Complete Bibliography, Wonder Women

Wang Zhenyi
Bernardi, Gabriella. The Unforgotten Sisters: Female Astronomers and Scientists.
Chichester, UK: Springer, 2016.
Cohen, Robert S., and Fan Dainian, eds. Chinese Studies in the History and Philosophy
of Science and Technology. Chichester, UK: Springer, 2013.
Leung, Angela Ki Che. “Wang Zhenyi.” In Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women.
Vol. 1, The Qing Period, 1644-1911, edited by Lily Xiao Hong Lee, Clara Lau, and A.D.
Stefanowska and translated by W. Zhang. New York: Routledge, 2015.
Ogilvie, Marilyn, and Joy Harvey, eds. “Wang Zhenyi (Chen-i).” The Biographical
Dictionary of Women in Science: Pioneering Lives From Ancient Times to the Mid-20th
Century. New York: Routledge, 2003.
Peterson, Barbara Bennett, ed. “Wang Zhenyi.” Notable Women of China: Shang
Dynasty to the Early Twentieth Century. New York: Routledge, 2000. [epigraph source]
Wang, Yanning. Reverie and Reality: Poetry on Travel by Late Imperial Chinese Women.
Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2013.
Yuwu, Shen. “On Wang Zhen-yi, a female scientist in the Qing Dynasty.” Journal of
Hangzou Teachers College (Natural Science Edition) 3, no. 3 (2004): 213-216.
Ada Lovelace
Denlinger, Elizabeth, and Stephen Wagner. Before Victoria: Extraordinary Women of the
British Romantic Era. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Essinger, James. Ada’s Algorithm: How Lord Byron’s Daughter Ada Lovelace Launched
the Digital Age Through the Poetry of Numbers. London: Gibson Square Books, 2013.
[epigraph source]
Isaacson, Walter. The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks
Created the Digital Revolution. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2014.
Kim, Eugene Eric, and Betty Alexandra Toole. “Ada and the First Computer.” Scientific
American 280, no. 5 (1999): 76-81.
Lewis, Judith S. “The Princess of Parallelograms and Her Daughters: Math and Gender
in the Nineteenth Century English Aristocracy.” Women’s Studies International Forum 18,
no. 4 (1995): 387-394.
Moore, Doris Langley. Ada, Countess of Lovelace: Byron’s Legitimate Daughter. New
York: Harper & Row, 1977.

Moore, Doris Langley. The Late Lord Byron: A Biography. New York: Melville House,
2011.
Stein, Dorothy. Ada: A Life and A Legacy. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1987.
Woolley, Benjamin. The Bride of Science: Romance, Reason, and Byron’s Daughter.
New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000.
Lise Meitner
Bartusiak, Marcia. “The Woman Behind the Bomb.” The Washington Post, March 17,
1996. Web. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wpsrv/style/longterm/books/reviews/lisemeitner.htm.
Hahn, Otto. “From the natural transmutations of uranium to its artificial fission.” Nobel
Lecture, December 13, 1946. Web.
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/1944/hahn-lecture.html.
Hanly, Beverly. “Feb, 11, 1939: Lise Meitner, ‘Our Madame Curie.’” Wired, February 11,
2010. Web. https://www.wired.com/2010/02/0211lise-meitner-publishes-nuclear-fission/.
L'Annunziata, Michael F. Radioactivity: Introduction and History, 224-36. Oxford, UK:
Elsevier, 2007. [epigraph source]
Meitner, Lise. "Looking Back." Bulletin of the Atomic Sciences 20, no. 9 (1964): 2-7.
---. “The Status of Women in the Professions.” Physics Today 13, no. 8 (1960): 16-21.
Nelson, Craig. The Age of Radiance: The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era.
New York: Simon and Schuster, 2014.
Rhodes, Richard. The Making of the Atomic Bomb. New York: Simon and Schuster,
2012.
Rife, Patricia. Lise Meitner and the Dawn of the Nuclear Age. Boston: Birkhäuser, 1999.
Sime, Ruth Lewin. Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics. Berkeley, CA: University of California
Press, 1996.
Yount, Lisa. A to Z of Women in Science and Math. New York: Infobase Publishing,
2007.
Emmy Noether
Byers, Nina. “Emmy Noether (1882-1935).” In Out of the Shadows: Contributions of
Twentieth-Century Women to Physics, edited by Nina Byers and Gary Williams.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Dick, Auguste. Emmy Noether, 1882-1935. Translated by H. I. Blocklier. Boston:
Birkhäuser, 1981. [epigraph source]

Einstein, Albert. “The Late Emmy Noether.” The New York Times, May 4, 1935,12.
Huylebrouck, Dirk, and Alice Silverberg. “Emmy Noether in Erlangen.” Mathematical
Intelligencer 23, no. 3 (2001): 44-49.
Kimberling, Clark. “Emmy Noether, Greatest Woman Mathematician.” Mathematics
Teacher 84.3 (1982): 246-249.
Osen, Lynn M. Women in Mathematics. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1975.
Phillips, Lee. “The female mathematician who changed the course of physics—but
couldn’t get a job.” Ars Technica. Web. http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/05/thefemale-mathematician-who-changed-the-course-of-physics-but-couldnt-get-a-job/.
Reid, Constance. Hilbert. New York: Copernicus, 1996.
Alice Ball
“African Americans in the Modern Northwest.” Center for the Study of the Pacific
Northwest, University of Washington. Web.
http://www.washington.edu/uwired/outreach/cspn/Website/Classroom
%20Materials/Pacific%20Northwest%20History/Lessons/Lesson%2021/21.html.
Ball, Alice A., and William M. Dehn. “Benzoylations in Ether Solution.” Journal of the
American Chemical Society 36, no. 10 (1914): 2091-2101.
Brown, Jeannette. African American Women Chemists. New York: Oxford University
Press, 2011.
Cederlind, Erika. “A tribute to Alice Bell: a scientist whose work with leprosy was
overshadowed by a white successor.” The Daily of the University of Washington,
February 29, 2008. Web. http://www.dailyuw.com/features/article_b749ad5a-9e0b-575e9e61-59ea5f8cc07f.html.
Dutton, Charles Judson. The Samaritans of Molokai: The Lives of Father Damien and
Brother Dutton Among the Lepers. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1932.
“Graduates of College of Hawaii Get Good Positions as Soon as they Leave School.”
The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, June 2, 1915.
Guttman, D. Molentia, and Ernest Golden. African Americans in Hawai’i. Mount
Pleasant, SC: Arcadia, 2012.
“Hawaii College Gives Degrees at Four O’Clock.” The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, June 1,
1915.
"Hawaiian Girl Heroine First Made Possible the Chaulmoogra Leprosy Cure." The
Honolulu Advertiser, November 20, 1925.
Hollman, Harry T. “The Fatty Acids of Chaulmoogra Oil in the Treatment of Leprosy and
Other Diseases.” Arch Derm Syphilol 5, no. 1 (1922): 94-101.

Kreifels, Susan. “Alice Ball made a stunning find in her early 20s.” The Honolulu StarBulletin, February 18, 2000. Web.
http://archives.starbulletin.com/2000/02/18/news/story3.html.
---. “Ground breaking African-American UH chemist finally recognized.” The Honolulu
Star-Bulletin, March 1, 2000. Web.
http://archives.starbulletin.com/2000/03/01/news/story7.html.
Wermager, Paul. “Healing the Sick.” In They Followed the Trade Winds: African
Americans in Hawai’i. Edited by Miles M. Jackson, 168-174. Honolulu: University of
Hawai’i at Manoa, Dept. of Sociology, 2004.
Jacqueline Felice de Almania
Amt, Emilie. Women’s Lives in Medieval Europe: A Sourcebook. 2nd ed. New York:
Routledge, 2010. [epigraph source]
Bourdillon, Hilary. Teaching History. New York: Routledge, 2013.
Ehrenreich, Barbara, and Deirdre English. Witches, Midwives & Nurses: A History of
Women Healers. New York: Feminist Press at CUNY, 2010.
Garcia-Ballester, Luis. Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Green, Monica H. “Getting to the Source: The Case of Jacoba Felicie and the Impact of
The Portable Medieval Reader on the Canon of Medieval Women’s History.” Medieval
Feminist Forum 42 (2006): 49-62.
Group, Thetis M., and Joan I. Roberts. Nursing, Physician Control, and the Medical
Monopoly: Historical Perspectives on Gendered Inequality in Roles, Rights, and Range
of Practice. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2001.
Herlihy, David. Opera Muliebria: Women and Work in Medieval Europe. New York:
McGraw-Hill, 1990.
Hughes, Muriel Joy. Women Healers in Medieval Life and Literature. New York: King’s
Crown Press, 1943.
Lord, Alana. Wayward Women: Representations of Mobile Jewish Businesswomen in
Medieval Northern Europe. MA Thesis. University of Florida, 2010: 30.
Yount, Lisa. A to Z of Women in Science and Math. New York: Infobase Publishing,
2007.
Emily and Elizabeth Blackwell
“An M.D. in a Gown.” Punch 16 (1849): 226.

Blackwell, Elizabeth. Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women:
Autobiographical Sketches. London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1895.
---. “The influence of women in the profession of medicine: address given at the opening
of the winter session of the London School of Medicine for Women.” 1890. In Medicine
and Western Civilization, edited by David J. Rothman, Steven Marcus, and Stephanie A.
Kiceluk. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1995.
---. Why Hygenic Congresses Fail: Lessons Taught by the International Congress of
1891. London: G. Bell & Sons, 1892.
---. Wrong and Right Methods of Dealing with Social Evil, as Shown by English
Parliamentary Evidence. New York: A. Brentano & Co., 1883.
Blackwell, Elizabeth and Emily. “Address on the Medical Education of Women.” In
Medical Education of Women. New York: Baptist & Taylor, 1864.
“Doctress in Medicine.” Boston Medical Journal and Monthly Review of Medical and
Surgical Science 4 (1849): 25-26. National Library of Medicine.
“Dr. Emily Blackwell Dead.” The New York Times, September 9, 1910.
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?
res=9D04E7DF1F39E333A2575AC0A96F9C946196D6CF.
Faderman, Lillian. To Believe in Women: What Lesbians Have Done for America – A
History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
Litoff, Judy Barrett, and Judith McDonnell, eds. “Blackwell, Elizabeth.” European
Immigrant Women in the United States: A Biographical Dictionary. New York: Garland
Publishing, 1994.
---. “Blackwell, Emily.” European Immigrant Women in the United States: A Biographical
Dictionary. New York: Garland Publishing, 1994.
K., D. “The Late Medical Degree to a Female.” The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal
40 (1849): 58-59.
Morantz, Regina Markell. “Feminism, Professionalism, and Germs: The Thought of Mary
Putnam Jacobi and Elizabeth Blackwell.” American Quarterly 34, no. 5 (1982): 459-478.
Morantz-Sanchez, Regina. “Feminist Theory and Historical Practice: Rereading
Elizabeth Blackwell.” History and Theory 31, no.4 (1992): 51-69.
“Obituary: Elizabeth Blackwell, M.C. Geneva, N.Y.” The Lancet, June 11, 1910. Web.
https://archive.org/details/LancetObituary06111910.
Thomson, Elizabeth H. “Blackwell, Elizabeth.” In Notable American Women, 1607-1950:
A Biographical Dictionary, edited by Edward T. James, Janet Wilson James, and Paul S.
Boyer. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971.

---. “Blackwell, Emily.” Notable American Women, 1607-1950: A Biographical Dictionary,
edited by Edward T. James, Janet Wilson James, and Paul S. Boyer. Cambridge:
Harvard University Press, 1971.
Wilson, Dorothy Clarke. Lone Woman: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell, the First
Woman Doctor. Boston: Little Brown, 1970.
Windsor, Laura Lynn. Women in Medicine: An Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABCCLIO, 2002.
Ogino Ginko
Anderson, Marnie S. A Place in Public: Women’s Rights in Meiji Japan. Cambridge:
Harvard University Press, 2010.
Chung, Yuehtsen Juliette. Struggle for National Survival: Eugenics in Sino-Japanese
Contexts, 1896-1945. New York: Routledge, 2002.
Duus, Peter. The Japanese Discovery of America: A Brief History with Documents.
Boston: Bedford Books, 1997.
Hara, Kimi. “Challenges to Education for Girls and Women in Modern Japan: Past and
Present.” In Japanese Women: New Feminist Perspectives on the Past, Present, and
Future, edited by Kumiko Fujimura-Fanselow and Atsuko Kameda. New York: Feminist
Press at CUNY,1995.
Hastings, Sally Ann. “Women’s professional expertise and women’s suffrage in Japan,
1868-1952.” In Gender State and Nation in Modern Japan, edited by Andrea Germer,
Vera Mackie, and Ulrike Wöhr. New York: Routledge, 2014.
Henshall, Kenneth. Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow
Press, 2013.
Lublin, Elizabeth Dorn. Reforming Japan: The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union in
the Meiji Period. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2010.
Nakaki, Setsuko. “Only superwomen need apply.” New Scientist 140, no. 1893: 60.
Nakamura, Ellen. “Ogino Ginko's Vision: ‘The Past and Future of Women Doctors in
Japan’ (1893).” U.S.-Japan Women's Journal 34 (2008): 3-18. [epigraph source]
Ogino, Ginko. “Experiences of the First Woman Physician in Modern Japan.” Japan
Evangelist 1, no. 2 (1893): 88-91.
---. “The Past and Present of Japanese Woman Physicians.” Translated by Nakamura
Chonosuke. Japan Evangelist 1, no. 4 (1894): 209-211.
Schmadel, Lutz D. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer,
2012.

Smith, Susan Lynn. Japanese American Midwives: Culture, Community, and Health
Politics, 1880-1950. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2005.
Walthall, Anne. “Japan.” In The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History, edited
by Bonnie G. Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Windsor, Laura Lynn. Women in Medicine: An Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABCCLIO, 2002.
Anandibai Joshi
"An Event for Hindostan and for Philadelphia, also." Philadelphia Public Ledger, April
1886. South Asian American Digital Archive. https://www.saada.org/item/201407163622.
Arnold, David. Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in
Nineteenth-century India. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1993.
Bodley, Rachel L. “Introduction.” In The High-Caste Hindu Woman. Pundita Ramabai
Sarwati. Philadelphia, 1887.
---. Rachel L. Bodley to Alfred Jones, June 19, 1883. From the Archives & Special
Collections on Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of
Medicine.
---. Rachel L. Bodley to “my dear friend,” December 9, 1887. From the Archives &
Special Collections on Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of
Medicine.
B., R. L. [Rachel L. Bodley?] "Distinguished Brahmin Lady in Philadelphia." Philadelphia
Public Ledger, April 1886. South Asian American Digital Archive.
“By the Queen’s Command.” Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 3, 1886. Enclosed in a
letter from Anna Thoburn to Rachel Bodley. From the Archives & Special Collections on
Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of Medicine.
Carpenter, Theodicia E. Theodicia E. Carpener to Rachel L. Bodley, June 18, 1883.
From the Archives & Special Collections on Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel
University College of Medicine.
Dall, Caroline Healey. The Life of Anandabai Joshee, a Kinswoman of the Pundita
Ramabai. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1888. Web.
https://archive.org/details/lifeofdranandaba00dall.
Dengel, Anna. “The Work of Medical Women in India.” The Medical Woman’s Journal 37,
no. 5 (1930): 132-135.
Forbes, Geraldine H. “In Search of the 'Pure Heathen': Missionary Women in Nineteenth
Century India.” Economic and Political Weekly 21, no. 17 (1986): WS2-WS8.

Gracey, J. T. “The First Woman Medical Student from India.” Newspaper clipping, paper
unknown, January 1, 1883. From the Archives & Special Collections on Women in
Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of Medicine.
Gurjarpadhye, Prachi. “Through a Changing Feminist Lens Three Biographies of
Anandibai Joshi.” Economic and Political Weekly, 49, no. 33 (2014): 37-40.
Joshee, Anandibai. “Obstetrics Among the Aryan Hindoos.” Diss. Women’s Medical
College of Pennsylvania, 1886. Drexel University College of Medicine Archives. Web.
http://archives.drexelmed.edu/transfer2/joshithesis/.
---. Anandibai Joshee to Alfred Jones, June 28, 1883. From the Archives & Special
Collections on Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of
Medicine. Web. https://www.saada.org/item/20120711-721.
---. Commencement Materials. From the Thirty-Fourth Annual Commencement of the
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, March 11, 1886. South Asian American
Digital Archive. Web. https://www.saada.org/item/20140716-3621.
Kosambi, Meera. “Anandibai Joshee: Retrieving a Fragmented Feminist Image.”
Economic and Political Weekly 31, no. 49 (1996): 3189-3197.
---. “Joshee, Anandibai.” The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History, edited by
Bonnie G. Smith. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Lotlikar, Sarojini D. “Anandibai Joshee.” Notable Women in the Life Sciences: A
Biographical Dictionary, edited by Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer. Santa
Barbara, CA: Greenwood Press, 1996.
Pearce, Louise. “A Century of Medical Education for Women.” Independent Woman 29,
no. 4 (1950): 104-106, 122.
Report on the Committee on Necrology, March 16, 1888. From the Archives & Special
Collections on Women in Medicine & Homeopathy, Drexel University College of
Medicine.
“The Women of India.” Jamestown Weekly Alert, June 28, 1887.
“The Hindoo Woman at the Medical College.” The Daily Enterprise, May 10, 1884.
Marie Equi
Baker, Jean H. Margaret Sanger: A Life of Passion. New York: Hill & Wang, 2011.
Chandler, JD. Hidden History of Portland, Oregon. Charleston, SC: The History Press,
2013.
Cook, Tom. “Radical Politics, Radical Love: The Life of Dr. Marie Equi.” Northwest Gay
and Lesbian History 1, no. 3 (1996) and 1, no. 4 (1997). Web.
https://www.theyliewedie.org/ressources/biblio/en/Equi,_Dr._Marie__Radical_Politics,_radical_love_The_life_of_Marie_Equi.html.

Engelman, Peter C. A History of the Birth Control Movement in America. Santa Barbara,
CA: Praeger, 2011.
Faderman, Lillian. Surpassing the Love of Men: Romantic Friendship and Love Between
Women from the Renaissance to the Present. New York: William Morrow and Co., 1981.
Helquist, Michael. Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions. Corvallis, OR:
Oregon State University Press, 2015.
“Items in Brief.” Dalles Times-Mountaineer, July 22, 1893.
Kennedy, Kathleen. Disloyal Mothers and Scurrilous Citizens: Women and Subversion
during World War I. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1999.
Krieger, Nancy. “Queen of the Bolsheviks: The Hidden History of Dr. Marie Equi.”
Radical America 17, no. 5 (1983): 55-73.
“OB Taylor Horse Whipped.” Dalles Times-Mountaineer, July 22, 1893.
“OB Taylor in Portland.” Dalles Times-Mountaineer, July 29, 1893.
“O. D. Taylor Chastised.” Dalles Daily Chronicle. July 21, 1893.
Prince, Tracy J. Portland’s Goose Hollow. Mount Pleasant, SC: Arcadia Publishing,
2011.
Sanger, Margaret. The Autobiography of Margaret Sanger. W. W. Norton, 1938. Mineola,
NY: Courier Corporation, Dover Edition, 2012.
Stone, Geoffrey R. Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime, From the Sedition Act of
1798 to the War on Terrorism. New York: W. W. Norton, 2004.
Brita Tott
Bruun, Henry, and Thelma Jexlev. “Birgitte Olufsdatter Thott.” Den Store Danske
Encyklopædi (The Great Danish Encyclopedia). From the Danish Biographical Lexicon,
Third Edition. Copenhagen: 1984.
Fryxell, Anders. The History of Sweden. Volume One, translated by Anne von Schoultz
and edited by Mary Howitt. London: Richard Bentley, 1844.
Jørkov, Birgitte. “Birgitte Thott ( - efter 1498) Thott, Birgitte Olufsdatter.” Dansk
kvindebiografisk leksikon (Danish Female Biographical Dictionary). KVINFO, 2003.
Rystad, Göran. “Falskt och äkta i Hammerstaaffären.” Scandia: tidskrift för historisk
forskning (Magazine for Historical Research), 25, no. 1 (1959): 108-112.
Stålberg, Wilhelmina. “Tott, Brita.” Anteckningar om svenska qvinnor (Notes on Swedish
Women). P. G. Berg, 1864.

Svanberg, Jan. “Albert målares bilder av sig själv och sina samtida,” Konsthistorisk
tidskrift (Journal of Art History), 74, no. 3 (2005): 148-161.
Mary Bowser
Abbott, Karen. Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War.
New York: Harper, 2014.
“The Adventures of a Government Female Spy.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 25, 1865.
Beymer, William Gilmore. “Miss Van Lew.” Harper’s, 123 (June 1, 1911): 86.
“General City News: Lecture by a Colored Lady.” The New York Times, September 10,
1865. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/1865/09/10/news/general-city-news.html.
Leveen, Lois. “A Black Spy in the Confederate White House.” The New York Times, June
12, 2012. Web. http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/21/a-black-spy-in-theconfederate-white-house/?_r=0.
---. “The Spy Photo That Fooled NPR, the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, and Me.” The
Atlantic, 27 June 2013. Web. http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/06/thespy-photo-that-fooled-npr-the-us-army-intelligence-center-and-me/277276/.
---. "Mary Richards Bowser (fl. 1846–1867)." Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Foundation
for the Humanities, 15 January 2015. Web.
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McNiven, Thomas [?]. Recollections of Thomas McNiven and his activities in Richmond
during the American Civil War. As told to his daughter Jeannete McNiven and transcribed
by Robert W. Waitt. Virginia State Library and Archives, 1989.
Sizer, Lyde Cullen. “Bowser, Mary Elizabeth.” African American Lives, edited by Henry
Louis Gates Jr. and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham. Oxford: Oxford University Press,
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"The Irrepressible Conflict Renewed." The Brooklyn Eagle, September 25, 1865.
Varon, Elizabeth R. Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a
Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
Winkler, H. Donald. Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals,
Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War. Naperville, IN: Cumberland
House, 2010.
Sarah Emma Edmonds
“A Female Soldier is Pensioned.” Winfield Courier, April 3, 1884.
Edmonds, S. Emma E. Nurse and Spy in the Union Army. Hartford, CT: W. S. Williams &
Co., 1865.

Eggleston, Larry G. Women in the Civil War: Extraordinary Stories of Soldiers, Spies,
Nurses, Doctors, Crusaders, and Others. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2013.
Gansler, Laura Leedy. The Mysterious Private Thompson: The Double Life of Sarah
Emma Edmonds, Civil War Soldier. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2007.
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Schultz, Jane E. “Performing Genres: Sarah Edmonds’ Nurse and Spy and the Case of
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States: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Issues, Events, and People, edited by Tiffany
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Young, Elizabeth. Disarming the Nation: Women's Writing and the American Civil War.
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Elvira Chaudoir
Carnavon, Lady Fiona. Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton Abbey. New
York: Broadway Books, 2013.
Crowdy, Terry. Deceiving Hitler: Double Cross and Deception in World War II. Oxford:
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“Elvira Concepcion Josefina CHAUDOIR, aliases BRONX, Eva, Elise DUBOIS:
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Released 12 August 2005.
Glinert, Ed. West End Chronicles: 300 Years of Glamour and Excess in the Heart of
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Macintyre, Ben. Ben Macintyre's Espionage Files: Agent Zigzag, Operation Mincemeat
& Double Cross. London: A&C Black, 2012.
---. Double Cross: The True Story of the D-Day Spies. New York: Crown/Archetype,
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West, Nigel. Historical Dictionary of Sexspionage. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2009.
---. Historical Dictionary of World War II Intelligence. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press,
2007.

---. The Guy Liddell Diaries Vol.II: 1942-1945: MI5's Director of Counter-Espionage in
World War II. New York: Routledge, 2007.
Noor Inayat Khan
Basu, Shrabani. Spy Princess: The Life of Noor Inayat Khan. New Lebanon, NY:
Omega, 2007.
Brown, Anthony Cave. Bodyguard of Lies. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press, 2007.
“Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood.” Supplement to the London Gazette,
38578 (1949): 1703.
Fuller, Jean Overton. Madeleine: Noor-un-nisa Inayat Khan. Rotterdam: East-West
Publications, 1988.
Helm, Sarah. A Life in Secrets: Vera Atkins and the Missing Agents of WWII. New York:
Anchor Books, 2008.
Hutton, Alice. “Princess Anne unveils bust of forgotten wartime spy whose last word as
she faced a firing squad was ‘Liberté.’” Camden New Journal, November 15, 2012. Web.
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Inayat, Taj. The Crystal Chalice: Spiritual Themes for Women. New Lebanon, NY: Sufi
Order Publications, 1978.
Khan, Noor Inayat. Twenty Jataka Tales. 1939. Reprint. Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions,
1985.
Marks, Leo. Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War, 1941-1945. New York:
Touchstone, 2000.
“Noor Inayat KHAN, aka Jeanne Marie RENIER - born 01.01.1914, died 13.09.1944.”
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January 11, 2011. Web. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-12151715.
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20 February 2006. Web. http://www.independent.co.uk/artsentertainment/books/features/noor-anayat-khan-the-princess-who-became-a-spy6108704.html
Visram, Rozina. Ayahs, Lascars and Princes: The Story of Indians in Britain 1700-1947.
New York: Routledge, 2015.
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