movement of 1968. every man had to be equally free. Gesellschaftswissenschaftliches Institut München für Zukunftsfragen In an anarchist society.and plurivalent characters which also question leadership and structures of power. Can we call the world on which these radicals collide sort of an anarchist utopia? May be not really.g. and his concept already includes democratic structures realised per media technologies. an anarchist quasistate) surrounds itself with oceans or mountains or walls to shut out the evil hierarchies of feudalism. because no man is dominated or exploited. We’re talking about Norman Spinrads 1979 novel “A World Between“. This border was typically spatial: An anarchist territory (or. Dipl. U005 Anarchist and Feminist Visions in Utopian and Post-apocalyptic Fiction Convenor: Peter Seyferth Female leadership and gender in post-apocalyptic fiction Jasmin Hammon. In my paper I will try to show how post-apocalyptic fiction imagine a greater diversity of gender roles by creating ambi. the housewives in William Morris’s News From Nowhere). In other contemporary literature such as the popular The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins or the Wool trilogy by Hugh Howey. or a radical feminism driven future society in which men will have a lot of problems that women should not have in the real present. or the state(s). Novels like Michelle Ende’s The Apocalypse According to Max depict female led terrorism. In traditional literary visions of anarchist societies. and we will have to overcome the blues that even our grandchildren won’t get there in their lifetime. The same be true for “feminism”. the view on Spinrads world „Pacifica“ will be a critical one. But it also holds restrictions of its own – so. But classical utopia was not only closed to outsiders. Either way. Phd student. anarchism and also abuse of power. it is female revolutionaries who turn society upside down. So. capitalism. Where did women belong in this male-centred scheme? Either they were defined away.. the hermaphrodites in Gabriel de Foigny’s The Southern Land. To make man free. anarchism will not be found only if it carrys the label ‚anarchism‘. classical utopias do not seem to have been very attractive to women. leadership. Known). phil. this freedom was often constructed by erecting a border against the realm of servitude. in politics as well as in family composition. so that only one gender existed (e.. The tabula rasa of a devastating catastrophe enables to break down traditional gender roles and habits and allows to try new concepts of power. Tübingen Baden Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Hopefully. let’s have a look on one of the few utopian novels that do not show an utopia that gradually proves to be a terrible dystopia. dipped into boredom.. but maybe it’s nonetheless getting closer to the dreams of anarchism and feminism than a lot of more unambiguous concepts of both.

LGBT. enabling many different and incompatible identities. precarious workers. precarious workers. female authors start to heavily contribute to the discourse of anarchist utopia. migrants and carers. Cailean Gallagher. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social changes? We welcome contributions that deal with both the contemporary socio-political landscape as well as more historical and theoretical reflections. migrants and carers. We are particularly interested in analyses of the role of social reproduction within a wide array of social movements and subjects including women. disabled. unemployed. Cailean Gallagher. care and migration from the perspective of Silvia Federici idea of social reproduction. disabled. LGBT. precarious workers. disabled. “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members” how can we bring forward analysis. . We are particularly interested in analyses of the role of social reproduction within a wide array of social movements and subjects including women. Amy Westwell. precarious workers. The panel wants to discuss struggles and conflicts around gender. not so unfair as in old utopias or in the real world. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social changes? We welcome contributions that deal with both the contemporary socio-political landscape as well as more historical and theoretical reflections. “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members” how can we bring forward analysis. care and migration from the perspective of Silvia Federici idea of social reproduction. 10:45 to 12:15 K109 Creating Self-Reproducing Movements [Panel 2] Convenors: Alessandro Froldi & Arianna Introna Speakers: Lynne Friedly. I will present an overview of gender constructions in anarchist utopian and science fiction texts of the last 40 years. If. The panel wants to discuss struggles and conflicts around gender. If. so that the utopian social order becomes dynamic and changeable. This includes women even in anarchist visions told by male authors. Alessandro Froldi. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social changes? We welcome contributions that deal with both the contemporary socio-political landscape as well as more historical and theoretical reflections. But they are constructed differently. Arianna Introna. Amy Westwell. Gender differences are not done away with and are still one (of many) sources of conflict. migrants and carers. Sacha Kahir & Kieran Curran The panel wants to discuss struggles and conflicts around gender. We are particularly interested in analyses of the role of social reproduction within a wide array of social movements and subjects including women. On the other hand. practices and organizations that can produce (and reproduce) dynamics of social changes? We welcome contributions that deal with both the contemporary socio-political landscape as well as more historical and theoretical reflections. Sacha Kahir & Kieran Curran The panel wants to discuss struggles and conflicts around gender. On the one hand. Alessandro Froldi. disabled. Perspectives and narrative voices multiply. unemployed. outsiders now are welcome in utopia. LGBT. unemployed. “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members” how can we bring forward analysis. But the closure of classical utopias has been overcome by the critical utopias and critical dystopias that have appeared since the 1970s. unemployed. U006 Creating Self-Reproducing Movements [Panel 1] Convenors: Alessandro Froldi & Arianna Introna Speakers: Lynne Friedly. If. Arianna Introna. “no movement can survive unless it is concerned with the reproduction of its members” how can we bring forward analysis. We are particularly interested in analyses of the role of social reproduction within a wide array of social movements and subjects including women. If. migrants and carers. care and migration from the perspective of Silvia Federici idea of social reproduction. care and migration from the perspective of Silvia Federici idea of social reproduction. LGBT.

medical care. Fucking law’s gendering function Grietje Baars. arguing that we must instead produce a form of prefigurative politics that eradicates our existing class-stratified identities (e. 32). New Zealand. by providing food. ableism.g. Finally. white supremacy. clothing. City University London Law’s role in upholding and continually reproducing the heteropatriarchy is increasingly being challenged. University of Leicester Within contemporary philosophy. and the queer caucus. School of Management. the pack” (Deleuze & Guattari 1987. It begins by documenting deliberative strategies like the ‘progressive stack’ and identity-based-caucus blocks within General Assembly meetings. etc. and the various ways the movement sought to equalise the grounds for participation and survival (e. the presentation considers the outcomes for various groups within the movement—including the People of Color caucus. as “immeasurable multiplicity. which sought to rebalance power inequities within wider society. classism itself. and shelter for participants who might otherwise be at the margins of political organising). proposals have been tabled to minimise the obligation to declare a gender in official documents. or: Considering Subject Groups and the Wolf Pack in the Production of Gendered Subjectivities Chantelle Gray van Heerden. This is happening directly. as well as the position of the mass in relation to their constitutive multiplicities.). I illustrate the importance and applicability of Badiou’s theory through a study of the original Occupy Wall Street encampment in New York City. Building on this. In the UK and The Netherlands. In particular. both philosophically and politically. in his conceptualisation of politics he makes an ontological argument for the inherent value of non-hierarchical forms of social organisation. Unisa (University of South Africa) In the plateaus entitled “1914: One or Several Wolves?” and “1227: Treatise on Nomadology: The War Machine” in A Thousand Plateaus. and the case of the anonymous Berliner currently waiting to be decided by the German Supreme Court. Ultimately. thus emphasizing the position of the subject. I consider Badiou’s assertion that the nature of revolution—and our metrics for revolutionary ‘successes’ and ‘failures’—depend on a movement’s progress toward these inherently anarchist goals.” What I therefore propose in this paper is to rethink the conceptual personae of the wolf-pack and multiplicity in terms of especially Guattari’s analysis of group formation and his distinction between subjugated groups and subject groups. K105 Theory stream [Panel 2] Implications of Badiouian Work for Anarchist Philosophy and Activist Practice Amanda Earley. in Australia. and K in the Netherlands). or. by those wishing to undo law’s compulsory binary gender performance through asking to be recognised as non-gendered (the case of Norrie in Australia. I look specifically at the writings of Badiou. ‘pregnant transfathers’ – for example the case of Warren Kunce in Sweden. Women Who Run With the Wolves. especially considering the concepts referred to above. Deleuze and Guattari argue that becoming-wolf. as they have the greatest implications for anarchist theory. “but an I feel. can gain much from Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophical collaboration. the work of political philosophers like Slavoj Žižek. on the edge of the pack. In turn. cissexism. what are called in the popular media. Here. while Freud purges the Wolf-Man of his ontological multiplicity or difference. it considers the economy of Occupy Wall Street. and Alain Badiou are a force to be reckoned with. 352).g. I feel myself becoming a wolf. he contests the idea of ‘identity politics’. The wolf. Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Gender Studies. one among others. patriarchy. My aim is show that gender. Nepal and India it is now . and by those seeking to ‘queer’ law’s gender binary through cases that assert the recognition of. Next. 352) – an irruption – “lies outside dualities of terms as well as correspondences between relations” (Deleuze & Guattari 1987.” Thus. 278) argue that such social and psychological constructs “leave too many special factors unaccounted for. U005 Gender and sexuality stream [Panel 1] Queer cases unmake gendered law. Deleuze and Guattari (1987. the women’s caucus. as praxis and subjectivity. The City Law School. heterosexism. Jacques Rancière. “as the instantaneous apprehension of a multiplicity” is not symbolic or representative according to Deleuze and Guattari (1987.

and asks what the queer struggle with the heteronormative can tell us about law’s social function. alternative models of community-based ‘transformative justice’ are gaining interest in North America and Europe. For survivors of sexual assault. community accountability is easier said than done. However. material effects and emancipatory or liberatory potential more broadly.cis and trans . From this vantage point emancipation is always a process of self-emancipation. offer alternative pathways for collective responsibility. ethical and pragmatic dilemmas of engaging in such protocols pose considerable challenges and difficulties. Will Boisseau & Richard J White For Spatial Emancipation in Critical Animal Studies: a veganarchist politics Richard J White & Simon Springer The paper argues that for the need to (a) pay critical attention toward the geographies (of space and place) where human and more than human animals are subject to violence and (b) to think more creatively around the importance of a spatial emancipatory praxis. Responding to the failures of the state to adequately address interpersonal violence in particular. this conflict is vital. Birkbeck. The latter sees the judicial system reasserting its hegemony as heteronorm-maker. Despite mainstream acceptance of homosexuals into the Conservative family structure ideology. These models seek to prioritise victim/survivor’s needs. cultural and structural factors that contribute to violence. other queers . The notion of emancipation envisaged here is deeply rooted in an anarchist ethic. Is now the time to say ‘fuck law’? Doing Justice Without Punishment: Queer/feminist/antiracist engagements with community accountability and transformative justice Sarah Lamble. Indirectly ‘fucking’ law’s gendering function are the so-called ‘gender deception’ cases of which three have recently gathered an increasing level of media coverage (McNally. Lads or fags?: Challenging the reification of masculinity in the provision of services for male survivors of sexual violence Jack Johnstone. Conservative ideology continues to punish male queer survivors of sexual violence and further. these queers do not have the option of conformity. while the popular press amplifies the vehemence of the lesbo. Newland. This paper evaluates the effects of these queer cases and legal reform efforts. grassroots feminist. School of Law. Survivor support services are moulded into following a heteropatriarchal outreach method in their attempts to secure government funding. The belief that there is a correct way to perform a gender or a sexuality has wide-ranging negative consequences for those who do not conform to societal standards of gender expression. possible for some to have a passport with gender “x”. Drawing on interviews with grassroots organisers who are engaged in community accountability work in Seattle. New York and Oakland. School of Law. Birkbeck. where the harms and failures of state-based criminal justice have become increasingly more acute. queer. anti-racist and anti-prison organisers are developing new models of justice that move away from punitive practices and instead foster community-based safety and accountability protocols. I ask the question of who is allowed to benefit from state-funded survivor support services: lads or fags? U006 Anarchism and animal liberation [Panel 1] Convenors: Livia Boscardin. which has a stark impact on male survivors who do not fit into prescribed norms of masculinity. which under a Conservative mandate seeks to reassert norms of masculinity and heterosexuality.and trans*phobia in these judgments. explore the ways in which transformative justice processes subvert the state criminal justice system in their responses to rape and sexual assault. University of London In the current era of mass incarceration.are left behind. which thereby brings greater focus and charge to . in the UK the genderneutral Mx title was officially adopted last year. The political. Unable and unwilling to be homogenised. University of London The United Kingdom is being subjected to the ideology of austerity. this paper considers the challenges and possibilities of doing justice without the state and without punishment. Lee). and attend to social. In this paper I will show how heteropatriarchal.

and the harm we do to ourselves when we perpetuate abuse and suffering. such as education or women’s rights. In animating this geography so that it can realize the larger goal of spatial emancipation we maintain that an anarchist perspective is paramount precisely because of its capacity to think and act in an integral way vis-a-vis the intersectional relations of domination. and developing a new geographic imaginary based on peace and nonviolence. he is particularly interested in de-constructing the ways in which exploitation of humans and animals runs side-by-side and intersects in society. Nádia Farage is Collaborative Professor in the Dept of History and in the Centre for the Study of the Social History of Culture. Richard J. they advanced the critique of experimental science. UK. and . It is a recognition of the relational assemblage of violence. for comparison. The vigour of anarchism in the labour movement in Brazil at the turn of the century. Naturism and biopolitical resistance in Brazil: a reading of Lima Barreto Nádia Farage This presentation discusses the presence of libertarian naturism within the framework of the labour movement in the first decades of 20th century Brazil. She has developed research and published articles on libertarian naturism in modern Brazil. making them central actors in the process of change. which implies notions of body. be they animals or workers. among them obligatory small-pox vaccination. in particular its theory of substance. we view a veganarchist politics and its related project of spatial emancipation as part of the furtherance of this developing awareness. Brazil. which targeted vulnerable bodies. at the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences. So in the vein of Reclus who considered humans as ‘nature becoming self conscious’. the paper explores the premises of such a critique. rather. University of Campinas. Nádia Farage is Collaborative Professor in the Dept of History and in the Centre for the Study of the Social History of Culture. the living being and the political -existential similarity between human and other animals. The incidence. South European naturist ideas and practices reached the labour movement in Brazil. similar in extent to that of France or Spain. authoritarian biopolitical measures were enforced in Brazil. the population’s resistance to obligatory vaccination culminated in street riots in 1904. unveiling the link between vaccination and vivisection. research and writing is committed to developing anarchist praxis within critical animal geography. But by ‘self’ emancipation we also mean that in an integral way. She has developed research and published articles on libertarian naturism in modern Brazil. White is a Reader in Human Geography at Sheffield Hallam University. University of Campinas. though. In short. has been thoroughly studied. it enables the emergence of a particular kind of community that benefits the dogs and humans within it. upon which the making of vaccine depended. with special attention paid to crucial anarchist interventions concerning cultural practices. In Rio de Janeiro. The paper argues that the relationships between cross-species ‘packs’ of people and dogs develop over time in the routine practices of walking in particular public spaces. A significant part of Richard's teaching. It cannot be said that there was a naturist movement in Brazil. at the beginning of the century. recognize that the geography of veganism simultaneously operates on many different terrains that bring together the personal and the political. Naturist theory had a considerable role in that resistance. nourishing its resistance against State biopolitics. at the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences. Guided by a reading of the work of the Brazilian anarchist novelist Lima Barreto. However. as in South America at large. the agency of non-human animals. In so doing. of naturist theses on the anarchist movement in Brazil has not been scrutinised. Addressing a range of ethical landscapes rooted in the context of social justice and total liberation movements. This does not just contribute to the well-being of individual humans or the dogs they live with. then the federal capital. Indeed. Brazil. in rural contexts. Multi-species Commons: Walking with dogs and the development of ‘posthuman community’ Erika Cudworth This paper draws on a study of companion animals in human households and public spaces and deploys material gained by ethnographic observation and interviews with dog walkers mainly in urban but also.

this research finds. Next. as it will be argued that critical animal studies has been coopted and hijacked by careerists and opportunists. dogs. The aim of this paper is to consider the appeal of Tolstoy’s anarcho-pacifist writings and in particular his use of ‘defamiliarisation’. Communities of people and dogs. Posthuman communities are also characterised by social inclusivity. particularly animal companions and the use of non-human animals for food. . is an Assistant Professor of sociology. Leo Tolstoy wrote countless books. the broader community more widely. UK. generated through walking together have particular characteristics.D. Director of the Academy for Peace Education. One of the reasons Tolstoy inspired so many was his application his literary skills – in particular the technique of ‘defamiliarisation’. His website is www. animals and war and the development of a more ‘creaturely politics’. 14:00 to 15:30 K109 Anarchism and religion stream [Panel 2: Non-feminist themes] Sparking the Pacifist Imagination by Depicting the Familiar as New: The Subversive Potential of Leo Tolstoy’s ‘Defamiliarisation’ Dr Alexandre Christoyannopoulos. and defensive. peace and conflict studies. other species and the places through which they walk. co-founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Critical Animal Studies. Nocella II. a tolerance of diversity and openness to others. these ‘Christian anarchist’ views have often been forgotten.. and National Co-Coordinator of Save the Kids. essays and pamphlets expounding his newly-articulated views on violence. and recognising the process which had numbed them into accepting that complicity. ignored. most recently including Policing the Campus: Academic Repression. He has published more than twenty books. by discussing its political potential as an activist tool. Ph.org. Nocella II This presentation will be grounded in my chapter in the book Anarchism and Animal Liberation: Essays on Complementary Elements of Total Liberation (2015). his writings on themes such as the cycle of violence. the church. through an anarchist criminological lens the conclusion will introduce the need for the abolition of punitive justice. These ‘posthuman communities’ of dogs and dog walkers are co-constituted – both humans and dogs are agential in the process of communitymaking. criminology. Nonetheless. through two examples – racial justice and disability justice. Finally. politics and international relations. She is currently working on a new book. Loughborough University In the last thirty years of his life. with Steve Hobden. including Gandhi and later pacifists.anthonynocella. or looking at the familiar as if new – to shake his readers into noticing the absurdity and incoherence of hegemonic justifications for violence. Her research interests include human relations with non-human animals. and the rise of transformative justice. and her books include Social Lives with Other Animals and Posthuman International Relations (with Steve Hobden). The Emancipatory Project of Posthumanism. Editor of the Radical Animal Studies and Total Liberation book series. of public spaces and are engaged in various practices of care for humans. Human members of such communities are invested in. Surveillance. including prisons. Since then. and the Occupy Movement. or dismissed as utopian or naive. These eclectic and dynamic networks of people and dogs are something that might be drawn on in developing new ways of sharing space in our more-than-human world. Erika’s current projects are on animal companion relationships (particularly with dogs). and state violence have inspired many. Radical Animal Studies. Erika Cudworth is Professor of Feminist Animal Studies in the School of Social Sciences at the University of East London. He is the editor of Peace Studies Journal. The first topic that will be brought up will be the need for the rise of radical animal studies. and by reflecting on the wider influence of Tolstoy’s political thought. total liberation a form of activism and a movement is defined and explained. admitting their implicit complicity in such violence. and on how to improve the human condition. and Anarchist Criminology Anthony J. the state. Total Liberation. She is author of many journal articles and book chapters. and Christian anarchists. where she teaches sociology. the continuity between means and ends. Anthony J. numerous Tolstoyan communities. and gender and women’ studies and Fort Lewis College and has published over fifty scholarly articles or book chapters. by illustrating his deployment of that device.

the Bible and biblical language as politically radical was made by Rocker and his associates. a distinctive contribution to the construction of religion. along with all other Buddhist institutions. Twickenham. This paper analyses contemporary Shinshu thinkers who are trying to disentangle Jodo Shinshu from its authoritarian past and formulate an ethic of social equality and critical independence from the state. even two centuries after the first temples were established a somewhat horizontal and grassroots Jodo Shinshu movement. instigated the first large scale peasant rebellions in the history of Japan. both in Japan and the United States. The momentum of this movement and Rocker’s activism in London was brought to an abrupt halt at the outbreak of the war. However. centralize and rule the Japanese archipelago well into the 16th century (1580s). centred on the charismatic figure of Shinran (1173-1263). politically-engaged Buddhisms. International University of La Rioja As self-confessed anarchist and Zen Buddhist scholar Brian Victoria points out. Although this socially progressive Shinshu ethic is not always expressed in an explicitly anarchist fashion. used by women. LGBT and disabled people within communities or activist spaces that resist or reject state justice systems. and his war efforts. which operated outside of state-controlled temple bureaucracy. This paper will analyse the ways in which Rocker constructed or assumed radical/anarchic notions of religion and the Bible but also look at the fate of these ideas in rest of the twentieth century. K105 Reflections stream [Panel 2] Safer Spaces: Reflections on the Anarchist Federation’s experience Emma Segar. it contributes a peculiarly libertarian voice to the ongoing Buddhist anarchist conversation and to the broader spectrum of progressive. The catastrophic Japanese defeat in World War II (1945) inspired a process of self-questioning and doctrinal revision in most Jodo Shinshu institutions. who also happened to be gentile. Its most prominent figure was the ‘Anarchist Rabbi’. a process that culminated in Buddhist support for the emperor. anarchism was thriving in the Jewish East End of London in its so-called ‘Golden Age’. Jodo Shinsu: Buddhism Against the State in Japan Enrique Galván-Álvarez. reinstated after the Meiji Revolution (1868). St Mary’s University. the Ikko-Ikki often refused to pay tax and took arms to resist the Samurai state(s) in their effort to unify. Starting as an arguably anti-authoritarian movement. Sometimes supported (and used) and sometimes condemned by the Shinshu institutional leadership. derived from Shinran and the subversive actions of his early followers. Secretary. the appropriation of what was assumed to be ‘Jewish’ language of liberty and freedom by the new Right. rituals and hierarchical structures of other Buddhist traditions. were brought under tight state-control. By discussing their reappraisal of Shinshu history. Rudolf Rocker and the Fate of the English Radical Bible James Crossley. Jodo Shinshu temples. state-supporting force. London Prior to the First World War. After the military success of Nobunaga (1534-1582). and our analysis of how the concept of Safer Spaces has affected ideas of accountability and justice within our own organisations and the wider activist community. Jodo Shinshu temples are one of the very few Buddhist establishments in America that currently perform same-sex marriages and some of its members have been vocal opponents of the War on Terror or Japan’s efforts to rearm itself. A dominant theme in this collective process of self-reflection is the critical reassessment of Jodo Shinshu’s historical and destructive role as a conservative. It will look at how such views became dispersed in political ideas among postwar Jewish groups. “there is no Buddhist tradition in Japan that has resisted the state more than Jodo Shinshu. and the ideological reasons for why the once popular figure of Rocker was quickly forgotten after his death. It includes a brief history of Safer Spaces and its development a mode of transformative justice. Anarchist Federation This paper discusses our experience of putting together and using a Safer Spaces policy. rather . and there is no Buddhist tradition that has been co-opted by the state more than Jodo Shinshu”. often unconsciously and even in contradiction to their more overt views on religion and theology being integral to the power of the state. Nevertheless. German and godless. Rudolf Rocker. Jodo Shinshu institutions (formed after Shinran’s death) quickly adopted the ideologies. I highlight the antiauthoritarian implications of their discourses and outline some of its social applications. However. the Ikko-Ikki (1486-1586). people of colour.

but is oriented after a healthy. women and other minorities. People were satisfied with life as it was and complacent in their ways. we would like to concentrate on its practical implementation and the benefits and difficulties that have arisen from it. I argue. as the constant demand for functionality and efficiency. organizing direct actions. relational and emotional labour. I began to look for revolution. However. U005 Gender & sexuality stream [Panel 2] Everyday Practices of Degrowth and Gender Justice . who has no responsibility outside employment. fragmented and are being devalued constantly in this world. that the organisational structure of anarchist networks is oriented after an ideal of performance. This is the story of one person’s journey of change within the Occupy movement. With the realization that reform and revolution are not viable options in the United States I am now content to do things on my own terms and in my own way. I propose to create new meanings for performance that value contributions outside the existing norm. In order to stop reproducing the same processes of exclusion and authority. the caring and bonding that keep anarchist networks alive. Within anarchist networks too often it is falsely assumed that everybody is the same and can perform in the same way. and participating in conscious raising efforts. But with the organized crack down on protestors. however. starting out as a reformist. We would like to invite discussion on how the concept of Safer Spaces has been adopted by student communities. and were not interested in change. Hamburg/Leicester Performance in employment. is to draw a connection between ecological and economic demands with a feminist socio-economic analysis of the social. The ideal of what a person should contribute and whose contributions are visible are tightly interwoven with gendered.Challenges of Mutual Aid and Care (Work) Mike Korsonewski. and general apathy of the people living in this country. is extensively discussed in anarchist theory. are overlooked. I also came to the realization that most people did not care about the inequality perpetuated by the current power structure. perform. Shenandoah University This paper explores the process that one self-identified feminist has gone through within the Occupy Movement. dispersing of encampments. that replicates the commodification of humans in capitalism. For anarchist networks performance thus creates a selective process for participation in terms of access. burn out Claire Chong. academically educated male. participate. Through my time spent in the Occupy movement. What remains a blind spot. Many . The so-called globalised capitalism takes its toll in a crisis with many facets. Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The current phase of the neoliberal organisation of economies could be characterised by its developing resource scarcity and seemingly unstoppable processes of consumption and production. the creation of hierarchies and extrusion. Human relations of care become fragile. I believed that an African American man could improve the political structure in the United States for people of colour. and eventually ending up as a feminist anarchist. facilitating general assemblies. we need to understand how performance influences our personal relationships and network structures. Reproductive. use of force by the state. I was a catalyst for change. All of these facets are both conditions and outcomes of capitalism and we have to think those interrelatedly. I will share which processes of exclusion I have identified in my experience and would like to discuss these with you. its role within anarchists networks has rarely been identified. Occupy: The making of a feminist anarchist Mary Hickok. drawing on our own experience. In the beginning I bought into president Obama's campaign promise of hope and change. a part of the revolution. and consider what we can learn from each other on its implementation. After Paris COP21 the environmental crisis has become a widespread topic again. The performance norm is not representing our actual needs and abilities. classed and ethnicised structures of oppression. Through observations of the political landscape I began to see that he was not able to. than being an academic document of the history of the movement. that they can openly talk in plenaries and stay for consensus discussions until midnight. We push ourselves to perform an activist identity of functionality and burn-out isolated and pathologised. transitioning to a revolutionary.

Thus. Their analyses show that our everyday reality is based on the gendered division of labour in a capitalist and sexist society which is responsible for the crisis of social reproduction. 1990). without compromising identity. Through her work she seeks to apply an innovative ‘veganfeminist’approach to theory.f. Department of Sociology. social movements and political organisations pointed this out. too? Feminist Politics of Non-monogamy. Adams. The paper draws upon anarcho-feminist ideas of the “new woman question” (Darity. Some modes of feminist analysis present autonomy as an inherently androcentric concept that endorses cultures of masculinist. seeking to bring these two communities together and. praxis. Degrowth? How do anarchist or libertarian groups and collectives implement strategies of gender justice and feminist approaches in these premises? What are visible examples to inform more people beyond activist communities. U006 Anarchism and animal liberation stream [Panel 2] Chickens. 2005). and furthering social justice. . and the wider gender implications of this in terms of the embodiment of personhood of both animal and human. What can we find in theory and in practice? How should nursing and care work be organised? How does this interlink with alternative approaches to economy. Cows. based around the exploitation of ovulation and lactation. support and care (work). through this. Feminist anti-monogamy arguments signify a longer-standing endorsement of the value of (erotic) autonomy within feminist politics. cow. There follows a move to consider the problematic construction of humanity as agentic. The actor*s of these movements demand social alternatives to emphasise and re-evaluate care and reproductive labour as economically relevant and to end exploitation and oppression. MMU References to the values of self-ownership and erotic autonomy figure prominently in women’s accounts on why they are practicing polyamory. taking the vegan-feminist as the central connection to integration of movements. contribute to restoring a focus on autonomy within feminist theorising and highlight the relevance of distinctively feminist notions of relational autonomy for sexual politics and ethics. Catherine Oliver is a PhD student in Human Geography at the University of Birmingham researching with vegan and feminist activists. and consider a starting point for theorisation of the ‘more-than-woman’. solidarity economy or green growth are making more of a progress in this respect but is left disappointed. Economies should be based on everyone’s needs and social justice especially when it comes to mutual aid. consider how moral communities can be extended to include animal bodies. rational individualism which are at odds with feminist practices of solidarity and care. though. degrowth economy. this paper considers the incarceration of both body and spirit of the female as ingrained in our current society. and the animal as non-agentic (c. 2012). One would think that discourses of sustainability. I place poly feminist voices within a longer history of feminist critiques of monogamy. In this paper. and the processes of sexualisation and consumption of the female body across species. I turn to this issue. and analysis based upon the principles of non-violence and unity. 1980. expanding upon current methodologies of participatory action research. analogical. Her research explores the possibilities of being an activist in more than one movement. Anarchist and feminist strands of critique alike can contribute to transform societies from bottom up. Polyamory and the Value of Erotic Autonomy Christian Klesse. sketching the intersubjective stories of the chicken.g. the female is considered as inescapably entwined through theories of the transcendence of the subject/object distinction (Kristeva. e. and how the incorporation of anarchist principles and consciousness of ‘other’ into theories of animal agency could extend moral community to the animal. This paper aims to point to the prominence of feminist voices within polyamory. as distinct from the more-than-human. and Women: Towards the More-than-woman Catherine Oliver This paper considers the similar representational. Presenting a narrative from the lives of an individual from each of these species. because autonomy occupies a rather precarious position within feminism. and human in our current society. and physical experiences of ‘the female of the species’. Latour.

through which she links the concepts of white able masculinity with that of humanness. Aga Trzak mainly organises with AntiSpeciesist Women and has recently obtained her PhD. as anarcha-feminists. Including Anti-Speciesism in our Anarcha-Feminism: Towards an Ahuman Activism Aga Trzak Aga's talk will combine her research and her activism to introduce the idea of the (hu)man. if we include a specifically antispeciesist ecofeminism in our politics. so as to specifically resist and diminish kyriarchy and its subject the (hu)man. So often those we stand in resistance against are described as not-human. especially expressed through language are also produced and reproduced within Eurocentric anarcha-feminist circles. truly dismantle the status quo. They are also active in the "no borders" movement. Lex will point out how problematic it is to refer to cops as pigs. mostly concentrating on neurodiversity. The (hu)man. This gives us the possibility to. we group ourselves with others who are experiencing similar struggles to ours and we come together in solidarity. less-than-human status (human denoting the dominant power holder). Lex observes how this process is embedded in the languages and forms of expression that create our realities. In animal and earth activism we can only ever practice the latter. Such an activism would negate the (hu)man conceptually and minimise the human literally. go unnoticed. As this talk argues. queer theory and animal liberation. oppression and exploitation of others. secondly. Secondly. we must abolish our own speciesist understanding of the world. In order to recognise animals as autonomous beings with intrinsic values and the right to be in this world independent of humans. which is a process that results in the prohibition of a fully human status. The dichotomous separation of human and not-human-enough/animal however does not only apply to mainstream hegemonic culture. a concept describing the interconnectivity of all systems of domination (Schüssler Fiorenza 1992) such as racism. . nationalism. This leads to the last point this presentation will make. That is one that indicates lower. Marginalised groups and their allies often adopt the very tactics reproduced by the dominant culture and use binary categorisation with speciesist assumptions to explicitly demarcate 'the system' as our enemy. Lex will describe the general functions of animalising human Others. however identify the one who holds power over animals and earth. anthropocentric subject of kyriarchy. independent of the status quo. We shall do so by practicing what Patricia MacCormack terms the ahuman (2014). sexism. which considers how this process of dehumanising effects those who actually do not have human species-belonging. We can. that is the making perceptible of the oppressor. that is animals. speciesist assumptions. for example. and speciesism. As members of the human species we can only ever interpret but never experience and truthfully reflect the realities of animal and nature Others. make perceptible our oppressors and their acts of violence that. Departing from MacCormack's theory this talk explores anarchafeminist ways to put the ahuman into action. be it in form of citizenship rights or social and micropolitical (power) relationships. I suggest. an undoing of the human. Aga's activism and academic work both focus mostly on an ecofeminist undoing of kyriarchy. The talk will draw particular attention to the construction of 'the animal' and animality as a concept that functions as a culturally determined identity marker. Only through practicing an ahuman antispeciesism can we work towards an emancipated society of plurality that celebrates difference. the (hu)man. through their works exploring and challenging inequality. The Third (Forgotten) Part in the Process of the dehumanisation: Animals Lex Kartanė Lex’s talk will go into more depth with this conception of objectification as a dehumanising/ animalising process and explore it through three interconnected aspects: Firstly. because it reproduces speciesist values and so includes oppressive discourse in various resistance movements. so as to create our own culture. as this talk argues. as an expression of anger or frustration with the police. practising solidarity instead of charity. That is. to achieve liberation our own and that of all Others I suggest we need to dismantle kyriarchy by deconstructing the (hu)man and all his institutions. Lex Kartanė is an artist and activist. in a hegemonic environment. Thus. is the masculinist. This talk understands the idea of (hu)manness as an identity that needs to be dismantled and unlearned which would necessitate an ahuman activism. We create our resistance groups through two mechanisms: Firstly. ageism. the (hu)man. Only by including an anti-speciesist politics into our resistance can we.

she also offers (if only implicitly) a critique of social institutions in general from this point of view. for some. My paper will attempt to show that this label does not do justice to the radicalism of Wollstonecraft's thinking about contemporary society and its institutions. it was the countercultures and the libertarian wave of 1968 that combined ideas like egalitarianism. in a striking manner. which. My paper will explore Wollstonecraft's reasons for thinking that. In that wider project. Claremont Graduate University France’s mid-nineteenth century revolutions sent thousands of refugees and exiles in search of new homelands. Wollstonecraft is sometimes characterised as a 'liberal' thinker. from critiques of colonialism and slavery. the opinions on gender.' presented at the 3rd Annual Conference of the PSA Anarchism Studies Network in September 2014. This period of immigration influx significantly overlapped with the emergence of French language newspapers in many of these same American regions. and educational institutions such as schools. I explore the relevance of Hegel's theory of recognition for those who are interested in the politics of social institutions.' Gender and Revolution in the mid-19th century French-American Radical Press Hilary Gordon. Management and the "Struggle for Recognition" in Social Institutions. 15:45 to 17:45 K109 Anarcho-feminist histories stream [Panel 4] Anarchism Prefigured? Mary Wollstonecraft. It has not been sufficiently appreciated that in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). not only does Wollstonecraft attach considerable importance to the motif of slavery. Despite disappearing political control of her American territory. regions where France maintained some cultural hegemony received many of the progressively displaced. and the descriptions of women’s roles within mid-nineteenth century revolutionary conflict. those at the bottom of these institutional hierarchies. and to the enslavement of women with the institution of the family. and spread . PhD Candidate. However. prefigures a way of thinking about social institutions that might plausibly be characterised as 'anarchist. which are contained in the print of mid-nineteenth century refugees and exiles settled in France’s former American colonies. the church. Can anarchist societies overcome white middle-class male privilege? Gender. History offers several examples of anarchistic societies. to qualifications human equality. Preliminary thoughts relating to this project were developed in a paper entitled 'Hegel and Anarchism: Authority. to questions on the very basis of political authority and roots of nationhood. involvement in these and other social institutions amounts to a more or less successful attempt to enslave them. Social Institutions and the Politics of Recognition Anthony Burns. These new medias served as spaces to define and debate streams of ideas brought to the fore by the revolutionary conflicts. freedom and sustainability. The present paper examines the political thought of Mary Wollstonecraft against this context. Exposing the connections and disjunctions between nascent French anarchist ideas and those expressed in the print of the diaspora can serve to both shed light on international networks of dialogue and clarify divergent streams of early American radicalism. University of London ‘We can transform ourselves and society here and now as well as work towards a more harmonious relationship with nature and a more egalitarian. race and class in post1968 libertarian communities Luca Lapolla. such as the renowned Paris commune or revolutionary Catalonia. drawing on the philosophy and social theory of Hegel. Birkbeck. Thus Peter Marshall identified some core principles for a libertarian society and highlighted the concrete possibility of building it in the present. I would like to discuss the characterizations of women. (Marshall 2008:694-5). free and sustainable future’. In A Vindication other targets of criticism for Wollstonecraft include the institutions of the army. University of Nottingham The issues discussed in this paper are part of a wider research project devoted to the broad theme of social institutions and the politics of recognition.

the concept of « free love » / « camaraderie amoureuse » emerged in the different anarchist currents in the North America and Europe at the end of the 19. that is. century and in the context of patriarchy. China was undergoing a historical socio-political transformation. many of the squats. Was equality real or just nominal? This paper will draw on interviews with current and former squatters/activists to investigate how categories like gender. among others. in early Sinophone anarchism. The anarchistic theory and practice of the concept of « free love » in the first half of the 20. race and class can affect life within and around libertarian communities. homosexuality mostly remained a taboo in anarchistic circles. then. and reflect on the importance of learning from previous experiences to avoid recurring mistakes. century. gender emancipation and anti-colonialism. it still did not find adequate meaning within the discussion regarding „free love“. LSE Under imperialist invasions and internal political struggles during the late 19th and early 20th century. These communities often replicated tensions around issues related to gender. Gender Institute. the creation of communities based on such principles.and anti-normative imaginings of intimate relating that aims to demonstrate ‘queer thinking’ in a non-western anarchist discourse. rather than being avant-garde. At the centre of prolific intellectual debates on how to transform. I will illustrate various strategies adopted by case studies to overcome both explicit or hidden privileges and hierarchies. Finally. or class present in mainstream society. and celebrated as an act of liberation for the individual and especially women. . but also demonstrate that the more or less recent call to couple queer thinking with anti-capitalism and anti-colonialism. homophobia and liberation is to be discussed within this framework. homophobia and liberation Maurice Schuhmann. the ideas of the conjugal family and ‘love marriage’ were by no means the only way through which Chinese thinkers imagined the transformation of the joint family and arranged marriage as the hegemonic forms of intimacy in the pre-modern China. I will explore the effects of different temporal and cultural frames on concrete libertarian societies. social centres and rural communes established after 1968 were openly inspired by these values. K105 Gender & sexuality stream [Panel 3] “Queer thinking” in the early twentieth century Chinese anarchism Miha Fugina. just as much as lesbian love. It must also be said that the concept of “free love” was mainly designed for heterosexual unions. Core emphasis lies on the German and French speaking movement. was the question of intimacy. engages in a historical interrogation of non. It was propagated as a counterdraft against the institution of marriage which was rejected as « state sanctioned prostitution ». the same structural connections and tension which have recently been highlighted in the context of (particularly non-western) contemporary queer theory. ‘modernise’ China. My paper. finds its precedence. In this manner. I propose to unpack Chinese anarchist engagements with the themes of family revolution and love to expose conceptual connections between sexual liberation. race. I will not only uncouple ‘queer thinking’ from ‘queer theory’. Despite the official measures. While measures were taken against the criminalisation of homosexuality. “Free love” between patriarchy. PhD candidate. My main intention is to discuss the different ways in which Chinese thinkers of the early 20th century re-appropriated anarchist theories to problematize both the dominant pre-modern Chinese and ‘western’ modes of intimacy and proposed a radical vision of social change that thoroughly challenged the equation between modernisation and westernization. In this paper. Specifically. I will shift the focus to the margins of the modernising discourse and examine Chinese anarchist interventions into the intimate sphere. In particular. Université Grenoble Alpes While the first generation of anarchists – Pierre-Joseph Proudhon. above all – still had a very classic and conservative understanding of the concept of marriage. While dominating the discourse on family reform. Autobiographic texts and memoirs by female protagonists of the aforementioned era often say that the anarchist activists often misunderstood the liberation as the freedom for libertinage. that is. By presenting examples from British and Italian post-1968 case studies.

but a descriptive term for a manner of social change. which in turn tends to feed into the frequent lionization of polyamorous arrangements among anarchists as being somehow "more radical" or even "more anarchist" than exclusive relationships. it is not employed in one determinate sense but subject to complementary decontestations. practices. the language used in discussing relationship arrangements has tended to conflate 'monogamy' with 'exclusivity' -. it is not an axial term designating a value. reform definitely emerges as just such a peripheral concept.g. Maurice Schuhmann. and that the conflation of critiques of marriage with arguments in favour of polyamory tends to open up polyamorous communities to the same sorts of patriarchal oppression that has been critiqued in the 'Free Love' communities of the 60s-70s. the term revolution is an anomaly. although many did engage in what we would now call polyamorous relationships. incidentally. the history of anarchism within the GDR (German Democratic Republic) and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon. Second.g. and events. Dr. First. and using 'non-monogamy' interchangeably with 'polyamory'. in which incarnation it has been roundly (and rightly) critiqued by feminists. born in 1978 is a graduate political scientist with a doctorate from Berlin (Germany). The paper examines this ambivalence through illustrative examples regarding anarchist identity (e. 'Free Love' as a term underwent a semantic shift as a result of its adoption by 1960s counterculture movements. closely mirrors the tendency in queer communities to uphold relationships perceived as "more queer" as "more radical" or "better" than those perceived as more traditional. most of the attention is given to the core concepts that constitute the heart of an ideological tradition. He has been living and working in France for a number of years. the anarchist idea of revolution has been expressed through two main distinctions.e. AK Press Historically. chair: Nathan Jun Reform Leonard Williams In Michael Freeden’s approach to understanding ideologies. More recently. One is between revolution and reform.. for anarchism. He currently teaches as a lector for German language and culture at the Université Grenoble Alpes. inherently reinforcing the patriarchy.revolution here designating abolition rather than amelioration of oppressive systems such as capitalism and . U005 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 2] Convenor: Benjamin Franks. describing relationships as 'monogamous' even where the partners have no intention to ever marry. His main research focusses on individual anarchism.. as the institution of marriage itself has waned in social importance. issues such as marriage equality or prisons). which highlight differences between anarchism and neighbouring ideologies as well as within anarchism itself. this position was known in the Anglophone West as 'Free Love' and didn't necessarily imply anything about the relationship structures of the people involved. This shift has contributed to the conflation of arguments against marriage with arguments in favour of multi-partner relationships. Traditionally. contexts. however. as terms regarding the depth and magnitude of social change . most anarchafeminists have explicitly rejected marriage as a tool of control by the state and/or church. Revolution Uri Gordon As a core concept in anarchist ideology. Relatively little attention. the story to be told is largely one of ambivalent identities and practices—a perpetual tension between revolutionary ambitions and pragmatic accommodations. In the early 20th century.i. In the context of a longstanding debate between reform and revolution within anarchist and other radical traditions. Against Political Polyamory and In Defence of Free Love Molly Uzzell. (A phenomenon which. I argue in this paper that.) I argue that this tendency is essentially mistaken. the cases of Chomsky and Bookchin) and anarchist practice (e. has been paid to more peripheral concepts that enable an ideology to adapt to particular social and political contingencies.

Once the ALFSG may have been providing for a score of prisoners. ‘Jacqui’ is one of the women targeted by undercover officers from the Metropolitan Police’s Special Demonstration Squad in the 1980s (Lewis & Evans. Perhaps not surprisingly. as the embodiment of particular constellations of norms and values embedded in . reducing multiple subjects to a singular. patriarchy. derives not only from insight about the decentralisation of power in modern society but also in part from resignation to the impossibility of thoroughgoing social change in advanced capitalist countries. when the ALF emerged and thousands rallied to the Hunt Saboteurs Association. and the more targeted campaigns a decade plus later against the Newchurch Guinea Pig farm and Huntingdon Life Sciences. frequently targeted at women. evolving material practices. had a devastating effect on the trust. the former involving a takeover of the state and the latter. Today. the concept of revolution as a more or less rapid process of upheaval and mass reconstruction now stands in tension with a concept of revolution as either identical with. Today. 1882 1914 . It also examines and responds to criticisms from some post-anarchism positions which argue that as prefiguration ties actions in the present to ultimate endpoints. It examines prefiguration. This paper explains that prefiguration identifies and extends the emancipatory cracks already existing and necessarily includes goal plurality and the possibilities of transcendence. 2014). the forces of the state have at times proved stronger than that movement. In particular. and is intellectually arrogant as it claims to embody post-revolutionary values when the ideological weight of capitalism occludes these from our consciousness. wider milieu (in part by some of its own victories) that decline is likely to continue. I argue. Another is the distinction between political revolution and social revolution. Thirdly. the process of anarchist revival over recent decades has seen the term's significance and very thinkability called into question. Whether revolution survives as a core concept in an anarchist ideology increasingly attuned to the prognosis of industrial collapse remains an open question Prefiguration Benjamin Franks This paper identifies the concept of ‘prefiguration’ and explains why it has been spatially and historically core to anarchist morphologies. its abolition along with class society. on issues such as hare coursing and vivisection that has led to the decline of militant animal liberationists. unitary goal and thus reasserting deterministic structures of governance. These include the direct actions of the 1980s.and structuring . The paper also examines and responds to criticisms of prefiguration from determinist Marxists who argue that prefiguration is inadequate or detrimental to a genuinely revolutionary (anti-)politics. it is a mere handful. "prefigurative" experiments and processes of everyday life. The latter approach. Deprived of an angry.diverse. it must be ultimately be a form of archē (generative first principle for social domination). or the uncertain outcome of. This paper presents two opposing views to allow this phenomenon to be critically assessed. She argues that illegal and immoral policing tactics. U006 Anarchism and animal liberation [Discussion Session] Discussants: Paul Stott & Jacqui “Has the militant animal rights movement in Britain declined?” Two perspectives on how and why… The history of the animal liberation movement in the UK has gone through distinct phases. character and vibrancy of animal rights activists. groups like the ALF are not what they were. Day 3 Friday 16th September 9:00 to 10:30 K109 Anarchist histories stream [Panel 1] The Texture of Politics: London’s Anarchist Clubs. making for a highly unstable core concept. as it restricts revolutionary practice. Paul Stott presents the view that it is the successes of the animal rights movement.

It focuses on three prominent examples: the Autonomie Club. politics and the history anarchism. also in Whitechapel. by way of comparison with other political clubs of its kind and the tracing of anarchist aesthetic influences. to link these to their practical use. However. which reflected the influence of the nihilist movement in its antagonism toward bourgeois norms. I will begin by telling the story of the Black Panthers in Britain before delving deeper into the development of the movement’s culture and organisational models. it represented a particular political aesthetic. its history touches on the fight within the anti-racist movement in Britain between its liberal and radical wings. which was shaped by a metaphysical outlook that saw the material world as a place of permanent conflict between the forces of Christian civilisation (order) and those of barbarism (chaos). In particular it aims to recover the ‘architectural principles’ of the clubs. It draws from newspaper etchings. oral interviews. Waugh sought to keep this temptation in check through his very deep and public conversion to Roman Catholicism. and political hierarchy. as he clearly was. These two factors in Waugh’s life. at 40 Berner Street in Whitechapel. organisation. and political ideology. letters. and show its shortcomings in terms of gender. building act case files and building plans. Department of Sociology & Communications. In addition. Waugh’s tory anarchism. and in turn how social history can invest even apparently mundane architectural details with political significance. where possible. and the Jubilee Street Club. Royal Holloway. reports in the anarchist and mainstream press. illustrations. memoirs of key anarchists. court statements. at 165 Jubilee Street. PhD Historical Geography. the paper argues. at 6 Windmill Street in Fitzrovia. Captivated. It concludes that the clubs all appropriated buildings subsequently restructured for new use were marked by the attempt to present an exterior appearance of respectability. and their ideas have had an enormous impact on activists who have come after them. My first aim is therefore to develop our understanding of the variety of anti-racist struggles in Britain. Alex Prichard & Thomas Swann . and the internationalisation of struggles against colonialism. Brunel University Evelyn Waugh’s life and art merged most clearly in his appearance as the iconoclastic tory anarchist. given that the oppressions and injustices they were fighting persist in present-day Britain. I hope to show in what ways the Black Panther movement in Britain can be taken as an inspiration for activists today. and which facilitated the democratic. Instead. antiauthoritarian principles of anarchist ideology. and their ambivalent relationship with gender equality. which belied an interior tendency towards dereliction and ‘deconstruction’. Far less famous. was the perfect expression of his world-view. class. U005 Anarchy Rules! workshop Facilitators: Ruth Kinna. the Berner Street International Working Men’s Club. that this was not incidental. By assessing both its strengths and weaknesses I hope to show the different ways in which we can draw lessons from the Black Panther movement in Britain The Temptation of Evelyn Waugh: Portrait of the Artist as Tory Anarchist Peter Wilkin. then. Although it acknowledges the material constraints informing such a style. by the temptations of a life committed to anarchy. are central to an understanding of his art. In this paper. University of London This paper explores the history of London’s anarchist clubs in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods. Overall it aims to show how architectural history can offer an added dimension to the social history of radical politics. was the Black Panther Movement in Britain. Active in the late 60s and early 70s. anarchy and religion. reconstructing their aesthetic choices and exploring their representations. neocolonialism and the Vietnam War. I also aim to critically assess the Black Panther movement from the perspective of intersectional anarchism. Jonathan Moses. The Black Panthers in Britain: a History and Intersectional Anarchist Critique Carlus Hudson The Black Panthers are one of the most pivotal organisations in the histories of radicalism and anti-racism in the United States. attempting. but by no means less significant. The paper further explores some of the contradictory features of the clubs’ interior design in their apparent veneration of movement elites.

The paper will suggest that in the work of thinkers such as Hardt and Negri. For. 2017. We might argue that there is no so much an ideological identity called ‘anarchism’ as there are many ‘anarchisms’. anarchism as an ideology is necessarily difficult to characterise. to explore the role they play in the formulation of diverse anarchist tendencies. to decide why some processes are better than others. to help resolve disputes U006 Conceptual approaches stream [Panel 3] Convenor & chair: Benjamin Franks Freedom Nathan Jun In this presentation I draw upon Michael Freeden’s morphological approach to examine diverse conceptions of freedom within the anarchist tradition. the idea of anarchy helps give content to rules (what's distinctive about the rules anarchists make?) IV: What rules anarchists can agree to. Intersectionality Surreyya Evren ABSTRACT PENDING 10:45 to 12:15 K109 Anarchist histories stream [panel 2] The ideas and activities of Kropotkin's Moscow League of Federalists .have always had an illocutionary dimension .to use a term of Quentin Skinner (1968) . the particular meaning and degree of relative significance that a given conception assigns to freedom depends on the internal arrangement of its “micro-components” and/or on its relation to other concepts within the ideological morphology. forthcoming). the various expressions of anarchism have been constituted in a context of opposition. to be clear about the way we want to live and how we want to interact with others. the Marxist who rejects all formulations of this idea ceases to be a Marxist. My principal aim in so doing is two-fold: first. For anarchists. Another is the opposition between the various historical formations of anarchism itself – considered practically and philosophically. Both of these factors must be taken into account in order to understand anarchism’s internal diversity as well as its distinctiveness among ideologies. Why bother with rules when non-dominating processes support anarchist organising? We think that rules can help anarchists. One such context is the historical opposition between anarchism and Marxist communism – the main focus of this paper. As I shall argue. Consequently. For Marxists.that is. they were developed (not always intentionally) as a performative political response to their contexts of articulation – this makes it at best exceptionally difficult to provide a positive definition of agency from an anarchist point of view. to determine how and to what extent these conceptions serve to distinguish anarchism from other libertarian ideologies. and second. We'll be discussing: I: What principles anarchists do/should advocate II: How. anarchist ideas of agency . class conflict would be a core concept. it is more of a challenge to identify such core concepts (see Bates. these principles support the generation of rules III: How. if at all. 2003) has argued that ideologies can be differentiated into core and peripheral concepts. if at all. Agency David Bates Michael Freeden (1996. there is an extent to which we can start to rethink agency beyond its anarchist (and Marxist) horizons. Moreover.

To many activists it became clear that syndicalism alone is not enough. The anarchist movement was too weak. Radical Education Forum and more. still not fully appreciated in the English language literature. a Proudhonist feminism can be rescued from his work. where he began to support the cooperative movement and was writing the big work on ethics. that you need to connect the self-organized labour movement and direct action with clear revolutionary ideas. but the Bolsheviks have disbanded League. it is telling of the anarchist movement how little critical engagement there has been with his anti-feminism. This task compliments and develops the work of Jenny d'Herricourt.the Russian Federal Democratic Republic. Preventing its onset. Canada and Switzerland. and the syndicalist – too disunited – to organize a general anti-militarist strike. Moscow The First World War was a painful ordeal for anarchists and revolutionary syndicalists. “The Great War swept away the creed of neutral syndicalism”. Proudhon’s Anti-Feminism Alex Prichard While much ink has been spilled on Proudhon's anti-Semitism. In fact. International Slavic Institute. justice and progress to criticise his provincial ideas about women's rights and gender equality. his most vocal 19th century critic. Where it is not ignored. Peter Kropotkin has come to the conclusion that the political federation in a democratic republican State is a transitional stage on the way to becoming anarchic social order. Syndicalists and the First World War Dr hist. explain and to promote the ideas of federalism. In this paper I correct this by showing that anti-feminism is central to Proudhon's social theory and his politics. Peter Kropotkin's activity in the area of practical federalism was in late 1917 . The aim of Moscow League of Federalists was to develop. K105 Radical education workshop Chair: Elizabeth Vasileva A workshop about anarchist and radical education projects and programmes. This was absolutely new idea in the Russian anarchist movement. later noted Schapiro. We can use Proudhon's own ideas about immanence. He headed Moscow League of Federalists and he was working out theoretical basis and trying to do practical work on creation of the foundations of the new Russian state . it is used merely as a stick to beat him with. proved beyond their means. Sergey Saitanov. Russian Academy of Sciences.early 1918. The impotence of ideologically “neutral” syndicalism and the growth of revolutionary sentiment during the war among the labouring masses (as predicted by the anarchists) made changes in the syndicalist movement all the more urgent. including The Free University of Brighton. This work was very important to Peter Kropotkin. Kropotkin stopped his work for federalism and moved to Dmitrov. The choice in the years of the post-war revolutionary upsurge was between Bolshevism and anarcho-syndicalism. . The league consisted of members of the various parties. Vadim Damier. Moscow The main sources about activities of this League of Federalists are very fragmentary. with little attempt to understand the place it holds in his broader social theory or how it chimes with his political anarchism. League had planned to public and the printed works on various aspects of federalism in Russia as practical acts. but need not be for us. And later he developed them on the basis of political structure of the North American United States. as they had planned. First source of his federalist views was parliamentary political system of Great Britain. and will add substantially to our understanding of Proudhon's theory of justice. Anarchists. Mainly preserved manuscripts and articles of Peter Kropotkin on theoretical questions of federalism.

The latitudinal intensities of this precarity exposed us to frequent and very strong events of discomfort which opened up spaces for collective witnessing (Boler 1999) and made us feel our shared co-presence. and inspired by Armaline's (2009) proposal to explore the potentials of physical movement for anarchist pedagogies. Action. & Marcus. and (dis)rupting society to mobilize knowledge and to affect authentic social change. 2007. 2003. I argue that our movement operated as cycling machine. Nu-Sol (Libertarian Sociability Center). thereby quasi-naturally making us unlearning dominant identitary and habitual scripts and pushing us forward to tentatively experiment with basic anarchist principles and organisation. Our collective was constantly challenged. Pussy Riot Demonstrations and Squatter Grrrls for Refugees. (Kearney. Kaltefleiter. each with about 30 participants. Such work remains disconnected from an activist collective that rejected formal organizational hierarchies.C to discuss the evolution and revolution of girl-centered activist culture. University of Münster. that we are selves in relation. (R)evolution and of the Riot Grrrl movement Caroline K. Focus is given to deconstructing anarcha-grrrl culture by dismantling formal boundaries and myths associated with revolution and charts influences of Riot Grrrl in anarchist actions such as Slut Walk. Riot Grrrl: captures and metamorphosis of a war machine Flávia Lucchesi. 2010). Utilizing Donna Hardaway’s (1989) seminal work. This paper extends my early work on Riot Grrrl (1995. Missing from these (herstories) is a discussion of a commitment to peace and social justice projects within an anarchist framework such as Food Not Bombs. not buoys of the self. I will reflect here on the commonalities of our cycling tours and focus on the longitudinal and latitudinal effects of collective movement on bicycles. Schlit. zine writing. but rather a continuum of (re)organizing. Resulting from the dynamic concatenation and composition of technical artefacts. the Green Avengers and Animal Liberation Front. Germany Grounded in direct experiences as co-organiser of four trans-european. We were pushed forward to transgress our inscripted roles and attitudes and driven into experimentation in how to relate to each other or put pragmatically in how to move on together without making us suffer. it was precarious. this essay discusses Riot Grrrls as cultural workers and advances analyses of “being” a Riot Grrrl through a fluidity of street activism.1998. Finally this essay interrogates the notion of postfeminism and post-girl power positing that grrrl/girl actions are fluid--neither post nor past. Previous studies of Riot Grrrl often rely on interpretations of Riot Grrrl artifacts. 2009) and incorporates authentic (herstories) including my own experiences as a member of Riot Grrrl D. U005 Theory stream [Panel 3] Who Has the Microphone? Anarchy. taken out of context and distant from original modes and messages of anarchy. In our tours the flow of stops and goes of this cycling machine basically operated an-archically and recurrently questioned the ways in which we tried to organize us for moving. More-than-Bodies in Collective Movement – Reflections on the Anarchist Pedagogies of a Cycling Machine Ferdinand Stenglein. persons and nonhuman objects. Department of Communication Studies & New Communication Media Anarchist Studies Initiative. long-distance cycling trips. we slowly became aware towards understanding that ultimately others suffering is our suffering. São Paulo . SUNY Cortland The Riot Grrrl Movement of the early 1990s in the United States intrigues scholars and activists alike. Institute of Sociology. Through these dimensions of our more-than-bodies in movement. Monem. In this way anarchist principles and practices of organisation quasi-naturally became of utmost relevance. and mediums of performance. the longitudinal effects of collective cycling are capricious.

Best. titled L’opera geografica di Eliseo Reclus [The geographical work of Élisée Reclus]. It is likely that she was also the only person in Italy at that time with the courage to speak openly about anarchism in the academy. Faced with increased girl’s interest in riot grrrl. This paper is based on my master’s thesis. U. the industry launched rock pop women singers moderately foul-mouthed. creating their performances by direct action based on feminist punk rock in the streets and private properties of Moscow. On the absence of Anarchist thought in German-speaking geography Simon Runkel.. In 1928. Instead. when she was only twenty years old. the daughter of the celebrated Italian intellectual and anarchist Luigi Fabbri (1877-1935). This typed text. geographic inquiry is closely linked to Anarchist thought. Luce was drawn to Reclus’s work as a child.” In hand against the industry and surpassing the riot scene appeared an anonymous girls association. Her defence earned her the highest mark as well as the nickname ‘signorina comunista’ (Miss communist) from the dean. White Anarchism. The riot grrrl appeared in the early 1990’s in the United States. critical perspectives have only recently become more visible. B. where I analyse the Luce Fabbri’s interdisciplinary readings of Reclus. They drew from the rock maxim “sex. In: Social Geography 4. she defended her dissertation at the University of Bologna on Reclus’s conception of geography. Inspired by Luigi. pp. was a sophisticated and important interpreter of the French anarchist geographer Élisée Reclus (1830-1905). & M. Anarchist thought resurfaced since the 1970s as radical geography in Anglophone academia and gained growing influence over the last decades. In this sense. drugs and rock’n’roll” and were thus considered by many: sluties. The riot grrrl adopted this word and experienced their sex liberated from the control of sexuality and macho violence. because Luce was the only candidate who refused to make the fascist salute before the examining committee. “Riot Grrrl: capturas e metamorfoses de uma máquina de guerra”. They were tired with the male chauvinist conduct and minor fascisms imposed on their lives also inside the punk movement. Her father. The work of Elisée Reclus and Peter Kropotkin gave human geography a critical impetus but their theoretical contributions remained marginalized in geography for decades. University College Dublin The Italian-Uruguayan intellectual Luce Fabbri (1908-2000). The original copy of Luce’s dissertation can be found in the archives of the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam. Feminism and Geography: Luce Fabbri reading Elisée Reclus Federico Ferretti. along with the correspondence and publications of the Fabbris. Chair: Dr Richard J. the Pussy Riot. which has intent to show the metamorphosis of riot grrrl war machine in the society of control. these critical perspectives in German-speaking human geography do not include Anarchist perspectives. School of Geography. is the principal source for my paper. It has been argued that the growing internationalisation of German geography on the one hand and a growing neoliberalization of academia on the other stimulated these developments since the 1980s (Belina. Department of Geography Historically. U006 The interdisciplinary promise of anarchist geographies stream Convenors: Richard J White. in the middle of the fascist dictatorship. . the riots emerged a new way of life: they liberated their howl. 2009). Naumann (2009): Critical geography in Germany: from exclusion to inclusion via internationalisation. who took refuge with his family in Montevideo after the establishment of the fascist dictatorship in Italy. In regard to German-speaking human geography. 47-58Belina et al. was the editor of the journal Il Pensiero and was among the first to translate the writings of Reclus into Italian. drawing on the double theoretical frame of feminist historical geographies and of the transnational turn in anarchist studies. Whether the rocker women who preceded the riot grrrl faced obscure paths to produce their music. or popstars who used a certain feminist discourse that today is largely known as “veracity of market. University of Heidelberg. the musical industry launched products and entertainers that could capture the latent unrest of the young girls attracted by the riots. targeting them as potential consumers. the music industry tried to invest in them but failed since the girls had an clear anti-capitalist attitude. In fact. Federico Ferretti & Anthony Ince. Surprisingly.

from the Palaeolithic period to the present day. to promote the idea that the future is ours to create – or to destroy . However. This long trajectory of the archaeological record produces a distinct spatiotemporal imaginary of the state throughout human history. activities and geographical imaginations of particular male anarchists such as Kropotkin and Reclus. While acknowledging limitations to archaeological ontologies and ‘gaze’. The basis of the presentation builds on our ongoing anarchist theorisation of ‘post-statist’ geographies (Barrera and Ince 2016. archaeology has since the 1990s increasingly explored the formation. University of Glasgow [The journal] seeks to promote an emancipatory geography. there had been attempts to include Anarchist approaches during the early beginnings of Critical geography in German-speaking academia in the 1980s. These contributions. The paper will discuss some reasons why such perspectives became disregarded. This paper turns its attentions to the geographical imagination informing the work of three anarca-feminists: in particular those women whose ideas and ambitions actively worked across a range of publishing spaces. the diversity of political spaces and relations. namely: temporalities of emergence and collapse. and nearly a century later the work of Dawn Gill and the establishment of the journal Contemporary Issues in Geography and Education from which the aforementioned quote comes and whose issue on Anarchism and Geography was published in 1990. Emma Goldman and the journal Mother Earth. we argue. Future (pre-)histories of the state: archaeology’s challenge to geography Anthony Ince & Gerónimo Barrera de la Torre In this presentation. the destabilisation of civilisation and progress. we identify four key themes within contemporary archaeology (especially post-processual and materialist archaeologies) that can usefully inform geographical debates. . However. This paper concerns itself with three specific examples from the 19th and 20th centuries: Charlotte Wilson and the establishment of the journal The Raven. can support greater empirical and theoretical depth in anarchist-geographic study of the state. Anarcha-feminism: geography. we explore the potential contributions of archaeology to geographical thinking on the state’s nature. functions and role in society. Poststructuralist and Feminist perspectives. and offers a useful set of conceptual and methodological tools that geographers could do well to investigate further. scales and educational contexts attentive to making new worlds of access and opportunity. which argues that geographers’ understandings of the state have been fundamentally linked to an epistemology of statism that limits how geographical knowledge is produced. Dr Jo Norcup. Ince and Barrera 2016). diversities and capabilities (1983:1). Anarchist thought is widely absent in German-speaking geography in favour of Marxist. and the contested terrains of power. stabilisation and collapse of states and polities.and to demonstrate that education bears some responsibility for building a better world responsive to human needs. it seeks. in other words. Accounts of the history of geography and the history of anarchism have long been attentive to the actions. publishing and education. authority and resistance.

Programmes will be available in larger fonts and dyslexia-friendly. but we offer assistance in finding translators from/to many spoken languages. . Accessibility Information: All university buildings are equipped with ramps and wheelchair accessible toilets. The conference food will be vegan. The social event will be at a pub which is wheelchair accessible on the ground floor with an accessible toilet. There will be a quiet space during the whole conference with comfy sofas available to the participants. do let us know about allergies and intolerances. The conference papers will all be delivered in English.