You are on page 1of 3

HowtoGiveEffectivePraiseintheClassroom| eHow

9/28/2016

-12 -12 B v ffv P m

How to Give Effective Praise in the


Classroom

B Mp
b

The most effective classroom praise increases students'


confidence and motivates them to perform well. As an
educator, providing effective praise is key to creating a
classroom environment that balances nurturing with
productivity. If praise is too general, too frequent or
insincere, students are less likely to benefit from the
feedback; ineffective praise may decrease motivation. As
with any other aspect of a functional classroom, effective

x v ' bx

Katy McDonnell/Digital Vision/Getty


Images

praise needs to be relevant, timely and thoughtful.


SponsoredLinks

StartDownloadViewPDF
Convert From Doc to PDF, PDF to Doc Simply With The Free On-line App!
www.fromdoctopdf.com

Review your current methods of classroom praise. Whether you hand out frequent
praise or you're more reserved, reviewing your classroom style can reveal important
habits and traits, according to Highland Learning and Teaching Toolkit. Ask a colleague to
observe your classroom, or videotape a session to review yourself. Pay attention to the
types of student actions that merit praise from you. For example, you may praise
academic achievements more than behavioral ones. Also notice which students (if any)
seem to earn the most praise from you.
Use specific language and examples. When offering praise, avoid empty adjectives such
as "wonderful," "good" or "nice." While these phrases may boost the student's confidence
temporarily, the vague wording makes it difficult for the student to identify and repeat
positive behaviors. Instead, use descriptive words and offer specific examples. For
instance, say, "You shared interesting observations about the story during our discussion
today," instead of merely, "Good job with your reading homework."
Speak naturally and sincerely. Show your genuine enthusiasm by using a natural tone of
voice and varying your language, rather than repeating the same phrases. Sounding
overly enthused may come across as artificial to students. Offer praise spontaneously
when you see behavior that merits encouragement, but try not to break a student's
concentration; adjust to the natural rhythm of the classroom.

Effective &
Ineffective
Classroom
Management

How to Motivate
Students

How to Motivate
Production Workers

How to Give
Feedback to
Employees

How to Increase
Employee Motivation

The Effects of Lack of Praise on Children

http://www.ehow.com/how_8005024_giveeffectivepraiseclassroom.html

1/3

9/28/2016

HowtoGiveEffectivePraiseintheClassroom| eHow

Reserve praise for behaviors that genuinely stand out. Students who receive constant

praise may become dependent on earning your approval


and may hesitate to challenge
themselves academically. Constant and inconsistent praise may also foster unhealthy

competition between students. By reserving specific praise for noteworthy behaviors


and achievements, students will still learn to think independently and enjoy learning for
its own sake.
SponsoredLinks

Onl i neTrai ni ng Cl asses


A Revolution In Learning, For the Evolution Of Business. Request A Free Demo!
learning.linkedin.com/Company/Training

FreePrintableWorksheets
Help Kids Build Critical Skills
With Fun Worksheet Activities.
education.com/worksheets

1WorstCarbAfterAge50
If you're over 50 and you eat this
carb you will never lose belly fat.
healthplus50.com

ConflictManagement
Workshop training materials to
teach staff conflict management.
corporatetrainingmaterials.com

Tips & Warnings

When a student is struggling, use constructive praise to illustrate her


progress and show that you've noticed her hard work. For instance, point
out past accomplishments and let her know you appreciate all the time
and effort she's putting into her work.
Avoid using praise as an attempt to control your classroom. When you
point to one student's behavior as an example, it may cause resentment
or lack of motivation in other students. Try giving praise more privately
and unobtrusively, so that each student can focus on his own work.

References
ERIC Digests: Praise in the Classroom.
Inside Jennifer's 1st Grade Classroom: Effective Praise
Highland Learning and Teaching Toolkit: Learning and Teaching should be Inclusive and
Enjoyable

http://www.ehow.com/how_8005024_giveeffectivepraiseclassroom.html

2/3

9/28/2016

HowtoGiveEffectivePraiseintheClassroom| eHow

Photo Credit Katy McDonnell/Digital Vision/Getty Images


Promoted By Zergnet

Comments
0Comments
Recommend

ehow.com

Share

Login

SortbyBest

Startthediscussion

Bethefirsttocomment.

Subscribe d AddDisqustoyoursiteAddDisqusAdd

Privacy

You May Also Like

Eight Parts of Speech for Kids


8 Parts of Speech for Kids. The eight parts of speech are the essential building
blocks to teaching kids proper grammar. The...

b
v
F

m f

p p

Pv P

Mb Pv

1999-2016 m M, .

http://www.ehow.com/how_8005024_giveeffectivepraiseclassroom.html

3/3