Spotting The “Wrong” Leaders: B e fo re I t I s To o L at e !

1



 


SPOTTING
THE
“WRONG”
LEADERS


Before It Is Too Late!

by
Daniel
A.
Brown,
PhD


I 
 T IM O T H Y 
 1:3 
 T H R O U G H 
 4:14

Almost
 nothing
 is
 more
 crucial
 for
 church
 growth
 than
 good
 leaders.
 Good
 leaders—and
 I’m
 not
 necessarily
 referring
 to
 obvious,
 standout
 leader‐types— encourage
active
participation
by
all
the
people
in
the
church.
Finding
the
right
set
 of
 leaders
 for
 church
 has
 been
 an
 issue
 since
 the
 earliest
 days
 when
 fledgling
 congregations
 were
 springing
 up
 around
 the
 Mediterranean
 world.
 A
 surprising
 number
of
New
Testament
verses
deal
with
the
subject
of
spiritual
leadership,
and
 those
passages
give
us
food
for
thought.
 As
 the
 new
 pastor
 of
 an
 existing
 church
 in
 Ephesus,
 Timothy
 was
 faced
 with
 a
 leadership
 problem.
 The
 wrong
 sorts
 of
 individuals
 had
 assumed
 leadership
 roles
 for
which
they
were
unsuited—not
because
of
a
lack
of
giftedness
or
training,
but
 because
they
had
faulty
concepts
of
spirituality.
They
made
incorrect
use
of
their
 leadership
 because
 their
 views
 about
 leadership
 and
 spirituality
 were
 fundamentally
flawed.
 Where
did
they
get
their
perceptions
of
leadership?
Probably
from
the
same
places
 many
 of
 us
 get
 ours;
 natural
 thinking,
 role
 models
 witnessed
 while
 growing
 up,
 hyper‐religious
examples,
etc!
Jesus
had
to
instruct
His
disciples
about
leadership
 when
 two
 of
 His
 followers
 (goaded
 on
 by
 their
 mother
 from
 a
 worldly
 mindset)
 sought
 greater
 rank
 within
 the
 kingdom…(see
 Matthew
 20:20‐28).
 Notice
 the
 contrast
Jesus
paints
between
world
thought
and
kingdom
thought.


Daniel
A.
Brown,
PhD
 ctw.coastlands.org


Spotting The “Wrong” Leaders: B e fo re I t I s To o L at e !

2



 Our
natural
notions
about
leadership
will
likely
take
us
in
the
wrong
direction.


P A U L ’ S 
 A D V IC E 
T O 
 T IM O T H Y 

What
can
we
learn
from
Paul’s
counsel
(1
 Timothy
1;
 2)
to
his
young
friend
about
 the
right
kinds
of
leaders
for
church?
What
did
Paul
identify
as
the
“wrong”
kinds?
 Do
 you
 have
 leaders
 with
 these
 qualities
 in
 your
 church?
 If
 so,
 you
 may
 want
 to
 have
 a
 good
 (redemptive‐for‐their‐sakes)
 talk
 with
 them—and/or
 remove
 them
 from
their
current
positions
of
influence.


T HE
 M YSTICS
 (1:3‐4)

• Focus
 on
 extra‐biblical
 subjects,
 not
 on
 simple
 truths,
 and
 they
 tend
 to
 specialize
in
extensive
teaching
on
little‐mentioned
truths.
 • Increase
mystery
and
pseudo‐spirituality,
rather
than
understandings
to
 which
everyone
can
come.
They
speculate
on
subjects
about
which
God
 has
said
little
or
nothing.
 • Make
true
leaders
feel
spiritually
unknowledgeable
and
inadequate,
and
 they
 imply
 that
 they
 have
 some
 sort
 of
 insider’s
 number
 to
 hear
 from
 God.


T HE
 L EGALISTS
 (1:7‐16)

• Focus
on
morality,
more
than
on
righteousness,
and
view
the
world
very
 much
in
terms
of
who
is
right/wrong.
 • Know
how
to
condemn
and
judge
whether
or
not
someone
has
measured
 up,
 but
 they
 have
 little
 knowledge
 for
 or
 interest
 in
 how
 to
 redeem
 people
who
have
failed.
 • Write
 people
 off,
 rather
 than
 help
 them
 change.
 When
 legalists
 are
 in
 charge,
decisions
about
prospective
leaders
(or
just
ordinary
people)
are
 made
too
quickly
and
too
conclusively.


Daniel
A.
Brown,
PhD


ctw.coastlands.org


Spotting The “Wrong” Leaders: B e fo re I t I s To o L at e !

3



 F ORMERLY
 S IGNIFICANT
 P ERSONALITIES
 (1:19‐20)

• Use
 their
 position
 or
 role—in
 the
 history
 of
 the
 church
 and/or
 in
 the
 community—as
 the
 basis
 upon
 which
 they
 have
 the
 right
 to
 advocate
 doctrines
and
directions
for
the
church.
 • Cease
 contending
 earnestly
 (and
 daily)
 for
 their
 faith,
 and
 shrink
 spiritually
 into
 a
 hollow
 shell.
 They
 may
 use
 religious
 words,
 but
 they
 cannot
describe
a
current
work
of
the
Lord
in
their
lives.
 • Do
not
focus
on
little
points
of
obedience
in
their
own
lives,
but
want
to
 steer
the
whole
church
according
to
what
they
think
it
(you)
should
do.


C ONTENTIOUS , 
 O PINIONATED
 M EN
 (2:8)

• Intimidate
 with
 arguments
 and/or
 anger;
 debate
 with
 indignation
 as
 they
try
to
“clear
house”
and
push
everyone
else
aside.
 • Impress
 other
 with
 their
 outspokenness
 and
 obvious
 competencies,
 but
 grow
uncomfortable
during
protracted
times
of
prayer
and
worship.
 • Forget
 that
 “the
 greatest”
 should
 become
 “the
 least,”
 and
 that
 the
 Lord
 uses
neither
our
might
nor
our
power.



F ASHION ‐D RIVEN , 
 V ISUALLY
 P ROMINENT
 W OMEN
 (2:9‐11)

• Impress
with
their
outer
adornment—hair
fashion,
costly
garments—but
 rarely
find
their
way
to
obscure
corners
of
servanthood.
 • Confuse
worldly
measurements
of
stature
with
marks
of
true
godliness.
 • Forget
that
God
“sees
in
secret”
and
that
most
real
work
in
the
kingdom
 is
done
behind
the
scenes.


S PIRITUAL
 J EZEBELS
 (2:12‐14)

• Overwhelm
 God’s
 intended
 order
 in
 the
 home
 and
 in
 the
 church
 by
 initially
offering
to
get
something
for
the
leaders.


Daniel
A.
Brown,
PhD


ctw.coastlands.org


Spotting The “Wrong” Leaders: B e fo re I t I s To o L at e !

4



 • Divert
true
leaders
from
their
God‐given
assignments,
and
cause
pastors
 to
second‐guess
themselves
again
and
again.
 • Cannot
 sit
 still
 and
 accept
 instruction/correction.
 They
 rise
 up
 and
 attempt
to
teach/lord
over
anyone
who
presumes
to
challenge
them.


LEADERS
SHAPE
YOUR
FUTURE

Each
 of
 these
 leader‐types
 are
 pseudo‐spiritual—meaning
 that
 they
 appear
 to
 be
 very
powerful
and
knowledgeable
in
the
kingdom,
but
they
convey
a
false
notion
 of
 what
 the
 Lord
 really
 wants
 in
 His
 followers.
 Instead
 of
 reproducing
 gentle,
 servant‐hearted,
loving
and
redemptive‐minded
saints
in
your
church,
these
sorts
 of
leaders
will
only
bear
fruit
in
like
kind
to
themselves.
They
will
create
a
spiritual
 climate
of:
strangeness
and
spookiness;
condemnation
and
shame;
favoritism
and
 cliquishness;
 contention
 and
 disagreement;
 showiness
 and
 shallowness;
 and,
 intimidation
and
abnegation.
 The
leaders
you
choose
for
various
positions—and
allow
to
remain
in
those
roles— will
be
prophetic
of
your
future.
Just
as
sowing
one
kind
of
seed
will
naturally
lead
 to
 reaping
 its
 fruit,
 so
 it
 will
 be
 with
 your
 leaders.
 Regardless
 of
 what
 you
 say
 in
 your
sermons,
announcements,
and
pleas
for
more
workers,
the
single
biggest
and
 loudest
 communication
 you
 make
 about
 servanthood
 and
 leadership
 will
 always
 come
from
the
examples
you
currently
have
as
leaders
in
your
church.
 Sometimes,
 then,
 it
 is
 better
 to
 temporarily
 have
 no
 leaders
 for
 CM,
 coffee
 ministry,
 or
 worship
 team
 than
 it
 is
 to
 have
 the
 wrong
 leaders
 perpetuating
 the
 precise
scenario
that
we’re
living
with—i.e.,
not
having
the
leaders
we
want.
 Have
 courage.
 Do
 not
 settle
 for
 the
 wrong
 leaders
 just
 to
 have
 leaders.
 Trust
 the
 God
 who
 calls
 into
 being
 out
 of
 that
 which
 does
 not
 exist.
 He
 who
 arranged
 the
 cosmos
 can
 arrange
 for
 leaders
 to
 emerge
 in
 your
 midst,
 through
 loving
 discipleship
and
being
merciful‐with‐their‐mistakes
mentoring.

 
 


Daniel
A.
Brown,
PhD


ctw.coastlands.org


Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful