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Alloy Designations

Ferrous Alloys. Irons and steels make up the vast majority of all materials used in the creation of
manufactured goods. Table 18.1 provides a general categorization of the various classes of steel.
With few exceptions, steel compositions are established by the American Iron and Steel Institute
(AISI), and the Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE). Both use a four numerical series to
designate
standard carbon and alloy steels, specified to chemical compositional ranges. In several
instances, five-digit designations are used. The general classifications are shown in Table 18.2.
The reader is directed to Ref. 5, pp. 15–20 5 for details regarding exact chemical composition of
the grades listed.
Nonferrous Alloys. The principles that govern heat treatment of metals and alloys are applicable
to both ferrous and nonferrous alloys. However, in practice, there are enough sufficient differences
that it makes sense to classify these materials differently. The peculiarities of the alloys of each
class
with regard to their response to heat treatment require careful understanding of each (see Sec.
18.1.5).
The common heat treatable alloys can be classified as shown in Table 18.3. The reader is directed
to
Ref. 5 for details regarding exact chemical composition of the grades listed.