UBD/SLO UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE

Teacher’s Name: Chasity Klein
Grade: 11

School: Waipahu High School

Content Area: English Language Arts

Complex: Leeward

Course Name: Expository Writing II

Period:

Student Population:
Total Number of Students:

Males:

Females:

SPED Inclusion:

SPED Pullout:

ELL:

GT:

Any Other: Free/Reduced Lunch:
Additional Information:

Essential Vocabulary:

STAGE 1: Desired Results
Learning Goal(s):
Students will be able to . . . .

To analyze an argument
To define the appeals and devices of rhetoric
To define rhetorical context
To analyze a persuasive speech
To analyze syntactic structures
To apply appeals and devices of rhetoric
To apply syntactic structure
To present a persuasive speech

Big Idea(s):
Students will understand that . . . .

Rhetorical context is essential when intending to persuade an audience.

(Declarative statement describing
concept that transcends grade
levels in the content area and is
related to the learning goal.)
Essential Question(s):

How a speech is presented is one of the key factors in how a message is interpreted by the
audience.
When giving a speech a speaker must engage with the audience and fill them with a sense of
urgency to motivate their audience.
How are the components of rhetoric applied to the creation and delivery of persuasive speeches?
How does presentation affect an audience?

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Standards/Benchmarks:
HCPS III or Common Core
Standards/Benchmarks:

General Learner Outcomes
Standards/Benchmarks:
State Teacher Standards
Interval of Instruction Necessary
to address Goals:

_____ Yearlong

______ Semester

X Other (Quarter)

STAGE 2: Assessment Evidence
Summative Assessment/
Performance Task:

8 parts of speech song (10 points)
Working in groups of (5-8), your assignment is to create and present a song parody that includes an
explanation and examples of each of the 8 parts of speech.
Advanced – 10
Proficient – 9
Proficient Minus – 8
Basic – 7
Below Basic – 6
Far Below Basic
Rhetorical appeals skit (20)
Working in groups, your assignment is to create and present a skit that incorporates rhetorical devices and
all rhetorical appeals.
Advanced – 20
Proficient – 18
Proficient Minus – 16
Basic – 14
Below Basic – 12
Far Below Basic -10
Americanish speech and presentation (50)

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Working in groups of 3, your assignment is to create an original speech that defends the statement,
“English should be the only spoken language.” This speech requires you to integrate rhetorical devices,
vocabulary terms, and all rhetorical appeals as well as use the structure of argument.
Advanced – 50
Proficient – 45
Proficient Minus – 40
Basic – 35
Below Basic -30
Far Below Basic 25
White Privilege speech and presentation (100)
Working in pairs, your assignment is to create and present an original persuasive speech about white
privilege. This speech will require you use the structure of argument, incorporate rhetorical devices,
vocabulary terms, and all rhetorical appeals.
Advanced – 100
Proficient – 90
Proficient Minus – 80
Basic – 70
Below Basic – 60
Far Below Basic - 50
Syntactical structure skit (20)
Working in groups, your assignment is to create a short skit, incorporating examples of all syntactical
structures including sentence length and grammatical moods.
Vocabulary skit (25)
Working in groups, your assignment is to create a skit that incorporates all vocabulary terms provided this
quarter.
Persuasive speech (200: 100 writing + 100 presentation)
Your assignment is to write and present an original, persuasive three- to five-minute speech that
addresses a contemporary issue. It should include a clear claim, support, counterclaim, and
conclusion/call to action. Incorporate rhetorical appeals and devices to strengthen your argument and to
help you achieve your desired purpose.

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Rubrics for Summative
Assessment/Performance Task:

8 Parts of Speech Parody
Advanced
Student meets all proficient criteria fully and consistently PLUS three or more of the
following:
 Provides 4 or more examples for each parts of speech
 Uses 5 or more vocabulary words correctly
 Seamlessly embeds vocabulary words into song so it appears natural
 Student sings clearly; loud enough to be hear and clearly enough to be
understood
 Student memorizes song and is supported by nothing more than 7x7 rule cue
card
 Students sings without pause or interruption
 Student incorporates purposeful gestures to enhance the song
Proficient
Students must meet all criteria to meet proficiency
Song criteria
 Original lyrics
 Include all 8 parts of speech (noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, adjective,
interjection, conjunction, preposition)
 3 examples of each part of speech
 3 vocabulary words used correctly
 Use appropriate language
 Hard copy clearly identifies and labels all the required song criteria
 Hard copy turned at the beginning of class
Presentation criteria
 Standing
 Introduction
 Greet audience
 Provide background of parody
 Everyone sings
Proficient Minus
Basic
Below Basic
Far Below Basic

Missing 1- 2 criteria
Missing 3 – 4 criteria
Missing 5 – 6 criteria
Missing 7 or more

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Rhetorical Appeals Skit
Advanced
Student meets all proficient criteria fully and consistently PLUS three or more of the
following:
Effectively incorporates all 3 rhetorical appeals
Enhances appeals by using 4 or more different types of rhetorical appeals
Seamlessly incorporates vocabulary words into skit so they sound natural
Uses more one 7x7 [rule] cue card or less when presenting
Rarely looks down at script when performing
Incorporates purposeful gestures and movements
Proficient
Student must meet all criteria to meet proficiency
Skit criteria
 Incorporate all 3 rhetorical appeals
 Incorporate 3 different rhetorical devices
 Include 5 vocabulary words used correctly
 Use appropriate language
 All requirements are clearly labeled and identified
 Hard copy turned in at the beginning of class
Presentation criteria
 Standing introduction
 Greet the audience provide background of skit
 Everyone must speak (individually) 5 sentences or more
 Student must speak clearly; loudly enough to be heard and clearly enough to
be understood

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Proficient Minus
Basic
Below Basic
Far Below Basic

Missing 1 criteria
Missing 2- 3 criteria
Missing 4 - 5 criteria
Missing 6 or more criteria

Americanish Speech & Presentation
Advanced
Student meets all proficient criteria fully and consistently PLUS three or more of the
following:
 Provides an engaging hook that introduces the concept and topic
 Claim includes both an argument and position
 Support relates to claim, provides reasons that makes sense, facts that relate
to the topic, credible sources, and a connection back to claim.
 Counterclaim mentions and explains opposing claim as well as provides
reasons and evidence that proves opposing claim is false.
 The conclusion provides a clear call to action that asks audience to agree and
support their claim by changing their ideas or behavior
 The rhetorical appeals are used effectively in that they enhance the
persuasive effect.
 Sequences ideas to aptly reinforce the argument.
 Concludes a clear and convincing call to action.
 Deliberately and effectively uses rhetorical devices for the intended purpose.
 Uses varied syntax in a way that adds to the persuasive impact.
Proficient
Student must meet all criteria in order to meet proficiency.
Speech criteria
 Greeting
 Use structure of argument (claim, support, counterclaim, call to action)
 Incorporate outside sources by way of quoting evidence or citing information
 Use all rhetorical appeals
 Include 3 or more different rhetorical devices
 Correctly use 5 vocabulary words
 Use appropriate language
 Little to no simple grammatical errors
 Use varied syntax

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

 Include vocal delivery marks
 Provide a hard copy of speech with all requirements clearly identified and
labeled
 Turn in hard copy at beginning of class
Presentation criteria
 Standing introduction
 Smile and greet the audience
 Everyone must speak at least 1 paragraph
 Student must speak clearly; loudly enough to be heard and clearly enough to
be understood
 Make eye contact when speaking
 Use both pitch and volume during delivery
Proficient Minus
Basic
Below basic
Far below basic

Missing 1 – 2 criteria
Missing 3 – 4 criteria
Missing 5 – 6 criteria
Missing 7 or more criteria

White Privilege Speech & Presentation
Advanced
Student meets all proficient criteria fully and consistently PLUS three or more of the
following:
 Students uses less than 2 cue cards to aid them with their speech that follows
the 7x7 rule
 Smiles at audience and manages to put a smile in their voice
 Clearly includes all rhetorical appeals (logos, ethos, pathos) and 5 different
rhetorical devices
 Incorporates visuals to enhance their message
 Clearly include a counterclaim and provides a strong refutation
 Provides strong supporting evidence and reason that makes it clear their line
of reasoning
 The call to action is clear, identifiable, and motivating
Proficient
Student must meet all criteria to meet proficiency
Speech criteria

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu











Greeting
Uses the structure of argument (claim, support, counterclaim, call to action)
Includes a claim that incorporates a position and an argument
Provides a supporting paragraph that relates to the claim, provides reasons
that makes sense, facts that relate to the topic, credible sources, connection
back to claim
Provides a counterclaim paragraph that mentions and explains the opposing
claim as well as reasons and evidence that prove the opposing claim false
Includes a call to action that asks the audience to agree and support their
claim by changing their ideas or behaviors
Includes all 3 rhetorical appeals
Incorporates 5 different rhetorical devices
Correctly uses 7 vocabulary words
Little to no grammatical errors
Uses a variety of syntax
Label and identifies all required components

Presentation criteria
 Student smiles and greets audience
 Speaks clearly; loud enough to be heard and clearly enough to be understood
 Frequently makes eye contact by looking around at the students
 Uses a variety of volume and pitch to enhance their vocal delivery
 Incorporates 5 intentional movements to emphasize their point
 Uses no more than 3 cue cards to assist with their speech
 Each card has no more than 7 bullets and no more than 7 words per bullet
Proficient Minus
Basic
Below Basic
Far Below Basic

Missing 1 – 3 criteria
Missing 4 – 6 criteria
Missing 7 – 9 criteria
Missing 10 criteria or more

Persuasive Speech Written
Advanced
Student must meet all proficient criteria fully and consistently PLUS at least three of the
following:
 Provides an engaging hook that introduces the concept of the topic.

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

 The contemporary issue is presented in a significant and compelling thesis
statement.
 The claim is clearly developed and supported with significant and compelling
facts and reasons.
 The rhetorical appeals are used effectively in that they enhance the
persuasive effect.
 Sequences ideas to aptly reinforce the argument.
 Concludes a clear and convincing call to action.
 Deliberately and effectively uses rhetorical devices for the intended purpose.
 Uses varied syntax in a way that adds to the persuasive impact.
 Embeds vocabulary seamlessly in essay, sounding natural.
Proficient
Student must meet all criteria for proficiency
 Student completes and turns in Prewriting worksheet at the BEGINNING of
class.
 Student brings ALL materials including (First draft, peer revision sheet,
revision, and peer edit sheet) at turns them in at the BEGINNING of class.
 Student uses the structure of argument (claim, support, counterclaim, and call
to action).
 The claim includes both a position and argument.
 The support includes: reasons that make sense, facts that relate to the topic,
creditable sources, and a connection back to the claim.
 The counter claim paragraph mentions and explains the opposing claim as
well as provides reasons and evidence that prove the opposing claim false.
 The conclusion includes a clear call to action that asks the audience to agree
and support their claim by changing their mind or the actions.
 Incorporates all 3 rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, logos).
 Incorporates at least 5 different rhetorical devices.
 Correctly includes 10 vocabulary words.
 Little to no grammatical errors
 Uses a variety of syntax
 Provides a resources page that list all sources used in correct works cited
MLA format.
 Label and identify all required components.

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Proficient Minus Writing Skills
Basic Writing Skills
Below Basic Writing Skills
Far Below Skills

Missing 1 – 2 criteria
Missing 3 – 4 criteria
Missing 5 – 6 criteria
Missing 7 or more criteria

Persuasive Speech Presentation
Advanced
 Used no cue cards
 Smiles at audience and manages to put a smile in their voice
 Clearly includes all rhetorical appeals (logos, ethos, pathos) and 5 rhetorical
devices
 Incorporates visuals to enhance their message
 Clearly includes a counterclaim and provides a strong refutation
 Provides strong supporting evidence and reason that makes it clear their line
of reasoning.
 The call to action is convincing, clear, and identifiable.
Proficient
Preparation
 Student turned in cue card at the beginning of class
 Student brought all materials necessary to complete speech (visuals, cue
cards with name)
Presentation
Student presents an effective persuasive speech by completing the following
 Smiles, greets, and acknowledges audience
 Speaks clearly; loud enough to be heard and clearly enough to be understood
 Frequently makes eye contact by looking around at the students
 Rarely looks down at cue card
 Uses a variety of volume and pitch and to enhance their vocal delivery
 Incorporates at least 5 intentional movements to emphasize their point
 Does not have more than 1 cue card to assist them with their speech
 The cue card does not have more than 7 bullets and each bullet has no mare
than 7 words each

Proficient Minus Presentation Skills

Missing 1 proficient criteria

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Basic Presentation Skills
Below Basic Presentation Skills
Far Below Basic Presentation Skills
Formative Assessments:

Rubrics for Formative
Assessments:

Missing 2 – 3 proficient criteria
Missing 4 – 5 proficient criteria
Missing 6 or more proficient criteria

All formative assessments are graded on a completion basis. They are not deducted points if they
answer incorrectly; formative assessments are used to inform instruction moving forward.
Formative assessments are given completion points.


















Grammar Pre-assessment (10points)
Unpacking Embedded Assessment (1)
Parts of speech notes (10)
Rhetoric notes (10)
Analysis of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Speech (8)
Structure of Argument notes (8)
The appeal of rhetoric notes (10)
Analysis of Martin Luther King’s “I have a Dream” (5)
Vocabulary Set #1 (10)
ACT practice timed write #1 (5)
Basic Grammar notes (7)
Structure of speech White Privilege outline (10)
White Privilege evaluations (8)
White Privilege reflection (1)
Peer revising (5)
Peer editing (5)
Syntax notes (12)
Vocabulary Set #2 (10)
Ted Talks (3)

Self-assessment (5)

Students receive 1 point for each answer, whether right or wrong. Points are given on a
completion basis and data collected will determine what strategies, modification, or extensions are
needed moving forward.
Formative assessments can be redone for full credit
For more detailed rubrics please see rubric chart

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Expected Targets:












Rationale for Expected Targets:

I know what skills and knowledge are necessary to complete the embedded assessment
successfully
I can identify all 8 parts of speech
I can explain the basic parts of grammar such as subject, predicate, clauses, and phrases
I can explain rhetoric and its use in effective writing
I can identify and use the elements of argument
I can effectively use rhetorical appeals
I can research and gather information on an issue
I can effectively use evidence to support my own perspective and opinion on an issue
I can effectively rhetoric to design an original speech
I can identify and use a variety of syntax to create a unique voice
I can analyze an effective speech and determine the different strategies that enhance their
presentation
I can incorporate vocal delivery and purposeful movement to enhance my speech

Students need to be able to determine the skills and knowledge necessary to complete their
embedded assessment. With that knowledge they will be better prepared to succeed when they
know what will be required of them.
Students will need to learn the basics of grammar for their upcoming state and national
standardized tests. Being knowledgeable in the rules of grammar will to create their own unique
tone and voice in their writing.
Students will need to know the elements of argument and how its used in a persuasive speech.
Learning the elements of argument and its use in a persuasive speech helps them to know the
foundation of an argument and its structure. This knowledge will help them to understand how an
effective argument is made which will help them begin to build their own argument for their
individual persuasive piece.
Students will need to research an issue to provide credible evidence to support their claims. In
order for students to persuade their audience they need to provide evidence to support their
perspective and convince their audience to complete their call to action. This is a life skill that
they will need, especially in college.
Students will need to know how to deliver an effective speech. Students will learn that a large part
of persuasion is contributed to the presentation of the argument by watching and analyzing
several great speeches. By learning how to presenters their voice and their body to enhance their

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

speech, students can master that skill and use it in their daily lives.

STAGE 3: Learning Plan
Include activities, instructions, groupings, differentiated instructional and engagement strategies,
digital literacy tool(s), and resources used
Day 1 (1/6/16)
Day 2 (1/7/16)
Day 3 (1/8/16)
Day 4 (1/11/16)
Day 5 (1/12/16)
 Introduction to 
 Grammar pre­
 Grammar pre­
 Parts of speech
Rhetoric
Expository 
test 
test 
 Intro: Hell Drills
NOTES:
Writing II
 Unpacking 
 Unpacking 
Students will take 
 Due dates for all 
embedded 
embedded 
NOTES: Students 
notes
3rd quarter DEJs.
assessment 
assessment 
will watch the 
­Work in groups on 
(146)
(146)
grammar video and 
­Syllabus (Go over 
P.A.F grocery list
take notes on each 
syllabus, the 
NOTES: Grammar 
NOTES: Grammar 
part of speech. 
expectations and 
pre­assessment will  pre­assessment will  ­Remind students’ 
­Remind students to 
take notes
procedures of Expos 
be taken and 
be taken and 
notes will be graded.
II)
corrected same day
corrected same day
­Collect tests and 
­Collect tests and 
­Have students copy  HD: parts of speech, 
Supplies: syllabus
then pass them out 
then pass them out 
rhetoric
down the 
randomly for 
randomly for 
requirements for the 
corrections
corrections
SUPPLIES: Rhetoric 
summative
PowerPoint
Students will begin 
Students will begin 
SUMMATIVE 
unpacking 
unpacking 
(PARTS OF 
individually, then 
individually, then 
SPEECH PARODY):
work as a group to 
work as a group to 
Students will work in
verify and finish 
verify and finish 
a group to create a 
putting together a 
putting together a 
parody that educates 
graphic organizer 
graphic organizer 
others on the 8 parts 
and then each group  and then each group  of speech.
presents information presents information ­Students will work 
on blackboard.
on blackboard.
in large groups to 
­Students will be 
­Students will be 
create their songs; 
split into groups for  split into groups for  class will be split into
unpacking.
unpacking.
3 groups.

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

­Compare and 
contrast the graphic 
organizers, point out
any missing 
elements.

­Compare and 
contrast the graphic 
organizers, point out
any missing 
elements.

SUPPLIES: 
SpringBoard

SUPPLIES: 
SpringBoard

­Students can 
determine who they 
want to work with
­Assessment 
requirements can be 
found in resources
HELL DRILLS 
(HD): A game in 
which students are 
tested on what they 
learned.  A ball is 
passed around, the 
teacher will 
randomly yell, “stop”
whoever has the ball, 
the teacher will ask a 
question on what 
students learned. 
­Parts of speech, 
vocabulary

Day 6 (1/13/16)
Rhetoric
NOTES:
Students will take 
notes
­Work in groups on 
P.A.F grocery list
­Remind students to 
take notes

Day 7 (1/14/16)
Song 
presentations
 Analyze and 
identify 
rhetorical 
context 

Day 8 (1/15/16)
Song 
presentations
 Analyze and 
identify 
rhetorical 
context 

NOTES:
Students will read 
“Second Inaugural 

NOTES:
Students will read 
“Second Inaugural 

SUPPLIES: 
YouTube video 
Grammar rock
Day 9 (1/18/16)
MLK DAY

Day 10 (1/19/16)
Structure of 
argument
 Intro: Appeal of 
rhetoric
 Identifying appeal
& devices

NOTES: Students 
should select their 
persuasive speech 

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

HELL DRILLS: parts 
of speech, rhetoric, 
vocabulary
SUPPLIES: Rhetoric 
PowerPoint

Address of Abraham
Lincoln” located in 
their SpringBoard 
and mark the text 
appropriately
­Students are 
practicing 
identifying rhetoric 
in a historically 
significant speech
HD: Parts of speech,
rhetoric, vocabulary
SUPPLIES: 
SpringBoard

Address of Abraham
Lincoln” (148) 
located in their 
SpringBoard and 
mark the text 
appropriately
­Students are 
practicing 
identifying rhetoric 
in a historically 
significant speech

topic and needs to be 
approved.
­Students should take 
notes of their 
summative 
requirements
­Summative 
requirements can be 
found in resources
­Have a student read 
speech animatedly 
(156)

HD: Parts of speech,
rhetoric, vocabulary
SUPPLIES: 
SpringBoard

­Suggest students 
work in groups or 
pairs to identify 
appeals and devices
HD: structure of 
argument, appeal of 
rhetoric, parts of 
speech, rhetoric

Day 11 (1/20/16)
Structure of 
argument
 Intro: Appeal of 
rhetoric
 Identifying 
appeals & devices

NOTES: Students 
should select their 

Day 12 (1/21/16)
Rhetorical skit 
presentation
 MLK speech 
analysis
 Americanish 
video & 
summative 
assignment

Day 13 (1/22/16)
Rhetorical skit 
presentation
 MLK speech 
analysis
 Americanish 
video & 
summative 
assignment
 Approval of 

Day 14 (1/25/16)
DEJ #1 due
Vocabulary set 
#1
 Work on 
Americanish 
speech

NOTES: Instruct 
students to use the 

SUPPLIES: Appeal of
Rhetoric PowerPoint,
SpringBoard
Day 15 (1/26/16)
ELA WORK DAY
 Timed Write
 Work on 
Americanish 
speech
NOTES: 
Instruct students not 
to write on the article 

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

persuasive speech 
topic and needs to be 
approved.
­Students should take 
notes of their 
summative 
requirements

NOTES: Go over 
the first chunk of 
MLKs speech and 
identify rhetoric and 
appeal before having
them do it on their 
own.

­Summative 
requirements can be 
found in resources

­Check to ensure 
students are actively 
working on 
identifying rhetoric 
and devices

­Have a student read 
speech animatedly 
(156)
­Suggest students 
work in pairs or 
groups to identify 
appeals and devices
HD: structure of 
argument, appeal of 
rhetoric, parts of 
speech, rhetoric,
SUPPLIES: Appeal of
Rhetoric PowerPoint,
SpringBoard

Provide students 
with a printed copy 
of the Americanish 
speech.
­Students will select 
their own small 
group 3­4 students.
­Have students write
down the 
requirements
Requirements for 
summative can be 
found in resources
­Remind students to 
bring in a hardcopy 
of the related article
HD: rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

speech topics
NOTES: Go over 
the first chunk of 
MLKs speech and 
identify rhetoric and 
appeal before having
them do it on their 
own.
­Check to ensure 
students are actively 
working on 
identifying rhetoric 
and devices
Provide students 
with a printed copy 
of the Americanish 
speech.
­Students will select 
their own small 
group 3­4 students.

skills for thinking 
vocabulary strategy
­Have the skills for 
thinking strategy up 
on board as a visual 
for students.

and to pace 
themselves
­Recommended time 
10­15min 
reading/brainstorming
, 30­25 minutes 
writing
Once students are 
done with the timed 
write collect all work 
and allow students to 
work on Americanish 
speech.
SUPPLIES: 26 hard 
copies of articles.

­Have students write
down the 
requirements
Requirements for 
summative can be 
found in resources
­Remind students to 
bring in a hardcopy 
of the related article
Students should 
have received 
approval of speech 

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

SUPPLIES: MLK 
speech audio, 
Americanish speech 
YouTube video, 
hard copy of MLK 
“I have a dream 
speech”, hard copy 
of Americanish 
speech

topic by today.  
­Articles for their 
topic are due the 
following class
­Students, who are 
not prepared with a 
topic, assign them 
one.
HD: rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

Day 16 (1/27/16)
ELA WORK DAY
 Timed Write
 Work on 
Americanish 
speech
NOTES: 
Instruct students not 
to write on the article 
and to pace 
themselves
­Recommended time 
10­15min 

Day 17 (1/28/16)
Americanish 
speech 
presentations
 Basic Grammar

SUPPLIES: MLK 
speech audio, 
Americanish speech 
YouTube video, 
hard copy of MLK 
“I have a dream 
speech”, hard copy 
of Americanish 
speech
Day 17 (1/29/16)
 Americanish 
speech 
presentations
 Basic Grammar

NOTES: Before 
students turn in hard 
copy of their speech 
make sure they 
identify all the 
requirements

NOTES: Before 
students turn in hard
copy of their speech 
make sure they 
identify all the 
requirements

Remind students that

Remind students 

Day 19 (2/1/16)
 Intro: White
Privilege 
speech 
summative 
 Begin 
drafting: 
rhetorical 
context
NOTES: Provide 
students with their 
timed writing.  The 
summative is 

Day 20 (2/2/16)
Drafting white 
privilege speech
 Structure of 
speech outline

NOTES: check 
students claim before 
allowing them to 
move forward with 
their introduction and 
body
HD: Basic grammar, 

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

reading/brainstorming
, 30­25 minutes 
writing
Once students are 
done with the timed 
write collect all work 
and allow students to 
work on Americanish 
speech.
SUPPLIES: 26 hard 
copies of articles.

Day 21 (2/3/16)
Drafting white 
privilege speech
 Structure of 
speech outline 
part 1: intro, 
support

the articles for 
individual speech 
should be a variety 
of for and against

that the articles for 
individual speech 
should be a variety 
of for and against

Basic Grammar 
lesson can be done 
on white board if 
time is constrained.

Basic Grammar 
lesson can be done 
on white board if 
time is constrained.

SUPPLIES: video 
camera

SUPPLIES: video 
camera

Day 22 (2/4/16)
Drafting white 
privilege speech
 Structure of 
speech outline 
part 2: counter, 
conclusion

Day 23 (2/5/16)
Drafting white 
privilege speech
 Structure of 
speech outline 
part 2: counter, 
conclusion

connected to their 
timed writing and 
will serve as a 
baseline/brainstorm 
for the speech.
­Students will work 
in pairs for white 
privilege speech.  

rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument, 
rhetoric, parts of 
speech

Have students begin 
drafting in notebook, 
stamp notebooks and 
double check 
rhetorical context for 
white privilege 
speech.
Day 24 (2/8/16)
Speech 
presentations
 Structure of 
speech outline 
part 2: counter, 
conclusion

NOTES: check 
students claim before 
allowing them to 
move forward with 
their introduction and 
body

NOTES: Remind 
students to practice 
and have their 
papers marked and 
cards ready prior to 
entering class

NOTES: Remind 
students to practice 
and have their 
papers marked and 
cards ready prior to 
entering class

NOTES: Remind 
students to practice 
and have their papers
marked and cards 
ready prior to 
entering class

HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument,
rhetoric, parts of 
speech

HD: Basic grammar,
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

HD: Basic grammar,
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

Day 25 (2/9/16)
Presentation 
reflections
 Begin drafting: 
brainstorming 
with articles

NOTES: Return 
articles to students 
have, provide them 
with the drafting 
outline.
HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument, 
rhetoric, parts of 
speech
SUPPLIES: Drafting 
outline

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Day 26 (2/10/16)
Presentation 
reflections
 Begin drafting: 
brainstorming 
with articles

NOTES: Return 
articles to students 
have, provide them 
with the drafting 
outline.

Day 27 (2/11/16)
Continue 
drafting outline

Day 28 (2/12/16)
Continue 
drafting outline

HD: Basic grammar,
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

HD: Basic grammar,
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

SUPPLIES: Drafting
outline

SUPPLIES: Drafting
outline

Day 29 (2/15/16)


PRESIDENT’S
DAY

NOTES: Revision is a
process and requires 
discussion
­Pair students who 
have not yet worked 
together
HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument,
rhetoric, parts of 
speech

NOTES: Revision is a
process and requires 
discussion
­Pair students who 
have not yet worked 
together
HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument, 
rhetoric, parts of 
speech

HD: Basic grammar, 
rhetorical appeals, 
structure of argument,
rhetoric, parts of 
speech
SUPPLIES: Drafting 
outline
Day 31 (2/17/16)
 Draft #1 due
 Peer Revision

Day 30 (2/16/16)
DEJ #2 due
Draft #1 due
Peer Revision

SUPPLIES: Peer 
Revision worksheet



Day 32 (2/18/16)
Draft #2 due
Syntax lesson
Peer Editing



Day 33 (2/19/16)
Draft #2 due
Syntax lesson
Peer Editing

NOTES: Editing is a
short activity, syntax
lesson should be 
done first
­Have editors return 
worksheet to the 
person whose paper 
they edited

NOTES: Editing is a
short activity, syntax
lesson should be 
done first
­Have editors return 
worksheet to the 
person whose paper 
they edited

HD: Basic grammar,
rhetorical appeals, 

HD: Syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 

Day 34 (2/22/16)
Final draft due
Vocabulary set 
#2
 Vocabulary 
summative 
assignment

Day 35 (2/23/16)
ACT pre­assessment

NOTES: Have 
students put their 
assessment packets 
together, the 
assessment packets 
are proof of their 
writing process

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

SUPPLIES: Peer 
Revision worksheet

Day 36 (2/24/16)
ACT pre­assessment

structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

SUPPLIES: Peer 
Editing worksheet
Day 37 (2/25/16)
 Ted Talk #1
 Review 
speeches
 Work on vocab 
skit

SUPPLIES: Peer 
Editing worksheet
Day 38 (2/26/16)
 Ted Talk #1
 Review 
speeches
 Work on vocab 
skit

NOTES: Clint’s 
speech is an 
example of a speech 
that draws mostly 
from personal 
experience, it has 
great examples of 
purposeful gestures 
and strong pathos 
and a variety of 
vocal delivery.

NOTES: Clint’s 
speech is an 
example of a speech 
that draws mostly 
from personal 
experience, it has 
great examples of 
purposeful gestures 
and strong pathos 
and a variety of 
vocal delivery.

Group students into 
groups
­Have students 
select their own 
groups (Keep 
problem­students 
separate)

Group students into 
groups
­Have students 
select their own 
groups (Keep 
problem­students 
separate)

HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 

HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 

HD: Syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech
Day 39 (2/29/16)
Ted Talk #2
Time speeches &
Practice vocal 
delivery
 Work on vocab

Day 40 (3/1/16)
ASPIRE/ACT
TESTING

NOTES: Group 
students into 
different groups
­Have students select 
their own groups 
(Keep problem­
students separate)
HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech
SUPPLIES: Shawn 
Achor “The happy 
secret to better work”

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Day 41 (3/2/16)
Ted Talk #2
Time speeches & 
Practice vocal 
delivery
 Work on vocab 
skit

NOTES: Group 
students into different 
groups
­Have students select 
their own groups 
(Keep problem­
students separate)
HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech
SUPPLIES: Shawn 
Achor “The happy 
secret to better work”
Day 46 (3/9/16)
SBA PRACTICE

parts of speech

parts of speech

SUPPLIES: Clint 
Smith’s “How to 
raise a black son in 
America”
Day 42 (3/3/16)
 Vocabulary skit
 Ted Talk #3
 Practice vocal 
delivery

SUPPLIES: Clint 
Smith’s “How to 
raise a black son in 
America”
Day 43 (3/4/16)
 Vocabulary skit
 Ted Talk #3
 Practice vocal 
delivery

NOTES: Group 
students into 
different groups
­Have students 
select their own 
groups (Keep 
problem­students 
separate)

NOTES: Group 
students into 
different groups
­Have students 
select their own 
groups (Keep 
problem­students 
separate)

HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

HD: Vocabulary, 
syntax, Basic 
grammar, rhetorical 
appeals, structure of 
argument, rhetoric, 
parts of speech

SUPPLIES: Monica 
Lewinsky’s “The 
Price of Shame” or 
Dan Pink’s “Puzzle 
of motivation”
Day 47 (3/10/16)
 Speech 
Presentations

SUPPLIES: Monica 
Lewinsky’s “The 
Price of Shame” or 
Dan Pink’s “Puzzle 
of motivation”
Day 48 (3/11/16)
 Speech 
Presentations

SUPPLIES: video 

SUPPLIES: video 

Day 44 (3/7/16)
PD WORKDAY
 Turn in DEJ
 Practice 
memorization 
and vocal 
delivery

Day 45 (3/8/16)

SBA PRACTICE

Day 49 (3/14/16)
Speech 
Presentations

SUPPLIES: video 

Day 50 (3/15/16)
Speech 
Presentations

SUPPLIES: video 

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

camera

camera

camera

camera

Materials and Supplies Needed:
SpringBoard
Projector
Speakers
Video camera
White board and dry erase markers
Pens/Pencils
Notebook
Worksheets
Resources Needed:
Lunsford, Andrea A. The Everyday Writer, Fifth Edition.
King, Martin Luther Jr. “I Have a Dream.” Lincoln Memorial. Washington D.C, VA. 28 Aug. 1968. Speech.
Smith, Clint. “How to raise a black son in America.” TED2015. TED. Web. Mar. 2015. Speech.
Pink, Dan. “The Puzzle of Motivation.” TEDxBloomington. TED. Web. July 2009. Speech.
Achor, Shawn. “The happy secret to better work.” TEDxBloomington. TED. Web. Mar. 2015. Speech.
Lewinsky, Monica. “The price of shame.” TED2015. TED. Web. Mar. 2015. Speech.
“Do white rappers benefit from ‘white privilege’.” BBC Trending. BBC News Services, 26 Jan. 2016. Web.
Persuasive final assessment packet
Scoring Guide
Peer revision and peer edit worksheets
ACT prompt worksheets
Results and Reflection:
Overall, students made growth in establishing and supporting a claim. I used continued to refer to their parts
of an essay strategy. Each time we worked on an essay, I referred back to the strategy. I found that with
time, many students began to show improvement. There were students who did not participate and other
students who were behind in their writing skill. For those students I provided explicit outlines to use. Some
of the students who took time to use it, greatly improved. There were students, however, who did not use it
or wrote their essay and then tried to work backwards. But, as a majority, I feel most of my students can
establish a claim and support it, using evidence.
I also found out that a majority of students did not use their time wisely in class. I gave students time to work
on their speeches during class. However, I realized without set expectations of work to finish by the end of

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

class, students would not utilize their time well. Although I gave students ample time to work on their
speeches, many of them turned their work in late and some not at all. In the future I will ensure that students
are given specific assignments to be done by the end of class.
Many students received low grades on their written speeches. I provided students with an explicit grading
rubric, which had been set up as a checklist. It was intended to make writing the speech easier. The
rationalization is that if students know exactly what they need to incorporate, they will succeed. What I have
found out is that a majority of students don’t look at the scoring guide. Despite going over the scoring guide
in class and providing them their own copy, many students still ask about the requirements. I believe if I had
begun the scoring guide (checklist) at the beginning of the year, rather than towards the middle, students
would have become accustomed to them.

Template is based on the ONR STEM UBD Template and DOE EES SLO Template for SY 2014-2015

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu

Chasity Kauilani Klein * 95 733 Makaunulau St Mililani, Hawai’i 96789 * (808) 227-3990 * cklai@hawaii.edu