This spreadsheet contains calculators for three different methods of estimating the performance o

Each of the methods requires you to have information about the noise, and about the capabilities
The HML method can be used if you know both the A-weighted and C-weighted noise levels
The octave band method can be used if you know the noise levels in frequency bands
The SNR method can be used if you know the C-weighted noise levels
All three methods are nearly equivalent in their accuracy in the majority of noise situations.

Each calculator is on a separate 'tab' within the spreadsheet. Click on the tab to go to the appropr
You can also move between the tabbed sheets by pressing Ctrl+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down.

The table below gives an indication of the protector factor that is likely to be suitable for different le
single number rating (SNR) value provided with a hearing protection device. The information is int
substitute for using one of the three methods, and in particular will not be appropriate if there are
components to the noise in question. Examples of noise environments which may contain significa
for which this table is not suitable, include press shops, generators and generator test bays, plant
shaker tables, moulding presses and punch presses.

A-weighted noise level (dB)
85-90
90-95
95-100
100-105

u to have information about the noise. and in particular will not be appropriate if there are significant low frequency ion. concrete and punch presses. Click on the tab to go to the appropriate calculator. It based on the provided with a hearing protection device. on of the protector factor that is likely to be suitable for different levels of noise. The information is intended as a guide rather than a ee methods. and . plant rooms. generators and generator test bays. Examples of noise environments which may contain significant low-frequency components. Select a protector with an SNR of … 20 or less 20-30 25-35 30 or more . and about the capabilities of the protector you are assessing. you know both the A-weighted and C-weighted noise levels used if you know the noise levels in frequency bands you know the C-weighted noise levels valent in their accuracy in the majority of noise situations. tab' within the spreadsheet. include press shops.ators for three different methods of estimating the performance of hearing protection. abbed sheets by pressing Ctrl+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down. boiler houses.

. and does not 'over-protect' Protector does not give adequate protection. Assume that this device will give: dB dB at the ear Colour codes: Protector gives adequate protection. LC Calculated level at the ear according to BS EN ISO 4869-2:1995 (=1) HSE recommends allowing 4dB for 'realworld' factors. LA C-weighted noise level. Click on the tab to go to the appropriate c You can also move between the tabbed sheets by pressing Ctrl+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down. or it 'over-protects' Each calculator is on a separate 'tab' within the spreadsheet.HML Method You can use this method if you know both the A-weighted and C-weighted noise levels Data on the hearing protector H M Noise levels A-weighted noise level.

l+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down. L dB dB Select a protector so that daily exposure is reduced to at least below 85 dB.and C-weighted noise levels Enter values in all white cells. aim for between 80 and 75 at the ear. Avoid protectors resulting in less than 70 dB at the ear . Click on the tab to go to the appropriate calculator. Ideally. .this is 'over-protection' (see BS EN 458:2004).

this is . Ideally. aim for an 70 dB at the ear .w 85 dB.

. If the hearing protector data is stated in terms of 'Assumed Protection Value enter the APV values in the 'Mean' row. Click on the tab to go to the appropriate calc You can also move between the tabbed sheets by pressing Ctrl+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down. and does not 'over-protect' Protector does not give adequate protection. Calculated level at the ear according to BS EN ISO 4869-2:1995 (=1) HSE recommends allowing 4dB for 'realworld' factors. or it 'over-protects' Each calculator is on a separate 'tab' within the spreadsheet.Octave band method You can use this method if you know the noise levels in frequency bands Octave band centre frequency (Hz) 63 125 250 Data on the hearing protector Mean attenuation (dB) Standard deviation in attenuation (dB) Noise levels (dB) Enter values in all white cells. Assume that this device will give: dB dB at the ear Colour codes: Protector gives adequate protection. and leave the 'Standard deviation' row blank or with zeros.

this is 'over-protection' (see BS EN 458:2004). Avoid protectors resulting in less than 70 dB at the ear . Ideally. aim for between 80 and 75 at the ear. . APV or similar. then on' row blank or with zeros.500 1000 2000 4000 8000 A-weighted erms of 'Assumed Protection Values'. he tab to go to the appropriate calculator. Select a protector so that daily exposure is reduced to at least below 85 dB. Up or Ctrl+Page Down.

or it 'over-protects' Each calculator is on a separate 'tab' within the spreadsheet. Assume that this device will give: dB dB dB at the ear Colour codes: Protector gives adequate protection. . Click on the tab to go to the appropriate c You can also move between the tabbed sheets by pressing Ctrl+Page Up or Ctrl+Page Down.SNR Method You can use this method if you know the C-weighted noise levels Data on the hearing protector SNR Noise levels C-weighted noise level. and does not 'over-protect' Protector does not give adequate protection. LC Calculated level at the ear according to BS EN ISO 4869-2:1995 (=1) HSE recommends allowing 4dB for 'real-world' factors.

Enter values in both white cells. aim for between 80 and 75 at the ear. p or Ctrl+Page Down. Ideally. e tab to go to the appropriate calculator. Avoid protectors resulting in less than 70 dB at the ear . Select a protector so that daily exposure is reduced to at least below 85 dB.this is 'over-protection' (see BS EN 458:2004). .