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Product Development Process

Ms. Nur Sabrina Mohd Anuar

Introduction to Product Development

The economic success of most firms depends on their ability to
identify the need of customers and to quickly create products
that meet these needs and can be produced at low cost.

A product is something sold by an enterprise to its customers.

Product development is the set of activities beginning with the
perception of a market opportunity and ending in the
production, sale, and delivery of a product.

Products Development

Characteristics of
Successful Product
Who Designs and Develops Products?
Development
• Marketing
• Product quality
• Design
• Product cost
• Development time • Manufacturing
• Development cost
• Development capability

The product development process
Planning

Concept
Development

System Level
Design

Detail
Design

Testing and
Refinement

Production
Ramp-up

Simple Model Design
Process

Design Process
French (1985) detail model on the
design process
Circle represent the reach/output
Rectangular represent the
activities/work in progress

Conceptual design
Statement of problem and generates
broad solution
Embodied of schemes
Schemes are workout in detail
A final choice is made
Detailing
A large amount of essential point is
decided

Brainstorming of ideas

Selection of concepts

Detail analysis of the components

Exercise 1
 List main components of your FYP Product
 Identify the functions of every components
 Sketch simple design products

The concept of product
development process
Mission
Statement Identify
Customer
Needs

Establish
Target
Specifications

Test
Product
Concepts

Generate
Product
Concepts

Set Final
Specifications

Select
Product
Concepts

Plan
Downstream
Development

Perform Economic Analysis
Benchmark Competitive Products

Build and Test Models and Prototypes

Development
Plan

The goal of method for comprehensively identifying costumer needs are:

 Ensure that the product is focused on customer needs.

 Identify latent or hidden needs as well as explicit needs.

 Create an archival record of the needs activity of the
development process.

 Ensure that no critical customer need is missed or forgotten.

 Develop a common understanding of customer needs
among members of the development team.

Five step method to process & identify customer needs
1.

Gather raw data from customers. (interviews; Focus groups;
Observing the product in use) – Identify the segment trough
choosing customers – Documenting (Audio recording,
Notes, Video recording, Still photography.

2.

Interpret the raw data in terms of customer needs.

3.

Organize the needs into a hierarchy of primary, secondary,
and (if necessary) tertiary needs.

4.

Establish the relative importance of the needs.

5.

Reflect on the results and the process.

Exercise 2
1. Identify who are your competence customers
2. Think what are the needs of your customers?
3. Develop questionnaires that representative to
verify the needs of your FYP Product
specifications.
4. Determine the method of marketing need
survey for your FYP product & how many
customer representative enough
5. Identify documents archives.

The concept product
development process
Mission
Statement Identify
Customer
Needs

Establish
Target
Specifications

Test
Product
Concepts

Generate
Product
Concepts

Set Final
Specifications

Select
Product
Concepts

Plan
Downstream
Development

Perform Economic Analysis
Benchmark Competitive Products

Build and Test Models and Prototypes

Development
Plan

Product Specifications

Customer needs for the suspension fork and their relative importance
No.

Need

Imp.

1

The suspension

Reduces vibration to the hands

3

2

The suspension

Allows easy traversal of slow, difficult terrain

2

3

The suspension

Enables high-speed descents on bumpy trails

5

4

The suspension

Allows sensitivity adjustment

3

5

The suspension

Preserves the steering characteristics of the bike

4

6

The suspension

Remains rigid during hard cornering

4

7

The suspension

Is lightweight

4

8

The suspension

Provides stiff mounting points for the brakes

2

9

The suspension

Fits a wide variety of bikes, wheels, and tires

5

10

The suspension

Is easy to install

1

11

The suspension

Works with fenders

1

12

The suspension

Instills pride

5

13

The suspension

Is affordable for an amateur enthusiast

5

14

The suspension

Is not contaminated by water

5

15

The suspension

Is not contaminated by grunge

5

16

The suspension

Can be easily accessed for maintenance

3

17

The suspension

Allows easy replacement of worn parts

1

18

The suspension

Can be maintained with readily available tools

3

19

The suspension

Lasts a long time

5

20

The suspension

Is safe in a crash

5

What are specifications?
 Product specifications represent an unambiguous agreement on what the team
will attempt to achieve in order to satisfy the customer needs.
 Product specifications mean the precise description of what the product has to
do. (“product requirement”, “Engineering characteristics”, “technical
specifications”)
 Specification consist of a metric and a value. Metric is “average time to
assemble”, while “less than 75 seconds” is the value of this metric. Values are
always labeled with appropriate units (e.g., seconds, kilograms, joules)

WHEN

ARE SPECIFICATIONS ESTABLISHED?

The product specifications would establish once early in he development process and
then proceed to design and engineer the product to exactly meet those specifications.

For technology-intensive products, specifications are established at least twice.

Immediately after identifying the customer needs, the team sets target specifications.

The team revisits the specifications while assessing the actual technological constraints
and expected production costs.
The team must frequently make hard trade-offs among different desirable
characteristics of the product during setting the final specifications.

Establishing target specifications

 The target specifications are establish after the customer needs have
been identified but before product concepts have been generated.

 The process of establishing target specifications contains four steps:
1. Prepare the list of metrics.
2. Collect competitive benchmarking information.

3. Set ideal and marginally acceptable target values.
4. Reflect on the results and the process.

Step 1:
Metric No.

Prepare List of metrics for the suspension

Need Nos.

Metric

Imp.

Units

1

1, 3

Attenuation from dropout to handlebar at 10
Hz

3

dB

2

2, 6

Spring preload

3

N

3

1, 3

Maximum value from the monster

5

g

4

1, 3

Minimum descent time on test track

5

s

5

4

Damping coefficient adjustment range

3

N-s/m

6

5

Maximum travel (26-in. wheel)

3

mm

7

5

Rake offset

3

mm

8

6

Lateral stiffness at the tip

3

kN/m

9

7

Total mass

4

kg

10

8

Lateral stiffness at brake pivots

2

kN/m

11

9

Headset sizes

5

in.

12

9

Steer tube length

5

mm

13

9

Wheel sizes

5

List

14

9

Maximum tire width

5

in.

15

10

Time to assemble to frame

1

s

16

11

Fender compatibility

1

List

17

12

Instills pride

5

Subj.

18

13

Unit manufacturing cost

5

US$

19

14

Time in spray chamber without water entry

5

s

20

15

Cycles in mud chamber without contamination

5

k-cycles

21

16, 17

Time to disassemble/assemble for
maintenance

3

s

22

17, 18

Special tools required for maintenance

3

List

23

19

UV test duration to degrade rubber parts

5

hr

24

19

Monster cycles to failure

5

Cycles

25

20

Industrial Standards test

5

Binary

26

20

Bending strength (frontal loading)

5

kN

Need

1 Reduces vibration to the hands
2 Allows easy traversal of slow, difficult terrain
3 Enables high-speed descents on bumpy trails
4 Allows sensitivity adjustment
5 Preserves the steering characteristics of the bike
6 Remains rigid during hard cornering
7 Is lightweight
8 Provides stiff mounting points for the brakes
9 Fits a wide variety of bikes, wheels, and tires
10 Is easy to install
11 Works with fenders
12 Instills pride
13 Is affordable for an amateur enthusiast
14 Is not contaminated by water
15 Is not contaminated by grunge
16 Can be easily accessed for maintenance
17 Allows easy replacement of worn parts
18 Can be maintained with readily available tools
19 Lasts a long time
20 Is safe in a crash

Metric
Attenuation from dropout to handlebar at 10 Hz
Spring preload
Maximum value from the monster
Minimum descent time on test track
Damping coefficient adjustment range
Maximum travel (26-in. wheel)
Rake offset
Lateral stiffness at the tip
Total mass
Lateral stiffness at brake pivots
Headset sizes
Steer tube length
Wheel sizes
Maximum tire width
Time to assemble to frame
Fender compatibility
Instills pride
Unit manufacturing cost
Time in spray chamber without water entry
Cycles in mud chamber without contamination
Time to disassemble/assemble for maintenance
Special tools required for maintenance
UV test duration to degrade rubber parts
Monster cycles to failure
Industrial Standards test
Bending strength (frontal loading)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

The needs – metrics matrix

Step 2:

Collect competitive benchmarking information

Metric
No.

Need
Nos.

Metric

1

1, 3

Attenuation from
dropout to
handlebar at 10 Hz

2

2, 6

3

Units

ST
Tritrack

Maniray
2

Rox
Tahx
Quadra

Rox
Tahx
Ti 21

Tonka
Pro

Gunhill
Head
Shox

3

dB

8

15

10

15

9

13

Spring preload

3

N

550

760

500

710

480

680

1, 3

Maximum value
from the monster

5

g

3.6

3.2

3.7

3.3

3.7

3.4

4

1, 3

Minimum descent
time on test track

5

s

13

11.3

12.6

11.2

13.2

11

5

4

Damping coefficient
adjustment range

3

N-s/m

0

0

0

200

0

0

6

5

Maximum travel (26in. wheel)

3

mm

28

48

43

46

33

38

7

5

Rake offset

3

mm

41.5

39

38

38

43.2

39

8

6

Lateral stiffness at
the tip

3

kN/m

59

110

85

85

65

130

9

7

Total mass

4

kg

1.409

1.385

1.409

1.364

1.222

1.100

10

8

Lateral stiffness at
brake pivots

2

kN/m

295

550

425

425

325

650

11

9
in.

1.000
1.125

1.000
1.125
1.250

1.000
1.125

1.000
1.125
1.250

1.000
1.125

NA

5

mm

150
180
210
230
255

140
165
190
215

150
170
190
210

150
170
190
210
230

150
190
210
220

NA

5

List

26 in.

26 in.

26 in.

26 in.
700C

26 in.

26 in.

Headset sizes
12

5

9

Steer tube length
13

Imp.

9

Wheel sizes

Step 2:

Collect competitive benchmarking information

Metric
No.

Need
Nos.

Metric

14

9

Maximum tire width

15

10

16

Imp.

Units

ST
Tritrack

Maniray
2

Rox
Tahx
Quadra

Rox
Tahx
Ti 21

Tonka
Pro

Gunhill
Head
Shox

5

in.

1.5

1.75

1.5

1.75

1.5

1.5

Time to assemble to
frame

1

s

35

35

45

45

35

85

11

Fender compatibility

1

List

Zefal

None

None

None

None

All

17

12

Instills pride

5

Subj.

1

4

3

5

3

5

18

13

Unit manufacturing
cost

5

US$

65

105

85

115

80

100

19

14

Time in spray
chamber without
water entry

5

s

1300

2900

>3600

>3600

2300

>3600

20

15

Cycles in mud
chamber without
contamination

5

kcycles

15

19

15

25

18

35

21

16, 17

Time to
disassemble/assemb
le for maintenance

3

s

160

245

215

245

200

425

22

17, 18

Special tools
required for
maintenance

3

List

Hex

Hex

Hex

Hex

Long
Hex

Hex, pin
wrench

23

19

UV test duration to
degrade rubber
parts

5

hr

400+

250

400+

400+

400+

250

24

19

Monster cycles to
failure

5

Cycle
s

500k+

500k+

500k+

480k+

500k+

330k

25

20

Industrial Standards
test

5

Binary

Pass

Pass

Pass

Pass

Pass

Pass

26

20

Bending strength
(frontal loading)

5

kN

5.5

8.9

7.5

7.5

6.2

10.2

Competitive benchmarking chart based on perceived satisfaction of needs
ST
Tritrack

Maniray
2

Rox
Tahx
Quadra

Rox
Tahx
Ti 21

Tonka
Pro

Gunhill
Head
Shox

No.

Need

Imp.

1

Reduces vibration to the hands

3

*

****

**

*****

**

***

2

Allows easy traversal of slow, difficult terrain

2

**

****

***

*****

***

*****

3

Enables high-speed descents on bumpy trails

5

*

*****

**

*****

**

***

4

Allows sensitivity adjustment

3

*

****

**

*****

**

***

5

Preserves the steering characteristics of the bike

4

****

**

*

**

*****

*****

6

Remains rigid during hard cornering

4

*

***

*

*****

*

*****

7

Is lightweight

4

*

***

*

***

****

*****

8

Provides stiff mounting points for the brakes

2

*

****

***

***

*****

**

9

Fits a wide variety of bikes, wheels, and tires

5

****

*****

***

*****

***

*

10

Is easy to install

1

****

*****

****

****

*****

*

11

Works with fenders

1

***

*

*

*

*

*****

12

Instills pride

5

*

****

***

*****

***

*****

13

Is affordable for an amateur enthusiast

5

*****

*

***

*

***

**

14

Is not contaminated by water

5

*

***

****

****

**

*****

15

Is not contaminated by grunge

5

*

***

**

****

**

*****

16

Can be easily accessed for maintenance

3

****

*****

****

****

*****

*

17

Allows easy replacement of worn parts

1

****

*****

****

****

*****

*

18

Can be maintained with readily available tools

3

*****

*****

*****

*****

**

*

19

Lasts a long time

5

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

*

20

Is safe in a crash

5

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Step 4:

Reflect on the results and the process

The team may require some iteration to agree on the target. Reflection
after each iteration helps to ensure that the results are consistent with the
goals of the project.

Questions to consider include:
 Are members of the team gaming?

For example, is the key marketing
representative insisting that an aggressive value is required for a particular metric in the hopes
that by setting a high goal, the team will actually achieve more than if his or her true, and
more lenient, beliefs were expressed?

 Should the team consider offering multiple products or at list multiple options for
the product in order to best match the particular needs of more than one market
segment, or will one “average” product suffice?

 Are any specifications missing? Do the specifications reflect the characteristics
that will dictate commercial success?

Metric
No.

Need
Nos.

Metric

Imp.

Units

Marginal
Value

Ideal
Value

1, 3

Attenuation from dropout to handlebar at 10
Hz

3

dB

>10

>15

2

2, 6

Spring preload

3

N

480 - 800

650 - 700

3

1, 3

Maximum value from the monster

5

g

<3.5

<3.2

4

1, 3

Minimum descent time on test track

5

s

<13.0

<11.0

5

4

Damping coefficient adjustment range

3

N-s/m

0

>200

6

5

Maximum travel (26-in. wheel)

3

mm

33 – 50

45

7

5

Rake offset

3

mm

37 - 45

38

8

6

Lateral stiffness at the tip

3

kN/m

>65

>130

9

7

Total mass

4

kg

<1.4

<1.1

10

8

Lateral stiffness at brake pivots

2

kN/m

>325

>650

11

9

Headset sizes

5

in.

1.000
1.125

1.000
1.125
1.250

12

9

Steer tube length

5

mm

150
170
190
210

150
170
190
210
230

13

9

Wheel sizes

5

List

26 in.

26 in.
700C

14

9

Maximum tire width

5

in.

>1.5

>1.75

15

10

Time to assemble to frame

1

s

<60

<35

16

11

Fender compatibility

1

List

None

All

17

12

Instills pride

5

Subj.

>3

>5

18

13

Unit manufacturing cost

5

US$

<85

<65

19

14

Time in spray chamber without water entry

5

s

>2300

>3600

20

15

Cycles in mud chamber without contamination

5

kcycles

>15

>35

21

16, 17

Time to disassemble/assemble for
maintenance

3

s

<300

<160

22

17, 18

Special tools required for maintenance

3

List

Hex

Hex

23

19

UV test duration to degrade rubber parts

5

hr

>250

>450

24

19

Monster cycles to failure

5

Cycles

>300k

>500k

25

20

Industrial Standards test

5

Binary

Pass

Pass

The target specifications

1

Setting The Final Specifications
1.

Develop technical models of the product.

2.

Develop a cost model of the product.

3.

Refine the specifications, making trade-offs where
necessary.

4.

Flow down the specifications as appropriate.

5.

Reflect on the results and the process.

Models used to assess technical feasibility

Suspended Mass
Unsprung Mass
Orifice Diameter
Spring Constant
Oil Viscosity

Dynamic Model of
Suspension Performance
(Analytical)

Support Geometry
Material Properties
Tube Geometry
Mounting Points

Static Model of
Brake Mounting Stiffness
(Analytical)

Fork Geometry
Material Properties
Fastening Methods
Suspension Geometry

Design Variables
(Model Inputs)

Fatigue Model of
Suspension Durability
(Physical)

Attenuation at 10 Hz
Estimated Monster g’s

Lateral Stiffness

Cycles to Failure

Metrics
(Model Output)

A bill of materials with cost estimates
Qty/
Fork

High
(RM ea.)

Low
(RM ea.)

High Total
(RM/fork)

Low Total
(RM/fork)

Steertube
Crown
Boot
Lower tube
Lower tube top cover

1
1
2
2
2

7.50
12.00
3.00
9.00
6.00

6.00
9.00
2.25
6.00
4.50

7.50
12.00
6.00
18.00
12.00

6.00
9.00
4.50
12.00
9.00

Main lip seal
Slide bushing
Slide bushing spacer
Lower tube plug
Upper tube

2
4
2
2
2

4.50
0.60
1.50
1.50
16.50

4.20
0.54
1.20
1.05
12.00

9.00
2.40
3.00
3.00
33.00

8.40
2.16
2.40
2.10
24.00

Upper tube top cap
Upper tube adjustment knob
Adjustment shaft
Spring
Upper tube orifice cap

2
2
2
2
1

9.00
6.00
12.00
9.00
9.00

7.50
5.25
9.00
7.50
6.75

18.00
12.00
24.00
18.00
9.00

15.00
10.50
18.00
15.00
6.75

Orifice springs
Brake studs
Brake brace bolt
Brake brace
Oil (liters)

4
2
2
1
0.1

1.50
1.20
0.75
15.00
7.50

1.20
1.05
0.60
10.50
6.00

6.00
2.40
1.50
15.00
0.75

4.80
2.10
1.20
10.50
0.60

Misc. snap rings, o-rings
Decals

10
4

0.45
0.75

0.30
0.45

4.50
3.00

3.00
1.80

30.00
62.52

20.01
47.22

312.57

236.04

Component

Assembly at RM 60/hr
Overhead at 25% of direct cost
Total

30 min

20 min

Metric
No.

Units

Value

1

Attenuation from dropout to handlebar at 10
Hz

dB

>12

2

Spring preload

N

600 - 650

3

Maximum value from the monster

g

<3.4

4

Minimum descent time on test track

s

<11.5

5

Damping coefficient adjustment range

N-s/m

>100

6

Maximum travel (26-in. wheel)

mm

43

7

Rake offset

mm

38

8

Lateral stiffness at the tip

kN/m

>75

9

Total mass

kg

<1.4

10

Lateral stiffness at brake pivots

kN/m

>425

11

Headset sizes

in.

1.000
1.125

12

Steer tube length

mm

150
170
190
210
230

13

Wheel sizes

List

26 in.

14

Maximum tire width

in.

>1.75

15

Time to assemble to frame

s

<45

16

Fender compatibility

List

Zefal

17

Instills pride

Subj.

>4

18

Unit manufacturing cost

US$

<80

19

Time in spray chamber without water entry

s

>3600

20

Cycles in mud chamber without contamination

kcycles

>25

21

Time to disassemble/assemble for
maintenance

s

<200

22

Special tools required for maintenance

List

Hex

23

UV test duration to degrade rubber parts

hr

>450

24

Monster cycles to failure

Cycles

>500k

25

Industrial Standards test

Binary

Pass

26

Bending strength (frontal loading)

kN

>10.0

The final specifications

Metric

Exercise 3
1.

Prepare the list of metrics.

2.

Collect competitive benchmarking information.

3.

Set ideal and marginally acceptable target values.

4.

Create the needs metric matrix

5.

Models used to assess technical feasibility

6.

Create Target specification table

7.

Create Bill of Material Table

8.

Create Final Specification Table

9.

Reflect on the results and the process.

The concept product
development process
Mission
Statement Identify
Customer
Needs

Establish
Target
Specifications

Test
Product
Concepts

Generate
Product
Concepts

Set Final
Specifications

Select
Product
Concepts

Plan
Downstream
Development

Perform Economic Analysis
Benchmark Competitive Products

Build and Test Models and Prototypes

Development
Plan

Activity of concept generation
 Approximate description of the technology,
working principles and form of product
 Concise description of how the product will
satisfy the customer needs
 Usually expressed as sketch or rough threedimensional model and accompanied by brief
textual description.
 Normally consumed 5% of the budget and 15%
of the production time.

Exercise 4
 Generate minimum 5 product concepts of your
FYP.

The concept product
development process
Mission
Statement Identify
Customer
Needs

Establish
Target
Specifications

Test
Product
Concepts

Generate
Product
Concepts

Set Final
Specifications

Select
Product
Concepts

Plan
Downstream
Development

Perform Economic Analysis
Benchmark Competitive Products

Build and Test Models and Prototypes

Development
Plan

Concept selection
 The process of evaluating concepts with respect to
customer needs & other criteria.
 Comparing the relative strengths and weaknesses
of the concepts.
 Selecting one or more concepts for further
investigations, testing, or development.
 The process of narrowing the set of concept
alternatives under consideration.
 Convergent process; frequently iterative and may
not produce a dominant concept immediately.

The concept selection methods
vary in their effectiveness and
include the following:
 External decision: Concepts are turned over to the customer, client, or
some other external entity for selection.
 Product champion: an influential member of the product development
team chooses a concept based on personal preference.
 Intuition: The concept is chosen by its feel. Explicit criteria or trade-offs are
not used. The concept just seems better.
 Multi voting: Each member of the team votes for several concepts. The
concept with the most votes is selected.
 Pros and cons: The team lists the strengths and weaknesses of each
concept and makes a choice based upon group opinion.
 Prototype and test: The organization builds and tests prototypes of each
concept, making a selection based upon test data.
 Decision matrices: The team rates each concept against pre specified
selection criteria, which may be weighted.

A structural method for
concept selection
 Structured selection depends on
 A customer focused product: evaluated against
customer-oriented criteria
 A competitive design: benchmarking concepts
against existing designs
 Better product-process coordination: evaluate
against manufacturing criteria improves the product
manufacturability
 Reduced time to product introduction
 Effective group decision making
 Documentation of the decision process

The potential benefits of
structured concept selection
method are:
 A customer focused product; explicitly evaluated against customer oriented
criteria.
 A competitive design: By benchmarking concepts with respect to existing
designs, designers push the design to match or exceed their competitors
performance along key dimensions.
 Better product process coordination: Explicit evaluation, respect to
manufacturing criteria, products manufacturability, match the product with
the process capabilities.
 Reduce time to product introduction: Become a common language
among team, faster communication, fewer false start.
 Effective group decision making: encourage decision making based on
objective criteria and minimizes the likelihood that arbitrary or personal
factors influence the product concept.
 Documentation of the decision process: readily understood archive, useful
for assimilating new team members, quickly assessing the impact of
changes in the customer needs or in the available alternatives.

Concept selection
methodology
 Concept screening
 Concept scoring
 The decision making is supported by the decision matrix
and can be used by team to rank, rate and select best
concepts.

 Steps of the concepts screening and scoring





Prepare the selection matrix
Rate the concepts
Rank the concepts
Combined and improve the concepts
Select one or more concepts
Reflect on the results and the process

Two-stage concept methodology

Concept generation
Concept screening
Concept scoring
Concept testing

Six step process of screening
and scoring concept selection
activity:
1.

Prepare the selection matrix.

2.

Identify reference concept

3.

Rate the concepts.

4.

Rank the concepts

5.

Combine and improve the concepts.

6.

Select one or more concepts.

7.

Reflect on the results and the process.

Concept screening
 Normally based on the group decision. All the
short list criteria may used in the paper or for the
flip chart for the larger group.
 First step prepare the selection matrix
 Rate the concepts
 Rank the concepts

Concept screening

Concept screening

Concept screening

Concept screening

Concept screening

Concept screening
 Combine and improve the concepts
 After rated and rank the team should verify the results –
question is the results make sense or not or it is a way to
combine and improve certain concept.
 Which is general good concept which is degraded by
the bad feature? Can a minor modification improve
the overall concept and yet preserver a distinction from
others concepts?
 Are there two concepts which can be combined to
preserver the better than qualities while annulling the
worse than qualities?

 Combined and improved concepts are then
added to the matrix, rated by the team, and
ranked along with original concepts

Concept screening
 In the example the team noticed that concepts
D and F could be combined to remove several
of the worse than ratings to yield a new concept,
DF.

 Concept G is consider for improvement – this
concept too bulky, so the excess storage space
was removed while retaining the injection
technique. The revised concept is in the next
slide.

Concept screening
 Select one or more concepts
 For more refinement and analysis
 Concepts A and E to be considered along with
G+ and new concept of DF

Reference product concept
 After careful consideration, the team chooses a
concept to became the benchmark, or reference
concept, against which all other concepts are
rated.
 The reference is generally either an industry
standard or straightforward concept with which the
team members are very familiar.
 It can be a commercially available product, a best
in class benchmark product which the team has
studied, an earlier generation of the product, any
one of the concepts under consideration, or a
combination of subsystems assembled to represent
the best features of different products.

Concept screening
 Entire team should agree with the decision

Exercise
 Perform concepts generation for the product
below (Pencil Holder)

Concept scoring
 Prepare the selection matrix for the selected
concepts

Concept scoring
 Rate the concepts
Relative performance

Rating

Much worse than reference

1

Worse than reference

2

Same as reference

3

Better than reference

4

Much better than reference

5

Concept scoring
 Rank the concepts
 The total score for each concept is the sum of
the weighted scores:

Weighting for ith criterion
Raw rating of concept j for the ith criterion
Total score for concept j
n

Number of criteria

Concept scoring
 Combine and improve the concepts
 The team looks for changes or combinations that
improve concepts
 Most creative refinements and improvements occur
during concept selection process.

Concept scoring
 Selection one or more concepts
 The team should explore the initial evaluation by
conducting sensitivity analysis.
 The team can vary weight and ratings to determine
their effect on the ranking
 The team can test the concepts

Concept scoring
 Reflect on the results and the process
 Point of return for the concept development process
 It is a useful to do the reality check to review the
concepts that are to be eliminated from further
consideration

Exercises 5
 How can the concept selection methods be used
to benchmark or evaluate existing product?
Perform such an evaluation for five automobiles you
might consider purchasing.
 Propose a set of selection criteria for the choice of
a battery technology for use in a portable
computer.
 Perform concept screening for the four pencil
holder concepts shown below. Assume the pencil
holders are for a member of a product
development team who is continually moving from
site to site.
 Repeat previous exercise, but use concept scoring

Concepts of the pencil
holder