Since May 2005

PRESORT STANDARD
US POSTAGE PAID
CHARLESTON, SC
PERMIT NO 437
POSTAL PATRON

FREE

Volume 12 Issue 12
Sullivan’s Island

Isle of Palms

October 7, 2016
Goat Island • Dewees Island

e
h
t
g
n
i
s
g
p
d
ga
Bri

Started in 1993, the annual 5K/10K event gives participants a chance to take on the Isle of Palms Connector when it’s closed to car and truck traffic.

PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

2 0 1 6 I S L E O F PA L M S C O N N E C T O R R U N A N D WA L K F O R
T H E C H I L D TA R G E T S A B U S E A N D N E G L E C T
BY SUSAN HILL SMITH

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

W

hen I travel over the Isle of Palms
Connector, the views can still take my
breath away and remind me how fortunate
I am to live here.
But even though I have driven across thousands
of times since moving here two decades ago, I had
only stepped foot on the connector once or twice
in the past, and just briefly.
Then I joined the crowd Oct. 1 at the Isle of Palms
Connector Run and Walk for the Child, something
I've meant for years to do, and I was struck in a
new way by our gorgeous landscape and our giving
community, which has long supported the event's
core mission, established by the Mount Pleasant
and Isle of Palms Exchange Clubs: To heal and
prevent childhood abuse.
Joining with neighbors
Living less than a mile from the connector, I
should have made it to the event long ago. When I
was younger, I couldn’t get my act together for the

race’s 8 a.m. start, and once I had kids, obligations
and activities got in the way.
This year I was determined, and I recruited
others to come along. As the Saturday morning
sun rose over my house, I put on my yoga pants—
or “Mount Pleasant pajamas” as my husband likes
to call them—clapped the sand out of my sneakers
and pinned on my race number.
By 7:30 a.m., a small group of friends and I set
out from 23rd Avenue for the 5K and 10K start
line in front of Isle of Palms Post Offce, where we
had a comfortable amount of elbow room for more
than a thousand people and time for hugs from
folks I hadn’t seen in awhile.
Let me be clear. I never intended to run any
part of the 5K, but because I came with runners
who offered encouragement, I attempted a jog at
the beginning. Halfway up the slope that starts
Run continues on page 4

INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
TURTLE
CONNECTING
TIDBITS
CULTURES
Pg 6-7

Pg 13

WELL
NOW
Pg 15

2

CIVIC

October 7, 2016

Sullivan’s Island deals with FEMA grant,
receives unmodified opinion in audit
C O U N C I L M E E T I N G R E P O R T, S E P T. 2 0 , 2 0 1 6
BY ALYSHA DUFF

T

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

he Sullivan’s Island Town Council meeting on Sept. 20, 2016
began with an unusually solemn ambience as Councilmember
Mark Howard led a moment of silence followed by words of
remembrance for island native Mary Grace Grisillo. Grisillo was a
resident on Sullivan’s Island for 94 years and a lifelong member
of Stella Maris Catholic Church. The council reflected on the great
impact Grisillo had on the island during her lifetime, commenting
that her memory will truly be cherished.
Council then shifted gears to discuss an update regarding the town’s
longtime-pending grant proposal to Federal Emergency Management
Agency for the 100-year floodplain. Back in 2014, Sullivan’s Island
partnered with HDR to capitalize on the ability to receive federal
funding for upgrades to the Wastewater Treatment facility, courtesy
of the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.
The funding would upgrade the facility for protection against
seismic and flood events on the island, such as the ice storm that
devastated the area in 2014. After waiting two years for approval, the
town’s application was deemed inapplicable.
Earlier that day, Mayor Patrick O’Neil, councilmembers Susan
Middaugh and Chauncey Clark, along with Town Administrator Andy
Benke gathered with FEMA Region 4 officials and South Carolina
Emergency Management Division officials to review the 44CFR
regulations and application requirements. The officials ultimately
denied the application, stating that the proposed facility design must
be for a 500-year floodplain instead.
Moving forward, Town Council unanimously agreed to revise and
adjust the application, through two phases, to meet the 500-year
event qualifications and be considered as a recipient. Phasing out the
application will ensure that all expenses for design and construction

will be included.
Phase One will consist of engineering professionals reworking the
preliminary design, which will be an estimated cost of $22,000. If the
design is approved, Phase Two will commence, requiring a “feasibility
study” (an approximate four month process) and the finalization of
construction drawings and expenses. The council is hoping that in
this instance, the second time’s a charm, and a timely one too.
Following the unpropitious outcome of the Hazard Mitigation
Grant application was some positive news from Larry Finney and
Emily Sobczak of Greene, Finney and Horton—an accounting and tax
consultation firm—who presented the FY2016 Financial Audit.
The two informed the council that the town received an “unmodified
audit opinion,” for 2016—the best opinion to be received. The town
received this rating based on its effective internal controls, financial
statements and efficient preparation and management of the budget.
Other key takeaways from the presentation include:
• Total fund balance decreased by $2.6 million to $7.9 million,
offset by new Town Hall construction
• Assigned fund balance of $20,000 for William Bradley Memorial
• Unassigned fund balance of $3.2 million, which covers 66% of
2017 budgeted expenditures
• $5.2 million general fund revenue during 2016 – 16% increase
from 2015, 16% better than budget
• The Water Fund had an increase in net position from current year
operations
• The Sewer Fund had a decrease in net position from current year
operations
• Total capital assets amount to nearly $14 million
A man dressed in uniform politely observed his first council meeting

www.islandeyenews.com

CIVIC

October 7, 2016

3

City’s journey toward marina
redevelopment continues

Lucky Dog Publishing
o f SC, LL C
Publisher of the
The Island Eye News
and The Island Connection

I O P C O U N C I L V O T E S T O PAY F O R R E F I N E D P L A N S
BY SUSAN HILL SMITH

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

P

roposed plans for the
redevelopment of Isle of
Palms Marina are moving
forward with City Council’s
Sept. 27 vote to spend $46,900
for surveying, a preliminary
engineering
overview,
more
specific cost estimates and a
presentation of findings by the
consulting firm steering the city
through the process.

Concerns came up within
council that the city might deviate
from its already stated course
toward a referendum on the
project, but Mayor Dick Cronin
indicated that citizens will vote
on any upgrade proposal that
emerges.
While most agree the marina
needs repairs, there’s not a clear
consensus on the project’s scope,

SI Council continues from page 2
until called to recognition by Mayor O’Neil. If you have noticed an
new face on the island, it is Officer Gary Erickson. Sullivan’s Island
welcomed Offer Erickson from the Isle of Palms, where he provided
25 years of service. Officer Erickson brings a total of 33 years of
experience and received the oath of office on Tuesday, Sept. 20 by
Mayor O’Neil. His addition to the team completes the island’s police
force.
The changes to the police department do not end with a new police
officer—the state of South Carolina has approved funding for new
police equipment, therefore research and testing for body cameras
will begin in the near future.
As for the update on the biggest change (and upgrade) of all, the
new town hall building is quickly approaching completion. While
98 percent of the building is complete, remaining items include:
carpeting, interior and exterior painting, telephone, IT and security
system installations, furniture, signage, landscaping, parking lot,
and shutter and gutter installations.
Though it may seem as though there much work left to be done,
the majority of the building is nearly finished and council is aiming
to wheel away the temporary trailer and christen its new home on
Oct. 17.
Additional key takeaways from the meeting include:
• August minutes were motioned for approval and unanimously
approved
• The restored Station 26 boat landing is reopen for public use
(small watercraft only)
• Council is in discussion over the lease contract with Battery
Gadsden—the contract may be extended from two to five years
• Bid proposals are being accepted for the fencing and landscaping
of the water plant facility at Station 17 and Middle Streets
• The next council meeting will be held Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016

which could potentially make the
marina more user-friendly and
turn it into more of a community
focal point. Work by Applied
Technology and Management
to
refine
the
conceptual
redevelopment plans will provide
more details for “everyone in the
community to look at it” as well
as a “more specific budget,” the
mayor said when introducing the
latest expenditures. “So we can
then decide what we can afford
going forth—what’s a need,
what’s just a want—and then we
can decide from there.”
Until this point, the city has
spent about $119,000 on the
initiative, according to earlier
statements by City Administrator
Linda Tucker at a meeting
of
council’s
Real
Property
Committee. While the city’s 10year capital plan includes rough
IOP Council continues on page 10

Monday, October 10
Real Property Committee
9:30 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, October 11
Public Works Committee
1 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Thursday, October 13
Personnel Committee
10 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard

Tuesday, October 18
Public Works Committee
5 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Monday, October 10
Council Workshop
Special Meeting Day
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street

Jennifer Tuohy
contributing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
Alejandro Ferreyros
graphic designer
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executive
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer


CONTRIBUTORS
Julie Cook
Kate Dittloff
Bob Hooper
Carol Antman
John B. Nelson
Marilyn Markel
Geoff Bennett
Sarah Díaz
Meredith Nelson

Recycle - WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12 - Recycle
Monday, October 17
Special City Council
Beach Season Parking After Action
6 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard

Kelly Smith
managing editor
kellyrae@luckydognews.com

Alysha Duff
Susan Smith
Mimi Wood
staff writers

CIVIC CALENDAR

Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net

Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com

Tuesday, October 11
Municipal Court*
5:30 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Thursday, October 13
Board of Zoning Appeals
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Tuesday, October 18
Regular Council Meeting
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Wednesday, October 19
DRB Meeting
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street

*Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith
Park (2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments
or questions.

PUBLISHED BY
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
FUTURE DEADLINE:
OCTOBER 12 for our
OCTOBER 21 issue
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned
subsidiary of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC
LLC, is a free, independent newspaper
published every two weeks and is for and
about the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island,
Goat Island and Dewees Island. Copies
are mailed free of charge to every active
mailbox in our coverage area and are also
available at area businesses. Contributions of information, pictures and articles
are welcomed and are used according to
space limitations and news value and cannot be returned except by special request.
Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News, or its writers.
All advertising rates are listed at:
under “advertising”

www.islandeyenews.com

4
Run continues from cover
the connector, I slowed to my
intended walk, but luckily had
bumped into a longtime friend
who was undoubtedly a perfect
person to share the moment with.
Finding the heart of the race
Dr. Eve Spratt has lived on Isle
of Palms for years, too, and we
know each other through church
and children. As we crested the hill
and looked over Hamlin Creek and
the Intracoastal Waterway, toward
Goat Island and the expanse of
Gray Bay, she reminded me of her
special connections to the event.
“I certainly love their mission,”
said Eve, a Medical University of
South Carolina child psychiatrist
and professor. She sees firsthand
the severe effects of child abuse and
neglect and the need for resources
to support vulnerable children
beyond what S.C. Department of
Social Services provides.
In 1997, Eve created the
nonprofit group HALOS to fill
those gaps, calling for help from
religious, political and business
leaders in the community. Some
of those first donations came from
Isle of Palms United Methodist
Church and Church of the Holy
Cross on Sullivan’s Island, and
the resources have continued to
flow in.
Last year, HALOS Kinship Care
Program won a $1 million grant
to support relatives who step in
to raise children so the kids will
not have to enter foster care. “In
our state, 55,000 households are
headed by a non-parent,” Eve told
me. “So it’s a grandparent or an
aunt, or sometimes, gosh a next-

door neighbor raising these kids,
because of a parent just not being
able to, for a host of reasons.”
A history of working together
The Isle of Palms Connector Run
and Walk for the Child has long
supported HALOS as well other
local charities like Lowcountry
Orphan Relief, Carolina Youth &
Development Center, Dee Norton
Lowcountry Children’s Center
and Windwood Farm & Family
Services. Its contributions to these
groups total more than $1 million.
The event started in 1993,
the same year the connector
opened and forever changed the
community by linking Isle of
Palms directly to Mount Pleasant.
Attorney Nick Sottile was
instrumental in establishing the
race through the Mount Pleasant
Exchange Club and served as race
director in 2005 when it won the
National Exchange Club’s Fundraising Award. The Isle of Palms
Exchange Club has been an
integral part of the effort as well
and will carry on the tradition
next year as the Mount Pleasant
club moves on to focus on other
fundraisers.
The cities of Mount Pleasant and
Isle of Palms have played key roles
as well. “Just like anything else,
the success of the race depends
on everyone working together,”
Isle of Palms Recreation Director
Norma Jean Page told me a few
days ahead of the race. Norma
Jean, this year’s race chair, also
credits Danny and Lesa White
with Race Management Systems,
for their part in making the 5Kand 10K-event a success. “We
get a lot of compliments on the

organization of it and how well
run it is.”
Carrying the experience forward
No doubt many participants
are drawn to the opportunity to
run and walk on the Isle of Palms
Connector without the worry of
traffic whizzing by.
This time of year, the weather
can be brisk or sweltering, so I
felt blessed to have a fluffy canopy
of cloud cover that gave us mild
temperatures and also deepened
the colors of the water, marsh and
sky.
Eve shortened her walk to turn
around with her husband, who
had trained to run the 5K and
was already on his way back. Not
long after I hit the 5K turnaround
point, I connected with Chris
Wainwright, someone I know
from my past work at The Post
and Courier in Charleston, where
she continues to serve in human
resources.
Chris has made an incredible
habit of running from her home
in Mount Pleasant’s Old Village to
work and back—at least a 7-mile
trip each way—but was hit by a
car in April, close to The Post and
Courier, resulting in an extended
hospital stay and extensive
rehabilitation. She is easing back
into races now by walking. “I do
this race every year—I usually do
the 10K—I think I’ve only missed
it once or twice,” said Chris.
As Chris and I climbed back
up the hill on the return trip to
the island, we passed a cluster of
four teenage boys, undoubtedly
earning school volunteer hours as
they cheered participants through
the last leg.

October 7, 2016

From left, Shannon and Alia Nawabi
gather beforehand with our writer, Susan
Hill Smith, and Dora Wilson, all from IOP.

Dr. Eve Spratt started HALOS to help
children who suffer abuse and neglect.

“Every step counts,” one of the
teens smiled at us, and while it was
likely something he had repeated
many times that morning, the
truth of it stuck with me well past
the finish line.
For race results, go to ioprun.
com. To see more Island Eye
News race day photos, go to
islandnews.com.

5

October 7, 2016

Timeless art

LOCAL ARTIST DEBUTS
"TIMELESS ISLAND"
E X H I B I T I O N O N S U L L I VA N ' S
JULIE COOK

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

“T

imeless Island,” a solo show of
the latest work of local artist Jim
Darlington, will open at Sandpiper
Gallery, 2201 Middle Street on Sat. Oct 8,
with an opening reception for the artist from
5–7 p.m.
Sullivan’s Island is renowned for its
commitment to preserving the natural
beauty and historic charm of the iconic
barrier island. Island artist Jim Darlington
has spent a lifetime capturing the timeless
beauty of the charming cottages, ancient
oaks, rustling palms, marshland, and
seascapes on canvas. His interpretations
of these irresistible sources of inspiration
focus on the essence of the subject, using
honed artistic license to remove distractions
and helping the viewer see the beauty in the
ordinary.
Regardless of the subject, Darlington
captures a range of emotions, sometimes
with subtle, fine brushwork and other
times with strong palette knife work that
adds a dramatic, sculptural visual impact.
In this show of work, Darlington presents
a group of plein air pieces in addition to
studio paintings. Plein air works are painted
outdoors in a spontaneous reaction to nature
and the environment. The technique is also
characterized by quick, instinctive brushwork
inherent in the process of capturing an image

quickly before the light changes.
Darlington says, “I usually begin a painting
by applying large flat areas of color to a
background, which is colored either red or
dark umber. Sometimes I have composition
in mind; other times I let the movement of
the brush suggest forms. I build upon these
forms, or change them, until I have a painting
that conveys a certain mood or an aspect of
the landscape I feel is authentic. I often bring
abstract qualities into my work, but I also
feel I could never completely abandon the
realist/impressionist style, simply because it

is my first love and contains within it such
rich means of expression.”
Collector Teri Bergin adds, “The timeless
quality of Darlington’s work transcends
the moment. In his landscapes, the
impressionistic quality of his work with
its textural richness invokes an emotional
response each time I walk by one of his
paintings.”
You
can
preview
sandpipergallery.net.

the

show

at

6

October 7, 2016

Sea turtle hospital
breaks ground

S O U T H C A R O L I N A A Q U A R I U M B I D S FA R E W E L L TO S E A T U RT L E S R E A D Y F O R R E L E A S E
BY KATE DITTLOFF

T

wo sea turtles treated by the
South Carolina Aquarium Sea
Turtle Care Center are once
again swimming the deep blue sea.
Hunley,
a
loggerhead
sea
turtle, and Glenn, a Kemp’s
ridley sea turtle, have been fully
rehabilitated; both were released
on Thurs. Sept. 22 at the Isle of
Palms County Park. The release
was held in partnership with the
South Carolina Department of
Natural Resources (SCDNR) and
the Charleston County Park and
Recreation Commission (CCPRC).
The
release
marks
202
threatened and endangered sea
turtles rehabilitated and released
into the wild by the Sea Turtle Care
Center. The remaining 10 patients
will continue to receive care in the
Sea Turtle Hospital. This season,
hospital team members worked
around the clock rehabilitating
turtle patients, with a record 43
admissions in 2016.
ABOUT THE SEA TURTLES:
Hunley
Hunley,
an
adult
female
loggerhead sea turtle, was recovered
by an SCDNR research vessel in
July of this year. Scientists on the
boat were immediately concerned
about this turtle’s state of health
upon noticing that she’d sustained
severe injuries to her head,
shell, and flippers; as such, they

BY JENNIFER TUOHY

O

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

hospital continues its mission of
conservation and care.
While the sea turtle hospital will
still occupy its basement home,
this expanded, state-of-the-art
recovery and medical care facility
will be in full public view, on the
first floor of the aquarium. It will
function as both an active sea
turtle rehabilitation space and an
interactive exhibit for visitors.
Founded in 2000, the Sea Turtle
Hospital is a world-renowned
center for innovative animal care.
This year the hospital marked the
successful release of its 200th
patient. When the exhibit opens
it will guide visitors through the
journey that a turtle goes through
when it arrives at the hospital;
from Rescue, to Rehabilitation,
to Release. Each gallery will
be
animated
by
interactive
experiences and technologies that
bring the learning experience to
life:
The Rescue Gallery
The entry point to the exhibit,
the Rescue Gallery will show

7

Return to the wild

A Q U A R I U M TA K E S F I R S T S T E P S T O WA R D
O P E N I N G N E W E X H I B I T I O N / FA C I L I T Y I N 2 0 1 7

n Wednesday, Sept. 21,
2016 the Zucker Family Sea
Turtle Recovery Center took
its first step toward concrete reality,
with a ceremonial groundbreaking
at the South Carolina Aquarium.
Opening in May 2017, the
Recovery Center will replace
the
Madagascar
experience
and will provide a glimpse into
how the aquarium’s sea turtle

TURTLE REPORT

Left, Kevin Mills, aquarium president and
CEO, middle Johnathan Zucker and his family,
wife, Laura Zucker, and children Gabriella and
Jeremy. Right, Kelly Thorvalson, Sea Turtle
Hospital manager, break ground on the new
sea turtle exhibit/hospital.

visitor the dangers facing sea
turtle populations and highlight
the groups that work tirelessly to
rescue injured turtles and deliver
them to the aquarium.
The Rehabilitation Gallery
Through interactive displays
and interpretive graphics, the
admission process of a sea turtle
into hospital will be highlighted.
Guests will interact with sea
turtle models using augmented
reality technology. There will
also be a working medical facility
here, including an examination
room, surgical suite, pharmacy,
and CT/radiograph room, new
rehabilitation tanks including
tanks that can accommodate
larger animals, and an exercise
pool to prepare turtles for release
and a life support room behind
the recovery area to ensure a quiet
environment for the animals to
heal.
The Release Gallery and
Theater/Classroom
A
multi-use
theater
and
classroom space rounds out the

www.islandeyenews.com

exhibition before a Release Gallery
celebrates the turtles who have
been medically cleared, or who
are nearing medical clearance for
release back into the wild.
At
the
ceremonial
groundbreaking Jonathan Zucker,
chairman of the aquarium’s board
of directors and son of Jerry
Zucker, founding board member
of the aquarium, expressed his
family's excitement to be part of
the new hospital.
“This is truly an opportunity to
make a difference in the world,” he
said.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

The sea turtle rescue squad gives Hunley
a lift home.

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

Glenn has his own cheering squad.

reached out to arrange immediate
transport to the Aquarium’s Sea
Turtle Hospital. Upon admission,
team members at the Aquarium
began treatment, including pain
medication, antibiotics, fluids,
wound care, and vitamins. It is
believed that the turtle not only
survived a shark attack but also
multiple boat propeller strikes.
After three months of hands-on
care and a healthy diet, Hunley is
fully rehabilitated and ready for
release.

Glenn
Glenn, a juvenile Kemp’s Ridley,
the most endangered of the world’s
seven sea turtle species, was
admitted to the Aquarium’s Sea
Turtle Hospital in April of this
year. Glenn was admitted after
being accidentally captured by a
hopper dredge that was operating
to deepen Charleston Harbor’s
shipping lanes. Team members
worked diligently to stabilize

What can you do?
You
can
help
protect
threatened
and
endangered
sea turtles. If you find a sick
or injured sea turtle, contact
the SCDNR sea turtle hotline
at (800) 922-5431. You may
also help care for sea turtles in
recovery in the South Carolina
Aquarium Sea Turtle Care
Center by making a donation at
scaquarium.org. Your donation
will not only support the care
of these turtles, but will also
help fund Zucker Family Sea
Turtle Recovery, enabling the
Aquarium to treat even more sea
turtle patients.

www.islandeyenews.com

Glenn during admission and
provided treatments such as fluids,
antibiotics, vitamins, and wound
care for numerous abrasions.
Additionally,
the
Aquarium
veterinarian
diagnosed
Glenn
with two additional and highly
concerning maladies: severe bone
infections in both front flippers
and a lung bulla. The lung bulla,
an extremely rare condition likely
caused by passage through the
hopper dredge, consisted of a nonfunctional bubble-like cavity in the
lungs and required experimental
treatment to cure. The Aquarium’s
highly-skilled vet team networked
with various human and animal
medical experts to craft a surgical
treatment plan and were very
successful in correcting the lung
bulla, which ultimately permitted
the left lung to heal and return to
normal size. After just six months of
intensive care, Glenn has regained
his/her health and is ready to
return to the Atlantic Ocean.
To read about the patients or
track their recovery progress, visit
the Sea Turtle Care Center blog at
scaquarium.org. Follow on Facebook
and Twitter for the latest updates
from the hospital, including public
sea turtle release details.

8

October 7, 2016

University School students, faculty and
alumni participate in Beach Sweep
STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

O

n Sat. Sept. 17, more than
30 members of the University
School of the Lowcountry (USL)
community participated in the annual
Beach Sweep on Isle of Palms.
The team was led by Beth Donoghue,
who teaches science and math to the
school’s third through fifth graders.
Teachers Heather Connelly, Alauria
Corbin, and Nikki Brockman also
participated, as well as Jason Kreutner,
founder and head of school, alongside
the students, parents, and alumni.
Participating in Beach Sweep is
part of USL’s commitment to learning
outside the classroom through service
to others. Picking up trash at the beach
also expands upon lessons that will be
learned this year as the school focuses
on water in its science classes, which
is one theme in a three-year rotation
Science and Math teacher Beth Donoghue led the team of 30 USL members in its annual IOP beech sweep.
among topics.
“Being part of Beach Sweep is
more than just a great way to help
University School of the Lowcountry (USL) is community. USL is accredited by the South
our environment and serve our a non-profit, 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt independent Carolina Independent School Association
community,” says Kreutner. “Our kids school serving students from grades three and is celebrating its tenth year of serving
get to see first hand the impacts that through 12. USL is a non-sectarian school children and families throughout the greater
pollution and littering have on the for high-achieving, nice, curious students Charleston area. For more information please
beach, and they can make connections emphasizing
individualized
academics, visit uslowcountry.org or call (843) 884-0902.
between that experience and what they experiential learning, and a strong sense of
learn in the classroom.”

Exclusively Sullivan’s
RESIDENTIAL & VACATION
HOUSEKEEPING

CALL FOR
A FREE
CONSULTATION
843.593.4473

www.islandeyenews.com

2o year
resident of
Sullivan’s
Island
Insured & Bonded

10
IOP Council continues from page 3
estimates of $4.375 million in expenses to overhaul the marina,
officials hope to secure up to $1 million from a government Boating
Infrastructure Grant to help cover the costs.
Councilmember Sandy Ferencz wanted to know if the expanded
work by ATM would get the city to the point where it could have an
open forum with citizens and then have a referendum.
“Yes, we will expose all this to the citizens,” Cronin replied. “Without
a cost, we don’t know what we’re dreaming of here.”
Councilmember Jimmy Ward also wanted reassurance that a
referendum would be held. “I just read some disturbing things in
some the minutes of the committee reports that sounded like there
might not be,” Ward said, “and I just want to make sure we are
steadfast on that road.”
Ward was apparently referring to comments by Councilmember
Patrick Harrington, who said during the Real Property Committee
meeting that in his opinion there was no need for a referendum,
according to the minutes. (Harrington clarified his comments later
during the meeting of the full council to say that the city is not “any
point near a referendum.” He added, “We’re not prepared to go to the
public yet.”)
The mayor conceded that the city may face roadblocks to marina
improvements along the way.
When it came up for a vote, the measure for the extra award of
$46,900 to ATM passed 7-2 with Ward and Councilmember Jimmy
Carroll against it.
The council also approved spending up to $20,000 as a match for a
potential shore-based saltwater fishing grant that could help provide
a fishing dock at the marina as part of the overhaul. The council had
already voted this summer to pursue the S.C. Department of Natural
Resources grant, which might yield up to $100,000 more for the
dock. Other locations for a public fishing dock had been discussed
with serious consideration given to city land at the marsh end of
25th Avenue. However, residents on that block previously voiced
alarm about potential problems with parking, traffic and disruptive
behavior.
POSITIVE FINANCIAL NEWS
The city ended fiscal year 2016 with a positive net of $637,940.
Council voted 9-0 to transfer $50,000 of that to the Disaster
Recovery Fund and $500,000 to the Capital Projects Fund and
allow $87,940 to remain in the unassigned General Fund balance. A
motion to keep the same millage rate of 2.47 mills for property taxes
as in fiscal year 2015 also passed unanimously.
PUBLIC MEETING ON PARKING SCHEDULED
The public is invited to give input on the inaugural season of
beach parking changes during a special forum at 6 p.m., Monday,
Oct. 17, at the Isle of Palms Recreation Center on 28th Avenue.
Changes enacted this year included more limits for daytrippers on
street parking in residential areas, parking stickers for residents and
automated kiosks rather than attendants at the city’s paid lots by
Front Beach. Council also voted mid-summer to allow vehicles with
either residential parking stickers or Wild Dunes property owner
decals to park for free in city lots by Front Beach.
SURPRISING MAPS FROM FEMA
City leaders are scratching their heads as they look at new

October 7, 2016
Flood Insurance Rate Maps proposed by the Federal Emergency
Management Agency. FEMA is looking to establish new maps for
Charleston County communities that would take effect in 2017—
current maps date back to 2004—and the agency has drawn dramatic
changes for Isle of Palms, with an overall shift to less restrictive flood
zones and lower elevation requirements.
“We have to understand if this makes our citizens safer or less
safe,” said Cronin. Others chimed in with Carroll saying he was
“shocked” when he saw the maps.
As a result, the council asked the Planning Commission to review
the changes and consider whether the city might need to make any
modifications to its own ordinances to ensure the city is as disaster
resilient as possible.
A major reason for the map differences: The reference elevation
has changed from one that dates back to 1929 to one from 1988 that
is approximately one foot lower. The new maps are also based on a
more accurate method of measuring elevations and a different FEMA
modeling method. Plus, the physical topography of Isle of Palms has
changed over the past two decades.
“They may be more technically accurate,” Planning Director
Douglas Kerr told the council, “but they are quite a surprise to us.”
The city has posted additional explanation and a link to FEMA’s
Isle of Palms flood maps at iop.net/flood-damage-prevention.
RESTRICTIONS ON RETAIL TRAILERS, FOOD TRUCKS
Council unanimously voted on first reading for zoning amendments
in the city’s commercial districts (which do not include Wild Dunes)
to prohibit mobile and temporary units being used for outdoor sale
or rental of personal property, except during special events hosted,
sponsored or sanctioned by the city.
Sale of food or beverage must occur within the footprint of a
permitted permanent structure. Any use of a mobile or temporary
unit, including but not limited to food trucks, vehicles, trailers and
carts, is prohibited, though there are some specific exceptions to the
zoning, which will not be retroactive to temporary units already in
place.
Representatives of brick-and-mortar establishments such as The
Windjammer and Acme Lowcountry Kitchen had voiced concerns
this summer to council about the potential impact food trucks could
have on their businesses.
MORE HIGHLIGHTS
In other business, Isle of Palms City Council:
• Awarded a contract to Carolina Fending for $11,200 to replace
baseball field fencing.
• Awarded a $35,000 contract to Petersen Grading, LLC, to make
repairs to the 49th Avenue beach access, where standing,
stagnant water attracts snakes and mosquitoes.
• Awarded a $9,620 contract to Hill Construction for what
Cronin called “a bottoms-up” assessment of all city building
needs “so we can then lay out a map for what needs to be
taken care of immediately, what needs to be dealt with over a
period of time.”
• Approved spending up to $3,500 to remove showers from the
exterior wall of the public restroom at Front Beach and install
temporary free-standing showers while the city works out longrange plans for a restroom upgrade and how to pay for it.

October 7, 2016

11

COMPUTER CORNER

Google and Facebook
know everything about you
BY BOB HOOPER

I

FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS

stopped by the Lucky Dog
Publishing offices recently
to do some work on their
printers/laptops and had a nice
chat with Lynn, the publisher.
I mentioned to him all the data
regarding your online “life”
that Chrome/Google collects
and stores when you have
an account, especially when
you have a Google+ account. I
showed him where even a list of
everything you view on YouTube
is “stored” for your “benefit.” Uh,
yeah, for my benefit. The data
that is stored online under your
login name is rather astounding
in its depth, and that amount of
date has increased recently.
To view and delete this data,
you need to be logged into your
Google account and then go to
myactivity.google.com. You’ll see
settings to clear recent history,
stop “following” you, and all
sorts of surprising things that
Google has been keeping track of
“for your benefit.” A good place to
also check is the general settings
at myaccount.google.com/intro.
So Lynn decided to check it for
himself. I was busy fixing one of
the laptops while he discovered

what was stored by Google, and
I heard him exclaim, “You gotta
be kidding me!” Do yourself a
favor and check it out. Now for
Facebook…
Both Google and Facebook
recently tweaked how they store
your data and collect it — not
only about you but friends that
may not even be on Facebook.
If you’re using the mobile
Facebook app, tap the gear (or
the “lines”) in the upper righthand corner and scroll down to
Settings. Start checking them
all out. Privacy/Ads/Timeline
are big ones to check, but all the
settings change frequently so
now is a good time to see what's
been added and what Facebook
is saving for your "benefit.”
As Lynn learned, you need to
check these two, and, really, any
program/app you used online
should be searched for the same.
More next time!

Help select the next
sculpture for BricksALIVE
BY KATE DITTLOFF

E

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

xhibit designers at the South Carolina Aquarium need your
help to pay homage to the No.1 city in the world: Charleston.

South Carolina Aquarium BricksALIVE — an innovative experience,
that uses more than 250,000 LEGO® bricks to form a collection of
more than 12 life-sized, one-of-a-kind animal sculptures, highlighting
some of the incredible creatures that call South Carolina home — is
set to build its next sculpture. A vote will decide what they’ll make.
It’s your chance to weigh in on which symbol of Charleston will be
created. Here are the three symbols to choose from.
• Giant Sweetgrass Basket
• Playtime at the Pineapple Fountain
• Holy City Landmarks Mural
Voting is live from now until Sun. Oct.16. The winning design will
be announced Fri. Nov. 18, and the sculpture will be unveiled on
Fri. Nov. 25. To cast your vote, visit the South Carolina Aquarium
Facebook page.

As with all of my columns, if
you want help or have questions
don't hesitate to call Rent A Bob
at (843) 822-7794 or email at
rentabob@live.com.

www.islandeyenews.com

You can now search properties in and around Charleston without giving your information.
No need to sign in. NO one is tracking you. NO one will contact you unless you generate the
conversation. Visit our new, updated website at sanddollarsc.com.

CHUCK
MIMMS

TROY
GANDEE

SARAH
VANBUREN CHURCH

EDY
MIMMS

CHAD
VINCENT

MEL
MILES

ELLIOTT
MIMMS

MARCI
SHORE

Call us today for all your Real Estate needs 843-530-8100
126 OCEAN BOULEVARD

Isle of Palms
7 bedroom/4F, 2H baths
$3,680,000

C ontact

MEL MILES
864.363.3049

Oceanfront property

Serving Sullivan's Island, Isle of Palms and Mt. Pleasant
Sullivans Island

843.530.8100

SanddollarSC.com

October 7, 2016

Meeting the culture keepers in the
Costa Rican rainforest

13

BY CAROL ANTMAN

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

“T

hat’s my uncle!” Luis
Quetzal said me in
Spanish as we watched
a scratchy vintage video at the
Gold Museum in San Jose. Luis,
a 12th-generation shaman, had
come from his remote village
to help lead our group of LEAF
Ambassadors. He’d never visited
the museum before. Luis was
surprised to see his uncle on
film chanting and ceremoniously
divining a cure. “He taught me
those same songs,” Luis said.
Around us lay the artifacts of
Costa Rica’s indigenous cultures.
Beside us walked a man who still
practiced those traditions. It was
a poignant introduction to why we
had come.
The LEAF Festival is held
twice-a-year in Black Mt, North
Carolina. Sold-out crowds revel in
the atmosphere of positivity set to
stellar world and regional music.
But LEAF’s mission of connecting
cultures through the arts at the
weekend festivals and in their
numerous outreach programs to
Asheville schools extends much
farther. In partnership with
programs in Bequia, Guatemala,
Panama, Rwanda, Mexico, Costa
Rica, Haiti, and Tanzania, LEAF
International
helps
support
indigenous culture keepers. Luis
explains, “If you take a tree that
only has roots from two years, it’s
very easy to uproot the tree but if
the tree has roots from ten years,
it’s very hard to uproot that tree.”
Deeper roots teach the children
that their culture didn’t start 200
years ago. It’s ancient. Seeing the
ideas in action as we did was a
transformative experience.
For more info on LEAF
Community Arts, go to
theLEAF.org, or to learn
more about the Koswak Bri
Bri village, visit koswak.
blogspot.com.

I’d been to Costa Rica a few
other times including some
relatively remote locations but
nothing like this. From Puerto
Viejo, we traveled by public bus,
hired a van, and (when that
broke down) a pick-up truck
until we reached the Urén River,
where long, dug-out canoes were
being loaded with everything
from furniture to bunches of
bananas. We gingerly tossed in
our backpacks and headed into
the Talamanca. Up the river,
down a dirt road and through a
grove of giant bamboo, we came to
the Amubri village of Koswak. Its
huge conical huts, made entirely
from bamboo and palm, are truly
marvels of engineering. There
is a dining hut where our hosts
cooked delicious meals on a wood
fire, a two-story sleeping hut with
private, mosquito-netted beds,
a gathering hut large enough for
dozens of folks and running water
and toilets nearby.
Our days were spent on
“intercambio:” cultural exchange.
We whipped up a rendition of
“Here Comes the Sun” to sing
in classrooms. Until a few years
ago, the only songs taught in
their schools were the ones the
evangelists had allowed. During
those years, the indigenous
language was banned. Now the Bri
Bris control their own schools so
the children sang their traditional
songs in their original language.
That night, we danced in a circle
with local drummers to depict
the world’s creation. We hiked to
visit Jairo, a drum maker. Beside
his family’s smoky conical hut,
his father and he showed us the
s’bok drums they were making
by meticulously carving out the
core of logs and covering them
with snake skin. Before LEAF’s
support, Jairo was making
trinkets for tourists. Now his
students learn fables set to music.
At every opportunity Luis sang:

Making dinner on the fire.

for our safe arrival, before our
long journeys home, to welcome
the sunrise; Every occasion is
elevated by music, he told us.
He conducted healing sessions
for those who were willing. The
chants and potions left fellow
traveler Steve with a mysterious
bolt of energy coursing through
his body and cured Isaiah of
“FOMO,” the fear of missing out
that our culture promulgates.

www.islandeyenews.com

The s'bok drums.

“LEAF makes us feel that …
our cultures are important,” says
Alexis Rodriguez, the culture
keeper who worked with LEAF
International to unite indigenous
tribal members from Costa Rica
and Panama. In their sacred
mountains, they saw their
Roadtrip continues on page 14

Roadtrip continues from page 13

Island Dream

1 56TH AVENUE, ISLE OF PALMS

e prope
siv
r
lu

es
ti

Ex
c

9 BEDROOMS • 7 BATHS • SLEEPS 20

Guaranteed 15% Increase in Rental Income
Absolutely No Mark-Up on Supplies or Services

PR
Ma

xim

OGRAM

i z i n g O w n e r Pro

fit

s

Innovative Marketing Strategies

Exclusive Properties
Luxury island getaways

Luxury Vacation Home Management

Showing the gigantic scale of the bamboo hut.

musical traditions performed for the first time as art. The power
of music is evident in the Rwandan program, which helped turn
homeless orphans into touring drummers. “To watch these teen
street boys become young men living in a home, and each being a
world-class performer has been a series of miracles and a testament
to the human potential,” LEAF’s founder Jennifer Pickering says.
Musical horizons are expanded when the festival brings international
students and culture keepers in to proudly share their traditions
with American audiences and Asheville students. Luis came last
year after consulting his spirit ancestors. “I was very nervous to
go to Asheville, but I found it was part of my journey. I’m happy to
share with you because we’re only one family.
“Music is the great bridge that can bring diverse communities
together in a manner that transcends conversations and divisive
ideologies … Politics and religion fade, while friendship and
understanding start to erase ‘isms,’” Jennifer says.
Luis puts it this way: “The only way to talk to God is [through]
music.”
Roadtrips Charleston highlights interesting destinations within a
few hours drive of Charleston as well as more far-flung locales. Carol
Antman’s wanderlust is driven by a passion for outdoor adventure,
artistic experiences, cultural insights, and challenging travel. For
hot links, photographs and previous columns, or to make comments,
please see peaksandpotholes.blogspot.com.

October 7, 2016

Winter Wellness

15

Outreach with ECCO

STAFF REPORT

O

STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

ver 20 healthcare professionals, specialists and other healthand-wellness agencies from Charleston and Mount Pleasant
volunteered at the Isle of Palms Community Wellness Fair on
Thurs. Sept. 22, offering free blood work to the public from the East
Cooper Medical Center. The services included cholesterol screenings
and flu shots, with Harris Teeter offering flu shots as well.
For further updates on future services offered by the city of IOP, go
to iop.net.

E

ast Cooper Community Church ECCO has been teaching
Healthy Cooking classes at Huger’s Baldwin Carson Center for
over a year. In last week’s class (pictured), ECCO Education
Specialist Sheila Russell shows the group how to make wonton
soup.
For more info on ECCO outreach programs, go to eccocharleston.org.

www.islandeyenews.com

16

MYSTERY PLANT

October 7, 2016

Name that plant
BY JOHN B. NELSON

This native aquatic plant is common in various places around the world.

surfaces of the leaves, and for
that matter, all the submersed
parts of the plant, are thickly
coated with a crystal-clear,
mucilaginous jelly. Because of
this, it is something of a challenge
to handle the plants: they are
really quite slippery.
This mucilage on the stems
and leaves may serve some
purpose, but we don't exactly
understand what it might be.
Seems like a good research
project for an imaginative botany
student. (It’s also hard to make
a decent herbarium specimen of
this plant, as the mucilage tends

to adhere tightly to the paper in
which it is being pressed. But
botanists love a challenge.)
The flowers are not much
more than the size of a quarter,
deep red or maroon, and barely
emerge from the water's surface.
The flowers appear in the middle
of the summer. To many people,
this plant looks to be some sort
of water lily, and in fact they
are somewhat related, although
water lilies (the genus Nymphaea)
have much showier flowers, and
the leaves are not peltate. Now,
in our Mystery Plant, each flower
is “perfect” … in having both

www.islandeyenews.com

female and male parts (that is,
pistils and stamens). But the
flowers behave as though they
“imperfect”, or unisexual. How? It
turns out that a given individual
flower will open up and have its
pistils fertilized, without giving
off any pollen, thus functioning
as a “female” flower. That same
day (or evening), the plant will
pull the flower under the water.
The next day, the same flower
reemerges from the surface,
only this time, sheds pollen from
its stamens (now, functioning
as a “male” flower). At the end
of the second day, the flower
disappears underwater, never to
be seen again, allowing its seeds
to develop, eventually released.
What a strange and wonderful
pair of botanical stories!
John Nelson is the curator of
the A. C. Moore Herbarium at
the University of South Carolina,
in the Department of Biological
Sciences, Columbia SC 29208. As
a public service, the Herbarium
offers free plant identifications.
For more information, visit www.
herbarium.org or call (803) 7778196, or email nelson@sc.edu.
[Answer: Water-shield, Brasenia
schreberi]

F

requently the leaves and
stems of a plant will prove
to be just as fascinating as
its flowers. This is a plant like
that, and it is a native, aquatic
species.
Except for its leaves, the entire
plant grows below the surface of
water, most often in quiet lakes
and millponds, or sometimes
creeks or beaver ponds. In the
Southeast, it is most commonly
seen in ponds on the coastal plain
and in the sandhills, but it also
grows in the mountain lakes. It’s
often easy to see in the various
impoundments in a number of
state parks, and of course, it is
unmistakable for anything else.
This species is actually quite
common in many places around
the world now. You generally
need to do some wading to get upclose and personal with it, unless
you have a canoe or kayak.
The leaf blades, dark green or
sometimes purplish, are shaped
like little footballs with rounded
ends. Each blade is attached
to a very long leaf stalk at its
center, rather than at its edge,
and botanists say that the leaf
is thus “peltate”, in architecture
something like an umbrella
with its handle. What is more
interesting is that the lower

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

October 7, 2016

4th-Annual Oyster Roast benefits
East Cooper Meals on Wheels

17

STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

W

About East Cooper Meals on Wheels:
East Cooper Meals on Wheels is a community based 501(c)
(3) nonprofit organization that has been recognized nationally
for innovation, integrity and entrepreneurship when it comes to
addressing the nutritional needs of homebound neighbors. East
Cooper Meals on Wheels serves nutritious meals to homebound
Charleston area residents east of the Cooper River, regardless of
recipient's’ age or income. There is no waiting list, and there is
never a charge for meals. Volunteers deliver over 12,500 meals
every month. For more info visit: www.ecmow.org.

ith three very successful years of this event under its belt,
East Cooper Meals on Wheels will hold its 4th Annual
Oyster Roast on Sun. Oct. 16, at Palmetto Islands County
Park. The event has been sponsored by Royall ACE Hardware. Noisy
Oyster will supply the oysters. In addition to oysters, the event will
include a Fireman’s Chili Throwdown sponsored by South State
Bank, BBQ Competition sponsored by Advanced Hearing Care,
live music provided by Awendaw Green, plus additional food and
beverages.
Teams from Awendaw, Mount Pleasant and Isle of Palms fire
departments will spice things up by participating in the “Chili
Throwdown,” a friendly yet competitive cook-off. The Mount Pleasant
Fire Department holds the 2015 title. New to this year’s Oyster
Roast is a BBQ Competition between five local teams. Guests vote
for the best chili and BBQ by dropping dollars into the collection
jars at each table. Whichever team collects the most wins, and all
proceeds go to East Cooper Meals on Wheels.
East Cooper Meals on Wheels packages and delivers meals to
those who are homebound and unable to provide for themselves,
most often due to injury or illness. Depending solely on donations
and fundraising, special events are key to the organization’s
vitality. “This annual event aims to grow awareness of Meals on
Wheels’ mission and help raise funds to support our work for local
residents in need,” noted George Roberts, President/CEO of East
Cooper Meals on Wheels.
The Oyster Roast will take place Sun. Oct. 16 at 3 p.m. at Palmetto
Islands County Park (444 Needlerush Parkway, Mount Pleasant,
29464). Tickets may be purchased online for $35 (everything
included), $20 (everything, except oysters), $10 for children under
12. For more event information, visit http://www.ecmow.org/oysterroast and www.facebook.com/ECMealsOnWheels .

www.islandeyenews.com

October 7
ONGOING
Mondays
Memoir Writing Circle
Every Monday at 10:30 a.m.
Come and share your stories.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843.883.3914.

Tuesdays
Toddler Time Storytime
10:30 a.m. Join Mrs. Marie for
stories and songs. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I'on Avenue.
843.883.3914.
Team Trivia
8 to 10 p.m., Home Team BBQ,
Sullivan's Island

Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults)
Every Thursday from 5:30 to 8
p.m. Learn to play American Mah
Jongg. Join us for a couple rounds
or the whole evening. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
843.883.3914.
Fridays
VFW Post 3137 Steak Night
Open House Steak Night every
Friday, 6 p.m. Claim your steak
(we only do 30 each week), season
to your liking, then you have
until 8 p.m. to cook it yourself on
Ocean Deck grills.
Choice Ribeye, Baked Potato &
Salad, $15.

Saturdays
VFW Post 3137 Fish Fry
Every 3rd Sat. of each month
June through Oct. 2016. Whiting
fillets, hush puppies, tater tots,
cole slaw, baked beans and
desserts $8 plate. Proceeds go
to VFW and Veteran programs,
and local community and youth
programs.
New Junior Ranger Program
The National Park Service will
be offering a special Junior
Ranger program commemorating
the 50th anniversary of the
National Historic Preservation
Act at Charles Pinckney National
Historic Site and Fort Moultrie
starting October 1st. The activity
book is geared for children ages 7
and up. Call 843.732.5013.

Friday, October 7
World Premiere of “Brain” the
Musical “Brain”
Oct 7-16 at the Footlight Players
Theater in Charleston’s historic
French Quarter, 7:30 p.m. and
run nightly through Oct. 16. The
Island Eye and Island Connection
have partnered with Footlight
Players Theater to offer two
complimentary VIP tickets. Please
visit thebrainthatwouldntdie.
net/ for tickets with promo code
“THANKSISLANDEYE” instead of
payment.

Saturday, October 8
STAR Therapy Dogs
Share a book with a furry friend.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843.883.3914.
Timeless Island - Plein Air and
Studio Paintings
Reception featuring the work of
local artist, Jim Darlington; 5 - 7
p.m. at the Sandpiper Gallery
2201 Middle Street, Sullivans
Island.

Monday, October 10
Basketball sign-ups
Isle of Palms Recreation
Department starts registration for
youth basketball for Isle of Palms
and Sullivan’s Island residents.
Others can register starting Oct.
17. Practices start in December.
843.886.8294; iop.net/recreation.

Wednesday, October 12
Fire Prevention Celebration
Look for a late afternoon SI/IOP
parade of engines headed to an
evening celebration at Sullivan’s
Island Fire House, 2050 Middle
Street.

Thursday, October 13
Charleston Style Exchange
Public shopping days Oct. 1315 at Holiday Inn, 250 Johnnie
Dodds Blvd, Mount Pleasant.
Semi-annual upscale women’s
consignment sale event. Free
admission. Consignors can earn
65-75 percent of their total sales,
get a VIP shopping pass, and
help out East Cooper Community
Outreach.Times vary by day.
CharlestonStyleExchange.com.

Friday October 14
1st Annual Classics
on the Creek
Please join the
Isle of Palms
Exchange Club on
Friday Oct. 14th
at 7 p.m. on a ghostly
adventure with the
showing of the original
“Ghostbusters.” The event

Is l a nd E y e C a l e nda r
is free to the public. We will
have refreshments, candy, and
fresh popcorn for purchase. The
event will be held outside on a
projector screen at the club which
is located at 201 Palm Blvd, Isle
of Palms. Please bring your own
lawn/beach chair as seating will
not be provided.

Saturday, October 15
Beach Lovers Book Club:
“Hamilton” the musical
10:30 a.m., CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue,
843.883.3914. Contact Connie
at darlingc@ccpl.org to join
discussion mailing list, receive
a bibliography and suggested
readings.
"Stained Glass" suncatcher
10:30 a.m. Crate a colorful tissue
paper suncatcher. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
Stained Glass Demonstration at
12:30 p.m. Call 843-883-3914 for
more information.

Sunday, October 16
Oyster Roast at Palmetto Park
East Cooper Meals on Wheels will
hold its 4th Annual Oyster Roast
at Palmetto Islands County Park
(444 Needlerush Parkway, Mount
Pleasant, 29464). The event has
been sponsored by Royall ACE
Hardware. Noisy Oyster will
supply the oysters. In addition
to oysters, the event will include
a Fireman’s Chili Throwdown
sponsored by South State Bank,
BBQ Competition sponsored by
Advanced Hearing Care, live
music provided by Awendaw
Green, plus additional food
and beverages.Tickets may
be purchased online
for $35 (everything
included), $20
(everything,
except oysters),
$10 for
children
under 12. For
more event
information,
visit ecmow.org/
oyster-roast.

November 5

Wednesday, October 19

Sunday, October 23

Sullivan’s Island and the
Pirates of Charleston
Battery Gadsden Cultural Center
Presents Captain Chris Downey on
“Sullivan’s Island and the Pirates
of Charleston.” The presentation is
from 6 - 7 p.m. at the Fort Moultrie
Visitor Center Auditorium, 1214
Middle St., Sullivan’s Island.

Benefit for Ohm Radio
The 7th Annual Charleston Jazz
Jam will be held from 4 - 8pm,
at the Dock House on Bowen’s
Island. Special Guest appearance
by nationally known saxophonist,
Richie Cole.

Friday, October 21

Launch and Lunch Tuesday
featuring Mary Alice Monroe
Blue Bicycle Books Charleston
Author Series luncheon at High
Cotton, with Mary Alice Monroe
on the launch day of her new
novel, A Lowcountry Christmas.
Noon.Tickets are $61 to meet
Mary Alice, enjoy a threecourse luncheon at High Cotton,
plus receive a signed copy of A
Lowcountry Christmas.

Ghostly Tide Tales
6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Local ghost
stories told by campfire on the
beach. Meet at 28th Ave. Beach
Access. Free. Offered by Isle of
Palms Recreation Department, for
more info call 843.886.8294, or
visit iop.net/recreation.
Sunset Cruise to Fort Sumter
Departs 5:30 p.m. from Liberty
Square in downtown Charleston
to Fort Sumter National
Monument. $100 per person.
Includes food and beverages,
historical presentations. Cash bar
also available. Supports Kids to
the Parks, an education outreach
program of the Fort Sumter – Fort
Moultrie Historical Trust. Visit
fortsumtertrust.org.
Aging Gracefully: Brain Care
10:30 a.m. Geriatrician Dr. Bill
Simpson shares strategies for
preserving brain function and
improving overall health as a
result. Reservations requested.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. For more information
call 843-883-3914.

Saturday, October 22
65th Annual Christ Our King
Fall Bazaar
10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Christ Our King
- Stella Maris School presents
the 65th Annual Fall Bazaar, fun
for the whole family with games,
prizes, face painting, jump castles,
cake booth, entertainment, crafts,
book fair, and costumes. Free
admission. Tickets available for
purchase for games and food.
Parking behind the school, 1183
Russell Dr., Mt Pleasant. Visit
Bazaar.COKSM.com.

Tuesday, October 25

Thursday, October 27

​Pumpkin Painting
4 p.m. Ages 5 to 14 years paint
pumpkins with staff at the Isle
of Palms Recreation Center. $
​ 5.
All materials provided. Register
through rec by Wednesday, Oct.
19. Call 843.886.8294, or visit
iop.net/recreation.

Friday, October 28
Sullivan’s Island Trunk or Treat
Halloween festivities in the
Sullivan’s Island Elementary
Parking Lot from 6-8 p.m.
Costume parade, trunk
decorating contest, face painting,
food trucks, games, food and
drinks available. Free admission.
Register vehicle by Monday,
October 17. For more information
contact Allyson at amfralish@
yahoo.com or 843.412.3725.
Cranford Hollow at Sullivan’s
Island Home Team BBQ
Music begins at 10 p.m. at Home
Team BBQ Sullivan’s Island, 2209
Middle Street. Price: $5. More info
at hometeambbq.com or 843-8833131.

Monday, October 31
Halloween Carnival at IOP Rec
5-7 p.m. free activities and

candy at Isle of Palms Recreation
Department, 28th Avenue.
Costume Contest starts at 5:30
p.m. sharp. For more information
visit iop.net/recreation.

Saturday, November 5

Lowcountry Hoedown
The 5th Annual Lowcountry
Hoedown will take place at
The Visitor Center Bus Shed in

Wednesday, November 9
The Crabpot Players returns
to The Windjammer
The company will produce "The Last
Meeting of The White
Magnolia" by Preston
Jones November 9,
10, 15, 16 & 17. Open
auditions will be held
October 10 at 6 p.m.
at The Windjammer. The
cast consists of nine men
ages 17-75 No experience
required. Also needed costume
designers, carpenters, painters, set
designers and backstage help.
For further information call
843.886.6218.

Downtown Charleston from 7 -11
p.m. The all-inclusive event will
feature a lineup of restaurants,
distilleries, breweries, and bands
showcasing the best of the South.
Tickets include entrance into the
Hoedown, samples of all craft
cocktails and brews, BBQ and
Southern fare from dozens of
restaurants and food vendors, live
music. For more information, visit
lowcountryhoedown.com.

20

Seasons
of the

South

Zucchini pancakes

PA N C A K E S W I T H C O U N T R Y H A M A N D
BUTTERMILK CRÈME FRAICHE
BY MARILYN MARKEL

T

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

hese make a lot of small pancakes perfect for an appetizer
portion. They are delicious at room temperature on a platter
with a bowl of the crème fraiche and a garnish of country ham
or smoked trout.

October 7, 2016
PANCAKES Serves 6 - 8
Ingredients
4 Tbsp buttermilk
1 cup heavy cream
1 lb grated zucchini, stems removed
1 heaping tsp salt
2 Tbsp finely chopped chives
1 minced shallot
¼ tsp pepper
¼ cup flour
1 egg, lightly beaten
¼ cup neutral oil
Chives for garnish
2 oz thinly sliced country ham or smoked trout, optional
Directions
1. Combine zucchini and salt in a colander and let sit over a sink
or bowl for ½ hour. Squeeze zucchini dry and press dry onto
paper towels or smooth, clean dish towel.
2. Combine zucchini with chives, shallot, pepper, flour and egg in
a medium bowl.
3. Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Drop zucchini pancakes
into oil by heaping tablespoons. Cook for several minutes per
side and keep warm while cooking remaining pancakes adding
more oil as necessary. Serve with crème fraîche, chives and
smoked trout or salmon.
CRÈME FRAICHE
Ingredients
1 cup cream
1/4 cup buttermilk
Directions
1. In a bowl whisk together cream and buttermilk.
2. Cover and let stand at room temperature for 24 to 36 hours
until it has the consistency of sour cream.
3. Refrigerate up to a week.
Culinary instructor Marilyn Markel lives in the South Carolina
Lowcountry, has served as culinary director for several schools and
is a member of Les Dames d’Escoffier, Southern Foodways Alliance
and International Association of Culinary Professionals. Her book,
“Southern Breads: Recipes, Stories and Traditions” will be published
Dec. 5, by Arcadia/The History Press.

We now
build
websites!

October 7, 2016

ON THE WATER

21

Tricks to optimize fall fishing

BY SARAH DÍAZ

BY GEOFF BENNETT

T

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

he perfect storm that makes fishing so great in the fall is about
to begin. The combination of lower water temperatures, tons
of bait and fewer fishermen on the water makes for fantastic
conditions. The fact that cooler days will make fishing much more
pleasant doesn't hurt either.
Many different approaches will work this time of year and popping
corks are a favorite. An angler can catch so many different types of
fish: redfish, trout, flounder, ladyfish, shark, etc. I use a weighted
popping cork so I can increase the distance of my cast. Then I put
an 18- to 24-inch fluorocarbon leader from the cork to a size 1 circle
hook. Mud minnows, shrimp and artificial shrimp all work well as
baits.
When focusing on redfish, we begin to use artificial lures as Fall
approaches. Jerk shad lures paired with flutter hooks are my go-to
option. Usually 4- to 5-inch length, these lures imitate small baitfish.
Flutter hooks have a weight on their shank that produces really great
action. Try flutter hooks in size 3/0 with a 1/8-ounce weight and
lures in natural hues like silver and grey.
For trout, the topwater bite has been very strong first thing in the
morning. I’ve tried lots of options but I overwhelmingly use Super
Spook Jr’s. My favorite colors are black head/ chartreuse body and
silver shad. Alternate your rate of retrieve until you find one that
works. Don’t be surprised if every now and then a big redfish takes
a swipe.
Ladyfish, a personal favorite, are more plentiful than any year I can
recall. We've spent many charters watching ladyfish blow up balls of
bait heading toward the boat. Toss a live mud minnow or shrimp in
their path and get ready for some great action. These acrobatic fish
are very entertaining as they fly through the air. While these fish
will fade as the water cools, we should still have a few more weeks of
activity.

Four new bird
species arrive

T H E B I R D - B A N D I N G S TAT I O N H A S , S O FA R ,
B A N D E D 4 2 7 B I R D S I N FA L L 2 0 1 6

See you on the water!  

Capt. Geoff Bennett operates Charleston Charter Fishing providing
light tackle and fly fishing charters. For more information, call 843324-3332, visit charlestoncharterfishing.com or email captain@
charlestoncharterfishing.com.
Local biologists recently discovered the migratory bird Bell’s Vireo on Sullivan’s Island.

T

he Sullivan’s Island bird-banding station has had an eventful
two weeks. The biologists have banded a handful of new
species, which brings their species total for the station to 64.
Some of the new species include the Baltimore Oriole, Bell’s Vireo,
Great-crested Flycatcher, and Northern Parula. The Sullivan’s
Island crew has four biologists working to study the migratory birds
that are passing through the Protected Land at Station 16.
As of Tues. Sept. 27, they have banded 427 birds so far in Fall
2016 and 1,317 birds since they first opened in Fall 2015. Banding
birds enables biologists to learn more about their longevity, site
fidelity during breeding and migration and also helps to create an
accurate census of the many species that are passing through a
specific area during migration.
The discovery of a Bell’s Vireo on Sullivan’s Island is noteworthy.
This species’ summer range is in the Western U.S., and they are
classified as vagrants in South Carolina. Strangely enough, the
bird-banding station on Kiawah Island banded another Bell’s Vireo
around the same week that the Sullivan’s Island station did.
If you would like to see more photos of the birds being banded on
Sullivan’s Island, visit facebook.com/sullivansislandbirds.

Acme Lowcountry Kitchen
Specializing in local and
sustainable seafood. All Altantic
Ocean sourced Seafood. $$-$$$
886-FISH (3474)
31 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms
Banana Cabana
A casual menu suits its beachfront
setting. Nibbles like peel and eat
shrimp and nachos alongside
heartier platters of seafood. $-$$
886-4361
www.thebananacabana.com
1130 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

your island hair salon

843-883-9101

2205 Middle St, Sullivan's Island

island eats
tap, spacious side porch, and live
music. $-$$
242-8310
www.dinghyiop.com
8 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms

Dunleavy’s Irish Pub
The islands’ only Irish Pub.
Famous burgers, Irish fare, favorite
locals hangout for over 20 years.
$$
883-9646
www.dunleavysonsullivans.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Beard Cat’s
Gelato made from locally sourced
ingredients, and coffee shop that
sits below Obstinate Daughter. $
416-5020
www.beardcatsweetshop.com
2063 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

High Thyme
A small island bistro, with a wide
range of dishes, from seafood,
tapas on Tuesday, and a Sunday
brunch. $$-$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream flavors,
from Chocolate Therapy, to Peach
Cobbler on Isle of Palms’ Front
Beach. $
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas,
Sunday Brunch. $$
883-3131
www.teamteambbq.com
2209 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

The Boathouse
Fresh, local seafood, and
phenomenal sunset views from
the upper deck on Breach Inlet.
$$-$$$
886.8000
www.boathouserestaurants.com
101 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

Island Ice Frozen Yogurt
All organic frozen yogurt, with
gluten free and vegan options.
Toppings are all natural or organic.
Local coffee and teas. $
885-7079
www.islandiceyogurt.com
1515 C Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

Coconut Joe’s &
Island Joe’s Coffee
Spectacular views of the Atlantic
on the rooftop bar and live music
every night during the summer.
$-$$. Island Joe’s next door
featuring coffee and ice cream. $
886-0046
www.coconutjoes.biz
1120 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Long Island Café
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood, plus so much
more at this island favorite. $$-$$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

The Co-Op
A gourmet deli specializing in
breakfast and lunch sandwiches
as well as local coffee. Enjoy
pantry staples including beer
and wine along with locally made
products and house made take
and go meals. Open 7 days a week.
Delivery available. $
882-8088
www.thecoopsi.com
2019 Middle St, Sullivan's Island
The Dinghy
Laid back Key West Vibe, great
food options, unique beers on

Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal Waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality. $$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
8040 1st Ave, Isle of Palms
The Obstinate Daughter
Restaurant serving contemporary
Southern cuisine, pizza & pasta in
a rustic, coastal-inspired space.
$$-$$$
416-5020
www.theobstinatedaughter.com
2063 Middle St, Isle of Palms

Pizza Hut
Now serving Isle of Palms in the
Harris Teeter shopping center.
Deliver right to your door or get
carryout. $
886-5759
www.order.pizzahut.com
1515 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poeinspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fish tacos. $$
883-0083
www.longislandcafesc.com
2210 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Refuge
Enjoy morning coffee with fresh
bagels and pastries from the coffee
bar and dinner or lunch at the
restaurant along with signature
cocktails.
www.therefugeiop.com
1517 Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms
Saltworks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
breakfast, smoothies, and
sandwiches. $-$$
883-3355
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Ave, Isle of Palms
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
flounder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere as well as lunch on the
weekends. $$
883-3222
www.saltstation22.com
2019 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made from scratch ‘Tex
Mex’ soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas. $$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Windjammer
Lively spot with a bar menu, a
deck overlooking the water, and
beach volleyball court out back.$$$
886-8596
www.the-windjammer.com
1008 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

off-island eats

Bacco
Regional Italian restaurant
featuring fresh pastas, fior di latte
mozzarella and Neapolitan style
pizzas from the wood burning oven.
$$$
843.884.6969
www.baccocharleston.com
976 Houston Northcutt Blvd., Mt.
Pleasant
Bistro Toulouse
Classic French cuisine, fine wines
and creative cocktails. Menu
highlights include Crepes, Mussels,
Cassoulet, Bouillabaisse, Cheese
& Charcuterie and house made
Desserts. $$$
843.216.3434
www.bistrotoulouse.com
1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant

Eggs Up Grill
Relaxed chain serving a menu of
breakfast, burgers & sandwiches in
a colorful setting. $-$$
388-3654
www.eggsupgrill.com
2664 Highway 17 North,
Mt. Pleasant
Sawyers
True to the low country, Sawyer's
On The Boulevard is surrounded
by beautiful Oak trees and done in
reclaimed wood on the inside with
copper tiles topping the bar area.
Local fresh shrimp and fish tacos
are a favorite here as well as some
of Charleston's best music 5 nights
a week. $$
843.388.5270
www.sawyersotb.com
1528 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant

Stack’s Coastal Kitchen
Join us for lunch, where we
offer fresh soup, salads, and
sandwiches. Enjoy dinner in a
casual bistro-style setting, nice
selection and outdoor seating. $$
388-6968
www.stackscoastalkitchen.com
1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant
The Wine Bar
Wine, unique variety of 40 +
cheeses and charcuterie meats
from around the world., chocolate,
bon-bons. $$
849-5185
www.thewinebarmtp.com
664 Long Point Rd, Mt. Pleasant

MOVING WITH MEREDITH

October 7, 2016

23

Busted: local pros expose
common fitness myths
BY MEREDITH NELSON
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

A

s fitness professionals, staff members at PrimeTime Fitness hear
“fitness myths” that drive us crazy. It seems that people often
want to eat that magic food that will rev up their metabolism,
do that one exercise that will tone a specific spot, or one-click to
purchase the latest Internet hot product.
These are some of the PrimeTime staff favorites to bust (in no
particular order).
Myth No. 1: I don’t have time to workout!
Busted by Meredith Nelson, owner, personal trainer, indoor cycling
instructor.
Truth: We hear excuses all the time. Everyday. Family responsibilities,
phone calls that run over, meetings you can’t miss, repairmen coming
to fix something … anything can interfere with your workout.
You set aside time for important appointments, and you make time
with family and friends. Granted, some things cannot be avoided. Kids
get sick and meetings can run late. But make an appointment with
yourself or with your trainer, and try not to break it. (You wouldn’t
cancel an appointment with your boss or client, would you?). Don’t
be afraid to take care of yourself first—then you’ll be at your best to
take care of everyone else.
No, it’s not selfish. It’s smart. Successful entrepreneurs, good
parents and high-powered CEO’s often realize that putting themselves
first for an hour or so a day is good not only for themselves but
contributes to the happiness of their families and success of their
businesses as well.
Myth No. 2: Lifting weights will make me big and bulky.
Busted by John Sistare, personal trainer
Truth: Lifting weights builds muscle mass. And yes, you do want
your muscle mass to increase. Muscle has a higher metabolic rate
than fat, so the more muscle you have, the more of an advantage you
have in your weight loss efforts. Yes, some people do appear “bulky”
when they lift weights regularly. This usually happens if you take
in more calories than you burn, in which case the big and beautiful
muscles remain hidden by layers of fat. It’s absolutely imperative to
burn the fat as well as increase muscle mass (and watch your calorie
count), otherwise those muscles stay covered up where no one can
see them.

Breac h Inlet Tide Char t
Date

High Tide

Oct 7
Oct 8
Oct 9
Oct 10
Oct 11
Oct 12
Oct 13
Oct 14
Oct 15
Oct 16
Oct 17
Oct 18
Oct 19
Oct 20

12:04am/12:42pm
12:51am/1:34pm
1:45m/2:31pm
2:45am/3:31pm
3:46am/4:29pm
4:45am/5:25pm
5:41am/6:18pm
6:36am/7:09pm
7:28am/8:00pm
8:20am/8:51pm
9:13am/9:42pm
10:06am/10:36pm
11:01am/11:32pm
11:59am

Low Tide
6:02am/6:57pm
6:50am/7:50pm
7:46am/8:47pm
8:49am/9:45pm
9:53am/ 10:41pm
10:55am/11:34pm
11:54am
12:25am/12:50pm
1:15am/1:44pm
2:04am/2:37pm
2:53am/3:30pm
3:43am/4:23pm
4:34am/5:18pm
5:28am/6:16pm

Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.

Source: www.saltwatertides.com

Myth No. 3: All those yoga twists will detox my body.
Busted by Rachel Glowacki, yoga instructor
Truth: Not exactly. There is actually no scientific evidence to support
that yoga twists detox your body. Your body is an amazing piece of
equipment that can usually get rid of the toxins you take in on its own.
Your liver and lymphatic system have the job of cleansing your body
of toxins; however, deep breathing during the twists may stimulate
the detoxification process. But if you want to truly detox your body,
drink lots and lots of water to flush your system.
When in doubt, just check the color of your urine. If it's clear, then
you are in the clear. Of course, you can also decrease the toxic load
on your body by reducing the amount of toxins you put into it. Try to
replace packaged foods with nutrient-dense whole and unprocessed
foods like nuts, fruits, vegetables, ancient grains and seeds.
Myth No. 4: Muscle weighs more than fat.
Busted by Julie Nestler, indoor cycling instructor
Truth: This one is easy to explain. The truth is a pound of muscle
weighs just as much as a pound of fat. The kicker, however, is that
a pound of muscle takes up less space than a pound of fat. So if
you lose a pound of fat, and replace it with a pound of muscle, your
measurements will be smaller. Therefore it’s very possible, with proper
diet and exercise, to weigh the same but look trimmer.
Then there’s the hype about cardio …
Myth No. 5: There is no better cardio than running for weight loss.
Busted by Sean Highsmith, personal trainer
Truth: While this may be true if you are a runner, for many people,
running is just unenjoyable. Whether they find it boring, hard, or
painful, some people just plain prefer not to run. Never fear, if you
fall into the category of those who don’t want to, can’t, or wouldn’t be
found running unless being chased, there are other ways to get the
benefits of cardio exercise.
Full body exercises such as rowing, burpees, dual-action bikes (bikes
that you pedal with your legs and also push/pull with your arms) and
cross-country skiing are all great ways to reap cardio benefits that
can even surpass those of running. PrimeTime Fitness trainer Sean
is a fan of the kettlebell swing, which, when done properly, works the
large muscle groups of glutes and quadriceps, taking your heart and
lungs into overdrive.
Myth No. 6: Working out in the ‘fat burning zone’ is the best way to
lose weight.
Busted by Karien Harwell, personal trainer, indoor cycling instructor
Truth: This one is a matter of simple math. When you work within
your “fat-burning zone” of 65-75 percent of your maximum heart
rate (or those flashing red lights indicating “fat-burn” on the cardio
equipment in the gym), you are burning a greater percentage – up
to 50 percent - of calories from fat. At a higher intensity, your body
may burn only 35 percent of calories needed from fat. BUT the total
calories burned at higher intensity is more—way more—than that
burned within the “fat-burning” range. So not only do you burn more
total calories by working harder, but also more of those calories are
from fat. An added benefit of working beyond the “fat-burning” zone:
You burn more calories in less time!
Myth No. 7: Cardio exercise is the best way to lose weight.
Busted by Susan Cox and John Sistare, personal trainers
Truth: If you are trying to lose weight, you just cannot neglect
resistance training. Period. Cardio exercises like running, cycling
and the elliptical do burn calories, and the more intense the exercise,
the more calories you burn. (Go back and read Myth No. 6 again.)
However, more muscle mass makes your body a more efficient fatburning machine. The more muscle you have, the more chances you
have in winning the weight loss battle. Workouts like PrimeTime’s
Boot Camp and Total Body Circuit combine high intensity cardio
exercise with resistance training in one session. Now that will burn
calories and continue to ramp up your metabolism even after the
workout is over.

Meredith Nelson, M.Ed, is the owner of PrimeTime Fitness, Inc, in
Mount Pleasant. Since 2000, PrimeTime Fitness has catered to the
mature exerciser and offers personal and small group training, indoor
cycling, yoga, golf fitness training, monthly gym membership, and
more. Meredith can be reached with your fitness questions at 843-8830101, or Meredith@primetimefit.net.