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OCT. 511, 2016

Riverside turtles find new home at Johnson Park


Students come together for the big turtle transfer, excited for future learning opportunities with the reptiles
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
The courtyard garden at Johnson Park Elementary School is
home to many things. It has milkweeds and monarch butterflies,
towering trees and flowering
plants. A few years ago it had
three Uzbekistan tortoises
named Izzy, Becky and Stan by
adoring students. But in 2009 they
were shipped to North Dakota to
a habitat more suitable to their
needs, and since then, the garden
has been short of reptiles.
On Thursday afternoon, this
changed.
Riverside
science
teacher Mark Eastburn, who
used to teach Spanish at Johnson
Park, returned to his old stomping grounds to release a cohort of
turtles. Students gathered by orange buckets filled with big turtles, medium-sized turtles and
baby turtles the size of a silver
dollar.
With excitement, a bit of caution and a hint of freaking out,
kids of all ages lined up where
they learned, under the supervision of Eastburn, JP science
teacher Lora Hobart and Principal Dr. Robert Ginsberg, how to
properly handle a turtle. They
then scattered throughout the
open air courtyard and placed the
turtles wherever they saw fit.

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Third graders Ellington Hinds, left, and Leonardo Momo are fascinated with the way this turtle moves.
For more photos, please see page 13.
These turtles would not be caged,
they would be free to roam in a
natural habitat and observed only
when found.
These are really adding to our
ecosystem, Hobart said. Were
doing a lot of work on genetics as

part of the Next Generation Science Standards and the turtles


will help a lot to facilitate the discussion. Weve been studying
plants in the curriculum. When
the kids come out here now,
theyll look for the turtles and

maybe one will be next to a purple plant. Then we can learn


about that. Plus, being outside is
just so good for the kids helps
with stress, to relax in nature.
When the turtles first arrived
at Riverside after Eastburn re-

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


BOE meeting
Plan discussed to tackle
population growth. PAGE 4

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

ceived a $1,200 grant from the


Princeton Education Foundation
in December 2014, there were 38
of them. Eastburn implemented
an initial population study with
his students and helped them analyze the data through a series of
science games. Since then, there
were 11 hatchling turtles in fall of
2015 and many eggs in 2016. The
population grew to more than 60,
and Riverside decided it was time
to share.
I like this one, first grader
James Price said as he kneeled
down to observe a baby turtle in
the JP yard. I think hes pretty
tiny.
Third grader Leonardo Momo
was a bit cautious of the larger
turtles, as his friend Ellington
Hinds held the big reptiles underbelly toward his face for a closer
look.
I am excited theyre here,
Momo said. I like how they
walk.
The turtle, now placed in the
grass, scurried away its legs
seemingly bow-legged on either
side of its oval, orange-speckled
shell.
Its kinda cool, Momo continued, and kinda fun.
Jocera Adams, another third
grader, picked up a baby turtle
please see TEACHER, page 14

MEET THE
CANDIDATES
Meet the two candidates
for Princeton Mayor. PAGE 10

2 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

Terhune Orchards plans Fall Festival Weekends


From apple and pumpkin picking to live country music, farm is full of family fun throughout autumn
Fall Family Weekends continue through Oct. 30. Every weekend at Terhune Orchards, there
are opportunities to pick your
own apples and pumpkins, listen
to some good old-fashioned country music, paint pumpkins and
take part in lots of childrens activities on the Mount Familys
200-acre farm on preserved farmlands.
A full day of fun on the farm
awaits the entire family. Get up
close and personal with nature
during a tractor wagon ride
through preserved farmlands or a
walk on the farm trail or explore
the corn maze. The Adventure
Barn is decorated differently
each year and tells the story of
life on a farm. This years theme
is about Johnny Appleseed. Walk
through this life-sized storybook
to learn how he planted apples all
across the land. The barnyard is
always a popular stop to visit
with the animals. There are pony

rides, scavenger hunts, a rubber


duck race and many more childrens activities to keep the little
ones engaged for hours.
Pams Food Tent is open for
lunch with barbecue chicken,
pulled pork sandwiches, vegetarian chili, soups and more. Treats
made with Terhune Orchards apples are also available. Enjoy your
choice of our famous apple cider
donuts, pies, muffins and freshly
pressed apple cider.
Our winery tasting room is
open to adult visitors to sample
our red, white and fruit wines
made with our apple cider.
Fall Family Weekends are 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. On Columbus Day weekend, the Fall Festival Weekend
will be on Saturday, Sunday and
Monday.
Admission on festival days is
$8, ages 3 and older. Parking and
access to the farm store, winery
and pick your own orchard on

Special to The Sun

Everybody enjoys apple picking in autumn! Stop by Terhune Orchards for family weekends for apples, pumpkins, food, music and
more.
Van Kirk Road is free. Terhune
Orchards is located at 330 Cold
Soil Road, Princeton.

Due to bridge construction,


Carter Road is closed. Use Cold
Soil Road to visit our home farm

and turn on Van Kirk Road to


visit our pick your own apple orchard.
The farm store is open daily, 9
a.m. to 6 p.m.
The winery is open FridaySunday, noon to 5 p.m. Wine bottles available in farm store daily.
Van Kirk Road pick your own
orchard open daily, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Find Terhune Orchards online
at terhuneorchards.com, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram
The following local bands will
perform from noon-4 p.m. during
Fall Festival Weekends: Mountain Heritage on Oct. 8; Tom &
Jerry Band on Oct. 9; Jay Smar on
Oct. 10; Jimmy Lee Ramblers on
Oct. 15; Ocean Country Band on
Oct. 16; Magnolia Street String
Band on Oct. 22; Heavy Traffic
Blue Grass Band on Oct. 23; Jersey Corn Pickers on Oct. 29; and
Growing Old Disgracefully on
Oct. 30.

Police: Three Princeton men allegedly assault Lytle Street resident


The following reports are on
file with the Princeton Police Department:
On Sept. 20 at approximately
10:37 p.m., three Princeton men
were walking on Lytle Street
when they approached
a 22-year-old-male who
resides on the first
block of Lytle Street.
The victim reported
being assaulted by
each of the men a 44-year-old, a
23-year-old and a 21-year-old.
The victim was pushed to the
ground where he was kicked repeatedly. The victim was able to
get to his feet and escape to a
nearby backyard. While there,
the accused individuals attempted to assault the victim with a
hammer, which had been taken
from the rear bed of a nearby
parked pickup truck.
The victim called out for help

and was assisted by a 29-year-old


male Lytle Street resident. Both
were able to escape into a nearby
home and lock the door. All three
accused continued to pursue the
victims to the home and attempted to break into the home by kicking and pounding the
door, causing damage.
When police arrived
all three accused were
placed under arrest.
The victims sustained
minor injuries and were not
transported to the hospital.
All three accused sustained injuries and were transported to the
University Medical Center of
Princeton at Plainsboro. It appears as though at least two of the
accused individuals were inadvertently struck with the hammer during the attack.
All three accused were charged
with the following crimes: aggravated assault, unlawful posses-

police
report

sion of a weapon, possession of a


weapon for unlawful purpose and
criminal attempt burglary.
Bail was set at $50,000 with no
10 percent posting option. All
were transported to the Mercer
County Correctional Center.

Sept. 26
Police were called to the Albert
Hinds Plaza to investigate the report of a juvenile harassing individuals. The 15-year-old male was
taken into custody. During the
process the juvenile physically resisted the officer and assaulted
him. The juvenile was transported to police headquarters where
he was processed and later released to a guardian. During this
incident, a separate 14-year-old
male was also taken into custody
for juvenile delinquency harassment. He too was transported to
police headquarters where he
was processed and later released

to a guardian.

Sept. 24
Subsequent to a motor vehicle
stop for numerous violations, including maintenance of lamps, a
37-year-old Perth Amboy male
was found to have multiple warrants for his arrest with a total
bail of $2,500. A passenger in the
vehicle, a 53-year-old New
Brunswick male was found to be
a wanted person out of Middlesex
County Superior Court. Both
were arrested and transported to
police headquarters where they
were processed. The elder was released to the Middlesex County
Sheriff s Department, and the
younger was released to the Readington Township Police Department.

Sept. 22
An unknown individual passed
a counterfeit $100 bill at a store lo-

cated on North Harrison Street.


The investigation has been
turned over to the Detective Bureau for follow-up investigation.
Subsequent to a motor vehicle
stop for failure to wear a seatbelt,
a 33-year-old Orange male was
found to have two active warrants
for his arrest. The warrants were
issued by the Orange City Municipal Court and the total bail was
$1,750. He was placed under arrest. A passenger in the vehicle, a
26-year-old Orange male, was
found to be a wanted person and
had a warrant for his arrest that
was also issued by the Orange
City Municipal Court. His warrant was a no bail warrant. He too
was placed under arrest. Both
were transported to police headquarters where they were
processed. The Orange City Muplease see JUVENILE, page 15

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 3

Walk newly restored


Woodfield trails Oct. 15
The Princeton Environmental
Commission and Friends of
Princeton Open Space invite you
to celebrate the major trail improvements that have been made
in this 100-plus acre preserve over
the summer with guided walks
and refreshments at 10 a.m. on
Oct. 15. Meet at the park entrance
on the Old Great Road.
Join to walk the three-quartermile Scout Loop or walk a longer
two-and-a-half-mile loop to visit
Tent Rock and Council Rock.
The trails have been cleared
and clearly marked and boardwalk has been installed over spots
that get muddy when it rains. The
work was done by 18 volunteers
organized by Friends of Princeton Open Space who spent 317
labor hours in 22 workdays clearing 1.5 miles of trail, constructing
1,000 feet of new trail and installing 220 linear feet of board-

walk.
This trail renovation was made
possible by a $1,500 Open Space
Stewardship Grant from the Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions supplemented by $500 each from Friends
of Princeton Open Space and the
Princeton Environmental Commission. Support was also provided by Hamilton Building Supply
Company.
Please wear shoes appropriate
for hiking as the trails run
through the woods and cover uneven terrain and bring a water
bottle. RSVP to info@fopos.org.

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OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge. Email
news@theprincetonsun.com.

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Call or Visit Us Online
to Register

www.AFTH.org
856.861.6719

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Tuesday
October 18th
6:30 PM

4 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

Open House &


Grand Re-Opening Carnival
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22ND
4-7PM
Fun for the whole family! Free Admission!
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BOE tackles plan


for student growth
With numbers on the rise, district
and superintendent work to remedy
population issue for short and long term
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
The Sept. 27 Board of Education meeting brought further dialogue about one of the public
school systems heaviest weights:
the rapid growth of its student
body. From last year alone, the
district has seen an increase of
163 students with John Witherspoon Middle School and Community Park Elementary School
having the heaviest hits.
According to Superintendent
Steve Cochrane, who presented
updated data since his report at
the meeting on the cusp of the

new school year, 105 of the 163


new students are from three new
developments: AvalonBay, about
10 percent of which is occupied,
Copperwood and Merwick-Stanworth, Princeton University
housing that has only one-third of
its capacity occupied.
So, this could go as far as having 200 to 225 new students when
these developments are full,
Board Vice President Pat Sullivan
said.
The district is working to complete a long-term plan, which
would be implemented in approximately four years.
Dina Shaw, parent to two PPS
sixth graders and one high school
freshman who is also co-president
of the JWMS Parent Teacher Organization, came to the podium to
question a more immediate plan
for the influx of students.
Some classes at JW have up to
27 students in them, Shaw said.
I can tell you I did not move to
Princeton to have classes of that
size, and I can tell you I am not
alone in that sentiment.
Shaw said there has been growing concerns among PTO members, but the realization of how
significantly classes have increased has not yet reached all
parents. Discussion of plausible
solutions within parent groups
have included removing Cranbury from the school district,
though it pays to attend, or demanding tax from Princeton University or the Institute for Advanced Study, both of which have
high numbers of faculty or students children attending PPS.
Neither the university nor the
institute pays the schools, yet we
have a large number of their children being educated, Shaw said.
I realize the university gives
money to the township, but that
please see HOMECOMING, page 12

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 5

Police offer voluntary


Community Camera Program
to residents, businesses
In furtherance of the concept
of community partnerships, the
Princeton Police Department has
developed a Community Camera
Program that will allow residents
and/or business owners to register their surveillance cameras
with the police department. The
department is requesting residents, businesses and organizations that have security cameras
in place on their property to complete a short registration form.
The registration is voluntary and
does not give the Princeton Police
Department access to your camera system. It allows the police to
maintain a database of active
cameras in the event a crime occurs in the area.
If you would like to partner
with
the Princeton Police
Princeton
Sun Department in deterring criminal activi-

ty and capturing violators, you


are encouraged you to register
your surveillance cameras with
the PPD. Residents or business
owners can register their system
on the department's website,
www.princetonnj.gov/police/cam
era-registration.html.
If residents or business owners
have any questions about the program, please call Sgt. Chris Tash
at (609) 921-2100 ext. 2184.

PSA

Poison Control Center


(800) 222-1222

ROSSEN MILANOV
Music Director

LEILA JOSEFOWICZ, violin

Classical Series Edward T. Cone Concert

VIENNESE REFLECTIONS
Sunday October 9 Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University
3pm Pre-Concert Talk / 4pm Concert
ROSSEN MILANOV, conductor
LEILA JOSEFOWICZ, violin; JULIAN GRANT, guest composer
JULIAN GRANT / Is it enough? Perhaps it is*, After J.R. AHLE and J.S. BACH
ALBAN BERG / Violin Concerto, To the Memory of an Angel
FRANZ SCHUBERT / Symphony No. 9 in C Major, D. 944, Great
*World premiere, commissioned by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra

princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020


Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change.
This program is funded in part by the NJ State Council on the Arts/Department
of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

6 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

in our opinion

Only two more debates to go

145 Witherspoon Street


Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245

Were not so sure we could take any more than that


Richard Donnelly

hankfully, there are only two


more presidential debates
plus a vice presidential debate and only about five weeks before a new president is elected. We say
that not necessarily because we cant
wait for either of these candidates to
enter office, but because we, like many
others, are simply sick of listening to
them campaign.
Whether you are for Democrat
Hillary Clinton or Republican Donald
Trump, you can agree that the campaign for this presidency, which still
has more than a month left, has been
ugly.
There have been accusations, critiques, fact checking and even some
name calling at just about every turn.

Your thoughts
What are your thoughts on the
campaigns in the presidential election?
Share your thoughts on this, and other
topics, through a letter to the editor.

Clinton and Trump havent been too


kind to each other. Even when they
were on the stage together in their
first debate, televised to the entire
country, they couldnt play nice.
Trump interrupted Clinton on numerous occasions. Clinton went over
her allotted time once or twice. They
threw insults at each other in roundabout ways, each calling the other a
liar at different points of the night.
This is not what we were hoping to
see. The first presidential debate last

Monday did not make us proud. It did


not fill us with joy.
Instead, it made us a little
ashamed not necessarily that Clinton and Trump are our candidates, but
that campaigning for the top office of
our country has turned into a complete circus.
There are some proposed policies of
Clintons that we like. There are some
from Trump that we like as well. But
what we dont like from either candidate is the path they are taking to try
to get elected.
Its a shame that our presidential
elections have turned into this, but its
something we will have to live with for
another five weeks. Thankfully, Nov. 8
is not that far off.

Morven Museum and Garden receives Award of Merit


The American Association for State and
Local History announced Morven Museum
and Garden is the recipient of an Award of
Merit for its exhibition Charles & Anne
Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age.
The AASLH Leadership in History
Awards, now in its 71st year, is the most
prestigious recognition for achievement in
the preservation and interpretation of
state and local history.
Curated by Morven Curator of Exhibitions and Collections Elizabeth Allan and
curatorial consultant Heather Smith,
Charles & Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the vices and virtues of
this prominent couple. The five-gallery exhibition is designed by Isometric Studio of
Brooklyn, New York. It is on view at Morven through Oct. 23.
This year, AASLH presented 63 national
awards honoring people, projects, exhibits
and publications.
The winners represent the best in the

ceo oF NeWspAper MediA Group

Tim Ronaldson

Joe Eisele

executive editor

publisher

MANAGiNG editor

Kristen Dowd
Erica Chayes Wida
AdvertisiNG director Arlene Reyes

seNior priNcetoN editor

The Sun is published weekly by


Newspaper Media Group, 145
Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ
08542. It is mailed weekly to select
addresses in the 08542 and 08540 ZIP
codes. If you are not on the mailing list,
six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99.
PDFs of the publication are online, free
of charge. For information, please call
609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@theprincetonsun.com.
For advertising information, call
(609) 751-0245 or email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from
readers including any information
about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look
for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Include your name, address and phone
number. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at 609-7510245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too.

Special to The Sun

Morven Museum and Garden is the recipient of an Award of Merit for its exhibition
Charles & Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age.
field and provide leadership for the future
of state and local history.
Presentation of the awards were made

at a special banquet during the


AASLH/MMA Annual Meeting in Detroit,
Mich., on Sept. 16.

The Princeton Sun reserves the right to


reprint your letter in any medium
including electronically.

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 7

Wilson-Apple Funeral Home

Ordinance introduced
for Civil Rights Commission
!

This is something that we need and it cant come soon enough, says
Human Services Subcommittee of Civil Rights Chair Leticia Fraga
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
At the Sept. 26 council meeting,
an ordinance was introduced to
create a Civil Rights Commission
for the town. The commission is
spearheaded by the Human Services Subcommittee of Civil
Rights, which includes Chair
Leticia Fraga, Elizabeth Bidwell
Bates, Larry Spruill, John Heilner and Tommy Parker.
It took the subcommittee two
years of research, speaking with
stakeholders and planning to
ready the ordinance for council. It
was tabled at a meeting in April
for wrinkles its members pointed
out to council. At last Mondays
meeting, the subcommittee said it
was still working with the administration to iron out policies and
procedures it didnt think were
up to standards.
We want to ensure that a
process is established that is accessible, welcoming and fair for
everyone, Fraga said.
If the ordinance is approved
after public hearing Oct. 24, the
commission would act as an advisory body serving individuals
who have complaints or concerns
about unfair or discriminatory
treatment. According to the ordinance, the commissions nine appointed members, in addition to
living in Princeton, must have experience in resolving discrimination complaints.
It [the commission] is making
sure the residents of Princeton
have somewhere to go and someone thats gonna listen to them.
Youd be surprised of how many
concerns there are in town. Some
of them may be small to a lot of

us, but to someone thats being


treated unfairly its something
that becomes extremely, extremely damaging in their everyday
life, said Council President
Lance Liverman.
The Civil Rights Commission,
or Joint Commission on Civil
Rights, as it was originally
called, was established in 1968
and, according to the subcommittee, functioned effectively for
more than 30 years to provide education and outreach, coordinate
community dialogues and conduct conflict resolution sessions
to help many resolve their grievances.
For me, Id like to see this implemented, Liverman continued.
This has over time served us
well. We have example after example of how many times weve
saved the town all kinds of fees
and embarrassment and everything else by just working with
people and trying to bring two entities together. Its a positive
step.
According to the ordinance, the
duties and responsibilities of the
Civil Rights Commission will be
to work among individuals and
groups to eliminate discrimination, to develop community education programs that foster open
dialogue about race relations, to
recommend ways of improving
or initiating municipal programs
and to make recommendations to
the mayor and council regarding
policies, procedures and programs to prevent and eliminate
discrimination.
I personally am thrilled that
we are nearing the point that all
our work will come to fruition. I
am confident that all our effort

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Drop us an email at news@theprincetonsun.com. Fax us at 856-4270934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.

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vested in this will eventually result in something that is positive


for our community, Fraga said.
In the years that Ive lived in
Princeton, even before I was on
the commission being out in the
community and talking to individuals this is something that
we need and it cant come soon
enough.

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MOTION GYMNASTICS
609-730-9394

3&(*45&3/08

$PNF+PJO6T'PS"O&YDJUJOH/FX:FBS
(SFBU(ZNOBTUJDTt(SFBU5FBNTt(SFBU'VO

Halloween Party
Fundraiser
Saturday
October 29th
1:00-4:00

CALENDAR

OCT. 511, 2016

WEDNESDAY OCT. 5
Citizenship Preparation Class:
These weekly classes are offered
by the Latin American Task Force
to assist in preparing for the U.S.
Citizenship Test. Classes include
history, civics and a review of
basic English necessary for the
citizenship interview. Oct. 5, 19,
26; Nov. 2, 9, 16. Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau St., 7 p.m.
Why the Saxophone?: PSO Music
Director Rossen Milanov and
Operations Manager Bryan
McNamara discuss the saxophone's unusual role as an
orchestral instrument. Princeton
Public Library, 7 p.m.

WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 145 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Or by email: news@theprinceton
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.theprincetonsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.

THURSDAY OCT. 6

t1BSFOU$IJME
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55 Route 31 South, BLD C
Pennington, NJ 08534

PAGE 8

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www.MotionGymnastics.com

Finding Your Purpose...


A Day of Infinite Possibilities
This event promises to be a day
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Lunch will be served.

Register directly on my website:


http://www.fitzgeraldlifecoaching.com/schedule.html

Princeton Farmers Market: Seasonal produce from local farmers,


flowers, crafts and a variety of
edibles are available through 4
p.m. at this weekly event. Live
music from 12:30-2:30 p.m. Hinds
Plaza, 11 a.m.
International Film Series: Sunset
Song. The daughter of a Scottish
farmer comes of age in the early
1900s. 2 hours, 15 minutes. Free
popcorn. Part of the International
Cinema series. Tickets - $11 general admission, $8 for seniors, $6
for members - may be purchased
online at thegardentheatre.com
or at the door. Princeton Garden
Theatre, 160 Nassau St. 5:30,
p.m.
Princeton CHOOSE Information
Session: Princeton CHOOSE
(Community, Holism, Opportunity, Outcry, Standards and Education) is a student-led organization
aiming to overcome racism and
inspire harmony through exposure, education and empowerment. In this information session,
founders Priya Vulchi and
Winona Guo will talk about their
mission and explain how others
can participate and engage with
their program. For information
and
meeting
place,
visit
www.princetonchoose.org. 7 p.m.

FRIDAY OCT. 7
Job Seeker Sessions: The library
and Professional Services Group
of Mercer County sponsor sessions for professionals who are
seeking new employment and
contracting
opportunities
throughout the region. Please

check the librarys website for


specific topics. Princeton Public
Library, 9:45 a.m.
Acting Out: Students in kindergarten through third grade
engage in dramatic activity
including discussions, games and
other fun activities. No experience necessary. Princeton High
School drama aficionados will
lead the sessions. Princeton Public Library, 4:30 p.m.
Library Live at Labyrinth with
Nancy Weiss Malkiel: The author
and professor emeritus of history
at Princeton University discusses
and signs copies of Keep the
Damned Women Out, her book
about the late 1960s when a
number of conservative, prestigious colleges and universities
began to admit women. Drawing
on archival research, the book
reveals how coeducation was
achieved not by the efforts of
women activists, but through
strategic decisions made by powerful men. Labyrinth Books, 122
Nassau St., 4:30 p.m.
Free Film: Hello, My Name is
Doris. Sally Field stars as a 60something woman inspired by a
self-help seminar to romantically
pursue her younger co-worker.
Part of the First Friday Feature
series. Princeton Public Library
Community Room, 7 p.m.

SATURDAY OCT. 8
Knit for Others: The library is collecting hand-knit and crocheted
items through the end of Decem-

ber as part of our seventh annual


Knit for Others program. Donated
items will be displayed on a
clothesline behind the Welcome
Desk and distributed to local
organizations. Items of all kinds
may be dropped off at the Welcome Desk and will be gratefully
accepted. Through Saturday, Dec.
31. Princeton Public Library, all
day.
Fall Festival Weekends: Fall Family
Weekends continue every fall
weekend through Oct. 30. Every
weekend there are opportunities
at Terhune Orchards to pick your
own apples and pumpkins, listen
to some good old-fashioned
country music, paint pumpkins
and take part in lots of childrens
activities on the Mount Familys
200-acre farm. Food, wintetasting and farm store available. $8,
ages 3 and older. Terhune
Orchards, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
Meditation, Kirtan, Bhakti yoga,
Bhagavad-gita - Hidden Treasure of the Sweet Absolute: Enjoy
a discussion, meditation and Indian vegetarian luncheon at the
institute of spiritual culture and
science. Every Saturday. Register
by email: Princeton@bviscs.org.
Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau St. #116, 2 p.m.
Go Between Club: All sixth, seventh,
and eighth graders are welcome
to join us on the second Saturday
of every month for a fun discussion of books and other interests.
Princeton Public Library, 2 p.m.

please see CALENDAR, page 9

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 9

CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8

SUNDAY OCT. 9
Fall Festival Weekends: Fall Family
Weekends continue every fall
weekend through Oct. 30. Every
weekend there are opportunities
at Terhune Orchards to pick your
own apples and pumpkins, listen
to some good old-fashioned
country music, paint pumpkins
and take part in lots of childrens
activities on the Mount Familys
200-acre farm. Food, wintetasting and farm store available. $8,
ages 3 and older. Terhune
Orchards, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
Princeton Bluegrass Jam: Craving
some bluegrass? Stop by Small
Worlds Witherspoon location for
a jam session of Princeton area
artists. Small World Coffee, 14
Witherspoon St., 7-9 p.m.

MONDAY OCT. 10
Letra Pequea: Through engagement with books, activities and
crafts, these sessions are
designed to help children and
adults improve Spanish language
skills. Sessions are conducted in
Spanish and are intended for parents/caregivers to attend with
babies and toddlers. Princeton
Public Library, 11 a.m.
Middle School Math Circle: Prince-

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ton High School math enthusiasts show students in grades six


to eight how fun and fascinating
math can be. Lesson plans will
focus on applied mathematics
and statistics. Princeton Public
Library Study Room 354, 4:30
p.m.
Genty y Cuentos: In discussing Latin American short stories in
Spanish, participants recount
their personal experiences and
how they relate to the characters
in the story. Princeton Public
Library, 7 p.m.
Mic Monday: Enjoy a cup of coffee
and some tunes for Small Worlds
open mic night. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon St., 7-9 p.m.

HIS JOURNEY BEGINS HERE

TUESDAY OCT. 11

PRINCETON ACADEMY
of the Sacred Heart

Chess: Children can learn to play


and practice chess at these weekly drop-in sessions led by Princeton High School Chess Club members. Princeton Public Library, 4
p.m.
PSA

Fall Admission
Open Houses

1128 Great Road Princeton, NJ 08540


www.princetonacademy.org

Sunday, October 16
1:00 p.m.

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Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

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10 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

MEET THE

CANDIDATES

Get to know the candidates for Princeton Mayor


in the below profiles. Starting next week, The Sun will delve
further into the elections on Nov. 8 by asking each candidate
two questions pertinent to issues in town.

Name: Liz Lempert


as a government. There is still
Age: 47
much more to do. We can build
Occupation: Mayor
on our recent successes to make
Political Affiliation: Democrat
Princeton a more connected,
Clubs/Organizations:
New
sustainable and affordable comJersey League of Municipalimunity, with a government that
ties Executive Board, Princeis fiscally responsible, progreston Public Library Board of
sive and innovative.
Trustees, Princeton University
If elected, what would be
Art Museum Community
your top priority? My top priLeadership Council, NEWDeal
ority is keeping costs down
LEMPERT
Leaders, Princeton Communiwhile providing excellent
ty Democratic Organization
services. Most immediately, I
and Meals on Wheels of Mercer County.
plan to focus on seeing through the
Why are you running for mayor? During planning projects currently underway,
my first term as mayor Ive worked to- including the Neighborhood Character
gether with the Council, municipal staff, and Zoning Initiative, a community
our volunteer boards and residents to ful- planning effort created in response to
fill the promise of consolidation. We have concerns among residents about the imsaved money, enhanced services and in- pacts of teardowns and development accreased our efficiency and effectiveness tivities occurring throughout town.

Name: Peter Marks


a time when I think the future
Age: 61
character of our lovely little
Occupation: Real Estate Contown is at issue.
sulting and Development
Political Affiliation: RepubliIf elected, what would be
can
your top priority?
Why are you running for
My top priority would be
Mayor?
persuading Princetonians that
The short answer is that I
the affordability, sustainwas asked to run and that I
ability and diversity they
usually try to accommodate
prize are possible only in a
MARKS
those who ask for my help.
state of equilibrium and that
The more complete answer
such a state is possible only if
is that a mayoral campaign,
we tighten our zoning, stabieven a futile mayoral campaign, offers lize our population, preserve our open
one of the relatively few opportunities spaces, challenge the state mandates
to reach people who ordinarily pay little that bloat our various budgets and reattention to local issues and to do so at turn control of our town to its residents.

Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

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OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 11

MEET THE BOE

CANDIDATES
Visit www.theprincetonsun.com to get
to know the candidates for Princeton Board
of Education Debbie Bronfeld, William Hare,
Alex Martin and Gregory Stankiewicz. Find
out why they are running and, if elected, what
their top priority would be. Starting next week,
The Sun will delve further into the elections on
Nov. 8 by asking each candidate two questions
pertinent to issues in town. Look for their
answers online and in our next issue.

Be social.
Like us on
Facebook!

www.facebook.com/
princetonsun

The Sun isn't


just in print. Like
us on Facebook
for additional
photos, stories
and tidbits of
information
about your town.

12 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

E L E G A N T | S U S TA I N A B L E

Homecoming Weekend is Oct. 12-14

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does not pay our bills. It doesnt


pay for teachers; it doesnt pay for
buildings. Id like to know what
our plan is to get them to pay
their fair share. Fair is fair.
Cochrane first addressed the
long-term plan that, once in place,
will allow the district to gain state
approval for short-term solutions.
The facilities committee will soon
be proposing a referendum for the
board to approve architects for capacity studies and needs analyses. Once data has been collected
and a plan drafted, the district
will approach the state and ask
for remedies to keep Princetons
educational philosophies in line
regardless of its rapid growth.
Those are the driving issues
for this year and for looking at
our next-year plan, Cochrane
said. Some of it will be more
teachers, and some of it will be
finding new space.
JW has extra space that could
be used for new classrooms if additional teachers were hired.
Other options for interim expansion include building trailers or,
as Cochrane noted euphemistically, cottages, and renting nearby
space.
When Shaw expressed concern
of taxes soaring, Board President
Andrea Spalla said it would not

be a sudden spike, and that


bonds from previous years would
be rolled over to cover expansion
costs as much as possible.
At this point, Princeton University pays a sum to the municipality in lieu of taxes, but
Cochrane said this may be something they look at, and the board
will work with the town to create
the best solution for the high population of students on a shortand long-term basis.
In other news:
The board, alongside Princeton Teachers Union co-presidents, released a statement in opposition to the state Department
of Educations recent implementation of students standardized
test scores bearing 30 percent
more weight in teacher evaluations. The statement is available
on the princetonk12.org homepage.
The superintendent outlined
the Merit Goals achieved for the
2015-2016 school year and the
Merit Goals for the current
school year. Upcoming goals include a review of service learning for grades K through 12, working to enhance cultural responsiveness and empathy with the
creation of programs such as a
Council of Diversity and Outreach, and revising administrator
evaluation instruments and protocols.
Some of the achieved Merit
Goals from last year include
Homework 2.0, which led to desig-

nated Homework Free Weekends for high school students,


and Athletics 2.0, which led to
this years implementation of Option II for athletes using gym
as a free period to relieve stress
load.
The board recognized the following
retirees:
Christophe
Auleus, custodian, Riverside Elementary, after 25 years of service,
effective Feb. 1; and Diane Lefenfeld, grade five, Johnson Park Elementary, after 22 years of service,
effective July 1. The board
thanked Auleus and Lefenfeld for
their efforts on behalf of students, parents, staff and community members over their years of
service in the district.
Spalla and Cochrane addressed the school, the community and the parents, friends and
peers of Owen Bardzilowski for
the unbelievable togetherness
and support fostered in the days
and weeks following Bardzilowskis passing. They thanked the
teachers, administrators, outside
organizations and all individuals
who worked to help those in need
and honored the Bardzilowski
family for their openness to create a dialogue for other children
and people suffering similarly to
Owen.
Cochrane reminded the board
of Homecoming Weekend Oct. 12
through 14 and encouraged all
parents and students to attend to
lift the spirits and contribute to
the joy of PHS students.

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 13

TURTLE
POWER
Photos by Erica Chayes Wida/The Sun

Clockwise from above: A turtle


slowly makes his way around his
new home at Johnson Park Elementary School. Jocera Adams,
third grade, particularly loves
the baby turtles. First grader
Dylan Hagt learns how to handle
a turtle. A new Johnson Park
turtle climbs against the base of
a tree. There is more than just
turtles in the school garden
such as this beautiful Monarch
butterfly. James Price, first
grade, gets a closer look at one
of his schools new turtles.

14 THE PRINCETON SUN OCT. 511, 2016

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Teacher says project


has helped spark
childrens curiosity
Continued from page 1
which appeared small even in the
palm of her young hand and
held it delicately.
My favorite thing is, well
theyre so cute, she said smiling.
I really like the babies.
Adams walked carefully and
showed off her new friend to the
younger children.
Steve Mahiri, a fifth grader
from Riverside, came along to JP

to assist with the turtles adjusting in their new home.


Its been good to help them
transfer, Mahiri said. I named
one of them Squid Nugget its
from a Youtuber. Im gonna miss
him.
According to Eastburn, the turtle project has been a significant
component to help spark childrens curiosity in science and develop an understanding of many
topics covered in NGSS. To learn
more about the turtles, how you
can collaborate or get involved,
visit www.teacherturtles.com.



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Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com








Tell us your news.

Well tell
everyone else.
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
Send news and photos to
The Princeton Sun via email
to news@theprincetonsun.com.

OCT. 511, 2016 THE PRINCETON SUN 15

Share input for upcoming


Princeton Battlefield Society
archaeological project
In celebration of International
Archaeological Day, the Princeton Battlefield Society and its consultants, archaeologist Wade
Catts (Commonwealth Heritage
Associates) and historian Dr.
Robert Selig, will be presenting
archaeological and historical research and analysis plans for a
newly acquired section of the
Princeton Battlefield.
The team will be seeking input
from the public on the overarching questions to be presented and
on the techniques to be employed
in answering these questions.
The presentation will take place
on Oct. 27 in the Community
Room,
Princeton
Municipal
Building, 400 Witherspoon St.
PBS is also calling for a limited
number of people to sign up who
are interested in volunteering to
perform limited archaeological
tasks under the supervision of a
professional archaeologist. In ad-

dition, an observation area will


be created on a day to be determined for members of the public
who sign up for time slots to receive commentary and observe
the work. PBS is also putting out
a call for letters, diaries and other
historical documents people in
the community may have from
the period of the Battle of Princeton. Seating is limited for the Oct.
27 presentation and RSVPs are required.
To RSVP and for communicating on the other matters listed,
please email princetonbattlefieldsocinfo@gmail.com or send a
note with a phone number where
you can be reached to the Princeton Battlefield Society, P.O. Box
7645, Princeton, NJ 08534.
This project is being financed
by a grant from the American
Battlefield Protection Program of
the National Park Service, U.S.
Department of the Interior.

Princeton Theological Seminary presents


A Conversation and Book Signing
American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant

RONALD C. WHITE
The New York Times best-selling author
of A. Lincoln: A Biography
Respondent: James M. McPherson, professor
of history emeritus, Princeton University

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 3:00 P.M.


Daniel J. Theron Assembly Room
Princeton Theological Seminary Library
25 Library Place, Princeton

Free and open to the public.


For more information, visit ptsem.edu/events.

Juvenile allegedly throws


liquid onto pedestrians
JUVENILE
Continued from page 2
nicipal Court released both individuals on their own recognizance.

Sept. 21
Patrols responded to the area of
Pretty Brook Road after a motorist claimed an individual threw a rock at
her vehicle and caused
damage to it while she
was driving in the
area. The on-scene investigation revealed a 61-year-old
Princeton male had purposely
thrown a rock at a moving vehicle.
The man was subsequently
placed under arrest and was
transported to police headquar-

ters where he was processed, issued a complaint for interference


with transportation and given a
future court date.

Sept. 20
Subsequent to a pedestrian
stop for disorderly conduct, a 14year-old juvenile male was taken
into custody for juvenile delinquency. The juvenile was observed by officers throwing unknown liquid onto a
group of pedestrians
in the area of South
Tulane Street. The juvenile was transported
to police headquarters
and was later released to a
guardian.

police
report

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