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VOL. CLXVI . . . No. 57,386

$2.50

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

2016 The New York Times Company

Obama Moves TRUMP ALLEGES


To Further Ease VAST CONSPIRACY
Cuba Embargo

BEHIND ACCUSERS

Directive Makes Policy


Harder to Reverse
2 WOMEN ARE MOCKED
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

MERIDITH KOHUT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

At a small clinic in hurricane-battered Rendel, Haiti, a cholera patient was bathed with soap and water mixed with bleach.

After Deadly Hurricane, Cholera Deepens the Misery in Haiti


By AZAM AHMED

RENDEL, Haiti There is a


plague on this town.
Even before the winds and rain
toppled nearly everything standing, cholera was already here. It
came down from the mountains,
washing into the lives of the thousands who once lived above the
river.
Now the only sign of life is in a
makeshift clinic dealing with hundreds of suspected cholera cases,
a small concrete building where
just a few nurses contend with the
swarms of patients arriving every
hour.
There is only one public official
left. The mayor was struck by
cholera and left on foot to seek
treatment hours away. One deputy died of the disease last week.
Another fled, like so many others,

to escape the ruin visited on the


town of Rendel by Hurricane
Matthew and its aftermath.
Ninety percent of our village is
gone, said Eric Valcourt, a priest
in the Roman Catholic parish that
runs the clinic and a school that
now serves as a shelter for those
too sick or poor to leave. Many
left by foot to escape the disease
and devastation. The rest died
from cholera or the hurricane.
A week has passed since the
hurricane tore through this remote stretch of Haitis southern
peninsula, leaving an apocalyptic
landscape of treeless countryside,
disarticulated homes and a land
robbed of its natural riches.
But for many, the torment has
only started. Cholera, the disease
at the heart of Haitis last disaster,
is being spread again by this one.
About 10,000 people have died
and hundreds of thousands have

A Hollowed-Out Town,
Stalked by Disaster,
Fights for Life
been sickened since cholera first
appeared in late 2010. Scientists
say it was brought to Haiti by
United Nations peacekeepers stationed at a base that leaked waste
into a river. After years of deflecting blame, the United Nations this
summer acknowledged its own
involvement in the suffering
Haiti has experienced from the
disease.
Now, cholera is stalking the areas gutted by the hurricane, a long
peninsula of coastal towns and
mountain villages where clean
water was already hard to find,

long before the storm. Here in the


remote town of Rendel, a grueling
four-hour trek to the nearest
paved road, the disease has
spread to every crevice of this valley and the hills above.
We are all at risk, said the last
official in Rendel, Pierre Cenel,
the magistrate.
A father raced down the hill to
the clinic with his young daughter
draped over his back, clutching
her legs, his face fixed in fear.
She must have cholera, the
magistrate said. He is running to
save her life.
Cholera was creeping through
the mountains even before the
hurricane, claiming the lives of
untold numbers as its pushed toward town. First came the sick,
who trudged down to Rendel, desperate for medical care.
Continued on Page A7

WASHINGTON President
Obama on Friday issued a sweeping directive to enshrine his administrations historic opening
with Cuba well beyond the end of
his presidency, setting a new policy to lift the embargo that codified the Cold War rupture as he
ended restrictions on importing
Cuban rum and cigars.
The action formalizes the shift
toward normalization that the
president unveiled nearly two
years ago with the announcement
that he and President Ral Castro
of Cuba had secretly agreed to repair their countries relationship.
Mr. Obama was using executive
power to transform what has been
one of his top foreign policy priorities and a vivid example of his
strategy of engaging with former
adversaries into a set of official
mandates that could shape United
States policy toward Cuba for
years to come.
Mr. Obama on Friday also made
what aides said were probably his
final major modifications to loosen United States sanctions on
Cuba, including lifting the $100
limit on bringing Cuban rum and
cigars into the United States. The
revisions will also allow Cuban
pharmaceuticals to be approved
by the Food and Drug Administration and imported into the United
States, permit online retailers to
sell goods in Cuba and allow credit
financing for the sale of agricultural goods, such as tractors and
pesticides, to Cuba.
I thought that might wake
some of you up, Susan E. Rice, the
presidents national security adviser, told an audience in a speech
here Friday as she outlined the
broad policy changes. You can
now celebrate with Cuban rum
and Cuban cigars.
The changes are an attempt by
Mr. Obama to press forward with
his thaw with Cuba even in the
face of lingering opposition in
Congress to repealing the embargo. The 12-page document he apContinued on Page A3

Accelerating His Retreat


From an Appeal to
Swing Voters
By ALEXANDER BURNS
and NICK CORASANITI

Donald J. Trump wielded his


presidential candidacy on Friday
as a weapon for savaging detractors and venting personal grievances, attacking the women who
have accused him of sexual assault and unwelcome advances
and railing against what he described as a vast conspiracy
against him by the news media
and Hillary Clintons campaign.
With a campaign speech in
North Carolina that whirled from
one target to the next, Mr. Trump
accelerated his shift away from
courting swing voters or delivering a message aimed at the political mainstream.
Instead, after weeks on the defensive, battered by disclosures
about his treatment of women and
about his business dealings, Mr.
Trump appeared increasingly
consumed with the idea that he
has been wronged and bent on
convincing his fans that sinister
forces are to blame for his political
decline.
Mr. Trump told the restive
crowd that his advisers wanted
him to focus on his core economic
message, but that he had no intention of allowing his critics to go unanswered.
My people always say: Oh,
dont talk about it. Talk about jobs.
Talk about the economy, Mr.
Trump said.
But I feel I have to talk about
them, because you have to dispute
when somebody says something,
he added of the allegations
against him. Fortunately, we
have the microphone. Were able
to dispute; some people cant.
Even as two more women came
forward on Friday to say he had
groped them, Mr. Trump disContinued on Page A12

Dylan and New York Share


A Complex, Fertile Romance

Policing Vows
Could Burden
De Blasio in 17

By JOSEPH BERGER
By J. DAVID GOODMAN

As Mayor Bill de Blasio of New


York turns toward his re-election
fight next year, an issue that galvanized his first run achieving
significant police reform is suddenly becoming a liability.
Caught in the gap between his
soaring rhetoric as an outsider
candidate and the realities of leading a city with a hair-trigger sensitivity to crime, Mr. de Blasio is disappointing many who once supported him, in a community he can
ill afford to lose: the black voters
who propelled him to office.
All I know is, in all our circles,
folks have conversations and
theres a buzz going around about
the disappointment, said Bertha
Lewis, the former leader of Acorn
who served on Mr. de Blasios
transition team in 2014, but has become a vocal critic. Theres a
growing enthusiasm gap.
Throughout the mayors term,
there have been opportunities for
him to live up to his image and his
promise as a would-be police reformer. Instead, those issues have
become magnets for dissent.
Tens of thousands in extra pay
for Daniel Pantaleo, the Staten Island officer who put Eric Garner
in a fatal chokehold in 2014. Disciplinary records newly shielded
from disclosure. Resistance to poContinued on Page A18

PATRICK AVENTURIER/GAMMA-RAPHO, VIA GETTY IMAGES

Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn in Paris in 2007 with his third wife, right, and one of his daughters.

Grieving Thailand Looks Warily to Royal Heir


By ALISON SMALE
and THOMAS FULLER

TUTZING, Germany For


more than two years, the king of
Thailand lay ill in a Bangkok hospital. During much of that time,
his son, the heir to Thailands
throne, was far from the kingdom,
flying around Europe in his Boeing 737 and ensconced in luxury
villas and hotels amid the misty
lakes and mountains of southern
Germany and Austria.
The lavish European lifestyle of

INTERNATIONAL A3-9

A Korean Balloon Warrior


Lee Min-bok fights North Korea with
giant balloons full of leaflets he calls
poison for its leader.
PAGE A4

the son, Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn, and his tastes for airplanes, fast cars, women and the
high life have caused great anxiety in the kingdom for decades.
Now he is on the cusp of ascending
the throne.
The death of the beloved King
Bhumibol Adulyadej on Thursday
has set in motion a succession that
many Thais say they wish they
could avoid. King Bhumibol had
been a unifying figure in a country
that is torn by deep divisions of
class and politics and is currently

ruled by a military junta. The issue is whether the prince, seen by


many Thais as lacking the deep
public devotion that his father enjoyed, can hold the country together.
The princes ascension also
raises questions about the future
of the monarchy, as a less-beloved
king could give strength to a republican movement that has
gained a foothold in recent years.
Among the issues at stake is control over one of the worlds great
Continued on Page A6

In Bob Dylans Dont Think


Twice, Its All Right, that rooster
crowing at the break of dawn
was probably a New York City
chicken, not a rural farmyard bird.
Indeed, Mr. Dylan may have
styled himself as a vagabond
country boy, but those familiar
with his life know he first rose to
prominence as a driven folk singer hanging out in the coffeehouses
of Greenwich Village. His first
apartment was at 161 West Fourth
Street, and Suze Rotolo, his girlfriend at the time, suggested
strongly in her 2008 memoir that
the crowing came from roosters in
a nearby store near the intersection of Thompson and Bleecker
Streets that sold freshly slaughtered chickens to residents of
what was then a largely ItalianAmerican neighborhood.
Mr. Dylan, who on Thursday
won the Nobel Prize for Literature, has had a complicated but
extraordinarily fertile romance
with New York. Although he grew
up in Hibbing, Minn., and now
lives in Malibu, Calif., New York
was where he lived during what
was arguably his most creative
period in the 1960s and 1970s. It
was the place where he sparked
his fiery fling with Joan Baez;

BLANK ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

Bob Dylan and Suze Rotolo on


his breakout albums cover.
snared the contracts with Columbia Records that brought his civil
rights and antiwar ballads to a national audience; and raised several of his six children. But it was
also a place with more than a few
obsessives who sometimes assaulted his privacy.
A. J. Weberman, an iconoclastic
member of the Yippies who made
a career out of studying Mr. Dylan
and produced a concordance of his
lyrics, infamously rooted through
Mr. Dylans garbage cans outside
his townhouse at 94 Macdougal
Street in search of insights. He
once even staged a demonstration
in a bid to prod Mr. Dylan into
Continued on Page A18

CLASSIC VINDICATION A Harvard seminar that enshrines Bob Dylan

alongside Homer and Virgil had cause to celebrate Thursday. PAGE C1

NATIONAL A10-16

SPORTSSATURDAY D1-6

THIS WEEKEND

Placing Strains on Insurers

Cleveland Takes Series Opener

Accidental Circumnavigator

The health care law has not enticed


enough healthy people into insurance
markets it created, so those who benefit
PAGE A10
most from it burden it.

The Indians rode the strong pitching of


Corey Kluber to a 2-0 win over the Blue
Jays in the first game of the American
League Championship Series. PAGE D1

A Shift in Gun Ownership

BUSINESS DAY B1-7

ARTS C1-6

Goldman Wins Libyan Suit

A Hometown Tribute to Prince

How a chance trip around the world,


with stops in Japan and Germany,
awakened a travelers spirit of exploration. Nicholas Kulish writes about his
journey and how he sought the counsel
of members of the Circumnavigators
Club before he embarked on it. TRAVEL

The Libyan Investment Authority said


the bank had exploited its financial
PAGE B1
navet. A court disagreed.

Acts including Morris Day and the


Time celebrated the rock star at a St.
PAGE C1
Paul concert. A review.

Americans are increasingly interested


in handguns rather than rifles and
PAGE A11
shotguns, a study finds.
NEW YORK A17-19

Behind Putins Combativeness

Newtown Suit Dismissed

Salesforce Declines on Twitter

A New Duo on Viceland

Recent actions by President Vladimir V.


Putin may aim to deflect attention from
PAGE A7
Russias domestic problems.

A judge cited a federal law for throwing


out a lawsuit against the maker of the
rifle used in the 2012 massacre. PAGE A17

Shares in the social network fell as it


appeared the company needs a self-help
PAGE B1
plan instead of a new owner.

Desus Nice and the Kid Mero, hip-hopinspired, slapstick-and-social-commenPAGE C1


tary comics, have a TV show.

EDITORIAL, OP-ED A20-21

Timothy Egan

PAGE A21

U(D54G1D)y+&!$!]!=!.

A2

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Inside The Times

B

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Metallic leather bootie with grosgrain cap toe


800.550.0005 CHANEL.COM

LOUIS STETTNER/CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU

Lens on the Streets


In the streets of the two cities he called his spiritual mothers, the photographer Louis Stettner captured arresting images
from everyday life. He died Thursday in Saint-Ouen, France, at 93. Above, Christmas Eve, le St.-Louis 1950. Page B8.

Tourneau, LLC 2016

INTERNATIONAL

NATIONAL

BUSINESS

Changes to Textbooks
In Jordan Stoke Anger

Florida Supreme Court


Rules on Death Penalty

Labor and Inflation Woes


Keep Interest Rates Low

An effort to help youths avoid drifting to extreme ideologies by toning


down Islamic content in textbooks
created a backlash, with many
viewing the curriculum changes as
a declaration of war on Islamic
values. PAGE A4

The State Supreme Court decided


that death sentences require a
unanimous jury after an earlier law
requiring the assent of 10 of 12 jurors
was ruled unconstitutional.
PAGE A10

Janet L. Yellen said the Federal


Reserve was struggling to understand the behavior of the labor
market and the weakness of inflation, complicating plans to raise
interest rates. PAGE B3

3 Held in Bomb Plot

FM Radios Local Impact


Even with broadcast ranges as little
as five miles, thousands of Low
Power FM stations are finding loyal
niche audiences eager to tune in.

PAGE A8

In a scheme targeting Somalis,


three militia members scouted out
an apartment complex in Garden
City, Kan., stockpiled guns and
composed a manifesto about their
anti-Muslim motives, prosecutors
said. PAGE A11

Panel Rules for El Salvador

Justice Regrets Comments

The government won a long-running legal battle when an international arbitration panel ruled that it
did not have to pay compensation to
a mining company that was denied
a concession to drill for gold.
PAGE A8

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who had


criticized the quarterback Colin
Kaepernicks on-field protests
against racial injustice, issued a
statement saying her comments
were inappropriately dismissive
and harsh. PAGE A16

Tempered Joy in Nigeria

A Rise in the Deficit

The country celebrated the release


of 21 girls whom Boko Haram had
seized from their school and held
captive for two and a half years, but
many others remain unaccounted
for. PAGE A9

The Obama administration confirmed that a six-year run of declining annual budget deficits had
halted: The shortfall for the fiscal
year that ended Sept. 30 was $587
billion, an increase over last year.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

Venezuelas New Budget


After a Supreme Court decision that
stripped the legislature of its oversight powers, President Nicols
Maduro of Venezuela released and
signed the countrys next budget.

Slimline
Manufacture
Perpetual
Calendar

WHICH WATCH TO LIVE


YOUR PASSION?
TOURNEAU KNOWS.

OBITUARIES

Thomas Mikal Ford, 52

3 Bryant Park TimeMachine 57th and Madison Ave


Walt Whitman Roosevelt Field The Westchester

tourneau.com
800.348.3332

He played the pragmatic yet charming character Tommy on the 1990s


sitcom Martin, who as a friend of
the title character was often the
subject of the jokes in the show.
PAGE B8

PAGE B1

Debt Plagues Puerto Rico


Weighing solutions to the territorys
debt crisis, many officials including
Gov. Alejandro Garca Padilla have
warned that significant federal
assistance will be necessary.
PAGE B3

I just want to send


him to heaven. He did so
much for us.

SUPASIT CHINWINITKUL,
a university student and one of
tens of thousands of grieving
Thais who lined the streets of
Bangkok to view the coffin of
King Bhumibol Adulyadej.
[A6]

ARTS

New York Philharmonic


Preserves New-Music Series
The series, Contact!, has emerged
as an important part of the citys
musical and intellectual life, presenting 21 world premieres.

Palantir Faults Data in Suit

PAGE C3

The Silicon Valley business, which


was recently sued by the Department of Labor for discrimination,
contested the data in the suit, saying it hired its own experts, who
found no bias at the company.

An Ex-Presidents Evolution

PAGE B3

In the new television series


Graves, a Reagan-like president
retires, then rethinks his old ideas
and tries to undo the damage of his
policies. A review. PAGE C4

PAGE A16

SPORTS

OP-ED

NEW YORK

FIFA Decision Increases


Chance of U.S. World Cup

Roger Cohen PAGE A21

Soccers governing body voted to


bar Europe and Asia from bids to
host the 2026 World Cup because
those regions are hosting the next
two, strengthening chances that the
United States could host the tournament. PAGE D6

Crossword C3
Obituaries B8
TV Listings C6
Weather B6

all retired football players, described incorrectly, in some copies, the relationship between
Alzheimers disease and head
trauma. The disease has never
been shown to be a product of
head trauma.

workshop at the Yeshiva University Museum in Manhattan misstated the day the program is to be
held. It is at 1 p.m. Wednesday, not
Sunday.

Becoming Citizens
Just in Time to Vote
In three ceremonies, 685 people
were sworn in as Americans, the
latest in a national wave preceding
the presidential election. PAGE A17

Classified Ads A19


Religious Services A19

Corrections
NATIONAL

A Critics Notebook article on


Friday about Bob Dylans songwriting, citing a verse from the
song Isis, quoted from the lyrics
on Mr. Dylans website rather
than the version Mr. Dylan recorded on the album Desire. On
the recording, the second line of
the verse ends Well, I guess, not
Well, not quite, and the fourth
line ends If you want me to, yes!,
not Yeah, I jes might.
An article on Tuesday about
damage from Hurricane Matthew
in North Carolina misstated the
name of the river that had flooded
near the towns of Lumberton and
Fair Bluff. It is the Lumber River,
not the Lumberton.
An article on Tuesday about
plans to build and launch a privately financed telescope to look
for an Earthlike planet in the Alpha Centauri system misstated

Report an Error:
nytnews@nytimes.com or call
1-844-NYT-NEWS
(1-844-698-6397).
Editorials: letters@nytimes.com
or fax (212) 556-3622.
Public Editor: Readers concerned

the size of the mirror of the ACESat telescope proposed by scientists at the NASA Ames Research
Center. It is 18 inches in diameter,
not 59.
BUSINESS DAY

An article on Dec. 30 about Twitters appointment of an executive


for diversity paraphrased incorrectly from a blog post by Leslie
Miley, a former Twitter engineer.
He wrote that about a quarter of
African-Americans had used Twitter, not that African-Americans
accounted for about a quarter of
the services users. This error was
called to The Timess attention
only recently.
SPORTS

Because of an editing error, the


Sports Business column last Saturday, about whether the N.F.L.s
concussion settlement is good for

THE ARTS

A Critics Notebook article on


Sept. 29 about the Provincetown
Tennessee Williams Theater Festival in Massachusetts, using information from the program, misspelled the surname of the actress
who played Violet in Small Craft
Warnings, one of the works presented. She is Sarah MacDonnell,
not MacDonell.
A picture caption last Saturday
with an article about Ashley
Bouder of New York City Ballet,
who has returned to performing
after having a baby in May, described Ms. Bouder incorrectly.
She is shown removing her pointe
shoes after a performance; she is
not preparing for a performance.

about issues of journalistic integrity


may reach the public editor at
public@nytimes.com or (212) 5568044.

WEEKEND

Newspaper Delivery:
customercare@nytimes.com or call
1-800-NYTIMES (1-800-698-4637).

An entry in the Spare Times for


Children listings in some editions
on Friday about a model Torah

OBITUARIES

An obituary on Thursday about


the civil rights lawyer Jack Greenberg referred incompletely to his
years teaching law at Columbia
University. Besides being an adjunct professor from 1970 to 1984,
he was a professor from 1984 until
retiring last year, including four
years when he was also dean of
Columbia College not from 1993,
when he stepped down as dean.
The obituary also misspelled the
given name of one of Mr. Greenbergs children. She is Sarah
Greenberg, not Sara. And the obituary omitted the name of a survivor. Besides his wife, children
and grandchildren, Mr. Greenberg is survived by a brother, Daniel.
An obituary in some editions on
Monday and in some copies on
Tuesday about the Polish filmmaker Andrzej Wajda misstated
his age when the German Army
invaded Poland in 1939. He was 13,
not 12.

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Diane Brayton, Secretary

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

By SOMINI SENGUPTA
and RICK GLADSTONE

UNITED NATIONS In the


end, politics trumped gender.
One of the top female candidates vying to lead the United Nations was viewed as too close to
the United States. Another was
seen as too close to Russia.
Even the 56 other countries that
banded together to push for the
first female secretary general in
the 70-year history of the United
Nations could not rally behind a
choice. Ultimately, their own national interests mattered more.
The rejection of all seven female
candidates spoke to the way the
United Nations still operates, critics say a clubby culture of quiet
diplomatic bargaining and horse
trading, dominated by men.
The women measured up very
well some better than others,
said Jean Krasno, a political science professor at the City College
of New York and the chairwoman
of the Campaign to Elect a Woman
U.N. Secretary General, an advocacy group. And yet it didnt happen, and I really feel that there
was a lot of discrimination against
the women.
At the end of the closed negotiations, systemic bias prevailed
against all of the women, said
many womens advocates, including those who like the man chosen: Antnio Guterres, 67, a charismatic former prime minister of
Portugal who led the United Nations refugee agency for 10 years.
One female candidates campaign tallied the leadership of the
15 nations on the Security Council
that made the final choice for Mr.
Guterres: Among their heads of
state, foreign ministers and
United Nations envoys, only 6 percent were women.
Misogyny is baked into the
system, said Shazia Z. Rafi, the
United Nations representative for
the All Pakistan Womens Association and the former secretary
general of Parliamentarians for
Global Action, an advocacy group.
Ms. Rafi said far more could
have been done by the countries
that had expressed support for a
woman. She drew an analogy to
the aggressive lobbying done by
the African Union 20 years ago to
make Kofi Annan, the Ghanaian
diplomat and statesman, the first
black African secretary general.
These changes dont take
place on a voluntary basis, Ms.
Rafi said. They take place because advocates work together. It
requires teeth.
Still, the selection of a man was
not a foregone conclusion for the
193-member United Nations,
which has proclaimed female em-

DON EMMERT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE GETTY IMAGES

Matthew Rycroft, the British ambassador to the United Nations.


Of the five permanent Security Council members, only Britain
openly championed the idea of a female secretary general.
powerment as a basic aspiration.
There had been widespread expectations that enthusiasm for a
female secretary general would
break the chain of men who have
occupied the post for the past seven decades.
But of the five permanent members of the Security Council,
which have the final say because
of their veto power, only Britain
openly championed the idea of a
woman all things being equal,
the British ambassador Matthew
Rycroft repeatedly said until a
man whom the British liked
scored highest on the first informal poll.
Security Council members who

Misogyny is baked
into the system, a
representative said.
had joined the coalition did little
public advocacy for the women.
On Oct. 5, when Mr. Guterres was
announced as the Councils unanimous choice, they all stood at the
podium outside the Council chambers, smiling.
They stand to gain, diplomatically. The Councils permanent members Russia, China,
Britain, France and the United
States are likely to lobby Mr.
Guterres vigorously for their chosen diplomats to take senior posts.
Ambassador Samantha Power
of the United States, the only female envoy among the permanent
members, conspicuously said little publicly about gender during
the selection process.
In an emailed statement to The

New York Times, Ms. Power said


that choosing a woman would
have sent an important message
to women and girls around the
world, and she welcomed the entry of so many women in the race.
We thought a number of them
would have made strong Secretaries-General, she wrote. At the
end of the day, though, the Council
has to agree on a single candidate.
You need only look at the vote totals to see that there was only one
candidate on which the whole
Council was able to agree, and in
our view Antnio Guterres is a
very strong leader.
The Russian ambassador, Vitaly I. Churkin, took pains to say
that the Soviet Union had
nominated the first woman for the
post in 1953: Vijaya Laxmi Pandit,
an Indian diplomat who had
served in Moscow and later in
Washington.
Still, Mr. Churkin was not enthusiastic about the calls for a
woman to lead the organization
this year.
He had warned early in the selection process not to discriminate
against men. Much later, he said,
Russia favored a woman if she
was from Eastern Europe diplomatic code for a woman the
Russians supported and knew the
West opposed: Irina Bokova of
Bulgaria.
The Russians were also known
to oppose the candidacy of Susana
Malcorra, the Argentine foreign
minister and career United Nations diplomat, perceiving her as
too aligned with the United States.
Bulgarian domestic politics also
roiled the chances of a woman for
the job. Ms. Bokova won her governments backing early on, but a
second Bulgarian, Kristalina
Georgieva, ran a shadow cam-

paign against her for months, only


to be officially nominated by her
government in September. That
competition, many diplomats said
privately, doomed her chances.
By then, Mr. Guterres had already scored highly in the Councils informal straw polls.
Karin Landgren, a former
United Nations envoy to Liberia,
applauded the selection of Mr.
Guterres but blamed bias and lack
of unity for the failure of all seven
female candidates.
Sexism, unconscious bias, the
difficulty for women to penetrate
mens hearing all played a role in
elevating weak male candidates
over stronger women, I suspect,
she said in an email, adding that
opinion never coalesced around
one particular woman.
Mr. Guterres is sure to be under
immense pressure to select a
woman as his deputy and to do
much more to make a dent in the
male dominance of senior United
Nations posts.
Last year, according to one
analysis, most of the senior jobs
went to men.
Another analysis found that the
United Nations senior management group consisted of 28 men
and 12 women, a far cry from the
50-50 gender parity that the
United Nations had set out as a
goal many years ago.
Ms. Power said Mr. Guterres
had a formidable record on
womens empowerment throughout his career and noted that he
has promised gender parity when
he moves to the 38th floor of the
United Nations headquarters on
Jan. 1.
In his acceptance speech, Mr.
Guterres said the protection and
the empowerment of women and
girls will continue to be a priority
commitment for him. On Friday,
he announced that his five-member transition team included three
women.
It did not go unnoticed that
when Mr. Guterres was formally
approved by the General Assembly this week, the United Nations
also announced the appointment
of Wonder Woman, the comic
book heroine, as its mascot for
womens empowerment.
Some advocates of the women
who lost to Mr. Guterres found it
offensive.
That was tone-deaf to the Nth
degree, said Melissa LaBonte, a
political science professor at
Fordham University who is a
member of Campaign to Elect a
Woman U.N. Secretary General.
As if they had put a Madison Avenue P.R. firm in charge of gender
parity. My jaw dropped.

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Obama Moves to Further Ease Embargo on Cuba


From Page A1
proved Friday does not erase the
laws restricting tourism and trade
only a vote of Congress can do
that but it declares the legislation at odds with United States
policy and requires that the administration lobby Congress to
eliminate it.
Opponents of the opening, including some Cuban-American
lawmakers who have characterized the policy as a concession to a
brutal autocratic regime that denies its citizens basic human
rights, swiftly denounced the latest move.
Todays announcement reaffirms the fact that President Obamas Cuba policy puts the Castro
regimes interests first, profits
ahead of Americas national security, and the Cuban peoples rights
and dignity dead last, Senator
Marco Rubio, Republican of
Florida, said Friday.
Yet support is growing on Capitol Hill for the approach, and it
would take another directive by a
future president to reverse Fridays move, something that Mr.
Obamas top advisers argued
would be difficult for a successor;
they say the shift is already reshaping the way Americans travel
to and do business with Cuba.
This directive takes a comprehensive and whole-of-government approach to promote engagement with the Cuban government and people, and make our
opening to Cuba irreversible, Mr.
Obama said in a statement. Challenges remain and very real differences between our governments persist on issues of democracy and human rights but I believe that engagement is the best
way to address those differences
and make progress on behalf of
our interests and values.
The very publication of the document an unclassified directive
that lays out the specific goals and
strategy for United States engagement with Cuba was significant after decades of secrecy
and mistrust overhanging the relationship. We are not seeking to
impose regime change on Cuba,
the directive reads, asserting that
the embargo is outdated and

Watch The Times.


NYTimes.com/Video.

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MERIDITH KOHUT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

A cigar shop in Havana. The presidents action will end American limits on importing cigars.
should be lifted.
As if to underscore a stark shift
from the spying and suspicion of
the past, the document specifically requires that American-led
democracy programs which
the Castro government has denounced as secret efforts to destabilize the country be transparent.
The United States used to have
secret plans for Cuba; now our
policy is fully out in the open and
online for everyone to see and
read, Ms. Rice said in her speech
on Friday. What you see is what
you get.
The moves on Friday were the
sixth round of regulatory changes
announced by the Treasury and
Commerce Departments aimed at
easing travel to Cuba as well as
trade and commerce between the
two nations.
The actions build on a series of
milestones with Cuba as Mr. Obamas tenure draws to a close. Last
month, he nominated the first
United States ambassador to
Cuba in more than 50 years, after
the reopening last year of embassies in Washington and Havana.
White House officials said Friday
that they hoped Jeffrey DeLaurentis, the career diplomat se-

lected by Mr. Obama for the post


and who currently serves as the
top official at the United States
Embassy in Havana, could be confirmed before the end of the year
over the objections of Mr. Rubio
and others in a lame-duck session
of Congress. In other openings,
the first direct commercial flight
from the United States reached
Cuba in August.
Still, substantial obstacles to

An effort to formalize
the shift toward
normalization.
full normalization remain, including the embargo and the decadesold, unresolved financial claims of
Americans whose property was
confiscated when Fidel Castro
took power.
The latest round of regulatory
changes, which takes effect on
Monday, leaves in place restrictions on agricultural and many
other imports from Cuba, and a
bar on Cuban banks opening ac-

counts in the United States, which


makes financial transactions between the two countries unwieldy.
The current $400 limit on the
amount of Cuban merchandise
that can be brought into the
United States, however, will be
eliminated, and with it, the cap on
rum and tobacco products. The
change bears practical and symbolic significance for a country
that prides itself on its cigars and
rum, both industries controlled by
the government, whose popularity has become a symbol for the
lasting strictures of the embargo.
During secret talks in Canada to
seal the initial agreement on normalization, Cuban officials would
routinely bring boxes of Cuban
cigars and bottles of Havana Club
rum to their American counterparts, gifts that served as implicit
criticism of the embargo that
barred Mr. Obamas team from
bringing them home to enjoy.
President John F. Kennedy dispatched his press secretary,
Pierre Salinger, to hoard 1,000 Cuban cigars for his private stash before signing the executive order
strengthening the trade embargo,
according to a 1992 article Mr.
Salinger wrote in Cigar Aficionado magazine.

A3

A4

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

My leaflets are a poison for Kim Jong-uns regime, because they help North Koreans wake up to his lies.
LEE MIN-BOK

JEAN CHUNG FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

THE SATURDAY PROFILE

Subverting North Korea, One Bundle of Leaflets at a Time


By CHOE SANG-HUN

POCHEON, South Korea


EE MIN-BOKS house, fashioned

out of two shipping containers, is monitored by 12 police


surveillance cameras. Dogs woof at
any stranger walking up the dirt
path. Plainclothes detectives check
his mailbox and tag along wherever
he goes to protect him from possible
assassins sent by North Korea,
which openly threatens to kill him.
But that has not stopped him.
On days when the wind blows to
the north, Mr. Lee, 59, ventures out
with his secondhand five-ton truck,
hauling a large hydrogen tank to
the border with North Korea, an
hours drive away. There, he fills
dozens of 23-foot and 39-foot barrelshaped balloons with the gas and
lets them drift away.
The balloons carry special payloads: radio sets, one-dollar bills,
computer memory sticks and,
above all, tens of thousands of
leaflets bearing messages that Mr.
Lee says will debunk the personality cult surrounding Kim Jongun, the youthful leader of North
Korea.

My leaflets are a poison for Kim


Jong-uns regime, because they help
North Koreans wake up to his lies,
Mr. Lee said during an interview at
his home.
Sailing 9,800 to 16,400 feet above
sea level, Mr. Lees balloons waft
across the worlds most heavily
guarded border, high enough that
North Korean soldiers have little
chance of shooting them down.
Then his patented timer devices
click, unfastening vinyl bundles.
Leaflets fall out like snowflakes
over the North, where Mr. Kim
struggles to keep his people under a
total information blackout, blocking
the internet and prefixing all radio
and TV sets to receive only his
governments propaganda-filled
broadcasts.

South Korea, there are 50 balloon warriors, many of them


defectors from the North like Mr.
Lee, who seek to breach the wall
with leaflets.
Mr. Lee is their godfather. When
he started floating large balloons in
2005, with others following suit, he
received credit and blame for
N

reigniting the leaflet battle the two


Korean armies had waged until it
petered out with the end of the Cold
War. He now launches between 700
and 1,500 balloons a year, each
carrying 30,000 to 60,000 leaflets.
To anyone who will listen, Mr. Lee
preaches that the best way to reform North Korea and end its nuclear weapons program is to subvert
Mr. Kims government from inside
the country. And the surest way to
do that, he says, is to infiltrate it
with outside information through
leaflets, radio broadcasts and DVDs
filled with South Korean TV dramas
and smuggled through the Norths
border with China.
Leaflets are the cheapest and
safest, Mr. Lee said. No border
guards, no radar, no radio jamming
signals can stop them.
With years of negotiations and
sanctions failing to stop North
Koreas nuclear weapons program,
Washington and its allies have
begun paying more attention to
waging an information war. After
the Norths fourth nuclear test, in
January, South Korea restarted
front-line loudspeakers to send

blaring propaganda broadcasts


across the border. Last month,
Washington announced a $1.6 million budget for projects to foster
the free flow of information into, out
of, and within North Korea.

some defectors claim


to have fled after reading
leaflets or listening to
outside radio, critics say leaflets do
little more than provoke Pyongyang.
It calls them an act of war and
threatens to direct an artillery
attack at their launching sites near
the border. Balloonists have clashed
with South Korean villagers worried about becoming targets of
Northern retaliation.
In 2011, a man was arrested on a
charge of plotting to assassinate a
balloon activist at the behest of
North Korea. Three years later, the
North directed antiaircraft fire into
the South Korean sky, trying to
down one of Mr. Lees balloons. This
year, it began retaliating in kind,
floating to the South leaflets that
called President Park Geun-hye a
snake and a prostitute.
HILE

Andrei Lankov, a professor at


Kookmin University in Seoul who
grew up in the former Soviet Union
and studied at a North Korean
university, was skeptical about the
impact of leaflets on the North.
One leaflet is not going to
change views of a person who is
exposed to daily official propaganda, he said. However, it would be a
mistake to stop the campaign now.
That is what the North Korean
authorities demand, and it is not a
good time to show weakness.
Mr. Lee avoids clashes with villagers by releasing his balloons
away from their towns. Unlike more
flamboyant activists, he seldom
invites journalists to his launchings.
The other activists leaflets often
carry highly personal attacks on
Kim Jong-un, ridiculing him as a
nuclear lunatic and exhorting
North Koreans to overthrow the
bloodthirsty pig. Mr. Lee believes
that a less provocative approach
will yield better results.
His leaflets, for instance, list the
number of cars and other figures
from South Koreas vastly superior
Continued on Page A6

Textbook Tweaks Infuriate Jordans Conservatives


By DIAA HADID

MAAN, Jordan When Jordans school year began last


month, educators began noticing
tweaks in the curriculum.
Along with the images of women wearing head scarves were a
few who went without them.
Cleanshaven
men
appeared
alongside drawings of devout,
bearded ones. And references to
Islam, once sprinkled liberally
throughout textbooks and other
class materials, were scaled back.
The 70 or so tweaks to Jordans
textbooks for first through 12th
grades are small. The books are
still laden with Islamic references: The 10th-grade science
text, for example, encourages students to marvel over Gods creation as it discusses evolution.
But they are one of the Middle
Easts first noticeable efforts to
moderate the school curriculum in
hopes of preventing youths from
drifting to extreme ideologies.
It could be a test case for the
region, said Musa Shteiwi, a sociologist who sat on an Education
Ministry committee for six
months last year to change the
textbooks. All of us in the Arab
world have the same problems.
We are all entering this battle.
So far, this modest effort has not
gone well. Islamists see it as a
threat to their traditional domination of the education system. And
among Jordans mostly conservative Muslim population, many
view the changes as a declaration
of war on Islamic values.
Dina Baslan contributed reporting
from Maan and Amman, Jordan.

Obama and Clintons schools


are not for us! shouted Mahmoud
Abu Rakhiya, an Islamist in Maan,
a desert town in southern Jordan,
at a rally on a recent Friday in late
September. In the capital, Amman, around the same time,
teachers set a pile of textbooks on
fire. A woman in a white face veil
shouted: We dont need these
textbooks anyway! We will teach
them what we want!
Even those who support
changes to the curriculum say the
government bungled the effort.
Jumana Ghunaimat, the editor in
chief of Al Ghad, a liberal newspaper that campaigned for a new
curriculum, said the changes, introduced without public debate,
had antagonized conservative
Jordanians.
I fear that this will not bring
positive change, Ms. Ghunaimat
said.
She added, And today we are in
a hard place, referring to growing
fears of extremist violence in Jordan.
The curriculum changes are
part of the balancing act that Jordans monarchy has long attempted to appease its conservative citizens; the United States, a
loyal ally that provides crucial
aid; its noisy secular elite; and its
influential Christian minority.
(Even as the government issued
the new textbooks, it arrested a
Jordanian writer, Nahed Hattar,
for sharing a cartoon on Facebook
that many saw as mocking God.
Mr. Hattar, 56, a prominent writer
from a Christian family, was fatally shot when he showed up at a
courthouse on Sept. 25 to face
criminal charges of insulting Is-

lam.)
The problem with the previous
Jordanian curriculum, advocates
for change said, was that Islam
dominated every subject, without
teaching children about the
shared humanity of non-Muslims,
including other Jordanian citizens. For instance, Jordanians are
taught, You are a Muslim, and
therefore you are moral, said
Oraib al-Rantawi, director general
of Al Quds Center for Political
Studies, which argued for revisions. So the question is, what of

An effort to make a
curriculum more
moderate backfires.
others? Non-Muslims? Are they
moral?
Pressure to change the curriculum came in 2015, after a Jordanian Air Force fighter pilot, First Lt.
Moaz al-Kasasbeh, was burned
alive in a cage by ISIS militants.
Some leading Jordanians hesitated to condemn his killing, appearing to sympathize with the
militants. At the time, hundreds of
Jordanians were already in neighboring Syria fighting for militant
groups.
Government officials began to
question how the education curriculum was influencing Jordanians, said Mr. Shteiwi, the sociologist. We began feeling that
what we are doing in our schools

was an important factor, he said.


Mr. Shteiwi, along with other
academics and religious figures,
was summoned by the Education
Ministry in the spring. As they
worked on the curriculum, a sense
of urgency grew. In June, three intelligence officers and two government employees were killed at
a Palestinian refugee camp. In November, a police officer fatally
shot five security officials, including two American trainers, a
South African and two fellow
Jordanians, at a compound in Amman, bringing fears of infiltration
by Islamist militants into one of
the Arab worlds safest cities.
The curriculum changes were
meant to give students a better
chance to enter the labor market,
and to make them more immune
to extremist ideas circulating
against them, said Mohammad
Momani, a government spokesman.
It is unclear how effective the
new curriculum will be in a country with around 1.7 million students and 30,000 teachers working in 4,000 schools, many of them
overcrowded.
Because of the protests, the Education Ministry has set up another committee to review the
changes. The teachers union, for
its part, has urged educators to ignore the new textbooks.
Atef al-Numat, a union member
in Maan, called the changes a disaster for our children and our
values. He particularly objected
to an image of a man vacuuming a
house, a crucifix hanging on the
wall behind him. Jordanian men
do not sweep their homes, he said,

MUHAMMAD HAMED/REUTERS

Refugee children in Amman, Jordan, getting books on the first


day of school. Jordans textbooks cut some references to Islam.
and the cross is a clear message
that conversion is possible.
Why did they change the curriculum? Mr. Numat asked.
There is no house in Jordan that
isnt angry.
Some teachers appear to be
heeding the call to boycott the new
textbooks. At a girls school in a
working-class neighborhood of
Amman, the principal said teachers were using the new curriculum. But her secretary interjected, What the teachers syndicate is saying, we are doing.
Hasan Abu Hanieh, a researcher on militant Islam, described the curriculum changes
as a disastrous experiment, because Jordanian Muslims already
believe that there is an attack
coming from the outside on Islam,
and the government is kneeling to
that pressure.
Mr. Momani, the government
spokesman, described those
claims as an extreme version of a

conspiracy theory.
But it is something many
Jordanians believe. In one Amman neighborhood, Leila Hassan,
a 40-year-old mother of six, said
the government had changed the
curriculum because they dont
want us to follow the prophet.
Ms. Hassans neighbor interjected, saying Israel dictated the
curriculum changes to weaken belief among Muslims. They want
these changes so that people dont
think of Jerusalem, said the woman, who gave her name as Umm
Ahmad.
Ms. Hassan said that since the
new curriculum was introduced at
her childrens school, teachers
had insisted on communal Muslim
prayers, to make sure the children
did not forget their faith. Some
teachers are also giving extra religious lessons, she said.
Its not the result they
wanted, Ms. Hassan said, grinning. Its the opposite.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

A5

A6

THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Thais Pay Tribute to Beloved King, Lining Bangkok Procession Route


By RICHARD C. PADDOCK

BANGKOK Tens of thousands of grieving Thais lined the


streets of the capital on Friday to
view the coffin of King Bhumibol
Adulyadej, a day after the beloved
monarchs 70-year reign ended
with his death.
Some people said they had arrived as early as 3 a.m. to claim a
spot along the route of a procession from Siriraj Hospital, where
the king, 88, died Thursday after
years of illness, to the Grand Palace, where Buddhist rites were to
be held. By midafternoon, as the
start of the procession neared,
spectators were crowded 50 deep
in some places, with many sitting
in the street.
Most people wore black, and
many sat under umbrellas in the
90-degree heat. Many also displayed framed photographs of the
king; some, lacking photos, held
up Thai bank notes with his picture on them.
I just want to send him to heaven, said Supasit Chinwinitkul, a
university student who said he
had come to the palace at 6 a.m.
He did so much for us. Just waiting for a short time is a small sacrifice for me. He did thousands of
times more for us.
The kings motorcade left the
hospital late in the afternoon,
moving slowly, escorted by police
officers on motorcycles. Spectators bowed as it passed, and members of the military along the route
dropped to one knee. Many in the
crowd sobbed, and some wailed.
The government declared Friday a holiday, but malls, shops and
street stalls were open, as were
banks and the Thai stock market.

ADAM DEAN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Thousands lined the street on Friday in Bangkok for the procession taking King Bhumibol Adulyadejs body to the Grand Palace.
Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, the head
of the military junta that seized
power in 2014, had urged Thais to
continue with business as usual
even as they mourned the king.
But signs of Thailands loss

were inescapable in Bangkok.


People everywhere wore black,
and some newspapers and websites went to a black-and-white
format.
Television channels, both do-

mestic and foreign, broadcast documentary footage about the king


at the governments request. They
were told they could resume
showing their own content starting at midnight, but without show-

ing entertainment programs.


King Bhumibol, the worlds
longest-reigning monarch when
he died, was revered by Thais,
even as faith in the monarchy had
ebbed in recent years. His son,

A Grieving Thailand
Looks Warily to an Heir
From Page A1
royal fortunes, an estimated $31
billion in real estate holdings
alone. Succession may force the
consideration of an unresolved
and rarely discussed question of
whether those assets and others
are the property of the royal family or of the Thai public.
The crown prince, 64, has led a
stormy life of byzantine quarrels
and breakups with various lovers
that were rarely fully elucidated in
public. To his critics, his romantic
liaisons have been more than just
a royal soap opera; they have
raised questions about whether
his character suits the institution
he is about to lead.
Having multiple lovers is a dynastic tradition his greatgrandfather King Rama V had
more than 150 wives and consorts
but the princes former partners have endured spiteful separations and the purged members
of his entourage have died under
suspicious circumstances. His
three divorces, and the brusque
ways they were handled, turned
many Thais against him and left a
trail of broken families, including
four children in the United States
with whom he has cut ties.
The crown prince returned to
Thailand in time to be present for
his fathers death on Thursday.
But the timing of his accession remains in question. Gen. Prayuth
Chan-ocha, the prime minister,
surprised the nation on Thursday
when he told reporters that the
prince had decided to wait until
the appropriate time to ascend
the throne, which is still replete
with the ancient pageantry and
extreme formality made famous
by the musical The King and I.
What details are known of the
crown princes life are whispered
and passed along furtively on social media in Thailand, where the
military government, enforcing a
strict lse-majest law, has sentenced dozens of people to long
prison terms for offending the
monarchy. The law has been interpreted broadly, stifling most public discussion of anything related
to the royal family.
But the few details that have
emerged in public records, leaked
documents and videos, and in
publications from abroad offer a
glimpse into the man who stands
Alison Smale reported from Tutzing, Germany, and Thomas Fuller
from San Francisco. Victor Homola contributed reporting from
Berlin.

to be Thailands next king.


The prince was still married to
his first wife, his cousin Soamsawali Kitiyakara, in the 1970s and
80s when he fathered five children with another woman, according to Thai news accounts at the
time. The other woman, an
aspiring actress and a commoner,
Sujarinee
Vivacharawongse,
would become his second wife.
That second marriage ended in
the late 1990s in such acrimony
that a public notice was posted at
the princes palace accusing Ms.
Sujarinee of corruption and infidelity with a soldier. The prince
cut off communication with four of
the five children from the marriage, stripped them of their royal
titles and diplomatic passports,
and wrote letters, since posted online by an exiled academic, to their
British boarding schools informing them that he would no longer
pay their tuition. They now live in
the United States, as does their
mother.
His third marriage, also to a
commoner, Srirasmi Suwadee, in
2001, produced the boy who is considered the next heir to the throne,
Prince Dipangkorn Rasmijoti, 11,
who lives in Bavaria with his father.
Thais got a rare insight into the
third marriage when a video clip
of an elaborate poolside birthday
party circulated widely on computer discs and on the internet.
The video, which showed the princess topless with a string bikini
bottom being attended to by submissive palace staff, scandalized a
public accustomed to perceiving
the monarchy as a paragon of
virtue.
It was never clear how the video
had been leaked but some suggested that the princes enemies
had spread it to promote the possibility that his sister Princess
Sirindhorn, beloved by the public
for her devotion to charitable
causes, could become monarch in
his stead.
The footage of the party was
never publicly discussed in Thailands news media.
The crown princes marriage to
Ms. Srirasmi blew up spectacularly in 2014, when members of her
family were suddenly swept up by
the police, charged and brought to
trial.
At least three of Ms. Srirasmis
siblings were sent to prison for
crimes including illegal possession of firearms and insulting
the monarchy, according to police
statements. Her mother and father were sentenced to prison for

Maha Vajiralongkorn, the crown


prince, who is expected to take the
throne, is less popular. Anxiety
over the succession was underscored Thursday night when General Prayuth announced that the
crown prince was not ready to become king and had asked for more
time to grieve.
Deputy Prime Minister Wissanu Krea-Ngam said in a televised interview on Friday that
Prem Tinsulanonda, 96, the head
of the privy council and a former
prime minister, became regent because the nation had no king.
The rules of succession require
that a regent be appointed if no
one is declared king after a
monarchs death. The crown
prince declined to become king
immediately because he wanted
more time to grieve, General
Prayuth, who is also the countrys
prime minister, told reporters on
Thursday.
Mr. Wissanu indicated that the
crown prince would ascend to the
throne but did not say when.
King Bhumibol was a stabilizing figure in an increasingly polarized country that has had many
military coups, and Thais viewed
him as a selfless monarch devoted
to his peoples welfare.
Narongnut
Phungsuta,
a
teacher, who lives 150 miles north
of Bangkok in Nakhon Sawan
Province, came to the capital for
the procession. He arrived outside
the palace at 3 a.m., he said, and
waited for more than 12 hours, in a
coat and tie, for a chance to say
goodbye.
The king is my life, he said.
He is like my father. He is my everything. All through his life he
did everything for us.

A princes European
lifestyle has caused
anxiety back home.

SUKREE SUKPLANG/REUTERS

Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn


with his mother, on his left,
and sisters in Bangkok in
2010. The crown princes villa
in southern Germany, left, offers him the privacy that he
appears to crave.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

insulting the monarchy.


Her uncle Pongpat Chayapan, a
high-ranking police officer, was
convicted of running illegal
casinos, oil smuggling, money
laundering and other crimes.
Ms. Srirasmi gave up her royally bestowed name, according to
an entry in The Royal Gazette, but
she was given a stipend of more
than $5 million of government
funds from the Crown Property
Bureau, a payment made public in
a letter signed by the junta chief.
The purge reinforced fears of an
ominous, violent side in the
princes entourage.
One of a handful of police officers purged in the 2014 separation,
Akkharawit Limrat, died under
mysterious circumstances, his
body hastily cremated, according
to a funeral certificate published
in the Thai news media.
The police, calling the matter
sensitive, gave only scant details.
Lt. Gen. Prawut Thavornsiri,
then the police spokesman, de-

scribed the death this way: He


got stressed out. So he jumped out
of the building and died.
A separate purge last year of
aides to the crown prince had a
similar outcome. Two of the three
men arrested died in custody in
military barracks.
The purges have somewhat
overshadowed recent efforts by
the government to rehabilitate the
princes image, including broadcasts of his riding in bicycle tours
to celebrate the king and queen
and the release of a video showing
him caring for his son Dipangkorn
in Germany. Critics said that after
the purge of his third wife, those
images sought to present him as a
healthy, responsible father.
The efforts suggested that the
military had cast its lot with the
prince, trying to forge the same
kind of mutually beneficial alliance it had with his father. The
king heads the armed forces and
must approve all governments,
while the military draws its legitimacy from the monarchs bless-

ing.
Then theres the matter of who
will be the new queen. Like so
many other parts of the crown
princes life, the answer is
shrouded in secrecy.
A former flight attendant,
Suthida Vajiralongkorn na Ayudhaya, has appeared by the
princes side on the official royal
broadcasts and has been bestowed the military rank of lieutenant general.
Kasit Piromya, a former foreign
minister, said he met Ms. Suthida
many times when he was in government.
Shes an air hostess, very
lively, highly intelligent, he said.
She can ski, she can bike. She
loves music. She knows what is
good wine in Italy.
Ms. Suthida appears to live with
the crown prince in Bavaria.
Bild, the German tabloid, published a photograph in July of the
crown prince on an airport runway in low-slung jeans, with what
appeared to be tattoos covering
his back and arms. The princes
companion, possibly Ms. Suthida,
is wearing stiletto heels and a
tight shirt, midriff exposed, an
outfit that might not raise eyebrows in Europe but would disqualify any tourist from entering
the Grand Palace in Bangkok.
The prince bought two villas in
southern Germany last year, one
on the exclusive Lake Starnberg

for an estimated $13 million, and


another, said to have cost some
$5.5 million, in the adjacent community of Feldafing.
When Andreas Botas, a real estate agent in Tutzing, showed the
prince and his entourage a property there last year, three black
Mercedes vans, a white Porsche
and three more vans arrived for
the appointment.
The driver of the Porsche
turned out to be the prince,
dressed in a skimpy T-shirt and
jeans but very good shoes, Mr.
Botas said. The prince looked
carefully at the villas 12 main
rooms as servants lay prostrate or
knelt on the ground ready to start
the white Porsche and open the
driver and passenger doors. Ultimately, Mr. Botas said, the prince
bought the other villas.
Bavaria offers the crown prince
the privacy that he appears to
crave. In Tutzing, the princes
three-story villa is defended from
prying eyes by a fence and hedge
more than six feet tall.
In Feldafing, few locals seem to
know the prince, but neighbors
said they heard parties around the
private pool late into the night last
summer.
Occasional public appearances
sometimes make news in the German and Austrian news media.
The crown princes entourage,
they reported, has visited a pumpkin farm, picked strawberries and
toured parts of Bavaria on mountain bikes. In the Austrian ski resort of Zell am Ziller, the princes
entourage in 2014 rented 70 rooms
in a spa hotel and demanded the
installation of a kitchen where the
princes own cook prepared his
food, according to an article in the
Innsbruck newspaper Tiroler
Tageszeitung.
But for the most part, this community shelters its wealthy
residents with discreet propriety.
The deputy mayor of Tutzing,
Elisabeth Drrenberg, said only
that her community of some
10,000 welcomed wealthy and
prominent people, but said nothing specifically about the prince.
The town does not show off its
wealth; there is no five-star hotel
or Michelin-starred restaurant.
The mayor of Feldafing, Bernhard Sontheim, was equally reticent. The princes entourage
showed up at his office in July, the
mayor said, and spent half an hour
chatting about generalities.
The prince, he said, is now a
resident of Feldafing, he lives here
and that is that.

THE SATURDAY PROFILE

A Balloon Warrior Subverts North Korea, One Bundle of Leaflets at a Time


From Page A4
economy. It then asks North
Koreans to ask ethnic Koreans
from China, who often visit their
country, whether those figures
are correct. It also urges them to
ask front-line soldiers to confirm
that the South Korean fences on
the border are awash with blinding lights at night while the
energy-starved North is buried
in darkness.
There has been no reliable
study on how many North

Koreans read the leaflets or how


they react.
Writing on the website 38
North, Ruediger Frank, a professor at the University of Vienna
and a frequent visitor to North
Korea, warned against assigning
too much weight to the accounts
of defectors and human rights
groups about discontent there,
thus creating the impression of
an imminent uprising that only
needs a little push from the outside to happen.
But Mr. Lee said his own story

was proof that a leaflet could


change a North Koreans life.
He was a biologist at a staterun agricultural research institute in 1990 when he picked up a
leaflet from the South while on a
trip near the border. It made
what was to him the shocking
claim that the Korean War
started in 1950 with a North
Korean invasion.
In the North, he said, the government had taught people to
hate the Americans by endlessly
reiterating that the United States

and its South Korean puppets


started the war. Mr. Lee did his
own research, asking old veterans and people who had lived
near the border when the war
started, and became convinced
the leaflet was right.
By then, his faith had already
been shaken, after the authorities reprimanded him for suggesting agricultural reforms.
Mr. Lee fled the North in 1991
and, after traveling through
China and Russia, arrived in the
South in 1995. On his way, he was

helped and baptized by South


Korean missionaries.
Today, sending balloons is Mr.
Lees full-time job. He finances
his operation with cash he earns
from lectures he gives at
churches and elsewhere. Christians also donate, asking him to
drop small Bibles and food into
the North. A Japanese group
contributes with the understanding he will send leaflets urging
North Koreans to help find the
whereabouts of dozens of Japanese believed to have been ab-

ducted to the North.


Mr. Lee said his obsession with
leaflets made him neglect his
family. The South Korean wife he
married in 1996 divorced him. He
is now married to a Chinese
woman who is far more supportive.
You need a partner in this
work, Mr. Lee said. You dont
know when the right wind will
blow, and your wife is the only
helping hand you can get when
you have to rush out with balloons.

THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

A7

After Hurricane, Cholera Deepens the Misery Stalking Haiti


From Page A1
Then, when the floods came,
cholera was carried down by the
water itself, which swept up fecal
matter dumped on the hillsides,
contaminating the river and other
drinking supplies.
Inexperience did the rest. Water unboiled or unchlorinated and
poor hygiene meant the infections
spread rapidly.
The town of Rendel and its surroundings, which once sheltered
25,000 people, are the center of a
potential disaster. Thousands
have left on foot, forging a waisthigh river that bends so often that
it requires nine crossings along
the way. The things they carry are
all they have left: split bags of
clothes and small livestock. They
carry disease, too, destined for
towns connected to the rest of the
country by road.
One family braced for a river
crossing, the youngest daughter
in a purple dress with a pink
sweater, clutching a live chicken
in her arms.
I dont know what we will do,
but we cant live here, said her father, Donald Augustin, 37, balancing a black suitcase on top of his
head. The people are dying of
cholera.
Those who remain bear witness
to the slow release of misery. Heroic nurses care for patients
splayed on the floor like rag dolls,
some resting atop the improvised
stretchers they arrived on. Patients vomit and defecate on the
floor or into small yellow buckets,
too sick to leave their stifling confines. The waste is emptied into an
hole on the hill just behind the
clinic, awaiting the next rainfall to
overflow once again. The smell of
bile and excrement stings the nostrils.
Patients come and go to escape
the stench and the oppressive
heat, while relatives risk disease
to tend to their loved ones. Many
refuse to come to the clinic at all,
fearful of being blamed for the outbreak. Sick people midway
through their recoveries are
shown the door to make way for
new patients. A single lantern is

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MERIDITH KOHUT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

CUBA

DOMINICAN
R
REPUBLIC

HAITI
Port-au-Prince

Rendel

A disaster speaks for


itself: When you look
around you, its like
the end of the world.
the only light for the nurses to
work by during grueling 12-hour
shifts.
A lowing child is rocked on her
mothers lap as an IV drip pumps
fluids into her tiny arm. A young
husband feeds his pregnant wife
hot porridge, blowing over each
spoonful as patients writhe beside
and beneath them. A father kisses
the ear of his 4-year-old son to
soften the taste of saline solution.
I spent the night here with her,
but the bed is too small for both of
us so I slept outside and checked
on her every hour, said Jean
Romit Cadet, 22, the young husband, handing the spoon to his
wife and urging her to eat. If I get
sick, I get sick. Im responsible for
her.
One morning this week, a rush
of patients poured into the clinic,
some carried on stretchers. A
nurse tried to register each patient but lost track in the chaos,
unable to take down everyones
details.
A young girl entered the clinic
and told the head nurse she was
suffering from diarrhea.
For how many days? the
nurse asked.
Three, the girl replied.
Why are you only coming
now? the nurse demanded. We
need to hook you up to an IV.
The girl refused.
Im not vomiting, she yelled
over her shoulder as she left the
clinic.
The nurse turned to the crowd
in the entrance of the clinic, a
porch robbed of its roof by the
storm. In its place hung a sagging
blue tarp.
This is the problem, she told
the crowd of patients, parents
holding sick children and others
laid out on the floor, their eyes
lolling back into their heads. She
doesnt want to use the IV because
she isnt vomiting. But that doesnt mean she doesnt have
cholera.
Another nurse approached and
whispered that they were running
out of needles for the IVs, which
dangled like translucent vines
from the rafters of the clinic. The
nurse disappeared into a back
room.
A patient seated on a bench
near the entrance erupted from
his seat and vomited over the
edge of the porch, onto ground
where people walk to and from the
back of the building.
A mother and father tried to
force-feed their 4-year-old son rehydration salts, sending the boy
into fits. The child tried to bite the
hand of an aide holding his arms.
A nurse approached and asked the
family if they had symptoms.
The mother, Osila Cominan,

Caribbean Sea
50 MILES
THE NEW YORK TIMES

A makeshift clinic in Rendel,


Haiti, was overwhelmed by
cholera patients on Wednesday. The clinic was the only
sign of life in the town, which
many residents had abandoned to escape the ruin inflicted by Hurricane Matthew
and its aftermath.

said it was her third day with diarrhea, but quickly added that she
was not vomiting and did not need
treatment.
You should be on an IV, too,
the nurse said, before rushing to
another patient vomiting on the
floor.
In the town, citizens had set up
a roadside cleaning station, a simple affair with a tank of
chlorinated water that was
sprayed onto the shoes and hands
of those fleeing. With all the departures, the fear of carrying
cholera to bigger cities was a real
one.
The town itself was hollowed
out. Those still here stood on what
remained of front porches, mired
in a state of shock, hoping the peo-

ple would return.


The stasis was interrupted every so often by another patient
heading to the clinic, staggering
down the rocky paths or carried
aloft by family. A few concrete
homes provide the only reminder
of the town that was. Lesser
houses have been stacked into
piles along with the trees and
branches scattered by the storm.
When you look around you, its
like the end of the world, said Joseph Kenso, 33. Look around you.
The disaster speaks for itself.
One of the only buildings left is
the clinic, a two-story structure
that formerly served as a center
for prenatal care.
The original cholera care center
was destroyed in the hurricane. It

had opened only a week before the


storm, to treat people streaming
in from the outbreak in the mountains above.
In the center of town, wearing
just one flip-flop, Mr. Cenel, the
magistrate, smiled ruefully at the
towns misfortune and his own, estimating that hundreds have died
between the hurricane and the
disease. But his math is like that of
many: a reflection of the emotional toll, not an exact one.
After a hurricane, if you dont
see someone for a few days, they
are usually dead, he said. Sixty
percent of the town has now fled,
he said.
No! I disagree, said a man
standing in the magistrates front
yard. Its at least 85 percent of the

population gone.
Another man standing nearby
said the people would return once
they could rid the area of cholera.
He was sure of it.
They might, said the magistrate, whose mother and father
are among those who left. They
might.
But how do you combat cholera
in a place where people get their
water from the river or surrounding springs, where disinfectant is
a luxury?
One woman leaving the clinic
with soiled sheets was stopped by
a nurse, who asked her to drop
them in a pile of clothing to be
burned that night. The woman
hesitated, throwing her hand over
her eyes as she addressed the

Haiti, which
was already
struggling
with a cholera
problem, faces
a resurgence
of the disease
in hurricaneravaged areas.
The clinic in
remote Rendel
treats people
from the area
who are often
too ill and
weak to walk.

nurse.
I cant, she said. This is all I
have left.
The toll from cholera is unknowable. Most of the departed never
make it to the clinic and get buried
without any record.
We dont know how many have
died in the surrounding community, said another nurse, Marie
Marguerite Bernadin, 42. But we
know most of the deaths occur
outside of here.
If the cases are caught early
enough, the nurses explained,
treatment is as simple as rehydration.
They dont come on time because for some of them its an embarrassment and they tried to
hide the sick, explained Alicia
Hyppolite, 32, a nurse in the clinic.
And people dont listen when
you tell them things.
About an hour and a half north
is the village of Delibarain, a hamlet near the mountain river that
feeds the springs of Rendel. Before the hurricane, residents and
officials said there were several
deaths from cholera, or what they
believed to be cholera, since there
were no labs on hand to confirm
the disease.
The first ones that residents
and local leaders can remember
were the members of the Vital
family, five of whom died from the
disease.
The dead were buried in graves
without wrapping them in plastic,
wearing gloves or taking the precautionary measures applied to
cholera-infected bodies. Soon,
even more people were infected.
The rainy season spread the disease farther.
They just placed them in the
earth, said Thomas Cyril, 47, who
lives in the village and knew the
family.
Prostrate on the floor were his
brother, Faniel Cyril, and his cousin, Alicia Delcy, both of whom
were showing symptoms of
cholera. Faniel, barely conscious,
reached out to grab the hand of
Mrs. Delcy from time to time.
Frightened of what was happening in their village, the pair
had come down the mountain on
Sunday to seek treatment.
It was bad in Rendel, he
granted, but up the mountain it
was worse.
Now the people are really dying, Mr. Cyril said.

THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

A9

YAHYA ARHAB/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

Food packages being readied in Yemen, where the United Nations says many are facing starvation. Below, after a Saudi-led coalition airstrike last week in Sana, the capital.

A Look at U.S. Involvement in Yemen


By The New York Times

OMAN

SAUDI ARABIA

Y EN
YEM
N
Red Sea

Sana
Houthi
forces

Al Mukalla

ERI
ER
E
R
RIIIT
T
TRE
TR
RE
R A

Gulf of Aden
Aden

ET
ETH
TH
T
HIOP
IO
OPIA
OP
A

SOCOTRA
YEMEN

Coalition airstrikes,
March 2015 to Oct. 2016

DJI
D
DJ
JJIIBOU
BO TI
TI
150 Miles

SO
SOM
S
OM
O
MA
AL
ALI
LA

OMA
MA
M
AN

SAU
AU
UDI
DI ARA
ARABIA
BIA

YEM
MEN
EN

Coalition
forces

More than 10,000 people have been


killed in Yemens civil war. This week,
the United States became more directly involved in the conflict, which
already included Saudi Arabia and
insurgents with ties to its sectarian
rival, Iran.
Since March 2015, the Saudis and
their allies have waged a military
campaign against the Houthi insurgents.

The Houthis, a Yemeni insurgent


group, took over Sana, the capital, in
2014 and unseated the government
months later with the help of rogue
army units. They have since secured
control of a large part of the country.
The Houthis have been fighting the
Yemeni government on and off since
2004. They have ties to Iran, but the
rebels have denied claims by Saudi
Arabia and its allies that they receive
military support from Tehran.
The United States has helped the
Saudi-led military coalition from the
beginning.

Sana

Houthi
forces

Qaeda area
of operations

Taiz
ER
E
ERI
RIIT
RI
T
TR
TRE
RE
REA

Aden

Coalition
forces

ETHIO
ETH
E
IIOP
OP
OPIA
PIA
A
DJI
D
JIB
JI
BO
BOU
OU
OUTI
TI
Source: AEIs Critical Threats Project (Oct. 2016)

SOM
SOM
OMAL
ALI
A
LA
THE NEW YORK TIMES

The only solution to the suffering in Yemen is a


political solution. We must never forget that.

The Americans are providing targeting intelligence and refueling


Saudi warplanes involved in bombing
rebel positions. But coalition strikes
have also destroyed hospitals, markets and residential neighborhoods,
killing large numbers of civilians.
Last Saturday, airstrikes by the
Saudi-led coalition killed more than
100 people at a funeral in Sana. The
threat to civilians has increased since
the collapse of peace talks in August.
An American warship recently fired
cruise missiles at radar installations in
Yemen.

STEPHEN OBRIEN
United Nations humanitarian relief coordinator for Yemen

MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE GETTY IMAGES

After the Houthi rebels launched


two failed missile attacks at an
American warship in the Red Sea,
another American vessel destroyed
three radar installations in Yemen.
It was the first direct military
engagement by the United States in
the civil war in Yemen. The Obama
administration has been pushing for
a deal to end the increasingly deadly
conflict while quietly supporting the
Saudi-led air campaign against the
rebels.
There is a critical lack of health
services and food in the country.

The aid group Doctors Without


Borders withdrew from six hospitals
in northern Yemen after several of

its facilities were attacked in Saudiled coalition airstrikes.


Many Yemenis are facing the threat
of starvation, malnutrition and a
critical lack of water and sanitation,
according to reports by the United
Nations.
The chaos in Yemen has given
extremist groups an opportunity to
step up operations.

The Qaeda branch in Yemen is one


of the terror groups most committed
to plotting attacks in the West. The
United States has been using drones
to strike against the branch for years.
In August, the Islamic State claimed a
suicide attack in southern Yemen that
killed more than 50 military recruits.

Nigerians Joy at 21 Girls Release Is Marred by Fear for Scores Still Missing
By CHRIS STEIN

LAGOS, Nigeria People


fanned out on bicycles and on foot
across a remote region of
northeastern Nigeria on Friday to
notify the families of 21 girls that
they had been liberated by Boko
Haram, the Islamist extremist
group, after two and a half years of
captivity.
Roads in the area are poor, and
Boko Haram had blown up cellphone towers in the region, so
many people had not heard the
news that the 21 girls among the
more than 270 who were seized
from a boarding school in the town
of Chibok on April 14, 2014 were
freed on Thursday in a deal brokered by the Swiss government.
We are not all in the same
towns, Yakubu Nkeki, the chairman of a parents group that has
urged more aggressive efforts to
secure the girls release, said in a
phone interview on Friday, adding
that some of the relatives lived as
far as 12 miles from Chibok.
But even as the nation rejoiced,
relatives of an additional 197 girls
who are believed to still be held by
Boko Haram were crushed when a
handwritten list of the freed girls
Sewell Chan contributed reporting
from London, and Alison Smale
from Berlin.

was released and they saw that


their sisters, nieces and daughters were not on it.
Many of them reacted so disappointed, because they were
feeling that Maybe my daughter
will be among them, said Sambido Hosea, a leader of a community of people from Chibok in
Abuja, the capital.
One of those people, Ayuba
Alamson, had hoped for news of
two cousins, Ruth Amos and Mary
Ali, who were abducted. Their
names were not among the 21, he
said, although several of the released schoolgirls were part of his
extended family.
I am somehow worried, and a
lot of people will be worried, he
said in a phone interview, but at
the same time, I am somehow
happy for a lot of my relations,
now that these girls have been
found.
None of the 21 have gone home
yet or spoken publicly about the
ordeal, although several appeared
at a news conference on Thursday
with Vice President Yemi Osinbajo. Doctors, social workers, psychologists and trauma experts are
looking after the girls at a medical
center in Abuja. One gave birth
during her captivity and is nursing a 20-month-old boy, who was
also released.
Muhammadu Buhari, who

made securing the girls release a


cornerstone of his campaign last
year for Nigerias presidency, said
Friday that around 100 other girls
were somewhere in the area of
Lake Chad, but that the government did not know precisely
where.
Speaking in Berlin alongside
Chancellor Angela Merkel of Ger300 MIILES

N
NIGER
CH
CHAD

Lagos
CAMEROO
CAM
ON
Gulf of Guinea
THE NEW YORK TIMES

many, where he was paying an official visit, Mr. Buhari said that Nigerian security forces had almost
succeeded in ensuring that there
was no area of the country where
Boko Haram dominates. He also
said his wife, Aisha Buhari, belongs to my kitchen, responding
to comments she made to the BBC
criticizing the makeup of his gov-

ernment. The comment drew outrage from Nigerians on social media who saw the remark as sexist.
The mass kidnapping was condemned around the world, and a
campaign, Bring Back Our Girls,
drew attention to the girls plight
and to the violence carried out by
Boko Haram in northern Nigeria,
where more than 20,000 people
have been killed and more than
two million forced to flee.
Pressure mounted on Mr.
Buharis administration after
months without any news, although his government recently
disclosed that it had been negotiating with Boko Haram.
Several dozen girls escaped
shortly after they were abducted,
and in May vigilantes in northeast
Nigeria stumbled upon Amina Ali,
another who was able to flee. But
scores of others remain unaccounted for.
The Nigerian and Swiss governments on Friday denied a report by The Associated Press that
the government had released four
Boko Haram militants in exchange for the 21 girls.
The government has no reason to conceal a swap, if indeed it
took place, considering that the
president has repeatedly stated
his readiness to swap fighters for
the girls if necessary, the Nigerian government said in a state-

ment.
The A.P., citing an unidentified
Nigerian hostage negotiator who
was not involved in the release of
the girls, said Switzerland had
paid a ransom on behalf of the Nigerian government and would recoup the money from about $321
million that it had committed to repatriate to Nigeria this year from
frozen assets looted during the
dictatorship of Sani Abacha.
Asked about the report, a
spokesman for the Swiss Foreign
Ministry, Jean-Marc Crevoisier,
denied it.
There is no connection between the liberation of the young
girls and the restitution of the
Abacha funds, Mr. Crevoisier
said.
A spokeswoman for the International Committee of the Red
Cross said the agency had acted
as a neutral intermediary and
didnt take part in the negotiations.
Although Boko Haram has been
weakened by internal divisions
a splinter faction, endorsed by the
Islamic State, no longer follows
the groups leader, Abubakar
Shekau it remains formidable,
according to Andrew Walker, who
wrote a recent book on Boko
Harams rise.
Stories of factional fighting are
emerging, but it is unlikely the

military will be able to capitalize


on this, Mr. Walker said. The
military for the most part are still
poorly trained, poorly motivated
and poorly equipped; also they
act almost like a foreign occupying force. Their brutality toward the general population will
help to bring the insurgency to an
end and may be adding to the
rapidly escalating food and humanitarian crisis.
Unicef warned in July that
250,000 children were at risk of
starvation in the northeast, where
Boko Haram has been active.
The released girls will face severe challenges, said Fatima Akilu, a psychologist who used to run
a government deradicalization
program for Boko Haram members and worked on a plan for reintegrating the Chibok girls in the
event of their rescue. Previously
released captives have been
treated with suspicion or even
shunned, she said.
Coming out of captivity, theres
often a sense of helplessness, a
sense of bewilderment, and really
being overwhelmed at coming
back at a society thats changed
and a society where you have
changed, Dr. Akilu said. The
women and girls who are coming
back are not the same, and they
have to adjust to the changes they
have endured.

A8

THE NEW YORK TIMES INTERNATIONAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Behind Putins Combativeness, Some See Motives Other Than Syria


By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

MOSCOW Somewhat obscured by the volatile American


presidential election this week
was the implosion of relations between the Kremlin and the West.
It began after the United States
distanced itself from cooperation
on Syria and suggested that Russia should be investigated for war
crimes.
President Vladimir V. Putin
took it badly, sending relations
into the kind of tailspin not seen
for decades, with dogs of war baying on the state-controlled news
media. So badly, in fact, that some
analysts began to suspect that
other factors were driving his response.
Mr. Putin instantly unplugged
several nuclear accords, including
a 16-year-old bilateral agreement
on
reducing
stockpiles
of
weapons-grade plutonium, and he
formulated a list of unattainable
economic and legal demands as
the cost of reviving the pact.
He deployed sophisticated antiaircraft weapons to Syria and redeployed long-range ballistic missiles to Russias Baltic enclave of
Kaliningrad, leaving one-nuclear
tipped version visible for the benefit of American spy satellites.
After France also called for Russia to be investigated for war
crimes, Mr. Putin canceled a
scheduled trip to Paris.
Finally, the Kremlin announced
that it was weighing reopening
military bases in Cuba and Vietnam, while dispatching 5,000
paratroopers to participate in military maneuvers in Egypt, the
first such cooperation in decades.
On the home front, some 40 million Russians, 200,000 rescue
Ivan Nechepurenko and Oleg Matsnev contributed reporting.

workers and 50,000 specialized


vehicles took part in civil defense
exercises. The Kremlins bellwether weekly news program also
repeated its stark reminder, first
rolled out two years ago, that Russia retained the ability to turn the
United States into radioactive
dust.
Boorish behavior toward Russia has a nuclear dimension, said
Dmitry K. Kiselyov, the shows
host.
So if Mr. Putin was not actually
preparing Russians for war, then
what was he doing? On the international front, analysts say, Mr.
Putin appeared to be positioning
himself to make maximum demands of the next American president and to pursue his perennial
goal of getting other world leaders

A federal budget with


gaping holes and
global maneuvering.
to treat him as an equal.
More immediately, they say, he
was raising the stakes for the anticipated resumption of negotiations over Syria, talks expected to
begin again in some form in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Saturday.
But increasingly, commentators in Russia have begun to suspect other motives, beginning
with a need to distract attention
from gaping holes in the federal
budget and the painful, politically
unpopular steps needed to close
them.
The serious part is not shown
on television, Ekaterina Schulmann, a political scientist at the
Russian Presidential Academy of

National Economy and Public Administration, said. The serious


part is the battle of the budget.
Russians are facing rising utility rates, and a new fee for building maintenance is especially irksome. Government spending on
health care might be slashed 33
percent.
Despite all the swagger the military budget will be cut by 6 percent annually for the next three
years, after 15 years of increases.
When we look at this rather
grim-looking budget, it is basically spending for police and pensions and not much else, Ms.
Schulmann said.
Domestic matters aside, Mr.
Putin still hopes to leverage the
Syria crisis to change Russias
role on the international stage. In
deploying his military there last
year, he initially planned to use
the conflict to stabilize the government of President Bashar al-Assad and break out of the economic
sanctions and general Western
isolation imposed on Russia over
the Ukraine crisis.
Marked success in stabilizing
Mr. Assad with little cost appears
to have fed larger goals. Once the
agreement with Washington fell
apart, Mr. Putin went all out to win
Aleppo for Mr. Assad, no matter
the price on the ground, to help
Damascus gain control over some
swaths of western Syria that
would then force the opposition
into an agreement.
Russia has a window of opportunity to do it, said Nikolai V.
Petrov, a Russian professor of political science, said. The next
American president will face a
new reality and will be forced to
accept it.
Various potholes mar the route
to long-term success, however,
one reason Russia rapidly agreed

IVAN SEKRETAREV/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Vladimir V. Putin in Moscow on Wednesday. Incomes


are falling in Russia for the first time since 2000.
to new negotiations over Syria.
For example, some unusual public
grumbling has surfaced from the
Russian military that the Syrian
Army is an unworthy ally.
The Syrian armed forces have
not conducted a single successful
offensive during the past year,
wrote Mikhail Khodarenok, a retired colonel and respected military analyst on Gazeta.ru, a Russian news website. The article included a scathing assessment of
corruption and general fecklessness throughout Mr. Assads military, and it called militia allies
from Iran and Hezbollah equally
suspect.
Beyond Syria, Mr. Putin harbors ambitions of restructuring
the global order, with an eye to restoring Russia to what he sees as
its rightful status in the upper tier.
I believe that the talk about
looming war is a propaganda
trick: Russia wants to show that it
can go far, it is an element of pressure, said Aleksei Makarkin, the

deputy head of the Center for Political Technologies, a Moscow


think tank. Russia dreams about
another Yalta conference, where
together with other great powers
it will divide the map.
Mr. Putin himself said as much
in remarks on Wednesday: Let
us not forget that we bear a special
responsibility as the two largest
nuclear powers for maintaining
international peace and security
at the global level.
Analysts brushed off the talk of
new bases in Cuba, Vietnam and
possibly Egypt, attributing it
more to nostalgia than reality.
There is no indication Russia
would be welcomed by any of
them, and the bases were shuttered over prohibitive costs. This
is hardly the time for taking on
more burdens.
Mr. Putin strokes the pride of
some Russians with the appearance that their country is influential again, especially given its
prominence in the American pres-

idential election, albeit mainly inspired by hacking accusations.


A while back, about a decade
ago, Russia was never mentioned,
they said there was nothing to talk
about with regard to Russia because it was a third-rate regional
power that was of no interest, Mr.
Putin said Wednesday. Today, the
No. 1 problem in the entire election
campaign is Russia. It is the main
talking point. That is very welcome of course, but only partially.
The partial part was that the
references were mostly negative.
It also remains unclear that international matters really distract
ordinary citizens from deepening
economic woes.
For the first time since Mr.
Putins first tenure as president,
which began in 2000, Russians are
facing falling incomes. An October
report from the Higher School of
Economics calculated that real
monthly income per capita fell to
just under $500 per month, or
roughly 87 percent of the income
level in August 2014.
The backlog of unpaid wages
has reached an astronomical $56
million, while the Center for Political and Economic Reforms
says the number of strikes and
rallies over labor disputes has
doubled in the past three months.
Given that the confrontation
over Syria is likely to stall any relief on sanctions or other economic relations, Mr. Putin did
what he often does in any confrontation: He raised the stakes.
I see a certain step-up in rhetoric which seems to be our usual
way to prepare for negotiations,
Ms. Schulman said, comparing it
to the Ukraine playbook during
the last crisis in 2014. There was
escalation and then consultation
and then some step back. That
seems to be the usual tactic and it
seems to be effective.

Leader Tests New Power


Over Venezuelas Budget
By NICHOLAS CASEY
and ANA VANESSA HERRERO

GEORGE OURFALIAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE GETTY IMAGES

No Sign of a Cease-Fire in Syria


An injured boy on Thursday in a government-held district of Aleppo, Syria. Rocket fire by rebels killed four schoolchildren, state
television reported. On Friday, government forces delivered a fresh wave of airstrikes in the opposition-held eastern part of the city.

El Salvador Wins Dispute Over Denying a Mining Permit


By ELISABETH MALKIN

MEXICO CITY The government of El Salvador won a longrunning legal battle on Friday
when an international arbitration
panel ruled that it did not have to
pay compensation to a mining
company that was denied a concession to drill for gold.
The case had been watched by
antimining activists, who had
pointed to it as a test of the rights
of governments to make laws protecting their citizens health and
the environment against challenges from corporations.
The panel, the International
Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes, at the World Bank
in Washington, accepted El Salvadors argument that the company, Pac Rim Cayman, did not
meet all the legal requirements to

receive a permit.
The ruling was a relief to the
Salvadoran government, which
faced a demand for $314 million in
compensation from Pac Rim Cayman for the loss of expected
profits from the mining venture.
What is clear is that investments are welcome if they respect
institutions, if they respect the environment and health, Lina Pohl,
El Salvadors environment minister, said in a phone interview
from San Salvador, the capital.
The World Bank panel, known
as Icsid, is a little-known body that
arbitrates disputes initiated by
private companies that argue that
their rights as investors have
been violated by governments.
Many free-trade agreements incorporate the rights of foreign
investors to seek redress from the

panel. Activist groups argue that


private companies are using the
dispute center to fight regulation.
The case has been hanging
over El Salvador, and the company used this case to try to get
permission to work there, said
John Cavanagh, the director of the
Institute for Policy Studies, a leftleaning think tank in Washington.
OceanaGold,
a
CanadianAustralian mining company that
acquired Pac Rims Canadian parent company in 2013, said the company had been seeking an amicable resolution. While OceanaGold
was disappointed with the outcome, it respected the opinion of
the arbitration panel, said Darren
Klinck, the executive vice president for corporate development.
The case that Pac Rim brought
to the three-person panel proved
to be so weak that the finding

against it was unanimous. The


company had never acquired the
rights to all the land it wanted in
its concession, which the government rejected in 2005.
The suit was filed in 2009, after
El Salvadors government declared a moratorium on mining
concessions.
An outside evaluation commissioned by the government later
argued that El Salvadors water
supply was too threatened, its institutions too weak and its land titles too conflicted to allow mining.
The country doesnt have conditions for mining, Ms. Pohl said.
Jamie Kneen, a spokesman for
Mining Watch Canada, said that
El Salvadors legal victory did not
diminish the threat that companies would go to the arbitration
panel in future cases.

Former Alberta Premier, Widely Respected, Dies in Plane Crash


TORONTO (AP) A former
Alberta premier, Jim Prentice,
and three others have died in a
plane crash in southern British
Columbia, Mr. Prentices family
confirmed on Friday.
The family said that Mr. Prentice, who had also served as a federal minister, died in the crash late
Thursday. He was 60.
He was among former Prime
Minister Stephen Harpers most
trusted cabinet ministers. At different times from 2006 to 2010, Mr.
Prentice served as the industry
minister, the environment minister and the minister of Indian
and northern affairs.
Mr. Prentice left federal politics
for provincial politics and became
the premier of Alberta in 2014. His

party was defeated in elections a


year later, which ended the Conservative partys four-decade
hold on power in the province.
Mr. Harper said in a statement
that Mr. Prentice was a family
man, a friend, a leader and a proud
Canadian. He once called him the
chief operating officer of Canadas
government.
He was highly respected and
well liked across all party lines because he brought an intelligent,
honest and straightforward approach to everything he did,
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
said.
Albertas current premier, Rachel Notley, said that Mr. Prentice
deeply loved Alberta, and that she
had benefited from his advice.

Mr. Prentice, a moderate conservative who voted for same-sex


marriage before many of his Conservative colleagues did, was
widely respected by many, including indigenous Canadians who
say he genuinely worked for them.
In todays world of dramatically increased polarization, he
stood out as a decent, civilized
public servant, Mayor John Tory
of Toronto said.
A team of investigators was on
its way to the scene of the crash
near Kelowna, British Columbia,
about 170 miles east of Vancouver.
A spokesman for Canadas
Transportation Safety Board, Bill
Yearwood, said a Cessna Citation
with four people aboard crashed
at about 10:30 p.m. on Thursday

after taking off on a flight from Kelowna to Springbank, Alberta, just


outside Calgary. Mr. Yearwood
said he did not have information
about what might have caused the
crash.
Mr. Prentice is survived by his
wife, Karen, three daughters and
two grandchildren. The family
said in a statement that Dr. Ken
Gellatly, the father-in-law of one of
Mr. Prentices daughters, was also
on the plane.
To lose two family members at
once is unbelievably painful, the
family said. In the time Jim has
been with us, he was a friend to
many. Jim was a loving and compassionate man who dedicated his
life to his family and public service. He will be so greatly missed.

CARACAS,
Venezuela

Venezuelas new annual budget


resembled those of past years.
Millions of dollars were promised
for social programs like housing
and education. Money would be
earmarked for local governments
to police the streets and repair
potholes.
But there was one big difference: President Nicols Maduro
never showed a word of it to lawmakers for approval and simply
signed his budget before a cheering crowd on Friday.
Everything that our country
needs, we must give it to ourselves, Mr. Maduro said, referring to his leftist government.
Only we know how to do it.
Critics say the presidents move
made possible by a Supreme
Court decision that stripped the
legislature of its budget oversight
powers is the strongest evidence yet that Mr. Maduro is consolidating power and sidelining
lawmakers.
This budget is openly unconstitutional, said Jos Vicente
Haro, a constitutional law expert,
who said no president had tried to
bypass the countrys congress,
the National Assembly, in such a
way since the 19th century.
The budget also reflected the
need for belt-tightening in Venezuela, where the economy is expected to contract by 10 percent
this year. The 2017 budget was

22 percent smaller than the last


one when adjusted for inflation,
said ngel Garca Banchs, an
economist at the consulting firm
Economtrica.
Venezuelas National Assembly
was once considered a rubber
stamp, quickly approving the
plans of the previous president,
Hugo Chvez, and his handpicked
successor, Mr. Maduro. But that
changed last year when the collapsing economy led voters to
elect rivals of Mr. Maduros leftist
allies to lead the legislature for the
first time in more than a decade.
While legislators have passed a
flurry of new laws, the courts have
overturned them, including bills
to free political prisoners and stabilize the economy. Now lawmakers have been stripped of the
power to approve the budget.
Its the National Assembly that
must always see the budget and
must make its observations, said
Oneida Guaipe, an opposition legislator. She said the moves by Mr.
Maduro and the court now put
this regime on the margins of
democratic principles.
In his speech, Mr. Maduro
hinted at some openness to speaking with his opponents. If one day
in the years to come they want to
sit with me to talk, I am ready to
talk, he said.
But he scoffed at efforts to oust
him through a recall referendum
that his rivals hope to organize.
No one can knock down Maduro,
especially those oligarchs, he
said, referring to his opponents.

WHAT IN THE WORLD

The Last of Their Kind


Abandon Fleet Street
By STEPHEN CASTLE

Just as Savile Row does for


lovers of custom tailored mens
wear, Fleet Street in London
stands for something in the
popular imagination: the British
press.
So it was a notable moment in
the life of Britains capital when
two journalists packed up recently and left the London office
of a Scottish newspaper, The
Sunday Post. They happened to
be the last of their kind actually
working on Fleet Street.
The thoroughfare was for
generations the center of a thriving newspaper landscape, clustering the offices of the most
famous publications together in a
historic part of London, sandwiched between the citys financial and political districts.
Though Britains national papers
were (and remain) fierce competitors, their employees tended
to mix and congregate after
hours in the same Fleet Street
bars and pubs.
For a century, the street was
a classless Illyria, Andrew Marr
wrote in a book about British
journalism. He called the street
a fantasy territory where eccentric Old Etonians, chippy Welsh
grammar-school boys, Mancunian crime reporters, Eastern
European Marxists and angry
Australians on the make could

rub shoulders.
Walking down Fleet Street
now, you can still find some of
those drinking holes, but you are
just as likely to find a Starbucks
or one of its rivals. The street
around them has smartened up,
and Goldman Sachs now occupies the grand former offices of
The Daily Telegraph.
The big newspapers have long
since moved away. A critical
moment came in 1986, when The
Times of London, during a bitter
labor dispute, abruptly relocated
from Grays Inn Road (some
distance north of Fleet Street,
but still part of Fleet Street)
out to Wapping in East London.
Then The Daily Telegraph moved
even farther east, to the Docklands, a newly redeveloped area
that has rather less to do with
shipping these days than with
financial services.
Still, such is the enduring
power of the Fleet Street name
that Rupert Murdoch, the owner
of The Times and other papers,
returned this year to be married
at St. Brides, a church reconstructed in the 17th century by
Sir Christopher Wren after the
Great Fire of London.
Despite its changing surroundings, St. Brides still describes
itself as the Journalists Church,
offering a spiritual home to all
who work in the media.

A10

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

The Place to Gauge How Turned Off the Voters Are Unanimity

Is Required
In Executions,
Florida Rules

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG

COLUMBUS, Ohio So here we are,


nearing the end of 2016s he-said, shesaid race to the bottom. Through it all,
through his ugly caricatures of Mexicans and Muslims, through her pretzel
contortions to explain her emails,
through the Russian hacking and the 3
a.m. Twitter rants and the rest, this was
always going to be a hold your nose
and vote election.
But at Tommys Diner, a colorful Columbus institution in a working-class
neighborhood once known as the Bottoms, hold your nose and vote is giving way, for some people, to hold your
nose and dont vote.
The distaste for the presidential election is obvious almost anywhere you
look here in the capital of a swing state
where in July 2015 Gov. John Kasich of
Ohio (remember him?) became the 16th
of 17 Republicans who hoped to succeed
President Obama. Aaron Burnside, 23, a
first-year law student at Ohio State University, was at the student union that
day, listening with optimism as Mr. Kasich declared that the sun is rising in
America words that now seem so
quaint.
Never for a minute did Mr. Burnside,
who described himself as a right-ofcenter, fiscally conservative, socially
liberal Republican, imagine himself
not casting a ballot on Election Day. But
on Thursday, with early voting underway here and Mr. Trump and President
Obama in town, Mr. Burnside had no
idea whether he would vote for president.
It depends on how I feel that morning, he said.
He will go to the polls its his civic
duty to back his party in down-ballot

By ALAN BLINDER

At an Ohio diner,
dispirited customers
discuss a hold your nose
election.
races; Senator Rob Portman, a Republican, is fending off a challenge from Ted
Strickland, a Democrat and former governor. Mrs. Clinton seems too far to the
left for him, he said; never a Trump fan,
he found the Republican nominees vulgar boasts of grabbing womens genitals disgusting.
So he feels stuck, as do many voters.
As early voting begins in Ohio and
elsewhere, many Americans are approaching the election with a sense of
dread. In a CBS News poll released earlier this month, just 46 percent of likely
voters said they were very enthusiastic
about going to the polls, down from 62
percent in late October 2012, according
to a New York Times/CBS News poll.
Whats uncertain this year is how many
people will cast reluctant votes and how
many wont vote at all.
At the diner, Tommy is a gregarious
Greek immigrant and American citizen
named Tom Pappas, who loves politics
but keeps his business nonpartisan. The
walls are covered with photos of
Democrats and Republicans in equal
numbers, and of Elvis Presley, Marilyn
Monroe, Tommys grandchildren and
Ohio State football stars.
Mr. Pappas, 63, and his wife, Kathy, 57,
have owned the diner for 28 years.
Kathy Pappas, who bakes the baklava
and bread pudding, pays little heed to
politics (she leaves that to Tommy), but
this year finds it impossible to escape. I
turn on the radio, looking for the traffic
or the weather, she said, and what do
they talk about?
Mrs. Pappas said she has always
voted. But I dont know if Im going to
this year, she said. I just dont care for
either one, and I dont trust either one.
Theres just not a good feeling either
way you look, and thats sad.
Every day 400 to 500 people pass
through Tommys; customers run the
gamut. Breakfast on Thursday brought
a group of retirees, middle-aged white
men in red T-shirts who had spent the
morning building tables and chairs at a
furniture bank for the needy; two retired social studies teachers with their
daughter, an acupuncturist (also an
Continued on Page A16

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREW SPEAR FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

At Tommys Diner in Columbus, Ohio, Charlotte Ondrus, center, and her husband, Bill, right, said they would vote
for Hillary Clinton. Mrs. Ondrus said she was not enthusiastic about it, but Im scared to death of Donald Trump.

A decision reached after a


state law requiring the
assent of 10 of 12 jurors
was ruled unconstitutional.

Beneficiaries Reflect Health Laws Strengths and Faults


By ABBY GOODNOUGH
and REED ABELSON

WASHINGTON Cara Suzannah


Latil is living proof that the Affordable
Care Act works but also of why a
central piece of the law is in turmoil.
Ms. Latil, 49, who works at a homeless shelter in Santa Fe, N.M., is one of
millions of Americans who once found
it difficult or impossible to get health
insurance because they already had
serious illnesses. Hepatitis C was
ravaging her liver when she learned in
2014 that she also had breast cancer.
Through the health care law, she was
able to buy subsidized insurance that
paid for all but $800 of her cancer
surgery and radiation, she said, as well
as tens of thousands of dollars worth
of medications that cured her hepatitis.
But stories like Ms. Latils help
explain a critical challenge for the
health law: The subsidies it provides
to help people pay for coverage, and

The Florida Supreme Court ruled Friday that the death penalty cannot be imposed without the unanimous support of
a jury, deepening the recent turmoil
around capital punishment in a state
with a long history of executions.
One of Fridays decisions, in a case
that previously reached the United
States Supreme Court and upended
Floridas death penalty system, said that
the Eighth Amendment, which forbids
cruel and unusual punishment, and
Florida state law effectively mandated
consensus in capital cases. The court
said in a separate case that a new state
law, which allowed for the death penalty
when 10 of 12 jurors agreed, was unconstitutional.
Requiring unanimous jury recommendations of death before the ultimate
penalty may be imposed will ensure that
in the view of the jury a veritable microcosm of the community the defendant committed the worst of murders with
the least amount of mitigation, the
Florida court said in siding with Timothy
L. Hurst, a death row inmate whose appeal led lawmakers early this year to rewrite the states death penalty law.
Referring to a 1958 United States Supreme Court opinion invoking the Eighth
Amendment, the Florida court added,
This is in accord with the goal that capital sentencing laws keep pace with
evolving standards of decency.
Nearly all of the 30 states with capital
punishment require that a jury unanimously support a death sentence, and
the Florida justices said their ruling
would allow the state to achieve the important goal of bringing its capital sentencing laws into harmony with the direction of society reflected in all these
states and with federal law.
The decisions, however, left unsettled
the status of capital punishment in
Florida and came about seven months
after the state revamped its death penalty in the wake of the Supreme Court
ruling. The overhaul, which the Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott approved in
March, required juries to reach conclusions about the aggravating factors that
are crucial to death penalty decisions.
The measure also required that 10 jurors support a death sentence; state law
had previously required the assent of
seven jurors, a simple majority.
Even the heightened standard proved
insufficient for the State Supreme Court,
which urged the Legislature to demand
unanimity in capital cases in a 2005 ruling. Under the heading of The Need for
Legislative Action, the states justices
said that lawmakers should revisit the
statute to require some unanimity in the
jurys recommendations.
But lawmakers generally ignored the
justices, and Fridays rulings might ultimately affect scores of cases.
Defense lawyers welcomed the decisions. Peter N. Mills, an assistant public

the penalties for those who remain


uninsured, have not coaxed enough
young, healthy people into the insurance marketplaces it created. So the
pool of customers in some parts of the
country is too sick and too small.
Most Americans get their health
insurance through their employers, or
via Medicare or Medicaid. But millions who lack those options use the
insurance markets set up under the
law.
It has turned out that so many
marketplace customers need expensive medical care that some insurers
are spending more on claims than
they earn in premiums. And the federal governments strategies for protecting insurance companies from
large losses have not been as effective
as hoped.
Insurers, including a few big ones
like Aetna and Humana, are withdrawing from the marketplaces in
many states, saying they are losing

too much money.


Others are sharply raising prices for
next year, and the turbulence is fueling
Republican criticism including from
Donald J. Trump during Sundays
presidential debate, in which he called
the rate increases astronomical.
A few customers can generate big costs.

Even a small number of customers


with serious conditions can greatly
increase costs. Roy Vaughn, a senior
vice president at BlueCross BlueShield
of Tennessee, said that just 5 percent
of the companys marketplace
customers had accounted for nearly 75
percent of its claims costs.
The company recently announced
that it would stop selling marketplace
plans in Knoxville, Memphis and
Nashville.
There are other reasons insurers are
raising their rates or leaving the marketplaces. A big one is that the Obama
administration, thwarted by Republi-

can opponents in Congress, has paid


out only a fraction of the $2.5 billion it
owes insurers under a provision of the
health law that was supposed to protect them against unexpectedly large
losses during their first few years in
the marketplaces.
But these payments would not be so
important if more of the roughly 10
million marketplace customers were in
good health. The Blue Cross Blue
Shield Association reported in March
that new customers who bought marketplace plans from its member
insurers in 2014 and 2015 had higher
rates of hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, depression, H.I.V.
and hepatitis C.
Chronically ill patients are worried
about next year.

Many of these customers are in


better shape after a few years with
health insurance. But they are scared
Continued on Following Page

defender in several of Floridas central


counties, called the rulings steps in the
right direction. He said a unanimity
mandate would encourage jurors to take
greater care with life-or-death decisions.
They take responsibility and a sense
of ownership when they are required to
come to a decision unanimously, so this is
a good thing for all of us, said Mr. Mills,
who chairs the Florida Public Defender
Associations death penalty steering
committee.
Spokeswomen for Mr. Scott and
Floridas attorney general, both of whom
are Republicans, said state officials were
reviewing the rulings.
The justices also ordered that Mr.
Hurst have a new sentencing hearing for
his conviction for a 1998 murder in Escambia County, in the Florida Panhandle. (The trial jury, by a vote of 7 to 5, recommended Mr. Hursts execution to a
judge, who agreed.)
The courts rulings shift attention and
pressure back to the Legislature, which
is not scheduled to meet in regular session until March. Legislators could also
consider the states death penalty system during a special session.
Richard Corcoran, the incoming
speaker of the Florida House of
Representatives, said the decision in Mr.
Hursts case was indicative of a court
that comes to a conclusion, then seeks a
judicial pathway, however tortured, to
achieve its desired result. He said lawmakers would consider our options going forward, but the Florida justices had
acted with no regard to the Legislatures constitutional duty to establish
policy in this state.
The Florida Department of Corrections said Friday that the state was housing 385 prisoners who had been sentenced to death. The state has not executed anyone since Jan. 7, five days before the Supreme Court announced its
opinion in Mr. Hursts case and prompted
a hold on executions in Florida.

THE NEW YORK TIMES NATIONAL SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Looking for Security, More in U.S. Pick Up a Handgun


By JULIE TURKEWITZ
and TROY GRIGGS

A new study of gun ownership


in the United States notes a shift:
Americans are increasingly
interested in handguns, the types
of small weapons that are easily
hidden and used for self-defense,
rather than rifles and shotguns
used for hunting and shooting
sports.
The study, conducted in 2015
by researchers from Harvard
and Northeastern, sought to
better understand the size and
composition of the countrys gun
inventory. It found that handguns made up 42 percent of the
countrys privately owned
firearms, up from 34 percent in
1994.

1994

34%

2015

42%

Shotguns

36

26
33

4
20

2015 survey
estimate of
gun stock

Other

Firearm
manufacturing
estimate, adjusted
for depreciation

Protection
from people
Protection
from animals

300
mil.

250
200

1994 survey
estimate

150
100

Reasons for Gun Ownership

50
63%

1945

20

Hunting

40

Sporting use

28

Collection

34

Other

40

1955

1965

1975

1985

1995

2005

2015

Source: Firearm manufacturing data: Newton and Zimring, Kleck, and ATF;
1% depreciation value applied by the National Firearms Survey;

There are an estimated


265 million guns in the
United States

Handgun Ownership by Sex

Protection is now driving Americas gun habits.

Beth Alcazar, a mother in


Alabama, carries two handguns
nearly all the time, a practice she
began in 2014. Often, she wakes
up, slips one in a purse and the
other in a belly band, and heads
out for the days errands.
Ms. Alcazar, 41, lives in a suburb called Chelsea and has little
interest in hunting. Her primary
reason for carrying? Protection.
I have three very important
reasons why I carry a gun, she
said in a recent interview. And
those are my children.
The survey indicates that a
growing number of gun owners
are like Ms. Alcazar they cite
personal safety as a major incentive for owning a gun. In 1994, 46
percent of respondents chose
protection as the primary reason
to own a gun. Two decades later,
63 percent of respondents made
that selection. (In the first survey, participants could select just
one reason for ownership. In the
second, they could choose several.)
The shift comes at a time of
conflicting narratives about gun
violence in America. During the
past 25 years, violent crime has
decreased dramatically in the
United States. But the number of
mass shootings per year has
surged, according to the F.B.I.
Applications for concealed-

The American gun stock

Types of Guns Owned in the U.S.


Handguns
Rifles

Handgun
Male

Long gun

22%

Female

Both
56

25
17

42

42

Half of Americas guns


are owned by only 14
percent of gun owners.

By Race
White
Hispanic

20

52

24
19

38

Black

57

44
7

36

One square represents


one million guns
Source: National Firearms Survey

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Note: Because of rounding, totals may not add up to 100 percent.


Source: 2015 figures: National Firearms Survey;
1994 figures: National Institute of Justice

carry permits have hit records in


some places, giving rise to a
group of people who consider
themselves part of a concealedcarry lifestyle. Ms. Alcazar, who
bought a gun in 2013 after an
armed man took five girls
hostage at her daughters middle
school, counts herself among
them. The episode pushed her to
become a firearms instructor and
focus her writing career on guns.
She now runs an Alabama chapter of the Well Armed Woman, a
national network of gun owners,
and contributes to Concealed
Carry Magazine.
It was a fire that sparked
within me, she said of the
hostage situation. Oh, my God,
this is six miles from my home,
these are my children. And I
need to know everything I can

THE NEW YORK TIMES

about protecting them.


The number of guns is still rising.

While the percentage of households with guns has declined to


22 percent from 25 percent, the
net numbers of guns and gun
owners have gone up. In 1994,
about 44 million Americans
owned 192 million guns. Today,
about 55 million Americans own
265 million guns.
The 2015 study also revealed
that many of Americas guns
were concentrated in a small
number of hands. About half of
the nations guns are owned by 3
percent of the population.
The demographic profile of
these super-collectors has
changed little since the last significant study. Most are male,
white, older than 30, from rural

areas and have an annual income


above $25,000.
Who owns the handguns?

Academics and others watching the gun industry cite a number of reasons for the shift to
handguns. A 24-hour news cycle
has made the world feel more
dangerous. A declining rural
population and waning interest
in hunting have pushed gun
companies to look for new
customers. Industry groups have
heavily marketed the idea of
concealed carry and personal
protection.
The authors of the 2015 survey,
however, caution that several
studies show that owning guns
does not make people safer.
Two widely cited
examinations, published in 1992

A11

and 1993 in The New England


Journal of Medicine, found that
people who kept guns in the
home faced a 2.7-fold greater risk
of homicide and a 4.8-fold greater
risk of suicide.
On average, the gun imperils
everyone in the home more than
it protects them, said Matthew
Miller, a professor at
Northeastern University and an
author of the 2015 study. If you
can get people to understand the
risk that they are assuming and
imposing on people in their
home, you can actually save
lives.
The survey polled 4,000 people
across the country and will be
published in 2017. Authors provided an advance copy to The
New York Times and other outlets.

3 Are Held
In Bomb Plot
Targeting
Somalis
By MITCH SMITH

Three militia members plotted


to detonate a bomb at a housing
complex in western Kansas where
Somali immigrants lived and worshiped, federal investigators said
Friday.
The men, who were arrested
Friday morning on domestic terrorism charges, scouted out the
apartments in Garden City, Kan.,
stockpiled guns and composed a
manifesto about their anti-Muslim motives, prosecutors said.
Their rhetoric and their
speech have revealed a hatred for
Muslims, Somalis and immigrants, an F.B.I. agent wrote in affidavit related to the case.
The plotters planned to carry
out their attack on Nov. 9, the day
after the presidential election, the
authorities said.
The three men are Curtis Allen
and Gavin Wright, both 49 and
from Liberal, Kan., about 65 miles
from Garden City, and Patrick
Stein, 47, of Wright, Kan.
According to the F.B.I. agents
affidavit, the men referred to Muslims as cockroaches and met
frequently to discuss the plot.
Officials said that the apartment complex they targeted
housed about 120 people, including many Somalis who work at a
nearby meatpacking plant, and
that one of the units was used as a
mosque.
Eric Jackson, the special agent
in charge of the F.B.Is Kansas City
office, said that agents infiltrated
the militia months ago, and that
the men planned to wait until the
presidential campaign was over
before carrying out the plot.
He did not specify which candidate the militia members were
supporting.
Prosecutors said Mr. Stein became worried this week that the
plan could be foiled after Mr. Allen
was arrested on domestic violence charges.
These individuals had desire,
the means and the capability, and
were committed to carrying out
this act of domestic terrorism,
Mr. Jackson said.
The Council on American-Islamic Relations called Friday for
state and federal law enforcement
agencies to increase protection of
mosques across the country.
The councils Kansas board
chairman, Moussa Elbayoumy,
said Garden City counted several
hundred Muslims among its
roughly 27,000 residents.
Mr. Elbayoumy said there was
one mosque in the city, which
served a mixture of long-established American Muslims and recent immigrants.
I am personally not aware of

Anti-Muslim motives
bring domestic
terrorism charges.

LEFT AND CENTER, PHOTOGRAPHS BY COOPER NEILL FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES; RIGHT, MARK OVASKA FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES.

The stories of, from left, Marque Dailey, Vickie Wilkerson and Cara Suzannah Latil help explain the Affordable Care Acts critical flaws.

Beneficiaries Reflect Health Laws Strengths and Faults


From Preceding Page
about the Affordable Care Acts
future.
Marque Dailey of Dallas, who
has multiple sclerosis, said his
marketplace plan from BlueCross BlueShield of Texas had
paid for visits to a neurologist,
physical therapy and a drug
called Lemtrada that is administered through two series of infusions a year apart. The list price
for the treatment is $158,000,
although insurers usually negotiate lower rates.
When Mr. Dailey, now 32, was
uninsured, he could not treat his
symptoms and had to rely more
and more on a wheelchair. The
stiffness in his legs got so bad, he
said, that he had to quit his parttime job as a merchandiser at
Coca-Cola, which did not offer
insurance. Now he is working
again, as a field organizer for a
Democratic state legislative
candidate. But Blue Cross narrowed the network of doctors
and hospitals he could use this
year, and he is worried that 2017
will bring even fewer choices.
I understand Im an insurance loss, Mr. Dailey said. I do
feel bad about it. But without
this, Im just kind of left out of
everything.

Costs are burdensome to


customers, too.

Other marketplace customers


with expensive medical needs
pointed out that the costs had
been a burden to them as well as
their insurers, most of which
remain profitable even as they
lose money in the Affordable
Care Act markets.
Vickie Wilkerson, 46, of
Shreveport, La., has a plan from
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
Louisiana that she said had paid
about $21,000 so far this year for
injections of Stelara, a drug that
has helped her severe psoriasis.
She pays just $5 per shot, but
only because by the time her
doctor prescribed it this year, she
had already met the $6,000 deductible on her plan. Two emergency room visits, for bronchitis
and a bad fall, had left her with
thousands of dollars in bills.
She chose a high-deductible
plan, she said, because the subsidy she received covered the
monthly premiums in full. She
had not anticipated needing
emergency care or being put on
such an expensive drug. Nor had
she realized that by choosing a
different type of plan with higher
premiums, she could have qualified for extra federal aid that
would have helped pay her de-

ductible.
Ms. Wilkerson, who never had
insurance through her longtime
job as a housekeeper, relied on
sporadic charity care until getting marketplace coverage in
2014.
Her worst fear, she said, is that
insurance companies will find
some kind of loophole to deny
coverage to people with existing
conditions, as they did before the
health law was passed.
I dont know what Id do, she
said.
Her insurer is raising rates an
average of 24 percent next year.
But Ms. Wilkerson is looking into
whether she qualifies for Medicaid now that Louisiana has expanded it under the Affordable
Care Act.
Im finally on a medication
that is working, she said. I
dont want to have to stop that
now and go back to the drawing
board.
Insurers are limiting choices.

Cathy Richardson of Elizabethtown, Pa., who works at her


husbands small financial planning business, was a healthy,
low-cost customer for the first
two years she had coverage
through the Affordable Care Act.
But early this year, Ms.

Richardson, 54, received a diagnosis of Stage 3 rectal cancer and


quickly became expensive to her
insurer, Capital BlueCross. She
has had two operations, chemotherapy, radiation and two additional hospitalizations.
There are signs that Ms. Richardsons insurer is working to
contain the costs of sick
customers like her: It will not
pay for treatment at the larger,
more prestigious hospital in her
area, requiring her to go to a
smaller hospital instead. And a
case manager from the insurance
company calls her weekly to
make sure she is getting the care
she needs, which could prevent
expensive complications.
The smaller hospital does not
have a cancer center, so her
oncologist, radiologist and surgeon do not work as a team.
You have to navigate between
the three of them, she said, and
you never know who to go to.
Still, her costs have been
limited to about $5,200. She is
bracing for a letter from her
insurer, due this month, that will
notify her of any price increase
and changes to her coverage for
2017.
Our choices are probably
going to be pretty limited, she
said.

Insurers are frustrated by


customers dropping coverage.

The Obama administration is


planning greater outreach,
through advertising, social media, mailings and email, to new
ways to persuade young, healthy
Americans to buy marketplace
coverage during the next enrollment period, which starts on
Nov. 1. It is also taking other
steps to address problems with
the risk pool, which it says shows
signs of improvement.
But insurers say they also
wish the government could make
it harder for people to drop their
coverage after their health problem is treated. Health Care Service Corporation, which operates
Blue Cross plans in five states,
said less than half of its marketplace customers paid for coverage for the full year.
Ms. Latil dropped her coverage recently; she had finished
her hepatitis treatment, a nearly
six-month regimen of the drugs
Sovaldi, Daklinza and ribavirin.
It was not a willful swipe at the
system, she said; she was struggling to make her premium payments of $179 a month.
I got my stuff taken care of,
said Ms. Latil, who will soon
have insurance through her job.
I am so extremely grateful.

any tensions between the Muslim


community and the surrounding
community, said Mr. Elbayoumy,
who lives in another part of Kansas. Most of them are getting
along very well, and there have
been contacts with interfaith
groups.
Investigators said the plotters
were part of a group called the
Crusaders that had militia and socalled sovereign citizen ties.
The authorities learned of the
attack from a paid informant, the
affidavit said.
In the affidavit, the F.B.I. agent
wrote, They chose the target location based on their hatred of
these groups, their perception
that the people represent a threat
to American society, a desire to inspire other militia groups, and a
desire to wake people up.
Mayor Chris Law of Garden
City said in a statement that he
was shocked, but at the same
time extremely proud of and
grateful for the efforts of local,
state, and federal law enforcement.
The Garden City police chief,
Michael Utz, said his department
had been aware of the investigation and was assured that all suspects were in custody.
Mr. Jackson, the F.B.I. official,
said he was confident the plot was
fully foiled.
It would have had a significant
impact not only on the state of
Kansas, this community, but also
this nation, Mr. Jackson said.
This would have been picked up
not only nationally, but internationally.

Other points of view


on the Op-Ed page
seven days a week.
The New York Times

A12

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ELECTION

2 016

Trump on Workers Side?


Come On, Obama Says
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

CLEVELAND President
Obama on Friday implored voters
here to reject a dark and pessimistic vision offered by Donald
J. Trump and urged a robust turnout on behalf of Hillary Clinton in
a state where the presidential candidates are locked in a razor-thin
contest.
Following by a day Michelle
Obamas deeply personal denunciation of Mr. Trump, the president also assailed the Republican
nominee as a morally compromised and intellectually inferior
person who fakes his concern for
the working class in America.
The guy spent 70 years on this
earth showing no regard for working people, Mr. Obama said, describing Mr. Trump as a wealthy
opportunist who is pretending to
be something he has never been.
And then suddenly, hes going to
be the champion of working people? Come on. Come on, man.
Mr. Obama cited a litany of
statements from Mr. Trump as evidence that the Republican
nominee is unfit to be president,
and said people do not have to be
a husband or a father to know
that Mr. Trumps comments about
women were unacceptable.
You just have to be a decent human being, Mr. Obama told a
crowd of Democrats at a rally on
the banks of Lake Erie, with
Cleveland skyscrapers as a backdrop.
The presidents searing critique
of Mr. Trump is an indication of the
Clinton campaigns hope that it
can emerge victorious in Ohio de-

spite recent polling that suggests


a very close race in the Buckeye
State.
Just weeks ago, Ohio with its
many economically struggling
communities of mostly white,
working-class voters seemed to
be trending toward Mr. Trump,
with several polls indicating a
small lead for the Republican
nominee. Mrs. Clinton went several weeks this fall without visiting the state.
But the avalanche of news since
the publication of a lewd recording
in which Mr. Trump demeans
women appears to have benefited
Mrs. Clintons chances here. An
NBC News/Wall Street Journal/
Marist poll released Friday
showed the race in Ohio between
Mr. Trump and Mrs. Clinton essentially tied among likely voters,
with Gary Johnson, the libertarian candidate, getting almost 10
percent of the vote.
For Mrs. Clinton to win Ohios 18
electoral votes, she will need overwhelming support in AfricanAmerican centers like Cleveland,
where slightly more than half of
the residents are black. Early voting began this week, and Mr.
Obama on Friday repeatedly
urged the crowd and those watching on television to take nothing
for granted.
Ohio is always close, Mr.
Obama told the crowd. You can
go vote early right now. Early voting started on Wednesday. This is
an opportunity for you to exercise
your right to vote, your civic responsibility.
The presidents stump speech

President Obama, campaigning for Hillary Clinton in


Cleveland on Friday, assailed
the Republican Party for
nominating Donald J. Trump.

AL DRAGO/THE NEW YORK TIMES

has evolved over the last several


weeks, with Mr. Obama testifying
to Mrs. Clintons qualifications,
but also lashing out at Mr. Trump
in increasingly blunt terms.
As Mrs. Obama was in her assault on Mr. Trump in New Hampshire on Thursday, the president
has become unleashed in his criticism of the Republican nominee.
In a speech Thursday night to
Democrats in Columbus, Ohio, Mr.
Obama assailed what he called
the swamp of crazy that Republicans have allowed to fester in recent years.
He said Mr. Trump was merely
the outgrowth of a political worldview that Republicans have increasingly embraced in Washington and around the country.
You claim the mantle of the

Calling on Democrats
to turn out the vote in
a state where the race
has tightened.
party of family values, and this is
the guy you nominate? Mr.
Obama told the crowd in Columbus. Youre the party that is
tough on foreign policy and opposes Russia, and then you nominate this guy, whose role model is
Vladimir Putin, the former head of
the K.G.B.? Im sorry, what happened?
Mr. Obama repeated that criticism of Republicans on Friday

morning, blaming the partys


elected officials for failing to stand
up to Mr. Trumps brand of politics
until polls showed that it might
damage their own fortunes.
Republicans who knew better
stood by silently and even during
the course of this campaign didnt
say anything, Mr. Obama said.
He acknowledged that a number
of Republicans have denounced
Mr. Trump in the wake of the lewd
recording, but added, What, you
werent appalled earlier when he
was saying degrading things
about women?
During much of his speech, Mr.
Obama seemed almost bemused
by the turn the campaign has taken, with Mr. Trump becoming an
easy target for the presidents
criticism on domestic policy, for-

eign affairs and personal temperament.


But the president clearly understands that Mrs. Clinton needs
help in establishing the kind of
passionate connection with voters
that he had in 2008. Several times
during his remarks, Mr. Obama
described Mrs. Clinton as tough
and qualified and urged voters to
embrace her.
During the campaign, he said,
Mrs. Clinton has not been complaining or whining or fighting.
She was just doing the work,
he said. And thats what you want
from a president: someone who is
going to sit there and do the work
for you.
As he has in the past, Mr.
Obama described his one-time
secretary of state as the most
qualified person ever to seek the
presidency. He said shes going to
be great at it, and he urged those
who supported Bernie Sanders,
the Vermont senator who challenged Mrs. Clinton in the primaries, to back her now.
If you felt the Bern in the primaries, you need to vote, he said
to big cheers from the crowd.
But in the end, the case Mr.
Obama made Friday morning was
to reject Mr. Trump. His voice rising in a singsong cadence, the
president said that courtesy,
equality, honesty and kindness
were all on the ballot.
Democracy itself is on the ballot right now, the president bellowed above a roar from the
crowd. Send a message of
progress. Send a message of
hope.

Trump Alleges a Conspiracy Is Behind His Accusers; Ridicules Clinton, Too


From Page A1
missed the mounting accusations
as total fiction and lies, lies,
lies. He assailed the motives of
the women speaking out against
him, and seemed to mock two of
them as not attractive enough to
draw his interest.
Believe me, she would not be
my first choice, Mr. Trump said of
Jessica Leeds, who said Mr.
Trump groped her on an airplane
in the 1980s. He referred to Ms.
Leeds, now 74, as that horrible
woman.
He was similarly dismissive of
Natasha Stoynoff, a former writer
for People magazine, who accused
Mr. Trump of physically accosting
her during an interview. Check
out her Facebook page, youll understand, he said.
Mr. Trump also ridiculed his op-

An effort to convince
fans that sinister
forces are to blame for
a political decline.
ponent in the presidential race,
Mrs. Clinton, for saying that he
had crowded her physically during their last debate, and he
seemed to offer an insult about
her physique. When Mrs. Clinton
walked in front of him, he told a
crowd in Greensboro, N.C., Believe me, I wasnt impressed.
And as he blasted the women
who have made allegations
against him as fabricators, Mr.
Trump suggested that perhaps
someone should make similar
claims against President Obama
next.
Why doesnt some woman,
maybe, come up and say what
they say falsely about me they
could say it about him, Mr. Trump
said.
Though Mr. Trump has said he
will provide information to refute
his accusers stories wholesale, he
offered no such evidence in North
Carolina. He has also loudly
threatened to sue multiple
publications for printing the
stories of his accusers, but as of
Friday evening no such suit had
been filed.
Mr. Trump made only passing
reference to the newest accusations against him. In an interview
with The Washington Post, a
woman named Kristin Anderson
said Mr. Trump had slipped his
hand beneath her skirt and
grabbed her genitals at a Manhattan nightclub in the early 1990s.
Mr. Trumps spokeswoman denied the account, and Mr. Trump
said in his speech that certain details were implausible because he
rarely sits alone at nightclubs. But
The Post did not say Ms. Anderson had described Mr. Trump as
being alone.
Nick Corasaniti reported from
Greensboro, N.C., and Alexander
Burns from New York. Alan
Rappeport contributed reporting
from Washington.

STEPHEN CROWLEY/THE NEW YORK TIMES

Donald J. Trump, at a rally on Friday in Charlotte, N.C., repeated his pledge to prosecute Hillary Clinton and encouraged his crowd in chants of Lock her up.
A second woman, Summer Zervos, a Republican and a former
contestant on The Apprentice,
said at a news conference in Los
Angeles that Mr. Trump had tried
to seduce her over dinner at a hotel in 2007, grabbing her breasts
and thrusting his pelvis into her
body. Ms. Zervos, 41, appeared
alongside Gloria Allred, the celebrity litigator and a Democrat who
was a delegate for Mrs. Clinton.
Mr. Trump denied in a statement several hours later that he
ever had a meeting with Ms. Zervos at a hotel or greeted her inappropriately. He again attacked
the media and said he would take
my message directly to the American people.
The claims against Mr. Trump
have gained a momentum of their
own since the revelation on Oct. 7
of a recording in which he boasted
to a television host about sexually
assaulting women. That tape led
to the direct questioning of Mr.
Trump, at Sundays debate, about
whether he had ever actually
done the things he described. Mr.
Trumps denial prompted Ms.
Leeds to come forward in an interview with The New York Times;
Ms. Anderson said Ms. Leeds had
inspired her to tell her story.
After learning of Ms. Leedss
story, Ms. Anderson told The Post,
she decided: Let me just back
these girls up.
By lashing out in multiple direc-

tions and presenting himself as


the target of a corrupt plot, Mr.
Trump may deepen his emotional
bond with voters who have turned
to him as a kind of political wrecking ball aimed at Washington. But
it is an unlikely strategy for improving his standing with the majority of voters who say in polls
that he is ill-suited to the presidency and biased against women and
minorities.
Democrats have called the
charges women have made
against Mr. Trump disqualifying.
On Thursday in New Hampshire,
Michelle Obama said she had

been shaken by Mr. Trumps cavalier bragging about assault.


Cecile Richards, the president
of Planned Parenthood and a
prominent Clinton supporter, predicted women would revolt
against Mr. Trumps remarks in
North Carolina.
If they werent already convinced, today proved to Americans that Donald Trump is an abusive and vindictive monster, Ms.
Richards said. With every ugly
and violent insult that comes out
of his mouth, Trump loses a vote,
and our country gains a feminist.
Leading Republicans have al-

FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA

Summer Zervos, a former contestant on The Apprentice, said


Friday that Mr. Trump tried to seduce her over dinner in 2007.

ready pulled back from his campaign, and new signs of distance
emerged on Friday between Mr.
Trump and the party he nominally
leads.
Senator Patrick J. Toomey of
Pennsylvania, who is seeking reelection, released a television
commercial saying he has a lot of
disagreements with Mr. Trump.
And in a closely fought congressional race in central New York,
the National Republican Congressional Committee has an ad vowing that its candidate, Claudia
Tenney, will stand up to Hillary
Clinton implying that Mrs.
Clinton will be the next president.
Paul D. Ryan, the speaker of the
House, who announced this week
that he would no longer defend
Mr. Trump, ignored him entirely
in a speech to college Republicans
in Wisconsin. Mr. Ryan criticized
Mrs. Clinton and Democratic policies, but made no case for his own
partys nominee.
Mr. Trump, who has savaged
Mr. Ryan repeatedly this week,
declined to revisit their conflict on
Friday afternoon.
But Mr. Trump escalated his
war on the news media, and unveiled a theory that The New York
Times was attacking him at the
behest of a Mexican billionaire,
Carlos Slim, who is the largest individual holder of New York
Times Company common shares.
Reporters for the newspaper,

Mr. Trump said, should be seen as


corporate lobbyists for Carlos
Slim and Hillary Clinton.
No media is more corrupt than
the failing New York Times, he
said.
Mr. Trumps bitter attacks on
the news media, and Mr. Slim in
particular, seem to echo the precise language used by two of his
advisers, Stephen K. Bannon and
Roger Stone, who have long cast
Mr. Slim as an ominous presence
in the American news media.
In
a
statement,
Arthur
Sulzberger Jr., publisher of The
Times, said Mr. Slim had no involvement in the papers news
coverage. Carlos Slim is an excellent shareholder who fully respects boundaries regarding the
independence of our journalism,
Mr. Sulzberger said. He has
never sought to influence what we
report.
Mr. Trump has spoken in ever
more apocalyptic tones in recent
days as his poll numbers have fallen: describing Mrs. Clinton as deserving incarceration; warning
that the election will be rigged;
and suggesting that international
bankers are colluding to bring
about his defeat.
On Friday, he repeated his
pledge to prosecute Mrs. Clinton
and encouraged his crowd in
chants of Lock her up. For what
shes done, he said, they should
lock her up.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ELECTION

A13

2 016

Utah Man Slowly Gains Notice as a Conservative Alternative to Trump


By JACK HEALY

LOGAN, Utah On a night


when Donald J. Trumps campaign was staggering under new
accusations that he had groped
and sexually assaulted women,
900 voters streamed into a middle
school auditorium in this reliably
Republican and mostly Mormon
city, desperate to hear something
different.
This is the only time in my life
Ive not known what to do, said
Holly Shapiro, 54, a conservative
who has never missed a presidential election, but may stay home in
November. Her daughter Nicole,
sitting next to her, described Mr.
Trump as profane and immoral,
and Ms. Shapiro nodded, saying,
I want to vote for a moral, upstanding person.
Backstage, Evan McMullin was
getting ready to make his pitch
that he was just that candidate.
He has little money and no major-party backing, and he is little
known outside Utah, his home
state. But lately, Mr. McMullin, 40,
has been drawing big crowds in
Utah and thousands of online
supporters who see his moonshot
run for president as a final refuge
for Never Trump conservatives.
Some polls show him turning the
battle here into a three-way race
with Mr. Trump and Hillary Clinton.
People come up and they just
thank us for running, in a relieved
sort of way, Mr. McMullin said at
his campaign offices on a treelined street in downtown Salt
Lake City. Some people say that
they were praying for another option.
Mr. McMullin has almost no
shot at winning the presidency. He
is on only 11 state ballots and is
bumping along the bottom of national polls when pollsters even
include his name in surveys. Because of state ballot deadlines, his
recently named running mate,
Mindy Finn, who worked on Mitt
Romneys 2012 campaign, will not
even be listed on those ballots.
But Mr. McMullin might have a
history-making moment in his
reach. Growing discomfort with

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JIM URQUHART FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Evan McMullin, at left, this week in Logan, Utah. He has called for a new conservative movement, and has criticized both Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump.
Mr. Trump among Mormon voters
is offering the Provo-born graduate of Brigham Young University
a tantalizing opportunity to capture Utahs six electoral votes. No
candidate outside a major party
has won a state since George Wallace in 1968, and Democrats are
also intensifying their efforts as
the race here tightens.
Though Mr. McMullins support
is growing, he still lags behind Mr.
Trump and Mrs. Clinton. A Monmouth University poll of likely
Utah voters released on Thursday
showed Mr. Trump ahead, with 34
percent of support to Mrs. Clintons 28 percent. Mr. McMullin
was third, with 20 percent of
voters.
Another survey, conducted this
week by a Republican pollster,
showed the three in a closer race
and set off a blitz of news media
interest in Mr. McMullin. The
campaign seized on it to try to
raise its profile here and in the
roughly 30 other states where he
is a write-in candidate.
As Trump collapses, as Clinton
continues to have troubles with
scandals, those voters are coming
in our direction, said Joel Searby,
the campaigns chief strategist.

Mr. McMullin is happy to unload on Mr. Trump, calling him a


con man and autocrat who promotes racial tensions, degrades
women and disregards the Constitution and basic American ideas
about fairness and compassion.

On the ballot in just 11


states, but conceivably
within reach of
making history.
He said he was deeply disappointed in Republicans like Senator Marco Rubio whom he supported in the primary for continuing to back Mr. Trump.
As he spoke in Logan on
Wednesday evening, Mr. McMullin presented himself as the
balm to all that the only true
conservative running for president.
He threaded his familys story
into Utahs, saying the McMullins
had joined the Mormon Church in
the 1800s and were among the pio-

neers who crossed the Plains to


settle here. A graduate of the
Wharton School, which he attended after Brigham Young, he
worked in war zones for the C.I.A.,
he said, served as a Republican
congressional adviser and was
with Goldman Sachs for about a
year and a half.
Mr. McMullin acknowledged
his campaigns long odds. Mrs.
Clintons recent rise in many polls
has dimmed his quintuple-bankshot path to victory, which hinges
on Congress deciding the election
if no candidate wins a majority of
electoral votes.
He called for a new conservative movement, and was applauded when he criticized Mrs.
Clintons use of a private email
server and called for cutting federal regulations, supporting charter schools and restoring power to
the states.
But the crowd also cheered
when he called for criminal justice
reform. And they gave him a thundering ovation when he criticized
Mr. Trumps proposed ban on
Muslims by saying, We dont
have to insult Muslims around the
world and apply religious tests
that are repugnant to the United

States.
After attending the rally, Ms.
Shapiro gave it some thought and
decided that Mr. McMullin was
her candidate. I think he could do
great, she said. But the campaign
was having a harder time winning
over some other voters.
Tanya Peters, a lawyer who
lives in the Salt Lake City suburb
South Jordan, is the kind of voter
who could have gone for Mr. McMullin: a 42-year-old suburban
Republican with roots in the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints who said she clearly
was not going to vote for Mr.
Trump.
In a telephone interview, Ms.
Peters said she believed that Mr.
McMullin was a good guy, but
she said he had never been vetted
and was concerned that he has
never held elected office. Others
echoed her skepticism, wondering whether the presidential bid
was a way for Mr. McMullin to try
to vault to another elected office in
Utah. Ultimately, Ms. Peters decided that despite her misgivings,
she will vote for Mrs. Clinton.
Utahs Republican voters and
politicians were among those
wariest about Mr. Trump as he

sought the Republican nomination, and were also among the first
to disavow him and call for him to
step aside after accusations surfaced over the last week that he
had forced himself on women.
They have not, however, surged
to Mr. McMullins side. Lt. Gov.
Spencer J. Cox, a longstanding
Trump critic who is running for reelection this year, said he was impressed with Mr. McMullins conservative message. He called him
a good person with a solid background praise that many here
do not extend to Mr. Trump.
But Mr. Cox said he was still
making up his mind, and suggested that Mr. McMullins lack of
elected experience was giving
some voters pause.
The decision was easier for
Miles Gillette, 28, who works for a
car dealership in Logan. When his
wife shared the Letter to America Mr. McMullin wrote to declare his candidacy and praise
American values, Mr. Gillette
stayed up till 3 a.m. reading about
him, he says. He has chatted with
the candidate, and believes in him.
Id rather take a long shot, Mr.
Gillette said, than sell my
morals.

Quick to Follow the Strongman, Hindu Nationalists Find a Candidate With Appeal
By JEREMY W. PETERS

Your typical Trump rally this


was not.
First there was the ritual Hindu
fire, a yagna, which burned in his
honor. Then there were the
posters, standard Donald J.
Trump head shots except for a
touch of artistic interpretation: a
tilak, the red dot symbolic of the
spiritual third eye in Hindu culture, smudged on his forehead.
This celebration of Mr. Trump in
New Delhi in May, and others like
it in India this year, are the work of
a small, devoted and increasingly
visible faction of Hindu nationalists in India and the United States
who see Mr. Trump as the embodiment of the cocksure, politically
incorrect, strongman brand of
politics they admire.
That some of Mr. Trumps most
passionate followers are Indian
may seem, at first, somewhat
strange, given how fond he is of
scorning Asian countries where
cheap labor saps demand for
American workers. A poll on
Asian-Americans political leanings conducted in August and September found that just 7 percent of
Indian-Americans
said
they
would vote for Mr. Trump.
But in one of the more peculiar
pairings of this most peculiar political season, Mr. Trump has unwittingly fashioned a niche constituency in the overlap between
the Indian right and the American
right, which share a lot of the
same anxieties about terrorism,
immigration and the loss of prestige that they believe their leaders
have been too slow to reverse.
Theres a lot of parallels there,
said Shalabh Kumar, the founding
chairman of the Republican Hindu
Coalition. Mr. Trump is all about
development, development, development; prosperity, prosperity, prosperity; tremendous job
growth. And at the same time, he
recognizes the need to control the
borders.
As one of Mr. Trumps biggest
Hindu financial backers, Mr. Kumar, who runs an electronics manufacturing company in Illinois
and grew up in the state of Punjab
along the Pakistani border, has
helped organize a speech by the
Republican nominee in Edison,
N.J., at a Bollywood-themed charity concert on Saturday. The proceeds will benefit terrorism victims.
It will be an incredible
evening, Mr. Trump said in a video promoting it, one of the few ethnic events he has agreed to do during this campaign.
Mr. Trump may be largely indifferent to the reasons behind his
Hindu loyalists fervor, but his
most senior advisers are not. The
campaigns
chief
executive,
Stephen K. Bannon, is a student of
nationalist movements. Mr. Bannon is close to Nigel Farage, a cen-

RAJAT GUPTA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

Above, a fire ritual in Donald J. Trumps honor in New Dehli in


May. Left, Shalabh Kumar, the president of the Republican
Hindu Coalition, arranged to have Mr. Trump speak at a Bollywood-themed charity concert on Saturday in Edison, N.J.

JOSHUA BRIGHT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

tral figure in Britains movement


to leave the European Union, and
he is an admirer of Indias prime
minister, Narendra Modi, a Hindu
nationalist Mr. Bannon has called
the Reagan of India.
It may be pure coincidence that
some of Mr. Trumps words channel the nationalistic and, some argue, anti-Muslim sentiments that
Mr. Modi stoked as he rose to
power. But it is certainly not coincidental that many of Mr.
Trumps
biggest
Hindu
supporters are also some of Mr.
Modis most ardent backers.
At times, the similarity of Mr.
Trumps and Mr. Modis political
vocabulary is striking. Mr. Modi

fed the perception that Indias


feckless leaders had failed to allow the country to reach its full potential. And he campaigned as the
only one capable of fixing that.
I will make such a wonderful
India that all Americans will stand
in line to get a visa for India, he
said once. A centerpiece of his
agenda is the Make in India program, which is aimed at stimulating economic growth by encouraging more manufacturing in the
country.
Its all about India first, or
Make India Great, said Sujeeth
Draksharam, a civil engineer
from Houston who supports Mr.
Trump and planned to attend Sat-

urdays event. Look at Donald


Trump. Its the same thing. Make
America Great Again strong
again.
Another similarly powerful sentiment that both leaders have harnessed is grievance. Mr. Trump
has seized on how the working
class feels out of place and left behind in a country that is changing
demographically and economically.
Even if Mr. Modis appeals were
never as crass as Mr. Trumps, his
followers say he always understood that many Hindus felt their
concerns were ignored by Indias
secular and, in their minds, deeply
corrupt government, which Mr.
Modi vowed to clean up.
One of the things that Modi
very subtly articulated, but was
very clear about, was something
which nobody wanted to say, said
Subramanian Swamy, a longtime
Indian politician and Hindu nationalist who is often a thorn in the
side of the countrys political elite.
And that is that Hindus, despite
being 80 percent of the population,
feel like they got a raw deal.
There are important differences: Mr. Modi has maintained

good relations with President


Obama and is a proponent of free
trade. Still, Mr. Swamy said, when
nationalist-minded Hindus hear
Mr. Trump, they think that this
guy talks the same language.
And Mr. Trumps Hindu
admirers accept him, controversies and all. How can he be anti-

One of the more


peculiar pairings in a
most peculiar
political season.
immigrant when two of his three
wives have been immigrants, as
one recently told India Abroad.
Why should he be punished for
singling out Muslim terrorism
when, as Mr. Draksharam said,
youve got to call a spade a
spade.
Manu Bhagavan, who teaches
South Asian history at Hunter
College, said the Hindu nationalist
movement in India and its

devotees in the United States


shared a belief that what was once
pure and virtuous about Indian
life has been tainted.
They locate this in a grand
Hindu past, he said. If you go before Muslims entered India, before all these foreigners came in
and messed things up, Hindus
could do this, Hindus could do
that.
The response, Mr. Bhagavan
said whether in India, the
United States, Britain or any of the
countries experiencing a convulsion of antiglobalism right now
is lets barricade ourselves in.
These problems are all stemming from these immigrants,
these different people, so lets get
rid of them, he said, describing
the views of many nationalists.
And its easy answers to not such
easy problems.
But perhaps the strongest link
between Mr. Trumps speech and
the Hindu nationalists who find
his politics so comforting is the issue of terrorism and how bluntly
Mr. Trump is willing to confront
Muslim communities about it.
Terrorism committed by Islamic
extremists is a scourge that has
rattled India as well, from the 2008
attacks in Mumbai that left 172
dead to the ambush killings of 20
Indian soldiers last month at an
army base near the border with
Pakistan.
Mr. Trumps brand of tough talk,
scholars said, gives some Indians
a sense that he would be much
harder on the countrys longtime
adversary, Pakistan.
What Donald Trump articulates has given them some food for
thought, said Harsh V. Pant, a
professor of international relations at Kings College London. If
there is a Trump presidency, then
there might be a stronger Washington policy vis--vis Pakistan.
When Mr. Trump arrives at the
Hindu charity gala in New Jersey
on Saturday, the estimated 10,000
guests will be taking in a performance with Bollywood stars, a
Hindu art temple and exhibitions
honoring the contribution of Hindus to math and science.
Mr. Kumar, the Republican
Hindu Coalition founder, said neither he nor Mr. Trump was nave
about the fact that most IndianAmericans vote for Democrats.
But there could be a few, he said,
who hear Mr. Trump on Saturday
and discover his message is not all
that unfamiliar.
What Mr. Trump should probably not expect is the kind of fawning reception he has gotten from
his small bands of followers in
New Delhi. There was the time in
June when a right-wing group
known as the Hindu Sena decided
to celebrate his 70th birthday. Absent Mr. Trump, who was in North
Carolina that day, they improvised
and fed a life-size Trump cutout a
piece of cake.

A14

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ELECTION

2 016

10 Competitive House Races


Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Monday told Republican House members seeking re-election to focus on their races and not on Donald J. Trump. Here some close contests to watch. By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

Mica (R),
incumbent

Bennett (D)

Comstock (R),
incumbent

Rosen (D)

Tarkanian (R)

OHalleran (D) Babeu (R)

Murphy (D)

NEW JERSEY FIFTH DISTRICT

ARIZONA FIRST DISTRICT

FLORIDA SEVENTH DISTRICT

VIRGINIA 10TH DISTRICT

NEVADA THIRD DISTRICT

Controversy put Republican


in the race of his career

Chance of rare Republican


pickup in Arizona

A formidable challenge for


a comfortable Republican

A Republican and her ties


to the top of the ticket

A race fueled by big


money and big names

Representative Scott Garrett, a Republican, rankled colleagues last year when


he said he would not donate to his
partys campaign committee because it
recruits and backs gay candidates.
Democrats have happily reminded
donors about those comments, attracting ample cash to benefit his challenger,
Josh Gottheimer, a former Clinton
speechwriter. Combined with Mr. Garretts tendency to vote against the
Republican leadership, analysts say the
incumbent is facing the toughest race of
his career.

Representative Ann Kirkpatrick, a


Democrat, left her seat to challenge
Senator John McCain of Arizona this
fall, opening up a competitive race in
this relatively conservative district. The
contest has pitted Tom OHalleran, who
is running as a Democrat despite having served as a Republican in the State
Legislature, against Paul Babeu, a
county sheriff. Mr. Babeu made headlines during the 2012 presidential race
when he was forced to resign as a cochairman on Mitt Romneys campaign
amid allegations that he threatened to
have a former boyfriend deported.

Representative John L. Mica, a Republican whose district is just north of Orlando, has comfortably held his seat for
more than 20 years. Or he did, until the
last-minute introduction of Stephanie
Murphy, a business professor and
former national security specialist
whose family immigrated to the United
States from a Vietnamese refugee camp
when she was an infant. Less than a
month before Election Day, House
Majority PAC, a super PAC working
to help Democrats retake the House,
has already put at least $962,000 into
this race.

Representative Barbara Comstock, a


first-term Republican, has abandoned
Mr. Trump after the release of his vulgar comments about women. Her
Democratic opponent, LuAnn Bennett,
a real estate developer, has done everything she can to tie Ms. Comstock to
Mr. Trump anyway.

Nevada has been a hub for campaign


spending this year, and the contest to
fill the seat Representative Joe Heck, a
Republican, who left to run for the
Senate, is no exception. With a few
weeks to go, both parties and outside
groups have already spent more than
$6.8 million. Jacky Rosen, a Democrat
who is a computer programmer and
consultant, is running with the powerful
backing of retiring Senator Harry Reid,
the minority leader. The other candidate is Danny Tarkanian, a businessman whose father, Jerry, was a legendary college basketball coach.

Carroll (D)

Vernon (D)

Bonoff (D)

Garcia (D)

Gottheimer
(D)

Deacon (D)

Garrett (R),
incumbent

Katko (R),
incumbent

Coffman (R),
incumbent

Blum (R),
incumbent

Paulsen (R),
incumbent

Curbelo (R),
incumbent

NEW YORK 24TH DISTRICT

COLORADO SIXTH DISTRICT

IOWA FIRST DISTRICT

MINNESOTA THIRD DISTRICT

FLORIDA 26TH DISTRICT

Symptoms of the
down-ballot effect

A race that could hinge


on the Latino turnout

An easy pickup for the


Democrats? Not so fast.

In Minneapolis suburbs,
a resilient incumbent

When running from Trump


may not be enough

Representative John Katko, a first-term


Republican, is defending his seat
against Colleen Deacon, a Democrat
and former regional director for Senator Kirsten E. Gillibrand of New York.
While analysts have given Mr. Katko
the edge heading into the final month of
the election, this district, which includes Syracuse, is relatively
Democratic, and opposition to Mr.
Trump could help sweep Ms. Deacon to
victory.

Representative Mike Coffman, a Republican who once co-sponsored a bill to


make English the nations official language, has weathered a round of redistricting that left him with the most
diverse district in Colorado. But this
year he faces his most difficult race yet,
contending with a talented opponent
Morgan Carroll, a Democrat who
served as president of the State Senate.
With a sizable immigrant population in
the district, this tossup contest could
hinge on turnout among Latinos.

Representative Rod Blum, a Republican


who is a member of the hard-right
House Freedom Caucus, has run most
of this race without much help from his
party. His district, which includes Dubuque and Cedar Rapids, voted for
President Obama twice, and Democrats
have pinned their hopes on Monica
Vernon, a member of the Cedar Rapids
City Council. But this district, once
thought to be a relatively simple pickup
for Democrats, is proving not so easily
won.

This contest seems to be trending in


favor of Representative Erik Paulsen,
signaling that perhaps Democrats are
not having as much luck tying vulnerable Republicans to Mr. Trump in suburban areas like those in this district near
Minneapolis. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and House
Majority PAC have devoted more than
$1.8 million to defeating Mr. Paulsen in
the hopes of replacing him with Terri
Bonoff, a state senator.

Representative Carlos Curbelo has


been outspoken in his opposition to Mr.
Trump, and it may not be enough. The
first-term Republican is locked in a
tight battle for his South Florida seat,
facing Joe Garcia, a former congressman, in a rematch from 2014. The
Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee has spent nearly $2.2 million on this race, signaling some confidence in the ability to reclaim this seat.

Republicans
In Close Races
Worry About
Trumps Effect

Democrats face a steep


climb to wrest control of
the House from the G.O.P.

By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

LANSDOWNE, Va. Like many Republican candidates, Representative


Barbara Comstock is trying to prevent
Donald J. Trumps problems from becoming hers.
Early on, she supported Senator
Marco Rubios presidential bid. In ensuing months, she remained resolutely reticent on Mr. Trump, simply never uttering his name in trying to avoid any political undertow that he might create. But
after the release last week of a recording
in which Mr. Trump boasted in vulgar
terms about assaulting women, Ms.
Comstock was among the first Republicans to call on him to step down.
This is disgusting, vile and disqualifying, she said in a statement. No woman
should ever be subjected to this type of
obscene behavior, and it is unbecoming
of anybody seeking high office.
Ms. Comstock is hoping her disavowal
will be enough. The outcome here in
Loudoun County, which in recent years
has been seen as a bellwether in presidential politics, will provide a measure of
any down-ballot damage that Mr.
Trumps contentious candidacy may
have caused.
Ms. Comstocks wealthy, highly educated district in the suburbs of Washington is a diversity-rich hub of government
largess, where federal contractors commute past Buddhist temples, mosques
and churches that offer services in Korean.
If the Democrats have any prayer of
taking the House, and I think its just a
long shot, theyve got to win this seat,
said Thomas M. Davis III, a former Republican congressman who represented
portions of Ms. Comstocks district.
So far, many analysts say, there is
scant evidence that voters will penalize
candidates because of Mr. Trump.
Believe it or not, it hasnt changed
matters all that much, said David
Wasserman, the House of Representatives editor for The Cook Political Report. He has forecast that Democrats
could pick up as many as 20 seats, 10
short of the number needed to regain
control of the House.
Polls have shown that voters are willing to separate their support for certain
House and Senate candidates from their
feelings about the top of the ticket. In an
effort to bolster Ms. Comstock and other
vulnerable Republicans, the Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC
aligned with Republicans, announced
Friday that it would invest an additional
$10 million into 15 targeted races, including hers.
Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin
also has tried to ensure his party holds its
House majority, offering a policy agenda
and promising appearances in dozens of
cities to lend his fund-raising power.
His campaign said on Thursday that
Mr. Ryan had raised $15.4 million in the
third quarter, collecting more than $48.2
million in 2016. He has transferred more
than $31 million of that to the National

PHOTOGRAPHS BY VANESSA VICK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Representative Barbara Comstock of Virginia, above, faces a challenge from a Democrat, LuAnn Bennett, below.

Republican Congressional Campaign


Committee.
Mr. Ryan having disinvited Mr.
Trump from their first planned joint appearance in Wisconsin last weekend after news of the recording broke effectively cut his members free on Monday,
saying he would not defend nor campaign with Mr. Trump. He has instead
shifted his focus to the argument that Republicans need to be re-elected to serve
as a bulwark against a potential President Hillary Clinton.
Representative Nancy Pelosi of Cali-

fornia, the Democratic leader, has


proved once more to be a fund-raising
powerhouse, raising $34.6 million for
House Democrats in the third quarter
and $127.7 million this election cycle, the
Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee said on Wednesday.
Initial reactions to the 2005 recording
of Mr. Trump have also given Democrats
cause for optimism. A Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, conducted shortly
after the recording was released by The
Washington Post, showed 49 percent of
voters preferred Democrats take control

of Congress, compared with 42 percent


who preferred Republicans the largest
advantage for Democrats since the government shutdown in 2013.
But Democrats have a steep climb.
With 247 seats, House Republicans hold
their largest majority since 1931.
Nathan L. Gonzales, the editor of the
Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report,
estimates that Republicans have already
locked up 217 seats and they only need
218 to keep their majority.
But Republican strategists are
haunted by the prospect that voters who

would typically support Republicans


might become so disillusioned that they
choose to stay home.
This is a highly polarized environment, Mr. Wasserman said. And I
think the only reason for Democrats to
overperform on Election Day is that Republicans are so depressed that they
dont show up.
At this point, that does not look very
likely, he said. While more educated, conservative voters who may have been
more likely to split their ticket are looking less enthusiastic, Mr. Trumps base
remains energized, he said.
In the suburbs of Minneapolis, the
Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee has run ads trying to tie Representative Erik Paulsen, a Republican,
to Mr. Trump. Mr. Trump is unpopular
there, but the contest had been trending
in favor of Mr. Paulsen who last week
joined Ms. Comstock in announcing he
would not vote for him.
Similarly, in northeastern Iowa,
Democrats have been struggling to oust
Representative Rod Blum, a Republican
who is a member of the hard-right House
Freedom Caucus. Mr. Blums district
voted for Mr. Obama twice, but the
pickup, originally thought to be likely,
has been bedeviling Democrats. Mr.
Blum has denounced Mr. Trumps remarks but did not comment on whether
he would continue to support him, according to The Des Moines Register.
Districts that had been seeing a socalled Trump effect appear to be the ones
with higher concentrations of Latinos
and Asians, Mr. Wasserman said. Also,
college-educated, white women a
group that may be especially motivated
by animus toward Mr. Trump are also
showing strikingly strong support for
Mrs. Clinton this year, said William H.
Frey, a demographer at the Brookings
Institution.
Though Ms. Comstocks district trends
slightly Republican, voters twice supported Mr. Obama. Mr. Trump is not popular here.
Mr. Davis, who represented the area
for seven terms, said most voter aversion to Mr. Trump stemmed from his
propensity for insults.
This is a pretty dignified, educated
group, and theyre just not into insulting
people and all that, he said. Not particularly liberal, but dignified.
Just one day before disavowing Mr.
Trump, during a debate hosted by the local chamber of commerce here, Ms. Comstock cited a collaboration with Senator
Tim Kaine, a fellow Virginian and the
Democratic vice-presidential nominee.
She twice invoked Bill Clinton, the president whose administration she built a
reputation investigating in the 1990s as a
House chief counsel. She steered clear of
saying Mr. Trumps name, saying she
was still watching the race to decide
who would get her vote.
LuAnn Bennett, a real estate developer who is challenging Ms. Comstock, on
Wednesday slammed her for waiting so
long to reject Mr. Trump.
Im afraid that what my opponent
was clearly watching for was how best
to preserve her own political career, she
said.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ELECTION

A15

2 016

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CASE JERNIGAN

The Savvy Persons Guide


To Reading the Latest Polls
By NATE COHN

Youve probably heard that its always best to focus on the average of polls. The poll
results that often get the most attention are outliers they get attention because theyre
shocking, not because theyre representative.
But we also know that people often ignore that advice. They want to know the details of
the newest poll, and how and why it might be different from the last. And to tell you the truth,
I do, too. I read the details and methodology of almost every survey that is released.
The problem is that its a lot harder than it looks. After a splashy poll is released, Twitter
is often overflowing with well-intentioned but misguided analysis.
Its true: You really are better off looking at the averages. But if youre going to assess
individual polls this election, heres a guide on how to do it well.

Look at the Topline


When a poll comes out, I start by looking
at the topline results Hillary Clinton is
plus three percentage points, or Donald J.
Trump is plus one, for example.
But its also worth looking at vote share
whether Mrs. Clinton has 47 percent or 40
percent, for instance. In particular, I care
about how close the leading candidate is to
50 percent.
Theres more uncertainty the further a
candidate is from 50 percent and the larger
the number of undecided voters.
Until a candidate approaches 50 percent,
its hard to know whether the lead is because of party unity or because the candidate has won over the key voters needed for
victory. This is especially true in a reliably
red or blue state: A Democrat who has 40
percent of the vote in Arizona still has a lot
to prove, even with a lead. He or she hasnt
yet won the Republican-leaning voters who
decide the states elections.
There was a good example of this in the
Arizona Senate race. A lot of polls showed
John McCain narrowly ahead, or even behind. But once he won the G.O.P. primary,
Republican-leaning voters returned to his
side.
Usually, anything at 46 percent or above
is a good indicator of real strength. Less
than that, and you have to wonder about
undecided voters.
Its also worth looking at whether theres a
difference between registered and likely
voters. In a presidential election year, I
generally prefer looking at the registered
voter numbers. Thats because many methods that screen for likely voters are poor
and yield noisy data. Registered voter samples are larger, and there arent additional
questions to add statistical noise. But theres
a caveat: Registered voter polls tend to
overrepresent Democrats, so I often focus
on the registered voter number and mentally shift it a point or two toward the Republicans.

This year, theres also the question of


whether to look at four-way or two-way

polls. Im not sold on which is best. This


years third-party candidates dont have the
strong bases of a Ross Perot or John Anderson. Its possible that the polls that name
them will overestimate their support; its
possible that the polls that do not name
them will underestimate their support. For
now, Im inclined to split the difference.

Comparing Where They Were


To get a sense of whether a poll is good or
bad news for a certain candidate, I usually
compare the results of the poll with the
polling averages or the last poll conducted
by the same pollster.
If the poll is very different from the polling
average, theres a good chance its an outlier.

If the poll shows a big shift from a prior


survey, I also wonder whether the previous
poll was an outlier. If so, a candidate might
appear to rebound simply because he or she
was unusually weak in a prior poll.

Its also worth looking at whether the


candidate has gained or lost vote share.
When candidates fall without good reason, I
often assume theyre likelier than not to win
back their former supporters.
I also look at the various measures of
whether Mr. Trump has a ceiling: like a 50
percent very unfavorable rating, or 50
percent who say they would be scared of a
Trump presidency. Im not convinced that
those measures actually represent a ceiling.
But they very well might, and I am curious
about whether hes making progress by
those measures.
I also care a lot about how the poll was
conducted.

See Who Did the Poll


Polling is hard. A lot of things can go
wrong, from question wording to weighting
a sample or selecting likely voters. These
choices can make a big difference even
with the same data. Worse, there are very
few pollsters that really provide enough
information to know whether theyre
making reasonable choices and what the

consequences of those decisions might be.


As a result, I strongly prefer experienced
firms with solid track records.

often less mobile than the population as a


whole).
Pay attention to sample size. If a poll has
a small sample less than 800 people or
so be aware that sampling error will
play a bigger role than usual. The gains
from big samples are smaller than you
might think, so dont give a lot of extra
credit for a poll that goes much higher than
1,200. Often, the polls with huge samples
are actually just using cheap and problematic sampling methods. If the sample is
less than 400, the result should be considered no more than a ballpark estimate.

I have serious problems with interactive


voice response, or I.V.R., polls. These are
sometimes called robo-polls, and they dont
have any means to contact voters with a
cellphone. This is a problem for even an
experienced firm with a good record. It can
be disastrous for firms without much knowhow.

I have reservations about online polls. Its


harder to draw a representative sample
online because you cant rely on traditional
random sampling. There are skilled and
experienced pollsters that do a good job, like
YouGov and SurveyMonkey. But theres a
somewhat higher burden for online pollsters
to build solid track records, make good hires
and publish a detailed methodology.

I dont usually pay much attention to the


margin of error because it does not even
come close to approximating the actual
potential for error in a survey. And pollsters calculate margin of error somewhat
differently. In particular, I see a lot of
lower-quality firms that dont adjust their
margins of error to account for the effect of
weighting making their poll seem more
confident than it is.

If the poll is from a less established firm,


Ill give a closer look if it has been transparent if the pollsters publish a detailed
methodology that gives me a better sense of
what Im getting.

Check Who Was Polled

Scan the Methodology

The country is deeply divided along


demographic lines, which makes it very
important to check on the demographic
composition of the sample.

You dont have to analyze every detail of a


polls methodology, but here are some rules
of thumb:

Know the targets. Almost all pollsters


adjust their samples to match
demographics like age, race and gender. If
a pollster isnt weighting for something
fundamental like that, its a big warning
sign.

A one-day poll is often a bad poll. You


usually need multiple days to call voters
back and get a representative sample.

Well over half of adults ought to be


reached on cellphones in a typical national
survey; about 40 percent of Americans do
not have a landline at all. A poll of registered
voters off the voter file can have a somewhat smaller number of cellphone-only
voters, since the poll can typically be
weighted by partisanship, and registered
and likely voters are less likely to have only
a cellphone (theyre older, more affluent and

The Upshot provides


news, analysis and
graphics about politics,
policy and everyday
life.
nytimes.com/upshot

Exit polls are not the word of God. There


are legitimate debates about the electorate.
Many of these debates center on differences between estimates based on the
census, voter files or exit polls. Most polls
are on the end of the spectrum showing a
whiter sample, since most polls use voter
file and census data. Many times, polls are
slammed on social media for being too
white in comparison with exit polls, even
though theyre near the consensus of more
reliable measures.

Sometimes colossal failures in weighting


or sampling are obvious, and the poll can
be dismissed out of hand on this basis
alone.
Examples of what I mean: a poll showing that more than 45 percent of the electorate in Pennsylvania will be over age 65
(thats too high), or that 13 percent of the
electorate in North Carolina will be black
(thats too low).
These are the basics of my mental checklist in judging whether an individual poll
might maintain the status quo, move the
needle or stand as an outlier. And then I go
back to the poll averages.

A16

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ELECTION

Trumps Barrage
Of Heated Speech
Has Little Precedent
By JONATHAN MARTIN

WASHINGTON There is a long tradition of presidential


candidates ratcheting up their language when they are trailing
in the closing weeks of an election.
But in the same fashion Donald J. Trump has broken with
other political traditions, he is taking a longstanding rite of fall
to new heights or perhaps new lows.
On Thursday and Friday alone,
Mr. Trump unleashed a barrage of
near-apocalyptic warnings about the
potential destruction of the country,
broad accusations about the illegitimacy of American democracy, and
crude innuendo about his opponent
that is almost without precedent in
modern presidential history.
He warned that Hillary Clinton
was conspiring with financiers to
destroy American sovereignty,
claimed the fate of civilization depended on his victory and ridiculed
the appearance of the one of the
women accusing him of sexual harassment, while also deriding Mrs.
Clintons looks and saying she ought
Donald J. Trump in
to be in prison. He also said the
Greensboro, N.C.
presidential election amounted to a
big ugly lie.
While delighting his partisans, Mr. Trumps rhetorical shooting spree has enraged Democrats and unnerved many Republicans, who believe he is acting out a political death wish.
Here are some of Mr. Trumps own words and how they
compare to the attacks wielded by some previous presidential
candidates language that was, at the time, considered inflammatory or controversial but which now seems quaint by comparison:

2 016

The Place to Gauge How Turned Off Voters Are


From Page A10
herbalist), and her boyfriend, a
tattoo artist; a group of bus drivers; a retired firefighter, plus the
usual smattering of lawyers and
state workers.
The acupuncturist, Keri Ondrus, 31, has given up on voting altogether; she has taught English
in Costa Rica, and was involved in
the Occupy Wall Street movement, describing herself as a total idealist and anarchist who
feels there must be another way to
repair the world. Her parents,
Charlotte and Bill Ondrus, the retired teachers, will vote for Mrs.
Clinton.
You guys are not enthusiastic
about Hillary, their daughter
said.
I know, her mother replied,
but Im scared to death of Donald
Trump.
Lunchtime brought a fatherand-son team of bail bondsmen;
an Air Force veteran and gun
rights enthusiast wearing one of
Mr. Trumps Make America
Great Again ball caps and a 9millimeter pistol in a sleek, black
Velcro case on his belt; and a halfdozen young African-American
hip-hop artists, preparing for a
show at Wright State University
in Dayton.
Why would I waste my time?
Kyle Steed, 23, a composer with
the group, said of voting, adding
that he would rather spend his

time helping the homeless as a


volunteer. His friend Shamere
Griffin, 21, another of the artists,
shook her head wordlessly, seeming to fight back tears.
She said she could never vote
for Mr. Trump, given his characterizations of blacks, Muslims,
Mexicans and women. She wants
an America in which she doesnt
have to remind my little brother,
when he walks down the street, to
walk with his hood down, and has
no confidence that Mrs. Clinton
can deliver that. She will stay
home.
Lets just be real, Ms. Griffin
said. What has she done for us?
Thats what I want to know. What
has she done for my people?
Ohio is politically engaged; in
2012, when President Obama ran
against Mitt Romney, 70.5 percent
of registered voters cast ballots,
compared with 57.5 percent nationwide, and one in three voted
early.
Some election offices reported
long lines when early voting began here Wednesday; David Pepper, chairman of the Ohio
Democratic Party, called Mr.
Trump a turnout machine for
Democrats. But an NBC/Wall
Street Journal poll released
Thursday and conducted after
the emergence of a recording of
Mr. Trump saying he groped women found the Ohio race virtually
tied.
Im very motivated, declared

Robert Tannous, a 54-year-old


lawyer in a dark blue suit, as he
navigated his way around a waitress during the lunchtime rush.
Motivated to vote for whom?
Hillary Clinton, Mr. Tannous
said. And the sad thing is, Im a
lifelong Republican.
George Wolf, a 73, a retired firefighter who owns a small heating
and air-conditioning business
here, comes to Tommys every
morning for the crispy corned
beef and a dose of friendship. A
longtime Republican, he says he

To some, a turnout
machine. To others,
just a turnoff.
cannot allow Hillary Clinton to
get in, and proceeds to tick off the
reasons.
When you mention Benghazi, I
get really upset, he said, referring to the 2012 attack on a United
States diplomatic mission in Libya. Four people died; she doesnt
seem to care. Then there are her
emails. And her paid speeches: I
just dont like the fact that a politician is out to make money, Mr.
Wolf said, adding that he would
vote for Mr. Trump, which he
views as better than not voting at

all.
He does not feel good about it.
He went bankrupt; as a smallbusiness man, that doesnt help
me pay my bills, said Mr. Wolf,
who added that he did not like Mr.
Trumps nasty nicknames
Crooked Hillary, for example.
Thats a child talking, Mr. Wolf
said. He backed Mr. Kasich in the
primary, but came around to Mr.
Trump after the Ohio governor
dropped out of the race.
Roughly a third of all Clinton
and Trump backers say the main
reason for their choice is that they
oppose the other candidate, a recent Pew Research Center survey
found. Millennial voters, ages 18 to
29, are especially discouraged and
looking for a political outsider who
can inspire them one reason
they rallied around Mrs. Clintons
primary
opponent,
Senator
Bernie Sanders of Vermont.
Picking at his chili and grilledcheese sandwich, Mr. Burnside
sounded absolutely deflated. His
dining partner was his mentor,
Steve Fitch, 68, a Clinton supporter. They were talking about Mr.
Fitchs work as a commercial litigator; Mr. Burnside was seeking
guidance on how he could use a career in law to resolve conflicts.
The 2016 campaign seemed
antithetical to the younger mans
dreams. Mr. Burnside was asked if
he ever thought about that.
Oh, he said. All the time.

Hillary Clinton meets in secret with international banks to plot


the destruction of U.S. sovereignty in order to enrich these global
financial powers, her special interest friends and her donors.
Mr. Trump at a rally on Thursday in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Mr. Trump veers dangerously close to the territory of The


Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a fabricated anti-Semitic text, in
discussing the WikiLeaks hacks that revealed some of Mrs.
Clintons speeches to financial institutions.
There is a long history in American politics of suggesting
ones opponent will do the bidding of a special interest, or highlighting nefarious connections. When Senator John McCain was
trying to gain ground on Senator Barack Obama in 2008, he
aired a television ad highlighting Mr. Obamas ties to the 1960s
radical William Ayers and said on the campaign trail that Mr.
Obamas political career was launched in Mr. Ayers living
room.
But despite entreaties from supporters, including his own
running mate, Sarah Palin, Mr. McCain refused to go a step
further and hold Mr. Obama accountable for the inflammatory
comments of his onetime pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.
Honestly, she should be locked up. She should be. Should be
locked up.
Mr. Trump, in West Palm Beach

Lusty, partisan crowds goading candidates into harsh attacks is another standby of White House campaigns. That is
what happened when the Florida crowd began chanting lock
her up, lock her up, a signature Republican line in this campaign relating to Mrs. Clintons handling of emails as secretary
of state. Though Mr. Trump had previously declined to use the
phrase, saying instead that he would beat her at the polls, on
Thursday he gave supporters what they wanted.
Mr. McCain faced a similar moment in 2008 when confronted with a questioner at an October rally who said she could
not trust Mr. Obama because he was an Arab.
Mr. McCain shut down the questioner and the assertion.
No, maam, hes a decent family man, citizen who I just
happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues, he
said.
Even when past candidates have played to the gallery, it
was far more tame.
President George Bush, struggling against Bill Clinton in
1992, raised eyebrows when he vented about the Democratic
ticket of Bill Clinton and Al Gore. My dog Millie knows more
about foreign affairs than these two bozos, Mr. Bush said.
Soon after, he offered a statement of regret. I thought it
was funny at the time, and everybody laughed, he said.
She walks in front of me, she walks in front of me, you know. And
when she walked in front of me, believe me I wasnt impressed.
Mr. Trump at a rally on Friday in Greensboro, N.C.

Mr. Trump could not resist offering his assessment of Mrs.


Clintons looks, using their encounter in the second debate as
his point of reference.
He is not the only candidate to give in to temptation and
ridicule ones rival. Senator John Kerry in 2004 won laughs from
a Democratic audience for mocking President George W. Bushs
halting speaking style and malaprops.
He keeps trying to say, Well, were-not-we-dont-no-wedont-you-know, we dont want somebody who wants to leave,
Mr. Kerry said, making sport of how Mr. Bush sought to characterize the senators position on Iraq as though the president
were Elmer Fudd (as a New York Times correspondent put it at
the time).
And Mrs. Clinton herself has tried out a few lines about Mr.
Trumps comb-over.
But commenting unfavorably, seemingly on the posterior of
the first female major-party presidential nominee while
fending off accusations of sexual harassment and misogyny
is something entirely new.
Reporters at The New York Times are not journalists. Theyre
corporate lobbyists for Carlos Slim and Hillary Clinton.
Mr. Trump on Friday in Greensboro

Mr. Trump escalated his assault on The Times, noting that


Mr. Slim, a Mexican telecommunications billionaire and the
largest individual holder of New York Times Company common
shares, has contributed to the Clinton Foundation.
Republican critiques of the media generally and The
Times specifically are as much a recurring feature of struggling presidential campaigns as invocations of Harry Trumans
improbable 1948 comeback against Thomas E. Dewey.
We are not going to let the media steal this election, Senator Robert J. Dole told supporters in the closing days of the 1996
race. The country belongs to the people, not The New York
Times.
But Mr. Dole made no mention of the ownership of The
Times, nor did he highlight the ethnicity of any of its investors.
Mr. Trump on Friday twice noted that Mr. Slim is Mexican.
Believe me: She would not be my first choice, that I can tell you.
Mr. Trump on Friday in Greensboro

Facing accusations from a growing number of women that


he made unwanted sexual advances, Mr. Trump has called them
horrible, publicity-seeking liars.
On Friday, he went further and suggested that he could not
have forced himself on one of them, Jessica Leeds, because she
was not attractive enough to merit his advances.
And that is where the historical comparisons come to an
abrupt end.

ANDREW SPEAR FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Shamere Griffin, left, and Kyle Steed at Tommys Diner in Columbus. Why would I waste my time? Mr. Steed said of voting.

Ginsburg Says She Regrets Chastising Quarterback


By ADAM LIPTAK

WASHINGTON Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg issued a
statement on Friday expressing
regret for her critical comments
on protests by San Francisco
49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick and other National Football
League players seeking to draw
attention to police brutality and
racial injustice.
In an interview published Monday, she had called the players decision to kneel during the national
anthem dumb and disrespectful.
On Friday, she said she should
have held her tongue.
Some of you have inquired
about a book interview in which I
was asked how I felt about Colin
Kaepernick and other N.F.L.
players who refused to stand for
the national anthem, she wrote in
a note to reporters. Barely aware
of the incident or its purpose, my

comments were inappropriately


dismissive and harsh. I should
have declined to respond.
It was the second time this year
that Justice Ginsburg has disavowed public comments. In July,
after a series of interviews expressing disdain for Donald J.
Trump, she issued a similar statement.
The recent comments came in
an interview with Katie Couric of
Yahoo News. Justice Ginsburg
was there to discuss a new book,
and Ms. Couric asked about the
protests. Would I arrest them for
doing it? Justice Ginsburg said of
players. No.
But she added: I think its
dumb and disrespectful. I would
have the same answer if you
asked me about flag burning. I
think its a terrible thing to do, but
I wouldnt lock a person up for doing it. I would point out how ridiculous it seems to me to do such an

act.
Mr. Kaepernicks protests have
also drawn criticism from Mr.
Trump, who said, I think its a terrible thing, and you know, maybe
he should find a country that
works better for him.
On the other hand, President
Obama has said that Mr. Kaepernick has been drawing attention to
some real, legitimate issues and
exercising his constitutional
right.
Speaking to reporters Tuesday
in the 49ers locker room, Mr.
Kaepernick said Justice Ginsburg
had shown a lack of sensitivity. It
is disappointing to hear a Supreme Court justice call a protest
against injustices and oppression
stupid, dumb in reference to
players doing that, he said.
He said he was reading an article that he said referred to the
white critique of black protests
and how they try to delegitimize it

by calling it idiotic, dumb, stupid,


things of that nature, so they can
sidestep the real issue. As I was
reading that, I saw more and more
truth how this has been approached by people in power and
white people in power in particular.
Justice Ginsburgs statement
suggested that she had taken the
wrong tone because she had not
been fully informed. In expressing
regret about her earlier statements, about Mr. Trump, she said
only that she should not have uttered them.
On reflection, my recent remarks in response to press inquiries were ill-advised and I regret
making them, she said in July of
the Trump remarks. Judges
should avoid commenting on a
candidate for public office.
In the future, Justice Ginsburg said then, I will be more circumspect.

Ending Trend, U.S. Deficit Increases to $587 Billion


By JACKIE CALMES

WASHINGTON The Obama


administration confirmed on Friday that a six-year run of declining annual budget deficits had
halted: The shortfall for the fiscal
year that ended Sept. 30 was $587
billion, an increase over last year
in dollars and as a percentage of
the economy.
The uptick, which had been projected last winter by government
analysts, largely reflected the revenue loss from expiring tax
breaks for businesses and individuals that Congress extended in
December. President Obama had
proposed to pair the tax cuts with
some tax increases on wealthy
Americans, to avoid adding to the
deficit, but Congress refused.
The $587 billion deficit for fiscal
year 2016 is equivalent to 3.2 percent of the gross domestic product, the measure of the overall output of the economy. The previous
years deficit was $438 billion, or

2.5 percent of G.D.P. a reduction


of three-quarters from the level
amid the recession at the end of
the George W. Bush administration.
While the tax cuts were the immediate cause of the return to rising annual deficits, budget shortfalls long had been forecast to
climb unsustainably after 2018 because of the costs of an aging population. The number of people 65
years or older is expected to increase nearly 40 percent in a decade, driving up spending for Medicare and Social Security.
Mr. Obama, in his budgets this
year and in past years, unsuccessfully proposed significant tax increases for the wealthiest taxpayers and some corporations to offset spending initiatives and reduce deficits. In contrast, congressional Republicans proposed
mainly to cut Medicare spending,
in part by offering beneficiaries
taxpayer-funded vouchers to pur-

A six-year string of
declining budget
shortfalls is over.
chase private insurance, and
Medicaid, with reduced block
grants to states. But legislation to
that end never came to a vote.
Hillary Clinton, the Democratic
presidential nominee, proposes
some of the same tax increases as
Mr. Obama has, and more. But the
new revenue is intended to pay for
her spending plans, including for
education, not to reduce deficits.
Mrs. Clintons Republican rival,
Donald J. Trump, would cut taxes
by trillions of dollars mostly for
the wealthy and corporations
even as he has vowed to sharply
reduce the federal debt. His promises to reduce spending enough to
cut the debt and pay for his tax

cuts have been disputed even by


conservative groups, because Mr.
Trump has said Medicare and Social Security are off-limits for cuts.
The Obama administrations final reckoning on spending and
taxes for 2016, which was jointly
released by Treasury Secretary
Jacob J. Lew and the budget director, Shaun Donovan, showed increases in spending for veterans
benefit payments, the health programs Medicare and Medicaid,
and for interest payments on the
nations debt.
Military spending increased little over all, and dropped for military operations and maintenance.
Spending on nutrition for the poor,
formerly known as food stamps,
was down 4 percent.

Everything you need to


know for your business day
is in Business Day.
The New York Times

A17

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Judge Dismisses Suit Against Gun Maker by Newtown Victims Families


By ELI ROSENBERG
and KRISTIN HUSSEY

A Connecticut judge has dismissed a


lawsuit filed by relatives of victims of the
Sandy Hook Elementary School attack,
delivering a blow to an ambitious effort
to hold accountable the makers of the assault rifle used in the 2012 massacre before the case ever went to trial.
The judge, Barbara N. Bellis of State
Superior Court, had surprised even
some of the plaintiffs by allowing the
case to move toward trial this year, despite a 2005 federal law that offers firearm manufacturers and sellers broad
protection from lawsuits when guns are
used in crimes.
But in a decision filed on Friday, Judge
Bellis repeatedly cited the law, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act,
as the basis for her reasoning. This action falls squarely within the broad immunity provided by the act, she wrote.
Lawyers for Remington Outdoor,
whose AR-15-style Bushmaster rifle was
used by Adam Lanza in the attack at the
school, in Newtown, Conn., had argued
for dismissal of the lawsuit. The com-

plaint also named the wholesaler and a


local retailer as defendants.
Lawyers for the plaintiffs, who include
relatives of nine of the 26 people who
were killed in the shooting, as well as a
teacher who survived, contended that
the laws exception for cases of negligent
entrustment, in which a gun is carelessly
given or sold to a person posing a high
risk of misusing it, justified the complaint.
They argued that the manufacturers
and distributors of assault rifles modeled
on the AR-15 had been negligent in selling the weapons to civilians, who are not
trained to handle a gun that is designed
to be used in combat to assault and kill
enemies of war, as Joshua D. Koskoff,
one of the families lawyers, said in June.
Judge Bellis ruled that their claims
were too broad to fall under negligent entrustment, and said Congress had already deemed the civilian population
competent to possess the weapons by
the nature of its law.
To extend the theory of negligent entrustment to the class of nonmilitary,
nonpolice civilians the general public
would imply that the general public

lacks the ordinary prudence necessary


to handle an object that Congress regards as appropriate for sale to the general public, she wrote. This the court is
unwilling to do.
James B. Vogts, a lawyer for Remington, said the company was very pleased
with the courts decision.
Mr. Koskoff said the families planned

A complaint challenging
the broad availability of
assault rifles to civilians.
to appeal the decision immediately.
While the families are obviously disappointed with the judges decision, this is
not the end of the fight, he said in a statement.
The case represented one of the most
serious legal threats to the gun industry
in years. Hillary Clinton, then in the middle of a primary fight against Bernie

Sanders in the Democratic presidential


primaries, praised one of the judges initial rulings in April.
The decision on Friday drew immediate condemnation from gun control advocates.
Jonathan E. Lowy, a director at the
Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said the decision shows the evils
of this federal law that gives special privileges to irresponsible gun companies
that no one else in society has.
It makes victims, including those in
the Sandy Hook massacre, into secondclass citizens, Mr. Lowy continued.
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy of Connecticut, a
Democrat, said laws protecting gun
manufacturers should be changed.
While today is a deeply disappointing
day for the families, their appeal will continue this fight for justice, Mr. Malloy
said in a statement on Friday.
Heidi Li Feldman, a professor at
Georgetown University Law Center, said
the ruling merited an appeal. And for
people who want the federal statute to be
rewritten, it gives them an example of
the type of judicial reasoning that could

motivate people who are not necessarily


aggressively pro-gun control, she said.
The cases effect should be measured
by more than its result in court, said
Timothy D. Lytton, an expert in tort law
and gun cases at the Georgia State University College of Law.
In popular discourse or political discourse, gun violence is often talked about
in the context of criminals using
weapons, Mr. Lytton said, who added
that these lawsuits suggest that the real
problem in gun violence we should focus
on is the firearm industrys sales, marketing and distribution practices.
Bill Sherlach, whose wife, Mary Sherlach, was killed while working as the
school psychologist at Sandy Hook Elementary, said he had hoped that a trial
would reveal the ways gun companies
marketed assault rifles.
Mr. Sherlach said he and other survivors of gun violence were trying to
limit the number of people who have to
join this horrific club that were all in.
Trust me when I tell you that nobody
wants to go through what weve all been
through, he said.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY VICTOR J. BLUE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Newly naturalized citizens recite the Oath of Allegiance in federal court in Brooklyn. They were among 685 people who became United States citizens in New York City on Friday.

Becoming U.S. Citizens, and Just in Time to Vote


By LIZ ROBBINS

In a packed federal courtroom in Brooklyn


on Friday, it was one-stop shopping for 262
New Yorkers: They became American citizens
and registered to vote all from their seats
and just before the deadline.
Today is the last day you can register to
vote in New York, Magistrate Judge Vera M.
Scanlon told the new citizens from 55 countries
immediately after they recited the Naturalization Oath of Allegiance to the United States.
That is one of the special privileges you have
that you didnt have three minutes ago.
Voter registration forms were distributed inside the courtroom, and Judge Scanlon
promptly directed the people to mail them at
the post office next door. But Fryda Guedes, a
staff member from the advocacy group Hispanic Federation, made it even easier. Ms.
Guedes went through the aisles and collected
the forms, saying she would hand-deliver
them to the Board of Elections.
That made Beverly Greigs day. A native of
Guyana and a 30-year Queens resident, Ms.
Greig, 67, wondered for weeks whether she
would have enough time to register.
I was asking everybody: Can I vote, can I
vote? I have to vote, Ms. Greig said. Thrilled,
she handed her form to Ms. Guedes.
In three ceremonies in New York City on Friday, 685 people became American citizens, the
latest in a national wave preceding the presidential election.
For many, the campaign of Donald J. Trump,
the Republican presidential candidate, was
motivation. Humera Qayyum, 25, a medical assistant from Coney Island by way of Pakistan,
said she had experienced discrimination as a
Muslim wearing a hijab, and was displeased
with Mr. Trumps call to bar Muslims from the
United States.
I want to vote Democratic because they
have respect for all religions, respect for everything, Ms. Qayyum said. She added: I
have been here for five years. I worked really
hard to be in this country and I dont want to
get kicked out.
A Muslim student from Bangladesh, Nazmus Sakib Choudhury, 25, said he was afraid of
a Trump presidency and intended to vote
Samantha Schmidt contributed reporting

A Divisive Election Motivates Many Applicants

In line with a national trend, applications for citizenship have risen over the
last 12 months in the New York City area, but applicants face significant waits.
Democratic. We dont have an option, he
said.
Not everybody agreed. An older man from
Canada, who did not want to give his name,
said he wanted to use his citizenship to vote for
Mr. Trump.
Maria Ester Lopez, 34, a Bronx resident
from Mexico, said she felt both lucky and
blessed to get her citizenship on the last day to
register to vote by mail.
Its kind of a miracle, she said. Just in
time.
But not everybody made it.
In line with a national trend, applications for
citizenship rose over the last 12 months in the
area that includes New York City and Long Island, with 110,895 people trying to become citizens, compared with 88,627 over the previous
12-month period, according to the federal Citi-

zenship and Immigration Services. And applicants faced significant waits. As of June 30,
72,595 applications were pending. (By comparison, 52,953 applications were pending at
the same point the previous year.)
The federal Citizenship and Immigration
Services, which processes the applications, denied that those numbers represented delays.
We are monitoring the situation and managing resources to address disparities in processing times, Katie Tichacek, a spokeswoman for
the agency, said.
But the Northern Manhattan Coalition for
Immigrant Rights, which helped prepare 600
applications for citizenship over the last year,
has noticed a substantial lag time in processing in 2016, which has resulted in some people
not being naturalized in time to vote, Angela
Fernandez, the groups executive director,

said. It took only three months to process applications in New York at this time last year,
but now took longer than five months, she said.
My understanding was that because of the
election, things would be moving more
quickly, said Sergia Ramos, 68, a client of the
coalition who came to the office on Thursday to
plead for intervention. She had been waiting
five months just to get an interview, she said.
Ms. Fernandez said it was too late for this
election, and referred Ms. Ramos to her local
elected officials.
For applicants who have naturalization ceremonies in New York scheduled up until Oct.
28, there is one last, little-known resort: New
York State allows them to bring their application in person to a Board of Elections office.
Raymundo Nelio Read Pinedo, a boiler mechanic who lives in the Bronx, was among
those who became a citizen with the Northern
Manhattan Coalitions help. At the federal
court in Manhattan on Friday, he was dressed
for the occasion, wearing a red velvet blazer
and bright red loafers. On his briefcase he displayed a small American flag, a gift from his
12-year-old daughter.
Mr. Read, 55, moved to the United States
from the Dominican Republic in 1988, he said,
but had always been so busy with work that he
had not made time to apply for citizenship until
this year.
He said he planned to celebrate on Friday
night by having dinner with his 82-year-old
mother, who has been a United States citizen
for 15 years.
It means a lot to her, Mr. Read said. For
the first time, a woman has the opportunity to
govern this country.
In Manhattan, workers for Dominicanos
USA and the Asian American Legal Defense
and Education Fund were handing out registration forms in the federal courthouse hallways and outside the building on Friday.
Inside the courtroom, District Judge Richard J. Sullivan encouraged the 167 new citizens
to vote, but spent more time talking to them on
a personal level about his children, his Irish ancestry and the significance of the moment.
I know Im going to celebrate today, he
said. Im going to have an ice cream cone on
your behalf. Ill raise it up like the Statue of Liberty and Ill think of you.

A18

THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW YORK SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Police Reform Vows That Helped de Blasio Win Office May Now Be a Burden
From Page A1
lice-reform legislation in the City
Council. Continuing fidelity to a
broken-windows model of policing.
Frustration can be heard at
New York Communities for
Change, a social justice advocacy
group and early endorser of Mr. de
Blasio in the 2013 Democratic primary, and from a former aide,
Kirsten John Foy, whose handcuffing at a Brooklyn parade in
2011 helped galvanize Mr. de Blasios views on the need for
changes in police practices. Last
month, Mr. Foy stood alongside
Representative Hakeem Jeffries,
a Brooklyn Democrat and a possible challenger to Mr. de Blasio in
2017, at a protest outside Police
Headquarters.
At the Council, a growing number of members have been refusing to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance at the start of meetings, in
part, they say, because of the administrations handling of policing
issues.
Councilman
Jumaane
D.
Williams, who was detained along
with Mr. Foy in 2011, began the effort, saying his decision to offer
the silent protest came after he
learned that Officer Pantaleo accrued overtime pay while on modified duty. Thats what brought
me over the edge, said Mr.
Williams, a Democrat from Brooklyn. I had to do something.
On the other side, members of
the Patrolmens Benevolent Association have orchestrated protests
outside the mayoral residence at
Gracie Mansion, and by the
Prospect Park Y.M.C.A. where Mr.
de Blasio regularly works out. In
their view, he has already gone too
far.
Mr. de Blasio, seemingly cognizant of his potential vulnerability, has responded in recent
weeks. After the citys stop-andfrisk police tactics became an issue in the first presidential debate
between Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton, the mayor seized the
opportunity to emphasize his opposition to the overuse of the tactics during the administration of
former Mayor Michael R.
Bloomberg, doing so on national
television and local radio.
On Friday, he said that he would
press for changes to state law to
allow greater transparency with
police disciplinary records, a
pledge that garnered a lukewarm
response from reform advocates.
The mayor moved swiftly last
month to restrict overtime pay to
officers on modified duty like
Officer Pantaleo then headed to
Harlem to bring his message to a
gathering at the Rev. Al Sharptons National Action Network.
William Neuman contributed reporting.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSHUA BRIGHT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Clockwise from top right: Councilman Jumaane D. Williams of Brooklyn and Kirsten John Foy, a former aide to Bill de Blasio,
were detained at a parade in 2011. Bertha Lewis, who served on the mayors transition team and has become a critic, noted a growing enthusiasm gap. The Rev. Al Sharpton said the basic supporters of Mayor de Blasio had been pretty much satisfied.
In the speech, the mayor outlined his administrations efforts
to improve relations between the
police and minority communities
fewer arrests; retraining of officers on the use of force; a commitment to reinventing community
policing while embracing demands for more in the future.
Thats the only way things
change, Mr. de Blasio said. Keep
those demands coming. Keep the

pressure on.
Mr. de Blasio has not yet announced new police reform initiatives. Phil Walzak, a top mayoral
aide, said the mayor would do so
during his campaign, but he declined to characterize them.
I dont think at any point is
anyone saying, All done here,
Mr. Walzak said. Theres more to
do. But this mayor is absolutely
committed to real reform. Hes put

real reforms in place, and theres


more to come.
Mr. de Blasio is also facing behind-the-scenes pressure to embrace a distant and difficult goal:
the closing of the Rikers Island jail
complex.
His campaign has stuck to a
simple message when it comes to
the police: Crime is down, even
with far fewer of the low-level arrests and police stops that fall

DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES

Some officers turned their backs on the mayor in protest as he began a eulogy in January 2015.

heavily on black and Hispanic


communities.
Dan Levitan, a spokesman for
the mayors 2017 campaign, said
Mr. de Blasio had proven New
York City can improve police-community relations while remaining
the safest big city in America. Mr.
Levitan pointed to poll numbers
showing that Mr. de Blasios support remained high among black
voters and had remained steady
on questions of police-community
relations.
Indeed, Mr. Sharpton said the
mayors basic supporters have
been pretty much satisfied.
Critics of Mr. de Blasios concede that there have been
changes at the Police Department
during his tenure.
But they lament that the reforms have been unilaterally taken and directed by the police
themselves. And they focus on the
apparent absence of punishment
for officers, even for those involved in the high-profile deaths
of unarmed black men, like Mr.
Garner and Ramarley Graham,
who was fatally shot in his Bronx
home in 2012.
When your training fails you in
the field, theres no accountability
for that, said Councilman Robert
Cornegy, a Democrat who repre-

sents parts of Brooklyn. But, he


added despairingly, the issue may
not cost Mr. de Blasio at the polls
because black voters are already
disaffected in their hopes for police reform.
Theyre disappointed, Mr.
Cornegy said of his black
constituents,
adding:
The
African-American
community
and the Caribbean communities
love really hard, and, consequently, when theyre done,
theyre done really hard. Theyre
not at a done period.
Policing presents a tightrope
for any New York mayor, perhaps
none more so than Mr. de Blasio,
who began his administration
amid the high hopes of reformers
and the skeptical eye of rank-andfile officers.
Those tensions burst into public
view starting in 2014 after street
protests arose in response to a
grand jurys decision not to indict
Officer Pantaleo in Mr. Garners
death, followed by the killing of
two patrol officers in Brooklyn
and a de facto work slowdown by
officers, as some turned their
backs on the mayor while he
spoke at the officers funerals.
Mr. de Blasio has at times presented what he hopes will be a
new model of community policing
in ways that are likely to appeal to
rank-and-file officers. This is not
social work; this is crime fighting, he said recently when asked
of the program, in terms oddly
reminiscent of the early administration of former Mayor Rudolph
W. Giuliani.
Representative Jeffries said the
mayors resistance to the Councils legislating police activity, his
continued support of broken-windows policing a tactic that involves aggressively going after
minor offenses to prevent major
ones and his embrace of a proposal to make resisting arrest a
felony were not the positions of a
police reformer.
These are the positions, he
continued, of someone who
seems afraid to aggressively go at
the police unions that defend the
status quo.
That feeling has been shared by
some who worked in the de Blasio
administration, and say they were
drawn there by the promise of
making deep changes to the criminal justice system.
Dominique Day worked on justice initiatives at the Mayors Office of Criminal Justice until January. She said she left disheartened
at the lack of zeal for changes,
such as improving the quality of
the information used in the increasingly data-driven interactions between New Yorkers and
the criminal justice system.
You have this really exciting
rhetoric of reform that has been
embraced by almost everyone, including
the
police
and
prosecutors, she said. But in
practice, its business as usual.

Mayor Calls for Change in Law That Blocks Release of Police Disciplinary Actions
By RICK ROJAS
and J. DAVID GOODMAN

In the face of mounting criticism of his record on transparency, Mayor Bill de Blasio called on
Friday for changing a state law
that the city has said blocks the release of details about disciplinary
actions taken against New York
police officers.
The mayor, in a statement, said
that the statute, a section of the
states civil rights law, was flawed
and that the public interest was
disserved by it.
The section, 50-a, has been at
the center of a legal dispute over
disclosing the disciplinary history
of the officer who placed Eric Garner in a fatal chokehold. The law
has been a longstanding obstacle
to civil rights groups, reporters
and others seeking information
about misconduct by police officers and corrections officers.
Without significant changes to
this statute, the city remains

barred from providing New Yorkers with the transparency we deserve, the mayor said. We hope
advocates for greater transparency will join us in the effort to reform this state law.
But critics of section 50-a said
the problem is not only with the
statute, but with the citys expansive interpretation of its protections, driven by a deference to the
unions representing officers.
The proposal was met with criticism from the largest union representing police officers, as well as
from police reform advocates and
civil liberties groups that have
been pushing for disciplinary information to be released.
In a statement, Communities
United for Police Reform dismissed the mayors proposal as
not substantive reform or a genuine commitment to full transparency. Others noted the challenging odds of the legislation being
enacted.
It is nothing more than a way

Altering a statute that


has been an obstacle
to sharing information
about misconduct.
to avoid responsibility for the
mess the administration itself created, said Christopher Dunn, the
associate legal director at the New
York Civil Liberties Union, which
was fighting in court to make public some of the same files City Hall
said it wanted to unveil through a
legislative change.
Well all be dead and buried,
Mr. Dunn said, before the New
York State Legislature turns its
back on the police unions and
rewrites the law to make public
more disciplinary materials.
Mr. de Blasio, a Democrat
whose 2013 mayoral campaign

championed police reform, has


disappointed some who supported his run, creating a potential liability in the 2017 election on
an issue that has been a key part
of his appeal to liberals, particularly among black voters.
Mr. de Blasio has appeared increasingly conscious of this vulnerability, and in recent weeks his
administration has been highlighting his reform efforts.
The law he is seeking to alter,
section 50-a, has been in place for
four decades. It says that the
records evaluating the performance and employment status of
police and corrections officers, as
well as firefighters, are considered confidential and should not
be available to outside review
without the persons written consent or a court order.
City officials have argued that
the law prevents the release of
summaries of misconduct by Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who held Mr.
Garner in the chokehold in 2014,

before his death. Earlier this year,


the Police Department cited the
law in changing a decades-old
practice of making available to
reporters basic details on disciplinary actions.
Under the mayors proposal,
the confidentiality protections
would be eliminated for disciplinary records of officers who are
being prosecuted by the Civilian
Complaint Review Board, making
the records of proceedings and the
results public. In such cases, the
department would post an officers name, charges against him
or her, transcripts and exhibits
from department hearings, summaries of the trial judge and the
commissioners determination.
I believe in transparency,
James P. ONeill, the citys police
commissioner, said in a statement. I also believe that making
information about disciplinary
proceedings public will help us
build trust with the community.
The proposal, which included

Dylans Fertile Romance With New York


From Page A1
leading the movement against the
Vietnam War. Mr. Dylan repeatedly asked Mr. Weberman to leave
him alone, and grabbed and
shoved him one day in 1972 near
Elizabeth Street before riding off
on a bicycle.
Mr. Weberman, with typical
New York insouciance, shrugged
off the episode.
I deserved it, he told an interviewer in 2006. I dont hold it
against him.
Mr. Dylan first came to New
York in January 1961 as a cherubic
but determined 19-year-old from a
middle-class Jewish Midwestern
home. He promptly visited his
musical idol, Woody Guthrie, at a
hospital near Morristown, N.J.,
where Guthrie was seriously ill
with Huntingtons disease. Like
more than a few eager refugees
from the heartland, Mr. Dylan
spun various stories about his
origins, telling the writer Nat
Hentoff that he had run away from
home to join a traveling circus.

Ms. Rotolo learned his real name,


Robert Zimmerman, from his
draft card.
Greenwich Village then was the
epicenter of folk music, though
many strummers of hillbilly and
bluegrass tunes were the sons and
daughters of the Bronx and
Brooklyn. Many of them were also
self-invented; Ramblin Jack Elliott, for example, was actually Elliott Adnopoz, son of a Brooklyn
doctor.
On his first day in the Village,
Mr. Dylan showed up at Cafe
Wha?, played harmonica and that
night had his first gig. He soon had
bookings at Gerdes Folk City and
the Gaslight Cafe and charmed
the more seasoned folk singers.
By July, at a hootenanny at Riverside Church, he met Ms. Rotolo,
at the time a 17-year-old from a
leftist Queens family. He described her in his memoir Chronicles: Volume One, as the most
erotic thing Id ever seen. They
moved in together in the shabby
top-floor apartment of a West
Fourth Street walk-up. They
prowled
Manhattans
lower

reaches at all hours, sometimes


heading down to Chinatown for a
meal at Sam Wos or to the musician Dave Van Ronks flat for an
all-night poker game or to the
White Horse Tavern to hear the
Clancy Brothers and Tommy
Makem sing their Irish rebel
songs.
According to John Strausbaughs neighborhood history,
The Village, Ms. Rotolo educated Mr. Dylan about social issues and took him to see Picassos
Guernica at the Museum of
Modern Art as well as several Off
Broadway plays, one of which was
a pastiche of Brecht and Weill
songs that dazzled Mr. Dylan.
On Fourth Street Mr. Dylans
bitter Positively Fourth Street
came out in 1965 was the Music
Inn, which sold instruments, and
Allan Blocks Sandal Shop, which
provided
the
folk-uniform
footwear and where musicians
could jam with the fiddle-playing
owner. At Izzy Youngs Folklore
Center, indigent troubadours like
Mr. Dylan could listen to records.
In those early years Bob Dylan

statements of support from the


commissioner and community
leaders, coincided with the citys
filing of a legal brief in its appeal of
the release of Officer Pantaleos
records. This is a step of progress
in the right direction, said City
Councilwoman Vanessa Gibson, a
Democrat from the Bronx and a
chairwoman of the public safety
committee.
But Patrick Lynch, the president of the Patrolmens Benevolent Association, said the statute
was essential to protect information about police officers.
Removing these protections
will put police officers at greater
risk of the types of targeted attacks we have seen with increasing frequency, Mr. Lynch said in a
statement. It may also allow
criminals to evade justice by turning criminal trials into smear campaigns against hard-working police officers, using issues that
have little to do with the guilt or
innocence of the accused.

Bob Dylan at Madison Square


Garden in 1974. His rise to
prominence began in Greenwich Village cafes.

LARRY MORRIS/THE NEW YORK TIMES

was a painter searching for his


palette, Ms. Rotolo, an artist who
died in 2011, wrote in A Freewheelin Time: A Memoir of
Greenwich Villages in the Sixties.
He had in mind the pictures he
wanted to paint; he just needed to
find the right color mix to get him
there.
He also, she wrote, had an uncanny ability to complicate the obvious and sanctify the banal
just like a poet.
Robert Shelton, then the folk

music reviewer for The New York


Times, saw Mr. Dylan perform at
Gerdes in September 1961 and
raved about a distinctive new stylist. Mr. Dylan was signed to a contract with Columbia that same
day.
Ms. Rotolo was the striking
young woman on the cover of Mr.
Dylans breakthrough 1963 album,
The Freewheelin Bob Dylan,
which, in addition to Dont Think
Twice, featured such signature
songs as Blowin in the Wind

and A Hard Rains A-Gonna Fall.


She is shown clasping his arm as
they stroll, hunched over against
the cold, on snow-blanketed Jones
Street. The scene epitomized the
offbeat sweetness of a Village romance, short-lived as theirs
proved to be they broke up in
1964 partly over Mr. Dylans affair
with Ms. Baez. (Appearing at the
Capitol Theater in Port Chester,
N.Y., on Thursday night, Ms. Baez
honored Mr. Dylan by singing four
of his songs and saying of his Nobel Prize, He earned it the best
of the best.)
Greenwich Village was not Mr.
Dylans only New York address.
During the early 1970s, he lived in
a rented townhouse on East 49th
Street next door to Katharine
Hepburn. In a handwritten note,
he once invited the great actress
to a party at his home the one
with the dog, he wrote celebrating a daughters graduation.
She does not seem to have attended.

THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW YORK SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

A19

0N

Scrutiny, and Aid, for Issues


Facing New Jersey Transit
Legislators Set Hearings; U.S. Seeks Money
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS

State lawmakers in New Jersey


moved on Friday to hold hearings
focused on investigating the problems plaguing New Jersey Transit, and a top federal official announced that a key project meant
to improve the railroads service
was moving forward.
The official, Anthony Foxx, the
federal transportation secretary,
said that the process of lining up
grants and loans to pay for the
project, a new rail tunnel under
the Hudson River, had started.
To use a football analogy,
weve carried the ball to the 50yard line, Mr. Foxx said, urging
local leaders to take the next steps
toward starting construction.
The tunnel project has gained
momentum over the past year af-

The public has lost


confidence in an
essential state agency,
a top lawmaker says.
ter a series of train delays at the
existing century-old tunnel that
now carries New Jersey Transit
and Amtrak trains between New
Jersey and New York. New Jersey
Transit is leading an environmental review that must be
completed before construction on
a new tunnel can begin.
But New Jersey Transit, the nations third-busiest commuter railroad, is also facing questions
about its safety record, financial
problems and worsening service.
Even before a fatal train crash in
Hoboken last month, federal officials were investigating a rise in
safety lapses at the railroad.
After state lawmakers criticized the state-run agency at a
news conference in Trenton on
Friday, Gov. Chris Christie announced that he had signed legislation raising New Jerseys gasoline tax by 23 cents a gallon to pay

for transportation projects, including those involving New Jersey Transit. He also ended a statewide shutdown of most transportation work he ordered over
the summer.
The gas tax increase, part of a
deal reached by Mr. Christie, a Republican, and Democratic leaders
last month, takes effect on Nov. 1.
Stephen M. Sweeney, the State
Senate president, said lawmakers
would hold a hearing next week to
investigate New Jersey Transits
many problems, including its failure to install technology that can
stop a speeding train automatically. The agencys new executive
director, Steven Santoro, would be
invited to testify.
Senator Sweeney, a Democrat,
described New Jersey Transit as
an agency in crisis, echoing the
findings of a report by The New
York Times this week.
An agency that was a national
model with a bright future seven
years ago is now suffering from
years of neglect, chronic underfunding, questionable decisionmaking, including poor preparations for Hurricane Sandy, he
said. Nearly one-fourth of the railroads fleet was damaged during
the 2012 storm.
Also on Friday, several members of Congress sent a letter to
Mr. Foxx in which they raised concerns about The Timess findings
and asked for details about safety
violations uncovered by a recent
Federal Railroad Administration
audit of New Jersey Transit.
Leaders of the State Assembly
are considering the use of subpoenas to require officials to testify
and to collect documents.
The public and the states economic vitality depend on N.J.
Transit to fulfill its mission, but
the public has lost confidence in
the agencys ability to operate
safely and efficiently, said the Assembly speaker, Vincent Prieto, a
Democrat.
Asked on Friday about New
Jersey Transits ability to lead the
environmental review for the pro-

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN TAGGART FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Above left, Anthony Foxx, the federal transportation secretary,


with Senator Robert Menendez on Friday at Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, left. Grants and loans are being lined up for
a new rail tunnel under the Hudson River, Mr. Foxx said.

posed Hudson tunnel, Mr. Foxx


said the agency had been a good
partner on the project so far. He
was joined by officials from Amtrak and the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey, who
are working together on plans for
the tunnel and other infrastructure improvements as part of a
larger project known as the Gateway program that could cost more

than $20 billion.


Senator Chuck Schumer, Democrat of New York and a key supporter of the Gateway project,
said construction on a new tunnel
could begin in 2019 and could take
four to five years to complete. Mr.
Schumer pledged to do everything he could to secure federal financing for the project and suggested that Hillary Clinton, the

Democratic nominee for president, would support the tunnel if


she was elected.
The project, which is likely to be
paid for with a combination of federal grants and loans, was accepted this summer into a pipeline
for federal grants known as New
Starts funding, Mr. Foxx said. The
environmental study is also being
expedited, he added.
The Portal Bridge, another key
choke point for trains approaching New York City, could be addressed sooner, with construction
on a replacement starting in 2018,
Mr. Schumer said. Problems at the
century-old swing bridge, which
spans the Hackensack River, often cause delays for Amtrak and
New Jersey Transit trains.
Patrick J. Foye, the Port Authoritys executive director, said
the tunnel project had the support
of the agency, as well as Gov. An-

drew M. Cuomo of New York, a


Democrat, and Mr. Christie. The
agencys board plans to discuss
the Gateway project at a meeting
next week, he said.
The Port Authority board is expected to consider approving $300
million for the Portal Bridge
project, according to an official
who was familiar with the plans
but was not authorized to discuss
them publicly.
About six years ago, Mr.
Christie canceled an earlier plan
to build a tunnel under the Hudson.
Asked whether the current proposal might be similarly thwarted,
Mr. Schumer said that he had faith
in Mr. Christie and Mr. Cuomo and
that anyone who stood in the way
would face dramatic consequences.
Were making sure, he said,
there is no one who can kill it.

For New Yorks Most Polluted Waterways, a Seat of Honor in a Hall of Shame
By COREY KILGANNON

The hardware is here, Rob


Buchanan said, wheeling in the
trophies on Thursday night for an
unusual award ceremony.
He was pulling a little wagon
bearing a toilet seat painted gold
and a toilet plunger painted silver.
Lets get this over with, so we
can go back to drinking beer, he
said, officially kicking off the 2016
Golden Toilet Awards.
Mr. Buchanan coordinates a
volunteer water-testing program
for the New York City Water Trail
Association, an advocacy group,
and holds the awards each fall to
honor, or really dishonor, the most
polluted waterways in and around
New York City. He also handpaints the two trophies himself.
Whether given to Flushing Bay,
Newtown Creek or the Gowanus
Canal, these awards the plunger goes to the runner-up are no
coveted achievements, but rather
seats in an environmental hall of
shame.
The awards are held at the end
of 20 weeks of testing conducted
by the Citizens Water Quality
Testing Program, a volunteer
group. Its members sample water
at some 50 locations from Yonkers
to Jamaica, Queens, and take
them by subway, by kayak, by a
network of cyclists in Brooklyn
known as the Pony Express to
Pier 40 in Manhattan or other testing sites throughout the city.
The samples are tested for fecal
bacteria from sewer runoff
hence the toilet-themed awards
and the results are posted online,
providing water-quality enthusiasts with data in addition to what
is typically made available by government agencies. The levels often rise with rainfalls that exceed
the capacity of treatment plants
and cause sewage to flow directly
into local waterways.
The awards have now been held
five times. Last year, the winner
was Flushing Bay, near La
Guardia Airport, and the year before that, the Saw Mill River,
which runs through Westchester
County and empties into the Hudson River in Yonkers. The river
regularly registers the highest
pollution levels, but Mr. Buchanan
awards other bodies of water to
widen the spotlight.
If it was a competition, the
same locations would win every
year, he told a group of samplers
on Thursday. They were gathered
around a table of snacks and beer
at the River Project, an educa-

PHOTOGRAPHS BY AMIR LEVY FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Ted Enoch holding the silver plunger award given to this years runner-up, Coney Island Creek. The winner was the Bronx Kill.
tional center on Pier 40 along the
Hudson River near Houston
Street. We want to spread the
love around.
Serving as a backdrop for the
ceremony were large fish tanks
filled with water piped in from the
Hudson River. They contained local species such as porgies,

striped bass, blackfish and one


mean-looking oyster toadfish.
And these are our stars of the
river, said Nina Hitchings, the lab
manager for the River Project,
pointing to a tank of sea horses.
She said the species has made a
comeback in the Hudson in recent
years.

Chris Girgenti with the top prize in the 2016 Golden Toilet
Awards. The dubious honors go to New Yorks foulest waters.

Then Mr. Buchanan announced


that the silver plunger would go to
a first-time nominee, Coney Island Creek in Brooklyn.
Ted Enoch, who tests the waters
in the creek, accepted the plunger
on the creeks behalf. He was applauded as he knelt before Mr. Buchanan, who held the plunger
aloft, as if to knight Mr. Enoch.
It really works, Mr. Buchanan
said of the plunger, adding that it
could be used for clearing sewer
blockages, though doing so would
mean it wont be silver for long.
Mr. Enoch said Coney Island
Creek was plagued this summer
by runoff from a large apartment
complex that was disconnected
from the sewer system and discharging directly into the creek.
Mr. Buchanan said that he had
raised the issue in the neighborhood press and that the problem
had been fixed.
Mr. Enoch planned on taking his
silver plunger to an upcoming
meeting with city environmental
officials to emphasize the need to
prevent similar messy discharges.
Then it was time for the Golden

Toilet.
The winner was the Bronx Kill,
a narrow strait between Randalls
Island and the southern tip of the
Bronx, connecting the Harlem
River to the East River.
I think the paint is still a little
wet so dont sit on it right away,
Mr. Buchanan told Chris Girgenti,
who manages the natural areas
for the Randalls Island Park Alliance and accepted the dubious
prize.
Mr. Girgenti said the kill may
have been polluted from different

sources, including sewage outflows and a homeless encampment.


Special mention went to the Gowanus Canal, which has been
called the most polluted waterway
in the country.
Eymund Diegel, who collects
samples in the canal, reported
that a pump had been activated to
pull fresh harbor water through a
tunnel to the head of the Gowanus,
but was churning up layers of noxious sludge, creating a frothy mixture he called a toxic milkshake.
It looks like a cappuccino latte
with some sprinkles on top, he
said. We are now a hipster neighborhood, so I have to use those
type of terms.
The sample from the Gowanus
is so foul that the two main lab specialists at the River Project, Ms.
Hitchings and Elisa Caref, said
they always argued about whose
responsibility it was to test the
water.
I mostly lost, Ms. Caref said.
She added that they could guess
the source of certain water samples by sight, from the frothy
Gowanus sample to the distinctive shade of green of the water
from Prospect Park Lake.
Wrapping up the awards, Mr.
Buchanan assured those whose
waterways did not win that for
better or worse your time will
come.

Manhattan Apts. Unfurnished


Three, Four & Five Rms.
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THE NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIALS/LETTERS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

The Assault Allegations Against Trump


TO THE EDITOR:
ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER JR., Publisher, Chairman
Founded in 1851

ADOLPH S. OCHS

ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER

ORVIL E. DRYFOOS

ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER

Publisher 1896-1935

Publisher 1935-1961

Publisher 1961-1963

Publisher 1963-1992

The Coming Battle for Mosul


The coming battle to retake Mosul in northern Iraq
could be a turning point in the American-led fight against
the Islamic State. The city is the terrorist groups stronghold in that country and critical to its claim to having established a caliphate.
For two years the Islamic State, or ISIS, has exercised
total authority over Mosuls inhabitants and subjected
many of them to brutal treatment. If, as the allies expect,
Mosul is soon liberated, ISIS will suffer a huge blow.
But what happens next? Despite months of planning
by the United States, the Iraqi government and their partners, much could go wrong. A comprehensive post-battle
arrangement for governing the city has yet to be worked
out, meaning that even the best-executed military operation could unleash new tensions. It is also not clear
whether the allies are prepared to handle the humanitarian needs of hundreds of thousands of civilians who might
flee the fighting.
The one lesson America should have learned in Iraq
and Afghanistan over the last 15 years is that unless governments reduce corruption, calm sectarian divisions, integrate all groups into the political process and deliver
services to their citizens, extremists are sure to rise again.
After the Americans overthrew Saddam Hussein, the
once-oppressed Shiite majority came to power and ran
roughshod over the Sunnis, Kurds and other minorities.
The current Iraqi prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, has
tried to be more inclusive. But old resentments linger, not
only among his fellow Shiites but also among the Sunnis,
whose anger at being largely excluded from governance
contributed to the rise of the Islamic State. The Kurds, the
other major sectarian group, are similarly disaffected.
These forces are in play in Mosul, a Sunni-majority
city that some Sunnis say should be granted more autonomy from the central government once ISIS is pushed out.
For that reason, some experts have argued that the attempted liberation of Mosul should be delayed until governance and other issues are addressed.
The counterargument is that delaying the battle for
Mosul would carry its own risks. American officials say
that after recent victories in retaking Ramadi, Falluja and
other towns from ISIS, the American-Iraqi coalition has
momentum. Meanwhile, ISIS knowing something is
coming has stepped up its abuse of the local population
and strengthened its defenses. President Obama also does
not want to leave the operation to his successor.
The Americans and Iraqis have made some attempt
to improve governance by assigning advisers to bolster
the weak governor in Nineveh Province, where Mosul is
located. As for the threat of mass displacement, the hope is

that residents will stay put and help secure the city once
ISIS is routed. Nevertheless, American, Iraqi and United
Nations officials have planned for a worst-case outcome
in which 750,000 or more people flee the fighting by setting aside $2 billion and preparing emergency sites where
civilians can live until it is safe to return.
The Americans have already negotiated an elaborate
battlefield plan with the Iraqis that is designed in part to
avoid more sectarian conflict. The best American-trained
Iraqi counterterrorism forces, backed by some army units,
federal police and American air power, will make the assault on Mosul. Iranian-backed Shiite militias, accused of
human rights abuses after earlier battles, and Kurdish
forces will be kept on the outskirts of the city. Post-battle
security is being assigned to thousands of local police officers and tribal fighters.
There is a lot riding on a victory against ISIS for
the civilians suffering under the terrorists rule; for Mr.
Abadi, Iraqs embattled leader; and for Mr. Obama, whose
regional credibility has been damaged by his decision not
to intervene directly in Syria. But retaking Mosul may be
the easier part of an operation whose ultimate success will
depend on putting in place effective long-term plans for
maintaining stability and rebuilding a shattered city.

As awful as Donald Trumps words


about inappropriate behavior toward
women are, his words also bespeak a
more generally troubling and inappropriate attitude: When youre a star . . . you
can do anything.
This is the Donald Trump we have
known for decades. Are we to surmise
that he will take this same attitude to the
Oval Office?
IVAN COOK
Birmingham, Ala.

TO THE EDITOR:

If Donald Trump believes that these


women are all lying, there is one way to
determine who is telling the truth and
who is not. Hook both Mr. Trump and
these women to lie detectors and then
lets see who is truthful and who is not. My
money is on the women.
NANCY McCAFFREY
East Moriches, N.Y.
TO THE EDITOR:

Re The Timess Lawyer Responds to


Trump (news article, Oct. 14):
David McCraws response to Donald
Trumps threat of a lawsuit over your article about two womens claims that he
sexually assaulted them was so brilliant.
Not a law case cited, no legal mumbo
jumbo. Just the essence of libel law, the
First Amendment and democracy explicated in a few lines, and Mr. Trumps demand for a retraction was totally demolished.
TOM DUFFY
San Francisco

TO THE EDITOR:

Many seem to wonder why women who


have experienced sexual assault do not
report the assault immediately, thus
making the claims questionable.
I, as a 12-year-old walking home from
school, was followed by a man who
sexually assaulted me just outside my
home. I told my mother when she returned from work, she called the police,
and I, with an immense sense of embarrassment and shame, told the police what
had happened.
The culprit was eventually apprehended. I picked him out of a lineup, faced
him in court, pointed him out as the assailant and, with excruciating and humiliating difficulty, told the court what he had
done to me. The first thing his defense attorney asked me was, What were you
wearing?
This is something I didnt tell my
spouse about until a few years ago and
only within the last month revealed to my
closest friend of 30 years.

TO THE EDITOR:

ALEX NABAUM

states distinguish strong teacher-training programs from


weak ones.
Under the new rules, states are required to gather information on new teachers, including the programs that
trained them, and to get feedback from both principals and
teachers on how well the training programs prepared
them. States must then report this information to the department and make it available to the public.
Most important, the states will rate teacher-training
programs on multiple indexes, including how teachers
fare on evaluations or growth in student learning, as
measured through a method determined by the state. As
part of this process, states are required to ensure that all
teaching programs give students a strong grounding in
the subject they will teach as well as in how to teach it.
States are also expected to help low-performing programs
get better.
In addition to giving the states a clearer view of how
well teacher-training programs are working, the new information will allow aspiring teachers to evaluate the
worth of teacher training programs before they go into
debt to complete them.
The new rules represent a necessary first step in
broader reforms of teacher preparation. Eventually, for
example, schools of education will have to become more
rigorous and selective if the country is to get the caliber of
teaching that it clearly needs.

The King Who Personified Thailand


He was a curious amalgam of modern and feudal: an
American-born, Swiss-educated king who could not be
criticized under Thailands stern lse-majest laws; an accomplished sailor, painter and saxophonist who once
jammed with Benny Goodman, but before whom his subjects had to prostrate themselves; a constitutional monarch with limited powers who commanded a vast fortune
and was accorded almost divine status; a head of state
whose reign was punctuated by a progression of bad governments and coups, yet was loved by his countrymen.
Perhaps it was because he was all these things that
King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who died on Thursday at age
88, became the personification of Thai nationhood in his
70-year reign. And that is also why his passing is so troubling to his country and its allies.
King Bhumibol was an accidental king, placed on the
throne of what used to be Siam at age 18 after a tumultuous period in which his uncle abdicated and his older
brother, the next king, was found dead with a bullet
through his head. Yet politics, geopolitics and his remarkable personality transformed him into a powerful unifying
force in a profoundly divided country, revered by the poor
for whom he launched hundreds of development projects
and esteemed by the royalist military and political elite.
The generals needed him to give legitimacy to their
coups and so built up the monarchy. And as Southeast Asia
became a battleground of East and West, the United States

TO THE EDITOR:

So many who havent experienced sexual assault have no clue how difficult it is
to experience such a thing and the seemingly inevitable questioning of your
claims and veracity that result.
What was I wearing?
LYNNE HOOLEY
Napa, Calif.

TO THE EDITOR:

In my version of an ideal world, the reputable papers and TV networks would ignore this cartoon of a campaign, now 100
percent smut, and focus entirely on the
policy substance of the tightest congressional races nationwide.
It will never happen, of course. This
election has been a windfall for the media.
There has never been a larger TV audience for the public flayings that we pretend are debates. Newspapers and magazines must be flying off the stands, too,
with the latest episode in the Campaign
2016 soap opera. And Twitter is on fire.
Mercifully, it will all be over soon. What
will the chattering classes do with themselves when the subject turns to the dull
work of governing? More important,
what will the president-elect do? Its impossible to tell the candidates are too
busy tearing each other limb from limb.
MARGARET McGIRR
Greenwich, Conn.

Expanding the Nobel Pantheon to Include Bob Dylan

Help Teachers Before They Get to Class


The countries that have eclipsed the United States in
educational achievement have far more effective systems
for training teachers. Consider, for example, Finlands system, which has consistently ranked among the best in the
world. Decades ago, Finland moved teacher education out
of teachers colleges and into universities, where students
are given rigorous preparation and recruited from the top
quarter of their graduating high school classes.
Teachers colleges in the United States have resisted
proposals for raising entry standards along these lines,
which is unfortunate given how abysmal teacher training
is in this country compared with training in high-performing nations. The problem was underscored in a 2013 study
by the National Council on Teacher Quality that rated only
10 percent of the 1,200 programs the study examined as
adequate. Most programs had low or no standards for admissions.
Even when they offer adequate instruction, the programs fail in other ways. For example, they regularly train
people in subject areas where no new teachers are needed,
while ignoring areas where there is a teacher shortage,
like math, science and special education. Beyond that,
schools often fail to arrange for student-teaching programs in schools in high-poverty areas, which puts those
schools at a disadvantage for finding new staff members.
This week, the Department of Education released
rules that are meant to address these problems and help

Re Trump Fires Back, Accusing


Women of False Smears (front page,
Oct. 14):
We must rise and with a common voice
echo Michelle Obama: Enough is
enough. Let Donald Trump be the agent
of change, but in ways that he could not
imagine. Let his ilk be symbols of a past
that we must expose and eliminate.
Rise and fight for common decency.
Speak loudly with your votes and actions
to drown out the hatred. Stop turning a
blind eye to rape, abuse, intimidation or
any other form of assault.
It was never right, but never has it been
more wrong.
Enough is enough.
DOUG SANDERS
Vancouver, British Columbia

saw in the king a critical bulwark against Communism.


But it was King Bhumibol himself who consolidated
his place as a Buddhist patriarch to his people by touring
villages to encourage development, often with doctors
who would treat people on the spot. That endowed him
with political powers far beyond his constitutional role and
helped him defuse political conflicts and violence.
But however effective he was in elevating the
monarchy, it was beyond his power to establish a stable,
well-functioning democracy or to leave behind an heir
who could fill his ornate slippers. King Bhumibols son and
successor, Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn, 64, is disliked by much of the public, which considers him an eccentric playboy lacking the decorum for the throne.
The last 15 years of King Bhumibols reign saw a bitter
political struggle between poor, rural supporters of
Thaksin Shinawatra, a businessman and former prime
minister now in self-imposed exile abroad, and the urban
and military establishments. In August, voters approved a
new Constitution written by the military junta in power
since 2014, which reduces the power of political parties.
The junta, which claims the late kings blessing, has said
there will be an election next year, but it has walked away
from similar promises before.
Ordinary Thais often looked to the king to provide the
leadership their politicians and generals could never
muster. They will miss him the most.

Re Bob Dylan Wins Nobel Prize, Redefining the Boundaries of Literature


(news article, Oct. 14):
If the criteria for winning the Nobel
Prize in Literature were intelligence,
imagination, economy of language, and
impact on an era, Bob Dylan would have
won several decades ago.
Better late than never.
CHARLES KAISER
New York
The writer is the author of 1968 in America.

panded it and challenged us to see the


beauty of words in all forms of writing.
Last year, the Nobel Prize redefined
literature to include the journalism of
Svetlana Alexievich: remarkable mosaics of human stories. This year, awarding the prize to Bob Dylan shatters the
conceit that songwriters are not writers
and that song lyrics are not literature,
and honors lyrics as a literary art as important and worthy as any other.
CHRISTOPHER THORPE
San Francisco
The writer is a poet.

TO THE EDITOR:

Anna North says Bob Dylan shouldnt


have gotten a Nobel Prize in Literature
(Editorial Notebook, nytimes.com, Oct.
13). To Ms. North, because Bob Dylan
writes music to accompany his words, he
is a songwriter and a musician, not a
writer, and his words are not literature.
In fact, lyrics are poetry, poetry lyrics,
and that is all you need to know.
The committee awarding Nobel Prizes
does not seem to share Ms. Norths narrow view of literature. It has instead ex-

Birth of a Nation Rebuff


TO THE EDITOR:

Re The Birth of a Nation Flops at


Box Office Despite Raves (Arts pages,
Oct. 10):
I am finding it hard to accept the apparent rebuff at the box office of The Birth of
a Nation, particularly after seeing the
film last weekend. It is an exceptional
piece of artistry and a vital portrait of our
American experience in trying to live up
to ideals we say we have. No one should
miss it no one who respects our country
and its long struggle to define itself.
I am sorry about the conflict with Nate
Parkers past, but lets try for some honesty here. Rosemarys Baby, as I recall,
had a similar tag on its director. It did well.
If you want to make a list of the directors
and actors who have rather public indiscretions, and who have in some cases
been acquitted of them, start counting.
What troubles me is this: Are we being
particular here with this extraordinary
film because its about the racist curse we
are struggling to erase from our country
and its director is black? The curse is
there. Go look at it. Do we have the
courage to do that? Its a fine work.
HAL HOLBROOK
Beverly Hills, Calif.
The writer is the actor.

Helping Homeless Students


TO THE EDITOR:

For New Yorks Homeless Children,


Getting to School Is the Hard Part
(news article, Oct. 11) highlights a dangerous national trend. Nationwide, there
are 1.3 million K-12 students experiencing homelessness more than the total
number of students enrolled in New York
City schools.
These students cant reap the benefits
of education without a stable home.
Luckily, we have a window of opportunity created by rare collaboration between
the president and Congress.
This month, provisions of the federal
Every Student Succeeds Act of 2016 take
effect that tackle barriers like transportation problems and housing disruptions for students facing homelessness.
The new law requires schools to identify
these students and calls for increased coordination among social services, law
enforcement, family courts and other
youth agencies.
Efforts by state and local jurisdictions
to address the instability noted in your
article set an important precedent for
how we can make the most of this opportunity.
Progress for students experiencing
homelessness will require continued collaboration across borders, bureaucracies and systems.
TRICIA RAIKES
Seattle
The writer is a co-founder of the Raikes
Foundation, which invests in programs
for homeless students nationwide.

ONLINE: MORE LETTERS

When is something carbon neutral?


Three experts discuss biomass
energy. nytimes.com/opinion

NEWS

EDITORIAL

DEAN BAQUET, Executive Editor

JAMES BENNET, Editorial Page Editor

JOSEPH KAHN, Managing Editor

JAMES DAO, Deputy Editorial Page Editor

TOM BODKIN, Creative Director

TERRY TANG, Deputy Editorial Page Editor

JANET ELDER, Deputy Managing Editor


MATTHEW PURDY, Deputy Managing Editor

BUSINESS

KINSEY WILSON, Editor for Innovation and Strategy


Executive V.P., Product and Technology

MARK THOMPSON, Chief Executive Officer

REBECCA CORBETT, Assistant Editor


STEVE DUENES, Assistant Editor
IAN FISHER, Assistant Editor
CLIFFORD LEVY, Assistant Editor
ALEXANDRA MAC CALLUM, Assistant Editor
MICHELE MC NALLY, Assistant Editor

MICHAEL GOLDEN, Vice Chairman


JAMES M. FOLLO, Chief Financial Officer
KENNETH A. RICHIERI, General Counsel
ROLAND A. CAPUTO, Executive V.P., Print Products
MEREDITH KOPIT LEVIEN, Chief Revenue Officer
ELLEN SHULTZ, Executive V.P., Talent and Inclusion
WILLIAM T. BARDEEN, Senior Vice President
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R. ANTHONY BENTEN, Controller
LAURENA L. EMHOFF, Treasurer
DIANE BRAYTON, Secretary

THE NEW YORK TIMES OP-ED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016


search demonstrating that treating depressed mothers with brief interpersonal
psychotherapy helps not only the mothers but also their distressed children
children who will not improve, despite
treatment, if their mothers remain ill.
This study needs replication; furthermore, the same principle might also apply
to anxious mothers and their children,
though it has never been tested.
Why not? Because this work lacks any
neurosignatures, which have become
virtually required to receive National Institute of Mental Health funding.
In 2010, the institute introduced a system of brain diagnostics known as research domain criteria. These criteria
discard diagnoses like post-traumatic
stress disorder, examining instead phenomena such as response to an acute
threat (i.e., fear) at various scientific
levels: genes, the molecules they
produce, cells, brain circuits, physiology
and behavior. Establishing links up and
down this ladder linking a gene to a
neurohormonal molecule, and ultimately

TIMOTHY EGAN

Burning
Down the
House
A wounded bear is a dangerous thing.
Detested and defeated, Donald Trump is
now in a tear-the-country-down rage.
Day after day, he rips at the last remaining threads of decency holding this nation together. His opponent is the devil,
he says hate her with all your heart.
Forget about the rule of law. Lock her up!
Hes made America vile. Hes got angel-voiced children yelling bitch and
flipping the bird at rallies. Hes got young
athletes chanting build a wall at Latino
kids on the other side. Hes made it O.K.
to bully and fat-shame. Hes normalized
perversion, bragging about how an aging man with his sense of entitlement can
walk in on naked women.
Heres his lesson for young minds: If
youre rich and boorish enough, you can
get away with anything. Get away with
sexual assault. Get away with not paying
taxes. Get away with never telling the
truth. Get away flirting with treason. Get
away with stiffing people who work for
you, while you take yours. Get away with
mocking the disabled, veterans and families of war heroes.
You know this by now all the sordid
details. For much of the last year, the Republican presidential nominee has been
a freak show, an oh-my-God spectacle.
He opens his mouth, our cellphones blow
up. But now, in the final days of a horrid
campaign, an unshackled Trump is more
national threat than punch line. Hes determined to cause lasting damage.
Is there one sector of society he has yet
to maul? Until this week, it was the denial wing of his own party, those leaders
who looked the other way while their
leader walked all over the Constitution.
But those who take pleasure in watching Trump destroy the Republican Party
are missing the bigger picture. Hes trying to destroy the country, as well. Civility, always a tenuous thing, cannot be
quickly restored in a society that has
learned to hate in public, at full throttle.
Trump has made compassion suspect.
Dont reach out to starving refugees
theyre killers in disguise. Dont give to a
charity that wont reward you in some
way. Dont pay taxes that build roads and
offer relief to those washed away in a
hurricane. Thats a suckers game. Were
not all in this together. Taxes are for
stupid people.
Every sexual predator now has a defender at the top of the Republican ticket.

Trump is now more


national threat than
punch line.
The most remarkable thing about last
Sundays debate was Anderson Cooper
having to school a 70-year-old man on
workplace taboos that most of us learn
on our first job.
You described kissing women without consent, grabbing their genitals,
said Cooper. That is sexual assault. You
bragged that you have sexually assaulted women. Do you understand
that?
What you heard was the lecture the
human resources director gives just before saying, Youre fired. Trump could
not get hired at the drive-through window at a Jack in the Box. Knowing about
his history would make any employer liable. It took decades to get the workplace
to that point where Trumpian predators
are shunned. Given the biggest pulpit in
the world, Trump is trying to bring that
consensus down.
He calls it locker room talk. The locker
room has pushed back, resoundingly.
Lets call it what it is the workplace.
And as Trump told Howard Stern in 2005,
when he bragged about his voyeur intrusions into backstage beauty pageants, I
sort of get away with things like that. He
made a similar comment the blueprint
for his actions in the 2005 television
tape that has blown up in his face. If he
can do it, any creep outside of the celebrity bubble should be able to get away with
the same thing.
Hes destroyed whatever moral standing leading Christian conservatives had
starting with Mike Pence. Their selective piety is not teachable. Take solace in
one of the small acts of courage breaking
out in recent days: a group of students at
Liberty University telling their Trumpsupporting president, Jerry Falwell Jr.,
to practice what the school preaches.
Trump is actively promoting the very
things that we Christians ought to oppose, the students wrote. These young
people, at least, are smart enough to see
what Trump is doing to their world.
It will take many people like those students, and like the first lady, Michelle
Obama, a model of decency and class, to
repair the awful damage Trump has
done.
In a powerful speech Thursday, the nations most respected public figure
scorned the hurtful, hateful language
of Trump and its effect on children: The
shameful comments about our bodies.
The disrespect of our ambitions and intellect. The belief that you can do anything to a woman. Its cruel. Its frightening.
So it has come to this: The core lessons
that bind a civilized society are in play in
the last days of this election. We long for
family dinners where Trump no longer
intrudes, for tailgate parties where football is all that matters, for normalcy. Remember those days? They may be gone
0
forever.

Gail Collins is off today.

In mental health
research, clinical studies
deserve more funding.

LEANDRO CASTELAO

Theres Such a Thing as


Too Much Neuroscience
By John C. Markowitz

HE United States government


recently announced its new director of the National Institute
of Mental Health, Dr. Joshua
Gordon. If you think thats just
bureaucracy as usual, think again. Mental
health research, under the leadership of
the previous director, Dr. Thomas Insel,
underwent a quiet crisis, one with worrisome implications for the treatment of
mental health. I hope Dr. Gordon will resolve it.
For decades, the National Institute of
Mental Health provided crucial funding
for American clinical research to determine how well psychotherapies worked
as treatments (on their own as well as
when combined with medications). This
research produced empirical evidence
supporting the effectiveness of cognitive
behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy and other talking treatments.
But over the past 13 years, Dr. Insel inJohn C. Markowitz is a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia and a research psychiatrist at the New York State
Psychiatric Institute.

creasingly shifted the institutes focus to


neuroscience, strangling its clinical research budget. Dr. Insel wasnt wrong to
be enthusiastic about the possibilities of
neuroscientific research. Compared with
the psychiatric diagnoses listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders (D.S.M.), which can be vague
and flawed, brain-based research holds
out the promise of a precise and truly scientific understanding of mental illness.
Psychiatric diagnoses depend on clusters of signs and symptoms. For major depression, for example, some criteria are
low mood; wanting to die; and sleep, appetite and energy changes. These diagnoses lack the specificity of the biological
markers that neuroscience seeks to identify. If we could find a genetic, neuroimaging or brain-circuit explanation for a mental illness, it might even yield a cure,
rather than just the treatment of what can
be recurrent, chronic conditions.
But where does that leave patients
whom todays treatments do not help?
Can they wait for neuroscience developments that may take decades to appear, or
prove illusory? Staking all your money on
one bet, as the institute did under Dr. Insel, has consequences.
One example: A colleague has done re-

to a behavior produces what is called


translational research.
Translational research is exciting. It
might, for example, one day uncover a
gene for psychosis. But it is also fragmentary and unproven. We could wait for
decades before tantalizing neural findings translated to useful human treatments.
Nonetheless, translational research
has become virtually required for funding. Although the neurosignature targets of the research domain criteria are
not demonstrably any more useful than
D.S.M. diagnoses, and though they are far
more distant from clinical symptoms and
treatments, the institute favors them.
As a result, clinical research has slowed
to a trickle, now accounting for only 10
percent of the institutes budget. Many
clinical researchers like myself worry
that this kind of research will disappear.
We have too often been reluctant to voice
our protest, for fear of incurring the institutes displeasure (and losing whatever
opportunities we still have for funding).
Although Dr. Insel departed the institute last November, the policy he promoted has persisted. The institutes position is that D.S.M. diagnoses are flawed,
which is true. Nonetheless, D.S.M. diagnoses still offer clinically useful, recognizable treatment goals. Dr. Insel once suggested that existing treatments are good
enough and for many patients, they
are. Theyre much better than they were
20 years ago, yet there remains a great
need for improvement, without necessarily involving neuroscience.
Many patients continue to suffer, struggle and lead unhappy lives. Some will kill
themselves, despite the best available
medications, psychotherapies and skilled
therapists. Patients cannot afford to wait
10 years or 20 years or longer for the results neuroscience promises. Gene therapy, for example, is unlikely to eliminate
suicide or to diminish it in the next decade.
We need both neuroscience and clinical
research. I hope the institute will re-establish that balance.
0

The Panic of American Parenthood


By Pamela Druckerman

PARIS

SPEND a lot of time listening to parents around the world complain. In


Kiev recently, a working mother told
me the joke about how Ukrainians
are raised by same-sex couples:
their mothers and grandmothers.
How hard or easy it is to raise kids, especially while working, is a big part of peoples well-being everywhere. This topic
rarely gets much traction in American
politics, but its become an issue in this
election. Even Donald J. Trump, when he
isnt boasting that he can grab women by
their genitals, claims he wants them to
have a better work-life balance.
There is a dawning sense among voters
that our lack of government support for
child care, and the anxiety this causes,
isnt normal. In other rich countries
heck, even in Ukraine parents get the
states help in their childrens early years.
Americans get practically nothing.
What we do get is a pervasive national
angst. A forthcoming study in The American Journal of Sociology finds that Americans with children are 12 percent less
happy than non-parents, the largest happiness gap of 22 rich countries surveyed.
The main sources of parents unhappiness
are the lack of paid vacation and sick
leave, and the high cost of child care, the
authors said.
I might have thought Americas parenting misery was inevitable if I hadnt
moved from the United States to France
(where parents are slightly happier than
non-parents). Raising kids is consuming
here, but not overwhelming: The government offers high-quality day care, billed
on a sliding scale, and free preschool for
children 3 and up. Older kids have subsidized after-school activities and summer
camps. On average, college costs less than
$500 a year.
Early childhood offerings vary, but everywhere in Europe and in Canada theyre
far more generous than in the United
States. Ukrainian dads may not change
enough diapers, but their government offers paid maternity leave; practically free
Pamela Druckerman is the author of
Bringing Up Bb: One American
Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French
Parenting and a contributing opinion
writer.

preschool; and per-baby payments equivalent to eight months of an average salary.


Americas parenting customs can shock
foreigners. When the British writer Ruth
Whippman got a bill for more than $46,000
for a routine C-section in California, she
found herself longing for the inedible
food and Victorian plumbing of the London public hospital where shed had her
first baby, at no charge, she writes in her
new book, America the Anxious.
And that was just the birth. Back in Britain which isnt generous by rich-country standards there was paid parental
leave and 15 hours a week of free preschool.
In America, she had no paid leave, and
discovered that the government offered
nothing for most kids until age 5. The
strangest part, for Ms. Whippman, was
that Americans considered all this normal, and blamed themselves when they
couldnt make it work.
The stress of managing all this alone
also struck the Finnish journalist Anu
Partanen, who, soon after moving to New

Make our country great,


by making it more like
the rest of the world.
York, had her second-ever panic attack
(her first happened when she was lost in a
Lapland forest).
While Nordic citizens often dont realize how good they have it, Americans
seem not to realize how terribly they are
being treated, she writes in her book
The Nordic Theory of Everything.
Ms. Partanen points out that many Europeans pay only slightly higher income
taxes than Americans do, while Swedes
and Britons pay less, and all get far more
in return. She concluded: Maybe I wasnt
racked by anxiety because I came from a
foreign country. Maybe I was racked by
anxiety because I was becoming an American.
Leaving America for Paris had the opposite effect. Suddenly it wasnt all on me.
I gradually understood why European
mothers arent in perpetual panic about
their work-life balance, and dont write
books about how executive moms should

just try harder: Their governments are


helping them, and doing it competently.
Both candidates in the American election have taken stands on this. Mr. Trump
(who once boasted that he never changed
a diaper, which could explain why he married two Eastern Europeans) said a year
ago that he was skeptical of paid family
leave and opposed universal pre-K. The
candidate wasnt even clear on his own
companys parental policies: He claimed
it offered in-house child care for
employees, when in fact this was a paid
service for hotel guests called Trump
Kids.
Recently, in need of female votes, and at
the behest of his daughter Ivanka, Mr.
Trump presented a plan for six weeks of
paid leave for mothers and tax credits for
parents. He would also reduce regulations
on child care to allow the market to
work.
Hillary Clintons proposals include 12
weeks of paid family and medical leave for
men or women, capping child care costs,
raising wages for child care workers
(theyre now paid less than janitors); and
providing pre-K for all 4-year-olds. She recently named Heather Boushey who
specializes in the issues of working families as chief economist of her transition
team.
Janet Gornick, an expert in gender and
income inequality at the City University of
New York, said members of Mrs. Clintons
campaign team had approached her several times to get statistics and ask how
various programs work. If Ivanka wants
to call me, I would absolutely give my
statistics and my numbers to anybody, but
they dont call me, she said.
Jane Waldfogel of the Columbia University School of Social Work said that Mrs.
Clinton knows these issues better than
any set of issues, maybe short of foreign
policy. Dr. Waldfogels on the advisory
council of Too Small to Fail, an organization Mrs. Clinton helped found in 2013 to
support children 5 and under.
Dr. Waldfogel said Mrs. Clintons proposals formed a national child care strategy addressing cost, quality and access. She predicted that Mrs. Clinton
could work with a Republican Congress
to find some middle ground and get this
stuff done.
Ive already mailed in my ballot. Its a
vote to make America great, by making it
a bit more like the rest of the world.
0

A21

ROGER COHEN

How
Dictatorships
Are Born
PALO ALTO, CALIF.

Something is happening here, but you


dont know what it is, do you, Mister
Jones?
Of course Bob Dylan deserved the Nobel Prize in Literature. Were all Mister
Jones now. Its the wildest political season in the history of the United States.
Just to make his pedigree clear, Donald Trump is now suggesting that Hillary
Clinton meets in secret with international banks to plot the destruction of
U.S. sovereignty, in order to enrich these
global financial powers, her special interest friends and her donors.
What was it the Nazis called the Jews?
Oh, yes, rootless parasites, thats it. For
Stalin they were rootless cosmopolitans.
Just saying.
Societies slide into dictatorship more
often than they lurch, one barrier falling
at a time. Just a buffoon, people say,
and vulgar. And then its too late.
Ive been reminded in recent weeks of
the passage in Fred Uhlmans remarkable novella, Reunion, in which a proud
German Jewish physician, twice
wounded in World War I, and convinced
the Nazis are a temporary illness, lambastes a Zionist for trying to raise funds
for a Jewish homeland:
Do you really believe the compatriots
of Goethe and Schiller, Kant and Beethoven will fall for this rubbish? How dare
you insult the memory of 12,000 Jews
who died for our country?
Germans fell for the rubbish. The Republican Party fell for the garbage.
Today, millions of Americans who plan
to vote for Trump are apparently countenancing violence against their neighbors, people who might be different from
them, perhaps Muslim or Latino. Its
easy to inject the virus of hatred: Just
point a gun.
That Trump traffics in violence is irrefutable. His movement wants action
deportations, arrests, assassination and
torture have been mooted. The most
worrying thing is not that Trump likes
Vladimir Putin, the butcher of Aleppo,
but that he apes Vladimir Putin.
Speaking of Latinos, heres what happened the other day to Veronica Zuleta,
who was born in El Salvador and became
an American citizen more than a decade
ago. She was in the upscale Draegers
Market in Menlo Park when the man
next to her said: You should go to Safeway. This store is for white people.
Zuleta was shocked. Never had she encountered a comment like that about her
brown skin. But even the Democratic
bastion of Silicon Valley is not immune to
the Trump effect: Once unsayable things
can now be said the world over. Go back
to where you came from is the phrase du
jour.
In the three months after the Brexit
vote in Britain, homophobic attacks rose
147 percent compared with the comparable period a year earlier. Its open season
for bigots.
Financial and emotional pressures
have been mounting on Zuleta. She lives
in what the visionaries of Google, Facebook and the like consider the center of
the universe. Where else, after all, are
people thinking seriously about attaining immortality, or life on Mars, or new
floating cities atop the oceans, or a universal basic income for everyone once
the inevitable happens and artificial intelligence renders much of humanity redundant?
Y Combinator, a big start-up incubator,
has announced it will conduct a basic income experiment with 100 families in
Oakland, giving them between $1,000 and

Thanks to Trump,
the unsayable
can now be said.
$2,000 a month for up to a year just to
see what people do when they have nothing more to do. Oh, Brave New World.
Back in the present, prices for real estate have soared. Zuleta lives in a modest
rented place on what used to be the wrong
side of the tracks, in East Menlo Park,
east of Route 101, which runs down the
Valley. As it happens, her home is now a
couple of blocks from Facebooks sprawling headquarters, designed by Frank
Gehry, that opened last year. She asked
about a job in the kitchen, to no avail. She
struggles to make ends meet.
Facebook is intimidating for people
like me, she told me. Its like, get out of
here if you dont know anything about
technology.
For its part, Facebook says it cares
about and invests in the local community
$350,000 in grants donated to local
nonprofits this year and last, new thermal
imaging cameras for the local fire district,
and so on. Its revenue in 2015 was $17.9
billion.
Zuleta works from 6:30 in the morning
until midnight, cleaning homes, driving
children to school and activities, running
errands for wealthy families (like shopping for them at Draegers) and cleaning
offices at night. In between, she tries to
care for her two young children. The other
day, she collapsed in her kitchen and
found herself in the hospital.
The doctor said I need to sleep and relax, she told me. But I cant!
Life is like that these days for many
Americans: implacable and disorienting.
As a Latina, Zuleta said, she would never
vote for Trump, but she feels overwhelmed.
Something is happening here, but you
dont know what it is, do you, Mister
Jones?
0

A22

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Interest Rate Decisions

Wells Fargos Earnings

Wealth Matters

The Puzzling Economy

The Cost of a Scandal

Museums Gold Seal

Janet Yellen, the Fed chief,


described why policy makers
have held off raising rates.

New account openings fell as


much as 25 percent last month,
4
Wells Fargo said.

Collectors like Michel Witmer


say a museums approval can
5
bolster an artworks value.

B1

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Goldman
Wins Suit
Vs. Fund
In Libya
By CHAD BRAY

PHOTOGRAPHS BY AN RONG XU FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

LONDON Libya, in the


words of one lawyer, was like the
Wild West in 2008, when Goldman Sachs bankers arrived in the
capital, Tripoli.
With the lifting of sanctions
against Col. Muammar elQaddafis regime, the country was
beginning to open to foreign companies after years of isolation. For
banks like Goldman, the desert
nation had a promising potential
client: a newly created sovereign
wealth fund backed by billions of
dollars of oil wealth.
What happened next was
fought out in a London courtroom
this summer.
In a trial that revealed tales of
prostitutes and lavish spending
on hotels and meals, the Libyans
accused Goldman of exerting undue influence over its employees
and pushing the fund into improper investments that led to more
than $1 billion in losses. Goldman
argued that the Libyan fund was
far more sophisticated than it had
claimed and was simply suffering
from buyers remorse.
On Friday, a London judge came
down heavily in Goldmans favor,
sparing the Wall Street firm from

The growing Chinese community in Queens is the target audience of two radio stations, using a Low Power FM license, that will broadcast in Mandarin.

Short Range, Deep Reach


With broadcast ranges as little
as five miles, FM stations are
finding loyal listeners.
By BRETT SOKOL

They would seem to make odd


broadcasting bedfellows: the Roman
Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and the
Global Service Center for Quitting
Chinese Communist Party. Yet the
two organizations are partnering on
the airwaves, with two radio stations
starting next month at 105.5 FM in
Queens.
Weekday mornings and early afternoons, the dioceses WDMB will
air daily Masses, rosary prayers and
call-in shows. At 2 p.m., the Global
Services WQEQ will take the microphone to disseminate info about the
Chinese Communist Partys crimes
against humanity as it declares in
its mission statement.
The common thread? Both stations will broadcast solely in Mandarin, focusing on the growing Chinese community in Queens. We
have a similar target audience, said
Msgr. Kieran E. Harrington, the
dioceses vicar for communications.
These are just two of the nearly
2,000 FM stations across the country
that have received new licenses from
the Federal Communications Commission over the last two years. All
are classified as Low Power FM
operating at 100 watts with a broadcast range of roughly five to 15 miles,
depending on the surrounding terrain and the proximity of other FM

transmissions. About a third are already on the air.


All of these new stations have received their licenses free. The F.C.C.s
only requirement was that the applicants be nonprofit organizations
committed to broadcasting locally
originating programs.
The recipients encompass an array of churches, schools, municipal
governments, artist collectives and
activist groups, including South

Too Big to Fail Debate


Resonates in Australia
By A. ODYSSEUS PATRICK

SYDNEY, Australia Dr. Benjamin Koh felt it was obvious what his
employer wanted: to avoid paying
the claim of a terminally ill customer.
His employer, the insurance arm of
the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, the countrys biggest bank, asked
Dr. Koh to check out the customer,
who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrigs disease. They asked me to back them
up and see if there was a loophole to
justify rejecting the claim, said Dr.
Koh, then the insurers chief medical
officer.
The customers physician left no
doubt. The patient, he said, was on
The Your Money column by Ron
Lieber will return next week.

morphine and would be lucky to last


even a few days.
Dr. Koh cites that example as one of
many that he says showed his employer was systematically trying to
refuse or delay legitimate insurance
claims. Fired shortly after he complained to its board, he took his accusations public and added to a growing storm in Australia over the size,
power and conduct of the countrys
four big banks.
Long politically protected and immensely profitable, Australias big
banks are now facing the biggest public outcry in a generation. The banks
dominate Australian financial life,
from credit cards and savings accounts to pensions and business
services.
Continued on Page 2

Floridas 1Miami, established by officials of the Service Employees International Union; San Francisco Community Radio, founded by volunteer
D.J.s from the University of San
Franciscos KUSF after the university abruptly sold the station to a
classical music network; Razorcake,
a magazine based in Pasadena, Calif.,
that covers the do it yourself punk

Paul Bass, founder


of WNHH, a Low
Power FM station in
New Haven, Conn.,
says listeners feel
more connected to
community radio.

Continued on Page 2

Claims that the bank


exploited a sovereign
wealth funds navet.
paying a huge sum in damages.
The ruling also provides some relief after several embarrassing
overseas predicaments that have
dogged Goldman and its reputation this year.
The judge, Justice Vivien Rose
of the High Court here, found that
the relationship between Goldman Sachs and the fund, the
Libyan Investment Authority,
did not go beyond the normal cordial and mutually beneficial relationship that grows up between a
bank and a client.
The judge also found that the
fees that Goldman earned on the
disputed trades were not excessive given the nature of the
trades and the work that had gone
into winning them.
Although the disputed trades
may be regarded as unsuitable for
a sovereign wealth fund, there
were other reasons why the L.I.A.
wanted to enter into them and, if
they were unsuitable, they were
no different from many other investments that the L.I.A. made
over the period in that regard, the
judge said in her 120-page ruling.
After the ruling, the Libyan Investment Authority said it was
disappointed with the courts
decision.
Time will be needed fully to digest the judgment, and all options
are being considered at this time,
the fund said in a statement.
In a statement, Goldman said,
We are pleased to win this case,
with a comprehensive judgment
in our favor.
The Libyan Investment AuthorContinued on Page 5

Salesforce Says No to Takeover,


Leaving Twitter to Fend for Itself
By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED
and QUENTIN HARDY

SAN FRANCISCO Twitter may


have to fix its problems on its own, at
least for now.
Salesforce.com, the enterprise
software maker that had been the
most likely bidder for the embattled
social media company, has declined
to pursue a takeover.
In this case weve walked away,
Marc Benioff, Salesforces chief executive, told The Financial Times in an
interview published on Friday.
As Salesforce exits, virtually no
other suitors seem likely to emerge.
Rumors of potential other bidders
Google, Disney and Apple were
among the names floated quickly
evaporated.
That leaves Twitter largely on its

own, at least in the near term. And the


move
will
please
Salesforce
investors, many of whom detested
the idea of a pricey and distracting
bid for the social network.
Shares of Twitter, which had stabilized on the hopes that Salesforce
might still make a bid, dropped about
5 percent in afternoon trading on Friday, to $16.88.
And shares of Salesforce rose
about 5 percent, to $74.27.
Mr. Benioff confirmed his remarks
but declined to comment further. A
spokeswoman for Twitter, Kristin
Binns, declined to comment.
The interview all but confirms that
Twitter will need to pursue a self-help
plan rather than looking to a new
owner that could shield it from the
Continued on Page 5

MIKE BELLEME FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

We Can Walk There


Ben and Christine Brown moved to a
more urban neighborhood that doesnt
require a car. Retiring, Page 4.

B2

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

FM Radio
Goes Local,
And Finds
Audiences
From First Business Page
rock culture; and the Maetreum of
Cybele, a pagan convent and temple in Palenville, N.Y..
Those 100-watt signals pale in
comparison to the 50,000 watts
that many big commercial stations possess, but Monsignor Harrington said it was still enough to
convey the churchs message
and perhaps change lives.
From our perspective, the
largest group coming into the
Catholic church and the Diocese of
Brooklyn is the Chinese, he said.
But there are great fears in the
community about public worship,
about attending religious services
and devotions. They are fearful
that the Chinese government is
surveilling them, and theyre worried about the implications for
their families back home.
Radio offers a way for them to
express and learn about their faith
without the fear of reprisal, he
said.
Low Power FM is another step
in the evolution of radio since the
1990s, when there was widespread
public concern over regulatory
changes that significantly increased the number of stations
one company could own. Critics
lamented what they called the homogenization of the FM band.
Thats why the commission
took steps to open the dial and increase the programming options,
said Neil Grace, an F.C.C. spokesman. Through the Low Power
FM program, the commissions
been able to empower community
voices, promote media diversity,
and enhance local programming
by giving small stations a chance
to make a big impact.

AN RONG XU FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

From left, Joe Ugly, Babz Rawls Ivy and Markeshia Ricks expound on a show on WNHH in New Haven, Conn. The mayor takes calls from listeners every Monday.
Yet the emergence of this fresh
crop of radio pioneers raises a
question: Does FM still matter?
In an era of online streaming and
podcasting, is there an audience
still scanning analog radio dials,
hungry for more options?
The trend lines arent in FM radios favor. A recent analysis from
Edison Research and Triton
Digital showed that 53 percent of
all Americans listened to online
audio last year, while 21 percent of
American households no longer
even own an FM radio and that
number jumps to 32 percent
among 18-to-34-year-olds.
If theres a bright spot for radio
die-hards, its inside automobiles:
84 percent of all drivers still tune
in to their cars AM/FM radios.
Alejandro Cohen, executive director of Dublab, an internet radio
station in Los Angeles and an-

other new recipient of a lowpower license, said the station


was relying on car radios as it prepares to broadcast at 99.1 FM.
L.A. is a driving culture. You
have a captive audience, and well
be offering a real alternative to
whats currently on FM, said Mr.
Cohen, whose stations D.J.s spin a
mix of vintage soul and of-the-moment electronica. He acknowledges the technological back flip
of an online-only station using a
low-power license to put its webstreams onto the FM band. As
people are heading for the exit,
were entering, Mr. Cohen said
with a chuckle, but its a way to
expand our voice.
Matthew Lasar doesnt see any
inherent conflict between streaming and FM broadcasting. Mr.
Lasar, an instructor in the history
department at the University of

California, Santa Cruz, and the author of Radio 2.0: Uploading the
First Broadcast Medium, said the
increasing fragmentation of audiences meant that low-power stations had to be everywhere their
potential listeners were. And, he
added, they had to offer programming that couldnt be found elsewhere.
Theres still a need for local
news and information, which
many public radio stations have
abandoned, he said. Theres a lot
of stations that just go on automatic pilot and play NPR and satellite downloads. Thats Low
Power FMs ace in the hole.
An early low-power success
story is WNHH 103.5 FM in New
Haven, Conn., started by Paul
Bass, a veteran journalist. Mr.
Bass founded The New Haven Independent, an online newspaper,

in 2005; it has largely eclipsed the


more than 200-year-old New Haven Register as the citys civic
watchdog. The key, he said, was
eschewing the news industrys
growing enthusiasm for click bait,
hastily shot videos and incessant
tweeting, all at the expense of actual reporting.
I felt the role of the reporter
had to go back to old-school shoe
leather fact-gathering and analysis, he said. Mr. Bass hopes to apply the same formula and outcome to WNHH.
After going on the air last year,
I was shocked by how much
more excited people were about
FM as opposed to web radio, he
said. People told me they really
missed old fashioned radio. In
my opinion, what theyre missing
isnt just the radio. Its local, live,
smart, real grass-roots interac-

Too Big to Fail Resonates in Australia


From First Business Page
Big banks are under a spotlight
around the world. International
regulators are weighing new rules
intended to put them on sounder
financial footing. In the United
States, officials continue to warn
that big banks there lack credible
plans in case of a financial collapse.
Still, Australia stands out. At a
time when the world is considering what to do about banks that
are too big to fail, Australia offers
a glimpse of just how big and
how dominant they can become.
Politicians from both of
Australias major parties say the
banks have used their position to
profit on the backs of the countrys
spenders and borrowers. At a gala
in April to celebrate the 199th
birthday of one bank, Malcolm
Turnbull, the countrys prime minister, said, Our bankers have not
always treated their customers as
they should. His government has
vowed to increase funding for the
local banking regulator and force
bank chiefs to appear before lawmakers.
The opposition Labor Party
wants to get even tougher. Mr.
Turnbull is now inviting them to
lunch in Canberra once a year so
he can wag his finger at them, Bill
Shorten, the partys leader, told
Carlos Tejada contributed reporting from Hong Kong.

reporters. This is a friendly


catch-up, not an investigation.
The banks have apologized for
some infractions but have largely
defended their role, citing their
stability and their role in the countrys long spate of uninterrupted
economic growth.
Australias four biggest banks
are more profitable than those in
the United States, Europe, Canada and Japan, measured by return
on stockholders equity, according
to a study last year by Australias
central bank. Two, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and the
Westpac Banking Corporation,
are each worth more than Goldman Sachs in terms of market value. The other two are the National
Australia Bank and the Australia
and New Zealand Banking Group.
The four hold roughly four-fifths
of the countrys loans, mortgages
and deposits.
They have prospered in large
part because they do business in a
small country (No. 56 in the world
by population) with a lot of money
(No. 12 in the world by size of economy). Given its small size, Australia has long tolerated control of
vital industries by a limited number of companies. Weve said in
Australia, we will live with the duopoly and we will live with the oligopoly, said Chris Adam, associate dean at the UNSW Australia
Business School.
As a result, the banks capture 3
cents in pretax profit of every $1
spent in the economy, estimates

David Richardson, an economist


who has studied the industry at
the Australia Institute, a policy
think tank. One way or another,
the banks are making monopoly
profits, he said, adding, There is
no competition in Australia.
Adding to the sense of public anger, Australian officials extended
$11 billion in financing to the banks
during the global financial crisis.
The banks have also benefited
from low rates that some politicians say they are not fully passing on to borrowers.
Australias corporate regulator
is suing three of the banks
Westpac, National Australia and
Australia and New Zealand
over claims that they manipulated
Australian interest rates to bolster profits. The government cited
a transcript of internal Westpac
phone calls quoting the head of
Westpacs treasury department,
Colin Roden, telling a colleague,
Weve got so much money on it
we just had to do it, right?
A spokesman for Westpac said
none of its employees had broken
the law. He declined to make Mr.
Roden available for an interview.
National Australia Bank and
ANZ have also denied any wrongdoing. But ANZ fired several
traders named in the investigation after discovering what it said
were disparaging remarks about
women and casual remarks about
drugs in employee emails and
chats.
Some customers have also ac-

Australia and New Zealand


Banking Group is one of
Australias four biggest banks.
The four hold about 80
percent of the countrys loans,
mortgages and deposits.

DAVID GRAY/REUTERS

cused the banks of selling them


products they did not need accusations that have drawn the attention of lawmakers. They accuse the lenders of giving their
employees big incentives to sell
products like mutual funds to unwitting customers. It causes
deep conflict within the services
arm of the bank, said Josh Mennen, a lawyer at the law firm Maurice Blackburn, which is suing the
bank on behalf of several clients.
Those incentives occasionally
led to outright misconduct, according to a parliamentary inquiry. In one case, a Commonwealth
Bank salesman forged a couples
signatures and transferred some
of their retirement savings into
high-risk shares, contributing to a
65 percent fall in the portfolio and
forcing them onto welfare, one
witness said. The bank apologized
in 2014 for what it said was wide-

Early Gains on Wall St. Fade, Leaving Stocks Barely Higher


By The Associated Press

The Dow Minute by Minute


Position of the Dow Jones industrial average at 1-minute intervals on
Friday.

18,260

18,200

18,140
Previous close
18,098.94

18,080
10 a.m.

Noon

Source: Reuters

man Sachs of duping the fund into


making risky deals.
Bond prices fell. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note rose to
1.81 percent from 1.75 percent.
Higher bond yields also help
banks because they lead to higher
interest rates on loans, which allows banks to make bigger profits
on lending.
JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup
reported results that were better
than investors expected. The reports may have raised investor
hopes for other companies that

2 p.m.

spread inappropriate selling of financial products and offered


customers free reviews of its financial advice.
CommInsure, a unit of Commonwealth Bank, has been a top
target of the Australian Securities
and Investments Commission, a
securities regulator. The regulator is investigating claims that the
insurer used outdated medical
definitions to avoid paying claims,
pressured doctors into denying
claims, deleted medical files and
left whistle-blowers exposed, according to the commissions chairman, Greg Medcraft, a former
Wall Street banker.
The banks need to have a culture their customers can believe
in, he said in an interview.
The day before Commonwealth
Banks chief executive was due to
answer questions from legislators, the bank said it had updated

its medical definitions for heart attacks and severe rheumatoid arthritis. The change means that 17
customers
whose
insurance
claims were denied will be paid,
and that 38 more could be after
further investigation by the bank.
We have done wrong by some
customers in that business and
other businesses, the chief executive, Ian Narev, told a parliamentary committee. The goal is to put
things right.
The government investigation,
and
lawsuits
by
former
customers, were largely tied to
the controversy set off by Mr. Koh,
the former chief medical officer of
CommInsure, the insurance arm
of Commonwealth Bank.
By the time he was asked to
check whether the man suffering
from Lou Gehrigs disease was really sick, Dr. Koh already believed
that the company was deliberately delaying claims from terminally ill customers to get out of
paying them. It was distressing
for me, Dr. Koh said, adding that
the customers physician was basically reading his last rites.
CommInsure fired Dr. Koh last
year for sending clients files to his
private email address, a step he
said was necessary to document
the banks behavior. He is suing
under whistle-blower protection
laws.

TRAFFIC REPORT

STOCKS & BONDS

Stocks on Wall Street gave up


large early gains and finished
barely higher on Friday. Banks
and technology companies traded
higher, while stocks that pay large
dividends fell thanks to a jump in
bond yields.
Stocks were on track for big
gains early in the day as reports
showed that consumers in both
the United States and China appeared to be spending more.
Banks rose after JPMorgan Chase
and Citigroup disclosed solid
quarterly results. But the gains
faded as the day wore on. Pharmaceutical stocks continued to fall,
and energy companies slipped.
The Dow Jones industrial average, which had jumped as much as
162 points in the morning, finished
up 39.44 points, or 0.2 percent, at
18,138.38. The Standard & Poors
500-stock index inched up 0.43 of a
point, to 2,132.98. The Nasdaq
composite gained 0.8 of a point, to
5,214.16.
Goldman Sachs was responsible for most of the Dows gains. It
rose $3.10, or 1.9 percent, to $170.52
after Britains High Court threw
out a $1 billion lawsuit against the
company.
Libyas
sovereign
wealth fund had accused Gold-

tions, discussions and music.


That has translated into a lineup of both hosts and guests from
all walks of life, Mr. Bass said, including New Havens mayor, who
sits in with Mr. Bass and takes listener calls every Monday morning, and a heroin addict, who
spoke candidly about the deadly
spread of fentanyl among local
opioid abusers.
Community radio is unpredictable, Mr. Bass said. As a listener
you can feel connected to it in a
special way you dont with reading a website.
Mr. Cohen of Dublab agreed.
Where FM is going, we cant say,
he mused. But theres still something about terrestrial radio that
is very enticing. Maybe its the romantic idea of being on FM and
literally floating through the air.

4 p.m.
THE NEW YORK TIMES

will report next week, like Morgan


Stanley, Charles Schwab and
BlackRock.
Rising bond yields attracted attention, spurring investors to sell
utilities, real estate investment
trusts and other stocks that pay
large dividends. Those payouts
are more appealing to investors
seeking income when bond yields
are low. The PG&E Corporation
fell 57 cents, to $59.80, while Duke
Energy slid 73 cents, to $77.21.
The Commerce Department
said retail sales rose in September

as spending on restaurants, cars


and gas improved, but spending at
department stores decreased as
consumers continued to do more
of their shopping online. Kohls
lost $1.44, or 3.2 percent, to $43.68;
Macys fell $1.23, or 3.3 percent, to
$35.57.
Twitter fell 91 cents, or 5.1 percent, to $16.88 after Salesforce.com told The Financial Times it
was not interested in buying the
company.
Salesforces
stock
jumped $3.64, or 5.2 percent, to
$74.27.
United States benchmark crude
oil gave up 9 cents to trade at
$50.35 a barrel in New York. Brent
crude, the international standard,
fell 8 cents, to $51.95 a barrel in
London.
The price of gold fell $1.90, to
$1,253.10 an ounce.
The dollar rose to 104.21 yen
from 103.59 yen. The euro rose to
$1.0970 from $1.1048.
The CAC 40 in France jumped
1.5 percent, and the German DAX
rose 1.6 percent. In Britain, the
FTSE 100 edged up 0.5 percent.
Japans Nikkei 225 index added
0.5 percent, and the South Korean
Kospi rose 0.4 percent. In Hong
Kong, the Hang Seng added 0.9
percent.

The most-read business news articles on nytimes.com from Oct. 7


through Oct. 13

1. Why Samsung Abandoned Its Galaxy Note 7 Flagship Phone


258 comments, including:
Catching a problem that is intermittent and happens very rarely is
nearly impossible to do with internal testing. All companies that
innovate are exposed to this and Samsung drew the short straw . . .
this time.
DOUG WATSON, OREGON

2. Buffett Calls Trumps Bluff and Releases His Tax Data


3. Billy Bush, Host on Today, Is Suspended by NBC
4. Mediator: Donald Trump the Showman, Now Caught in the
Klieg Lights
5. Apprentice Producer Denounces Trump but Wont Release
Possibly Damning Tapes
6. Billy Bush Negotiating Exit From NBC After Lewd Tape
7. Wells Fargo Chief Abruptly Steps Down
8. Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmstrom Win Nobel in Economics
for Work on Contracts
101 comments, including:
Nobel Prizes for devising a couple of clever ways to rearrange the
First Class deck chairs, with no thought of the crew or the other
passengers. Nor of whether there might be icebergs. Oh well.
CAROL GOLDSTEIN, NEW YORK

9. How NBC Finished Second on the Trump Video Story


10. Tech Fix: The Definitive Guide to Cord-Cutting in 2016,
Based on Your Habits

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

B3

Labor and Inflation Complicate Plans to Raise Rates, Yellen Explains


By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

BOSTON Janet L. Yellen, the


Federal Reserve chairwoman, did
not talk on Friday about the Feds
plans for its benchmark interest
rate. Instead, she talked about
why those plans have been so
hard to make.
In a wide-ranging speech, Ms.
Yellen said the Fed was struggling
to understand the behavior of the
labor market and the weakness of
inflation. It is reconsidering how
changes in monetary policy ripple
through the economy, and the impact of international events. In
short, as often happens after a crisis, the Fed is sorting through
some existential issues.
The events of the past few
years have revealed limits in
economists understanding of the
economy and suggest several important questions I hope the profession will try to answer, she
said at a conference here hosted
by the Federal Reserve Bank of
Boston.
The Fed has indicated it is likely
to raise rates in December if economic growth continues, although
it has repeatedly retreated from
similar predictions in the last nine
months. Investors now see more
than a 70 percent chance of a December hike, according to CME
Group, and Eric S. Rosengren, the
Boston Feds president, buttressed those expectations Friday.

The market seems to think


that theres a very high probability of December, Mr. Rosengren
told CNBC. Well see how the economic data actually comes in, but
I think that is priced appropriately.
Mr. Rosengren, however, was
ready to raise rates in September.
Ms. Yellen and most of her colleagues were not.
The debate among Fed officials
revolves in part around the consequences of holding down interest
rates to push unemployment to an
unsustainably low level. A certain
amount of unemployment lubricates labor markets, maintaining
a ready supply of workers for
businesses that are expanding. In
the past, pushing unemployment
below that level has increased inflation. Mr. Rosengren has
warned that could force the Fed to
raise rates more sharply, potentially driving the economy into recession.
But an unusually large share of
American adults are neither
working nor counted among the
unemployed. They are not trying
to find jobs. Ms. Yellen and other
Fed officials have raised the possibility that a low unemployment
rate could persuade some of these
people to start looking. That could
increase growth without increasing inflation.
If strong economic conditions
can partially reverse supply-side

damage after it has occurred, then


policy makers may want to aim at
being more accommodative during recoveries than would be
called for under the traditional
view, Ms. Yellen said on Friday.
Ms. Yellen described this outcome as plausible but not proven. Businesses buoyed by strong
sales might expand; workers
might find it easier to move into
better jobs; increased investment
in research might even lead to
higher productivity growth.
The Fed is embarked on the experiment. Officials predicted in
December that they would raise
rates four times this year. So far,
they have not raised rates at all.
The Feds benchmark rate remains in a range between 0.25
percent and 0.5 percent, a low level that encourages investment
and risk-taking.
And over the last year, the unemployment rate has held steady
while the labor force has expanded.
The question is how much further the Fed can go.
The presenters at the Boston
Fed conference, which was devoted to the slow pace of growth in
recent years, generally attributed
a large share of the economys
underperformance to issues that
would seem beyond the reach of
monetary policy, including demographic shifts and slow productivity growth.

CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Janet L. Yellen, the Federal


Reserve chairwoman, spoke at
the Boston Fed on Friday.
Just pushing down unemployment, by itself, is unlikely to draw
large numbers of workers back
into the labor force, said Gabriel
Chodorow-Reich, a professor of
economics at Harvard University.
James Stock, also a Harvard
economist, said annual growth
during this expansion has been
about 1.74 percentage points
slower than the last three expansions. He said demographics and
productivity accounted for about
0.9 percentage points of the shortfall. He attributed most of the rest
to insufficient government spend-

ing and weak demand for exports.


Yet few drew the conclusion
that the Fed should raise rates.
Peter Ireland, a professor of
economics at Boston College, described himself as really, really
nervous about the judgment that
the central banks work is done.
My December vote is no, said
Robert E. Hall, a Stanford economist.
The Fed is unlikely to act at its
next meeting, in November, just a
few days before the presidential
election on Nov. 8. Patrick T.
Harker, president of the Federal
Reserve Bank of Philadelphia,
said on Thursday that the election
could cause significant economic
disruptions.
It may be prudent to wait until
we have resolved some of that uncertainty, Mr. Harker said.
The Feds last meeting of the
year, in December, looks more
likely for a rate change. Charles
Evans, president of the Federal
Reserve Bank of Chicago, said
early this month that he wanted
the Fed to move forward slowly,
but that he did not regard the exact timing of the next rate increase as important.
December would be fine, Mr.
Evans told reporters in Auckland,
New Zealand. I am less concerned about the timing of the
next increase than I am about the
path over the next three years.
Ms. Yellen surveyed a number

of the issues that are perplexing


Fed policy makers.
The conventional understanding of monetary policy is that the
Fed raises or lowers interest
rates, which moves markets,
which changes the behavior of
businesses and consumers, and so
the American economy grows or
slows. But the Fed has struggled
to stimulate the economy.
One possible reason, Ms. Yellen
said, is that households and businesses with relatively large debts
were unwilling, or unable, to take
advantage of low interest rates.
She said that the Fed also needed
to improve its understanding of
the economic impact of changes in
financial conditions.
The behavior of inflation is another mystery. It fell less than expected during the recession; it
has strengthened more slowly
than expected in the aftermath.
The influence of labor market
conditions on inflation in recent
years seems to be weaker than
had been commonly thought, she
said.
Finally, she mentioned the impact of global economic weakness
on domestic growth.
This is a wonderful time to be
an academic, Mr. Rosengren said
in introducing Ms. Yellen. But, he
continued, I empathize with the
challenges our chair has in charting policy with so many uncertainties.

Puerto Rico Said to Face


Death Spiral Over Debt
Governor Warns Against More Austerity
By MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

Reach for your wallets. It is going to be expensive to pull Americas largest territory out of its
death spiral, Puerto Ricos outgoing governor warned the islands
new federal oversight board on
Friday.
Even if Puerto Ricos 3.4 million
residents keep tightening their
belts, and even if the creditors
who lent it $74 billion agree to less
than full repayment, the island
will still need the assistance of
the federal government to bring
this economic and humanitarian
crisis to an end, said Gov. Alejandro Garca Padilla, addressing the
panel that the Obama administration set up to handle the territorys
staggering debt.
He urged the boards seven
members to join him in one voice
before Congress to seek help.
Twenty floors below the room in
Lower Manhattan where the governor made his remarks, protesters chanted their opposition to
colonialism which is how they
view the power that the panel
holds to make decisions about
Puerto Ricos future.
It was the first substantive
meeting of the board, known in
Spanish as the junta, the Spanish
word for political group, that Congress created this year to direct
Puerto Ricos financial affairs.
The group is similar to the control
boards that have led other distressed American jurisdictions,
like New York City in the
mid-1970s. But because of heightened sensitivities about Puerto
Ricos colonial history, Congress
gave Puerto Ricos governor, and
not the board, the authority to
draft the 10-year fiscal plan that
will become the basic road map
for moving Puerto Rico out of its
financial troubles.
Most of Fridays meeting was
devoted to the governors delivery
of his fiscal plan and questions
from the board. Next, the board
will review the plan and decide
whether amendments are needed.
Puerto Rico has stopped paying
its bondholders and would be

mired in creditors lawsuits by


now if Congress had not proscribed most creditors from enforcing their claims for a few
months. Lawsuits by creditors
could resume as soon as February,
which is one reason the governor
urged the board to move quickly.
Puerto Rico needs a plan in
place immediately, he said.
But the board members seemed
inclined to proceed cautiously.
Puerto Ricos debt structure is
dauntingly complex. And all
board members are aware that
their decisions could set a precedent: The arrangements they
make for Puerto Rico could be
sought in the future by severely
troubled states such as Illinois,
Pennsylvania or New Jersey.
These states have some of the
same problems as Puerto Rico
in particular, unfunded pension
promises to retired public workers that are rising so fast that they
are crowding out other essential
government services and making
it more expensive to borrow.
Like Puerto Rico, Americas
states are barred from seeking
help under Chapter 9 of the bankruptcy code, the chapter that distressed cities and other local governments can use. But the law
that gave rise to the oversight
board and the stay on lawsuits,
known as Promesa, also gives
Puerto Rico certain debt-restructuring powers that are normally
available only in bankruptcy.
Puerto Rico can use those powers
only if a majority of the board
members agree.
During the meeting, Andrew G.
Biggs, a board member who is a
resident scholar at the American
Enterprise Institute, seemed to be
trying to figure out where Puerto
Ricos cash had been moved to as
the islands troubles accelerated
last spring. He asked how much
money the government had
parked in commercial banks and
how far it had fallen behind on
paying its vendors.
Juan Zaragoza, Puerto Ricos
treasury secretary, gave a detailed description of how revenue

PHOTOGRAPHS BY YANA PASKOVA FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Above, protesters gathered on Friday at an office building in


New York where a fiscal oversight meeting discussing Puerto
Ricos debt burden was taking place. Alejandro Garca Padilla,
left center, governor of Puerto Rico, attended the meeting and
urged board members to join him in asking Congress for help.

arrives at the islands treasury


and what the government is doing
to collect more taxes. He said
there were about $1 billion worth
of unpaid bills outstanding, and
that the government had written
about $350 million in checks but
had not yet sent them a practice
that could make it look as though
the bills had been paid, even
though vendors have not received
their money.

That prompted another board


member, Carlos M. Garca, the
head of a private equity firm in the
Boston area, to question the governors fundamental premise that
Puerto Ricos government lacked
enough money to govern.
Youre currently at high tax
collections, and youre currently
not paying debt service, he said.
Why does the government not
have enough money to pay ven-

In Bias Lawsuit, Palantir


Faults Labor Dept.s Data

dors
or
provide
essential
services?
Mr. Garca was a president of
the Government Development
Bank for Puerto Rico under a previous administration, which was
led by a rival political party. He
seemed skeptical in general of the
governors description of the islands problems and what had
caused them.
Mr. Garca Padilla did not waver. He said his fiscal plan called
for Puerto Rico to improve its financial reporting, to merge
branches of government to end
duplication, to ease certain regulations and to court investors, especially those interested in financing infrastructure and energy
projects.
The governor also said that current efforts to collect more tax
revenue and reduce government

Samsung Warns of Huge Loss


From Recall of Galaxy Phone
By CHOE SANG-HUN

By QUENTIN HARDY

SAN FRANCISCO Palantir, a


large and secretive Silicon Valley
start-up recently sued by the
United States Department of Labor for discrimination, contends
that the government misread the
way it hires employees.
In a filing on Friday, the company said a government audit initiated in 2010 looked at 18 months
of employment data, and found
discrimination against Asians in
three of 44 job titles. The Office of
Federal Contract Compliance Programs erred in weighing all rsums, including unsolicited applications from sites like Craigslist, as if they were from people
with the relatively demanding
skills required at a place like
Palantir, the company argued.
The filing also said that Palantir
had hired outside experts who reviewed its practices and found no
discrimination, and noted that
several members of its senior
Katie Benner contributed reporting.

leadership, as well as hiring managers, were themselves Asian.


Palantir, based in Palo Alto,
Calif., specializes in sophisticated
pattern-finding software, and
counted the federal government
among its first customers.
Originally specializing in matters
like profiling terrorist organizations and tracing money laundering, the company has since built
practices in areas like selling distressed mortgages and maximizing retail sales of candy.
The Labor Department sued
Palantir in late September after
what both sides characterized as
years of private negotiations to
settle the case. The department
asked that, should its suit succeed,
the government cancel all its contracts with Palantir.
That would be disastrous for the
company. Palantir, privately
valued at about $20 billion and
counting numerous well-known
investors, will most likely generate more than $1 billion in revenue
this year. Nearly half of that

spending would continue, but he


pleaded with the board not to
double down on austerity.
You will soon realize that any
reduction in spending implies intolerable effects in aggregate demand, and will further throw
Puerto Rico into a death spiral
that will directly affect creditors
recoveries across the board, Mr.
Garca Padilla said.
Without help from Washington,
he warned, the government could
end up with a total accumulated
debt of $59 billion over the next 10
years.
Federal assistance, Mr. Garca
Padilla suggested, could take the
form of improved Medicare and
Medicaid programs, and tax
measures that could help Puerto
Rico become more competitive as
an offshore manufacturing site for
United States companies.

PETER DASILVA FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Palantir engineers at company offices in Palo Alto, Calif. The


company said the government misread how it hires employees.
comes from federal contracts, including with the Army, the Central
Intelligence Agency and disaster
relief organizations. With Palantirs filing, the case will now head
for court. Settling the matter may
take a year or more.
As a federal contractor, the
company is obligated to have a
place on its applications for people
to indicate their race, which is
most likely how the government
determined the number of Asians
applying for work at Palantir.
Diversity and discrimination is-

sues have dogged many Silicon


Valley companies in recent years,
though usually in cases involving
gender, Latinos or African-Americans. In disclosures over the last
two years, companies like Google
and Facebook have displayed
work forces made up disproportionately of white men.
A discrimination suit against
Facebook last March was
dropped. Google is also said to be
under investigation by the Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission.

SEOUL, South Korea Samsung Electronics said on Friday


that it expected about $3 billion
in operating profits to evaporate
over the next two quarters because of its decision to ditch the
troubled Galaxy Note 7 smartphone.
Authorities in the United
States announced a ban on
Galaxy Note 7s aboard airplanes, citing the risk of fire. Previously the Federal Aviation Administration had urged passengers to turn off and not
charge the phones aboard
planes.
Samsung said in a news release that the reduction in profits
tied to that decision was expected to be in the mid-2 trillion
won range in the OctoberDecember period and about 1
trillion won, or $900 million, for
the first quarter of next year.
Since its decision to recall millions of Note 7 devices and end
production of the model, Samsung has been readjusting profit

estimates. On Wednesday, it revised its previously estimated


profit of 7.8 trillion won for the
third quarter, cutting it to 5.2 trillion won.
With the Note 7, Samsung had
hoped to compete with Apples
iPhones in the high-end smartphone market. But after some of
the Note 7s were reported to
heat rapidly and catch fire, it
faced one of the biggest and
most costly product recalls in the
technology industry.
Moving forward, Samsung
Electronics plans to normalize
its mobile business by expanding sales of flagship models such
as the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7
Edge, the company said in a
statement. Additionally, the
company will focus on enhancing product safety for consumers by making significant
changes in its quality assurance
processes.

Get more on NYTimes.com.

B4

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

PERSONAL BUSINESS
RETIRING

Choosing a Place
To Settle Down
In the Age of Fitbit
By JOHN F. WASIK

EW people in America
walk to work. Most of us
drive to the supermarket.
But more older people
these days are looking for a
community where they can enjoy
a full life without a car.
Ben Brown and his wife, Christine, say they werent thinking
about retirement when they
moved to Franklin, N.C., a small,
lovely town nestled in the Smoky
Mountains near Asheville, a
haven for many East Coast and
Midwest retirees.
We loved the idea of living in
a small town in a rural mountain
area, Mr. Brown recalled. And
we converted a summer house to
a year-round home to suit our
tastes.
Yet Mr. Brown, a 70-year-old
writer, and his 66-year-old wife
said they had second thoughts as
they made the transition toward
retirement.
We realized aging in place
means a lot more than just a
comfortable house, Mr. Brown
said. So we began thinking more
about aging in community. That
means an urban neighborhood
where you can walk or take transit to just about everything you
need.
Then they discovered West
Asheville, a vibrant, urban neighborhood that is brimming with
trendy new restaurants, inviting
shops and a number of bus
routes into the larger city next
door. Nearly every place they
wanted to go was within walking
distance, a major benefit for
those who dont want to drive
everywhere as they get older.
We always thought wed end
up in an urban environment, Mr.
Brown added. Were in one of
the few places where you can
comfortably live without a car in
a growing, mixed-use neighborhood.
In the age of the Fitbit and a
growing cohort of active, en-

gaged retirees eager to take their


daily 10,000 steps, retirement
communities have been slow to
change. Eighty percent of
retirees still live in car-dependent suburbs and rural areas,
according to a Brookings Institution study.
Developments for independent
retirees typically come in two
flavors: isolated, gated subdivisions or large homes on golf
courses, often in the same bland
package of multiple cul-de-sacs.
Both require driving everywhere, which is a problem for
those who either dont want to
drive or cant.
Enter a new paradigm: the
walkable, urban space. It may
range from existing neighborhoods in places like Brooklyn or
San Francisco to newly built
housing within city and suburban cores from coast to coast.
Though not primarily for
retirees, places like Reston, Va.,
and Seaside, Fla., were early
examples of the new urbanism
built from the ground up. Among
senior housing projects, examples include Waterstone at Wellesley along the Charles River in
the Boston area and The Lofts at
McKinley in downtown Phoenix.
The theme is simple: Get out and
walk to basic services.
Walkability, though, is much
more than a hip marketing pitch.
Its linked to better health, social
engagement and higher property
values.
The researchers Philippa
Clarke and Linda George found
that walkable, mixed-use environments could possibly reduce
disabilities many face as they
age. Pedestrian-friendly communities promote walking to a grocery store, cafe or other services
like a dry cleaner or library.
Although there is clearly a
growing demand for walkable,
urban retirement communities,
they are difficult to build within
cities, said Christopher Leinberger, a developer based in

MIKE BELLEME FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Ben and Christine Brown in West Asheville, N.C., which they say is a more walkable community than their previous home.
Washington and a professor at
the George Washington University School of Business.
Mr. Leinberger noted that
most mainstream retirement
developers had traditionally
favored suburban or exurban
sites that involve sprawling
greenfield building on relatively cheap farmland. The new
approach, by contrast, is for
dense, urban or town-centered
sites that are accessible for
services and socially vibrant.
The model used to be to isolate old people on cul-de-sacs
backing up to a golf course, Mr.
Leinberger said. The new model
just beginning to rise is for walkable urban places.
But there are many obstacles.
Age-friendly communities within
cities may require extensive
infrastructure improvements,
including wider sidewalks, bike
lanes, more public transportation
options and longer pedestrian
signal walk times. Local officials

may not want to rezone or invest


in the improvements or even
permit them.
Michael Glynn, a vice president with National Development
in Boston, who has built walkable
communities primarily for homeowners 75 and older, said he had
faced many roadblocks in pursuing his projects.
Towns are frightened by
density, Mr. Glynn said, referring to clustering housing units
in downtown areas. But if you
build in the right, walkable location, it could do a lot of good for
an 85-year-old.
Walkable areas in mature
cities, though, may be unaffordable for retirees who are interested in paring their overall
housing costs. Some of the most
walkable cities are among the
most expensive: New York, San
Francisco and Boston top the list
compiled by Walkscore.com,
which also rates individual
neighborhoods.

New Yorks Little Italy and


Flatiron Districts; Chinatowns in
Boston, San Francisco, New York
and Washington; Philadelphias
Rittenhouse Square; and
Chicagos Near North and West
Loop all scored well.
Although the price tags for
these neighborhoods can be lofty,
there is a financial upside. They
promise higher home equity
down the road, if you can afford
to buy there.
Mr. Leinberger, in a G.W.U.
study, found that the walkability
factor added more than 72 percent in increased housing value
compared with car-dominated
developments, where he says
prices will fall over time as
America ages.
The affordability issue may be
a roadblock to many retirees
looking to cut housing expenses,
but it shouldnt be a high barrier
to those already living in a city.
They may be able to stay put if
the neighborhood where they

live can accommodate their


changing needs.
How do you rate a neighborhoods walkability? You can start
with the WalkScore rankings and
sort cities based on affordability,
location and amenities.
Also keep in mind that the
most walkable communities may
need other services to fit your
needs.
Do they have quality health
care institutions nearby? Is public transportation adequate? Will
you need barrier-free sidewalks
and retail establishments? How
easy is it to leave and visit other
parts of a city or its metropolitan
region? Will you need to rent or
share a car? What about local
colleges for cultural amenities
and lifelong learning programs?
Picking the right community
also should involve your family. If
you want to be close to children
and grandchildren, you should
consider a place accessible to
them as well.

YOUR MONEY ADVISER

Why, and When, Your Teenager Should Have a Debit Card


By ANN CARRNS

ANY children learn to


save by stashing cash
in a piggy bank or jar,
then graduate to a
basic savings deposit account.
But as teenagers, they start to
spend more lunch while on a
field trip, a movie with a friend
and may need an account that
lets them make purchases with a
debit card.
A variety of options are available, including traditional checking accounts with debit cards, as
well as prepaid debit cards, that
parents can manage jointly with
a child. The cards give children
control over their own cash but
allow parents to monitor the
spending and offer guidance as
needed.
You can start by asking if your
own bank or credit union offers
an option for joint accounts with
teenagers, said Laura Levine,
Email: yourmoneyadviser
@nytimes.com

chief executive of JumpStart


Coalition, which promotes youth
financial literacy. Some institutions dont permit minors to have
debit cards under their own name
until they are at least 16, but
others offer them to children who
are 13 or even younger.
Parents should look for features like no or low fees for funding and maintaining the account,
online account monitoring, convenient A.T.M. access and the
ability to set spending limits.
USAA offers a Youth Spending account, available to children 9 and older, when their
parents open the account. Children have their own debit card,
but parents can check spending
online or on a mobile app. Parents can also set spending limits
and receive text messages if their
child exceeds them.
You can look over their shoulder and see what theyre doing,
said J. J. Montanaro, a financial
planner with USAA. (Generally,
to open a USAA account, you or a

family member must have a


current or former military affiliation.)
The financial website Nerdwallet recently recommended several accounts for teenagers,
including Alliant Credit Unions
Free Teen Checking and Capital
One 360s Money account.
Sean McQuay, a card expert
with Nerdwallet, said he generally preferred a checking account
with a debit card for teenagers,
rather than a prepaid debit card,
because the checking account
could be linked to a savings account, reinforcing the habit of
setting money aside for longerterm goals. Some prepaid cards
offer the ability to sequester
funds, he said, but the money
usually doesnt earn interest.
Some prepaid cards, however,
can work well for youngsters.
Consumer Reports recently gave
a top ranking to Bluebird from
American Express, which offers
family accounts. The main account is opened by an adult, who

can give additional debit cards to


up to four family members ages
13 or older. Parents can monitor
the accounts online, set spending
limits and restrict access to
A.T.M.s if they choose.
When deciding what account to
open, it is wise to consider how
the child will need to use it, said
Christina Tetreault, a staff lawyer
specializing in financial services
at Consumers Union. A college
student will probably want to be
able to pay bills online, she said,
but a high school student mainly
interested in shopping at the mall
or online can probably do without
the bill-paying function.
Make sure to read the fine
print with any prepaid card.
Some may charge fees for speaking to a customer service representative or charge for loading
funds onto the card. New federal
rules scheduled to take effect
next year will require all prepaid
cards to disclose fees and other
details more clearly, Ms.
Tetreault said.

Here are some questions and


answers about bank accounts for
teenagers:
What is the right age to open a
spending account for my child?
Children vary in the speed at
which they learn to handle
money responsibly, Ms. Levine of
JumpStart Coalition said. Some
may be ready in middle school,
while others may not be until
high school or later. Generally,
however, it is better to let them
make mistakes under a parents
tutelage, she said, than to wait
until they are on their own, when
the financial impact is greater. It
is equally important, she said, for
parents to be ready to devote the
time necessary to monitor the
account, discuss spending and
offer guidance.
Should I link my childs checking
account to a savings account?
Having an account separate
from the one for spending can
help encourage saving for specific goals. But Patricia Seaman,

Wells Fargo Says It Feels Effect of Scandal


By MICHAEL CORKERY

Wells Fargo disclosed on Friday


that new account openings had
taken a nose-dive since the scandal over illegal activity at the bank
erupted: Bank executives said
customers opened 25 percent
fewer checking accounts and applied for 20 percent fewer credit
cards in September compared
with a year ago.
Wells Fargo executives acknowledged that customers may
have shunned the bank as the extent of the problems came to light.
Timothy J. Sloan, who was named
the chief executive on Wednesday,
said on the companys third-quarter earnings call that he understood the gravity of the situation.
As a new C.E.O., my immediate
and highest priority is to restore
trust in Wells Fargo, Mr. Sloan
said.
In other measures of the fallout,
the bank said that a gauge of
customer loyalty which asks
customers whether they would
recommend Wells Fargo to family
and friends was also down in
September.
Although it was too early to assess the impact the declines might
have on the banks bottom line, the
fallout from its widespread creation of sham deposit accounts
and credit cards dating back to

2005 was clearly taking its toll.


Friday mornings earnings call
was the first time Mr. Sloan had
addressed the banks investors
and analysts since taking over the
top spot from John G. Stumpf, who
retired abruptly on Wednesday
during intense criticism of his
handling of the scandal.
Removing the tarnish from
Wells Fargos name will not be an
easy job, given the breadth of the
problems that have surfaced since
the bank announced that it had
reached a settlement with banking regulators on Sept. 8.
The decline in new customer account openings came with less
than three weeks remaining in the
third quarter. In an interview, the
banks chief financial officer, John
R. Shrewsberry, attributed the decline partly to the bad publicity
and to the fact that customers
were irritated with Wells Fargo
in September.
The bank said traffic at its
roughly 6,000 branches remained
consistent in September with
levels of a year ago, while credit
card and debit card use increased.
Wells Fargo executives who
have been questioned by two congressional committees, excoriated by corporate governance
groups and criticized by former
employees faced probably their

most friendly audience on Friday:


Wall Street analysts who for years
have celebrated the bank as a
profit machine.
But even this group had pointed
questions for Mr. Sloan, 56, who
has spent 29 years at the company, most recently in the dual
role of president and chief operating officer.
Paul Miller, an analyst at FBR
Capital Markets, echoed concerns
raised by members of Congress
that the management shake-up
this week failed to bring in any
fresh faces at the top.
Has there been any thought
about bringing somebody from
the outside? Mr. Miller asked
during a lengthy conference call
on Friday. Because a lot of you
guys have been with the bank for
multiple, multiple years.
Mr. Sloan said it was a fair
question, and one that we have
been getting asked. But in the
end, he said, the board was very
supportive of the management
team.
Other analysts pressed Mr.
Sloan and Mr. Shrewsberry to estimate how much revenue the
bank could expect to lose from the
scandal, including the higher legal
expenses related to the slew of
lawsuits and government investigations that are underway. The

spokeswoman for the National


Endowment for Financial Education, advises waiting a while
before linking the two accounts,
to make sure your child has the
discipline to leave the money in
the savings account alone. You
dont want the savings to be too
accessible, she said.
What about overdraft fees?
Many but not all accounts
geared toward teenagers dont
allow them to spend more than
their balance. If a child tries to
buy something for more than is
available on the debit card, the
transaction is declined. That is
the best way to teach children to
control spending and avoid
costly fees, Ms. Seaman said. So
if your teenager uses an account
that offers overdraft protection
meaning the purchase will be
approved, but the account will be
charged a fee you should
decline the offer, she advised.
Let them get turned down at the
fast-food restaurant, she said.
Let them be embarrassed.

John G. Stumpf, who retired


as chief of Wells Fargo on
Wednesday, testified on
Capitol Hill last month on the
creation of fake accounts.

ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS

bankers said it would take time


before the full financial damage
could be calculated.
It could get a little bit worse before it gets better, Mr. Sloan
warned.
Expressing regrets that senior
managers failed to take steps
sooner to root out the problems,
Mr. Sloan outlined how the bank
was trying to make things right.
Among the initiatives: sending
mystery shoppers on as many as
20,000 visits to branches to make
sure customers were being
treated correctly.
More broadly, the bank is potentially facing an extensive overhaul in its business model as it
shifts from pushing sales to improving customer service.

That could prompt the bank to


close branches and shift its business emphasis away from breadand-butter checking and savings
accounts. But Mr. Sloan said that
any major moves would come
many months down the road.
For now, there is the continuing
fallout to deal with: On Friday,
Ohio became the latest state to
say it would stop doing business
with Wells Fargo (for a year) because of the banks duplicity. Gov.
John R. Kasich of Ohio which is
Mr. Sloans home state posted
on Twitter that the banks actions
have cost it the publics confidence.
When one analyst asked
whether Mr. Sloan planned to pursue the same strategy as Mr.

Stumpf, who had run the bank


since 2007, the new chief executive reminded the group that he
had been on the job for only two
days.
Candidly, I would be a lot more
nervous if I were you if I came out
with some new strategic plan for
Wells Fargo in 48 hours, Mr.
Sloan said. That would be pretty
dangerous from my perspective.
For most of the call, Mr. Sloan
sounded contrite about the problems and vowed to keep investigating new complaints. He came
closer than his predecessor to acknowledging that there were
problems with Wells Fargos corporate culture that had contributed to the problems.
I just wanted to address a few
of the most common questions
weve been getting, Mr. Sloan
said. First is whether Wells Fargos culture is broken.
He continued: Our goal of
building lifelong relationships
with our customers and appropriately offering them additional
products is still the foundation of
our business model. But there was
clearly something wrong, and we
will make the necessary changes
to fix it.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

B5

PERSONAL BUSINESS
WEALTH MATTERS

A Museums Seal of Approval Can Add to Arts Value


By PAUL SULLIVAN

OR most art lovers, museums are a place to indulge


a passion or seek solace
from the world outside.
But for art collectors like Jorge
Garcia, they offer a level of objectivity about an artists work that
galleries lack.
Not to mention what a museum
curators imprimatur can do to
the value of the art.
Mr. Garcia, a regional sales
manager in Miami for an environmental consultant, says that
before he buys artworks and
he has bought hundreds he
studies the artists to find out
where they are from, where they
studied art, what shows they
have had and which gallery represents them.
But then, Mr. Garcia says, he
goes further. He looks at the
museum shows the artists have
had, or better yet, those they are
scheduled to have.
The contemporary art market
is investment-driven, he said.
Theres a lot of demand. But it
doesnt mean all of these artists
are going to be around in 10 or 15
years.
He goes to galleries to buy
works of art, but if that is all the
artists have on their rsums, he
asks himself, Is it just gallery,
gallery, gallery commercial,
commercial, commercial?
Grela Orihuela, the director of
Art Wynwood and a consultant
for Art Miami, two art fairs in
Miami, agreed that a museum
show can change the reputation
of an artist.
She added: A museum show
can be very influential for an
artist. It changes the price point,
the popularity, the awareness a
person has for an artist.
She pointed to Frank Stella, a
painter who had a retrospective
show last fall at the Whitney
Museum of American Art. The

show ran for a little more than


three months, and after it closed,
the value of his existing work
rose even though Mr. Stella
has been a well-known American
artist since the 1960s.
This winter, the Coral Gables
Museum in Florida is staging an
exhibition of Cuban art in the
20th century. And in an attempt
to similarly capture collectors
interest in the artists exhibited
there, Ms. Orihuela said, Art
Wynwood is staging shows of
both established and younger
Cuban artists.
We have a gallery that will do
all our fair, and Ive confirmed
that the prices will be different
with Art Wynwood 2017 because
of this show, she said.
Dr. Julio Ortiz, an eye surgeon
in Miami, has seen the effect. He
said he bought pieces by the
Cuban artist Roberto Fabelo for
$30,000 a few years ago. But
after his work was shown in
museums in the United States
and Europe, similar works
fetched $100,000.
I wouldnt say the quality is so
different, but theres more demand, Dr. Ortiz said.
Using museum shows to inform investments is not limited to
living artists. Michel Witmer, a
collector in New York City, said a
show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art that was centered on
the painters represented by Paul
Durand-Ruel, a Parisian art
dealer at the turn of the 20th
century, persuaded him to buy a
work by Pierre-Auguste Renoir,
an artist he had never liked.
When I went to the DurandRuel show, I got to learn more
about Renoir and why he was so
important, he said.
Shortly after the show, he
bought a Renoir at auction. I
wouldnt have bought that piece if
I hadnt seen the show, he said.
It may seem odd that it took a

BENJAMIN NORMAN FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Michel Witmer, a collector in New York City, was persuaded to buy a work by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, an artist he had never liked, after attending a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
museum show to persuade a
collector with the means to buy a
Renoir to buy one at last. But Mr.
Witmer disagreed.
I have a home in Greenwich,
and Im fond of my friends there,
he said. But there are people
who want to buy something because theyve seen it in the
homes of well-known collectors.
Going to shows in museums
helps us become better individual
art collectors.
Researching artists through
their museum shows, with the
expectation that the prices for
their art are going to soar, is a bit
like private equity investing.
Some pieces may take off. Others
may maintain their value. But for
some, the market to resell the

works may dry up.


Mr. Garcia said this had happened to him. Ive bought stuff
and I cant sell it today, he said.
You cant predict. Theyre contemporary artists. But I still like
it.
Nevertheless, he said, its
worth the risk. As a comparatively small collector, he said, if
he did not buy a work early, he
could be priced out or excluded
from buying a work even if he
could afford it. If a major collector comes in from New York or
London, hes going to get first
dibs over me, he said.
Art collectors also have the
option of lending their art to
museums to increase the value of
their works. Ramn Cernuda, a

collector of Cuban art who sold


his publishing company and
opened an art gallery in Coral
Gables, Fla., said he had about
350 works of art but could display
only about a third of the collection.
Right now, seven or eight of his
paintings by Wifredo Lam,
among the best-known Cuban
painters, are part of a traveling
retrospective that is now at the
Tate Modern in London. Another
60 pieces by various artists are
on loan to the art museum at
Florida State University.
We did this at first for the
opportunity for other people to
enjoy the artworks and for other
people to learn about the artists,
he said.

But Mr. Cernuda said he understood the financial impact of his


loans. In general, it enhances
value, he said. There is a direct
relationship between value and
exhibition museums being the
highest level of exhibition prestige for an artist or an artwork.
Still, lending artworks in the
hope that a museum show will
increase their value carries risks.
People who buy art and exhibit it around the world to increase
its value do it because theyre
told its going to increase the
value, said Diana Wierbicki,
global head of the art law practice group at Withers Worldwide.
Their hesitations on it always
come down to an insurance issue.
One risk is that a piece will be
damaged, leading to a claim for a
partial loss of value. The insurance company comes back and
says its a 20 percent loss, she
said. But we could say its a 30
percent or 40 percent loss.
Another risk is that a work of
art will be seized while on loan
internationally. (A work can be
seized if a country or person
claims it, but it could also be
taken to pay a debt.) Ms. Wierbicki said an insurance policy
could include coverage against
seizure, but whether the policy is
enforceable depends on the country where the work has traveled.
If the insurance can be worked
out, the benefits of art loans to
museums can be immense. Mr.
Cernuda said that after the Lam
show opened last fall at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the value
of the artists work at auction
jumped over 80 percent.
There is a very direct and
inevitable link between the market and museum exhibitions, Mr.
Cernuda said.
And chasing that link will
surely drive some collectors this
fall.

Salesforce Says No to Deal,


Leaving Twitter on Its Own
From First Business Page

ESAM OMRAN AL-FETORI/REUTERS

Pipelines at the Zueitina oil terminal in Libya. The countrys sovereign wealth fund is backed by billions of dollars in oil money.

Goldman Did Not Trick Libyan Fund, Judge Says


From First Business Page
ity argued at trial that it was improperly steered into a series of
complicated derivatives transactions by Goldman when it simply wanted to invest in the stocks
of Western companies and lost
$1.2 billion after the financial crisis
hit, while Goldman pocketed more
than $200 million in fees.
The nine derivatives transactions were tied to the stocks of Citigroup, the French utility EDF and
other companies.
The court heard testimony from
fund officials claiming that there
was considerable anger when
they discovered how risky the derivatives were. A lawyer for the
Libyan Investment Authority told
of a fund officials storming into a
board room to scream obscenities
at two Goldman bankers and
telling them to leave Libya.
I remember thinking that I had
experienced the strangest meeting of my career between one of
the largest sovereign wealth
funds and one of the biggest international banks, she said.
Despite such colorful descriptions, the trial featured few documents and no testimony from
the major decision makers at the
center of the dispute.
Muhammad Layas, the chairman and chief executive of the
Libyan Investment Authority,
died in 2015, and Mustafa Zarti,
the funds former deputy chairman, did not testify in the case.
Many of the funds documents

from before October 2013 were either destroyed or lost. One of Colonel Qaddafis sons used the building in Tripoli where the sovereign
wealth fund has its offices as his
base during the revolution that
unseated the Libyan leader and
led to his death.
Youssef Kabbaj, a former Goldman Sachs banker and an important contact for the wealth fund,
also did not testify.
As part of its case, the Libyan
fund leveled accusations that Mr.
Kabbaj had tried to win influence
by providing entertainment and
gifts to members of the wealth
funds staff, including iPods and
chocolates.
The fund also claimed that Mr.
Kabbaj provided prostitutes during a lavish trip to Dubai, in the
United Arab Emirates, and an internship to Haitem Zarti, the
younger brother of Mustafa Zarti,
the wealth funds deputy chairman.
The judge rejected that argument on Friday, saying that the
main motivation behind the offer
of an internship to Haitem Zarti
was that Goldman thought he
might be chosen to lead the wealth
funds new office in London and it
would be beneficial to establish a
working relationship at an early
stage.
Although the offer of the internship may have contributed to
a friendly and productive atmosphere during the negotiation of
the April trades, it did not have a
material influence on the decision
of Mr. Zarti and the L.I.A. to enter

into the April trades, the judge


said in her ruling.
She also noted that there was no
evidence that Mustafa Zarti knew
the nature or extent of entertainment provided to his brother or
that it had any influence on his investing decisions.
Indeed it is not clear to me that
he would have taken a positive
view of what went on, the judge
said. He may well have been less,
rather than more, inclined to give

Tales of prostitutes,
lavish travel and
$1.2 billion in losses.
Goldman Sachs more business if
he had found out about what went
on.
The judge noted that other
banks seeking to win the wealth
funds business also purchased
meals, provided trading and engaged in other corporate hospitality aimed at the funds staff, including providing tickets to sporting events.
I do not accept that it necessarily shows any special relationship
between these parties, the judge
said. Indeed the perceived need
to keep providing expensive entertainment in order to maintain
the relationship rather negates
the idea that the relationship had
grown into one where Goldman

Sachs could exercise undue influence.


The judge also said the Libyan
Investment Authority, in its arguments, placed too much weight on
what were effectively sales
pitches by the bank to the fund.
The judge also questioned the
recollections of several junior
members of the wealth funds staff
in their testimony, saying she believed that they were mistaken.
I also consider that the L.I.A.
witnesses written and oral evidence shows that they now view
the material events from a perspective that may have caused
them to exaggerate the closeness
of their relationship with Goldman Sachs and downplay the contacts they had with other banks
with whom the L.I.A. is not in dispute, the judge said.
The trial occurred during a
somewhat challenging summer
for Goldman. Questions have
been raised and the bank has
been sued about its relationship
with the prime minister of Malaysia, Najib Razak.
United States authorities have
accused Mr. Najib and people
close to him of embezzling billions
of dollars from Malaysias state investment fund, 1Malaysia Development Berhad, or 1MDB.
In Britain, Goldman was
dragged into the controversy surrounding the collapse of one of
countrys best-known retailers,
BHS, over its role as an informal
adviser to Philip Green, the
chains former owner.

skepticism of stock market


investors.
Despite its prominence as a
forum for public discussion especially during the presidential
race Twitter has still lost
ground to competitors old and
new. Some Twitter users have
been leaving the service, and the
company has found it difficult to
persuade people to join. Its advertising revenue growth is also
on a path toward slowing down.
Twitter has been emphasizing
its mission around live events
and real-time commentary,
stressing initiatives based on
live-streaming video, like its
broadcasts of some N.F.L.
games. Twitter executives and
the board have tried to buy more
time to show that they can refocus the company on those live
events and increase its appeal.
During the weeks when rumors of a Twitter deal reached fever pitch, speculation swirled
around potential divides within
the companys board. Among
those who opposed a sale, at
least at first, was Jack Dorsey, its
co-founder and chief executive.
More recently, Mr. Dorsey had
become increasingly open to selling the company. Without a deal,
Mr. Dorsey and his team are
more likely to face tough questions when earnings are reported on Oct. 27.
Twitter executives have considered selling some units or laying off employees, as The New
York Times reported last month.
It could sell Vine, the mobile
short-video service, or MoPub, a
mobile advertising business. The
investment banks Goldman
Sachs and Allen & Company are
advising it on its options.
There is declining advertising interest in Twitter, said Mark
Mahaney, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets. When you overlay
that with the companys current
fundamentals, youll see very little top line revenue growth next
year.
At the same time, companies
mooted as potential buyers had
decided that Twitter at its current valuation its market capitalization has surpassed $13 billion at certain points was too
expensive and required too
much work to fix.
Salesforces investors are
probably feeling some relief.
For much of its 17-year existence, Salesforce has relied on acquisitions to grow, augmenting
its core customer-relationship
management offerings. But 2016
has proved a particularly active
time for deal-making at the company. Salesforce has bought 13
companies for more than $4.4 billion.
Katie Benner contributed reporting.

Shareholders were upset that


in August, Mr. Benioff agreed to
pay $582 million for a company
called Quip, a maker of real-time
collaboration software that had
negligible revenue. But Mr. Benioff said he needed its founders
to rebuild his corporate architecture for the next new things in
corporate software.
A bid for Twitter a consumer-oriented company with
significant challenges represented to many investors an act
of overweening ambition. At a
$12 billion market cap, Twitter
would have been the largest deal
yet for Salesforce, which is worth
$50 billion.
It was Salesforces initial takeover approach that set off the
flurry of speculation about a
takeover, and as recently as this
month, Mr. Benioff telegraphed
his interest in buying what he
called an unpolished jewel.
In an interview during his annual customer conference this
month, he said he was attracted
to Twitter as a way for compa-

Shares of the
embattled social
network tumbled.
nies to field customer complaints
and promote themselves, and
pursued the deal in part to learn
more about the current tech market.
Some of that may have been
bluster. Mr. Benioff has often
treated his company a bit like a
start-up, both in his generous
stock grants to employees and
his
single-minded
decision
making. Yet many large Salesforce shareholders, including the
mutual fund giant Fidelity Investments, sent emails and other
messages to Salesforce executives voicing their displeasure.
The prospect of a shareholder
revolt could have proved disastrous for the company, which relies heavily on its stock for
making deals and to pay its
employees. A sustained drop in
Salesforces stock price would
harm both activities.
In a meeting with analysts last
week, Mr. Benioff sounded unusually contrite and somewhat
shocked that his impetuous style
had
riled
his
biggest
shareholders. We will think
through everything, but we
would never do a deal that would
ever do the kind of things that I
have been reading in the emails,
Mr. Benioff said at that meeting.
By Friday, Mr. Benioff conceded that Twitter was a deal he
could afford to pass up.
Its not the right fit for us for
many different reasons, he said
in the Financial Times interview.

B6

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Weather Report
30s
30

Vancou
Vancouver

Metropolitan Forecast

50s

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Winnipeg
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Quebec
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Spokane
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and

5
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50s

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Bismarck

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Fargo

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n o
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60s

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orad
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shvi
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90s
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Memphis

Little Rock

Albuquerque
Albuquerqu

90s

High 70. High pressure will slide off the


coast, allowing for a southwest flow of
milder air to move into the area. Sunshine
will mix with some clouds. There may be
a shower late at night.

Richm
chmond
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rle
leston
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uisville
u

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Wichita

Los Angeles
A gele

TOMORROW ............Sun mixing with clouds

Wash
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Indianapolis
i

Las
Vegas

Low 52. High pressure will remain in


control, bringing a clear and moonlit
night. It will be seasonably chilly.

New York
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Charlotte

7
70s
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bia

Birmingham
m

Lubbock
bock
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MONDAY .........................A morning shower


A frontal boundary may cause a brief
shower in the morning. Expect intervals of
clouds and sunshine and a warm afternoon.

A
Atlanta

Tucso
on
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Dallas

El Paso

Jackson
n

80s

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Jacksonville

80s

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Orleans

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Miami
Nassau

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Weather patterns shown as expected at noon today, Eastern time.


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<0

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eau

COLD

WARM

STATIONARY COMPLEX
COLD

FRONTS

50s

30s

Normal
highs

60

50

TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY ...................Sunshine, warmer

Tampa
a

90s
20s

70

Normal
lows

O
Orlando

90s

70s

Record
highs

80

TONIGHT ..........................Clear and moonlit

Bos
Boston
Har
Hartford
a

Detroit

Sio
Si
ioux
o Falls

Denver

M
Ma
Manchester

Albany
B
Buffalo

Milwau
aukkee
au

70s

Che
he e
heyenne

San Franc
San
Francisco
Fran
co
Fresno

Toronto
To

St.. Paul
S

High 64. High pressure over the region


will provide a mostly sunny sky. Temperatures will be close to average for
mid-October.

H
Halifax

Montreall

60s

Eugen
E
ene

90

TODAY .....................................Mostly sunny

Regina

Meteorology by AccuWeather

40s

50s

60s

70s

80s

90s

100+

Tuesday will be mostly sunny and breezy


with near-record high temperatures. The
high will be 80. Wednesday will be mostly
sunny with near-record warmth again.
The high will be 82.

M T W T F S S M T W
TODAY

40

HIGH LOW
PRESSURE

MOSTLY
CLOUDY

SHOWERS T-STORMS

RAIN

FLURRIES

SNOW

ICE

Low

PRECIPITATION

Highlight: Warmth Across the East Next Week

National Forecast

Metropolitan Almanac

High pressure will


strengthen off the
Southeast Coast early
next week. Southwest
winds on the back side of
the high will send
unseasonably warm air
from the southern Plains
to the Ohio Valley and
Northeast. Afternoon
temperatures could reach
the lower 80s in parts of
the Northeast on
Tuesday, which is nearly
20 degrees above
average.

There will be high pressure today in


much of the eastern third of the nation,
allowing for mainly dry conditions and
sunshine. The main exception will be
across Florida, where a flow off the Atlantic could create a few showers and thunderstorms.
Much of the central states will be dry,
breezy and warm. Spotty showers and
thunderstorms will move across Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa.
Former Super Typhoon Songda will
cause hurricane-force winds and flooding
rain across Washington, Oregon and
Northern California. The storm will cause
pounding surf at the coast, which will lead
to some coastal flooding and beach erosion. The wet weather will fail to reach the
Southwest, where sunshine will prevail.

In Central Park for the 16 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday.

Cities
High/low temperatures for the 16 hours ended at 4
p.m. yesterday, Eastern time, and precipitation (in
inches) for the 16 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday.
Expected conditions for today and tomorrow.

C ....................... Clouds
F ............................ Fog
H .......................... Haze
I............................... Ice
PC........... Partly cloudy
R ........................... Rain
Sh ................... Showers

S ............................. Sun
Sn ....................... Snow
SS ......... Snow showers
T .......... Thunderstorms
Tr ........................ Trace
W ....................... Windy
.............. Not available

N.Y.C. region
New York City
Bridgeport
Caldwell
Danbury
Islip
Newark
Trenton
White Plains

Yesterday
61/ 47 0
64/ 46 0
63/ 41 0
58/ 38 0
61/ 46 0
63/ 46 0
63/ 42 0
61/ 43 0

Today
64/ 52 S
63/ 49 S
65/ 43 S
62/ 39 S
63/ 46 S
65/ 48 S
65/ 43 S
63/ 45 S

Tomorrow
70/ 60 S
67/ 57 S
70/ 54 S
66/ 52 S
66/ 55 S
71/ 57 S
69/ 53 S
67/ 55 S

United States
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington
Casper
Charlotte
Chattanooga
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbus
Concord, N.H.
Dallas-Ft. Worth
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fargo
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Key West
Las Vegas
Lexington

Yesterday
57/ 33 0
77/ 50 0
47/ 31 0
82/ 62 0
62/ 46 0
85/ 66 Tr
64/ 42 0
87/ 62 0
89/ 63 0
60/ 48 0.15
58/ 43 0
59/ 42 0
54/ 36 0
78/ 44 Tr
73/ 54 0
81/ 61 0.01
66/ 52 0
68/ 54 0
66/ 45 0
82/ 51 0
66/ 47 0
59/ 30 0
77/ 70 0.20
84/ 51 0
69/ 60 Tr
62/ 46 0
86/ 59 0
67/ 52 0
61/ 33 0
85/ 74 0
89/ 69 0.06
68/ 54 0
87/ 60 0
82/ 66 0
67/ 61 0.01
87/ 78 0.04
94/ 70 0
71/ 59 0

Today
64/ 43 S
82/ 50 S
44/ 27 PC
78/ 61 PC
65/ 52 S
90/ 65 PC
67/ 48 S
86/ 67 PC
85/ 64 S
61/ 48 C
58/ 47 S
70/ 59 S
63/ 49 S
69/ 50 W
73/ 53 PC
83/ 61 PC
73/ 64 PC
79/ 62 PC
77/ 64 S
82/ 48 S
77/ 61 S
61/ 37 S
89/ 70 S
80/ 52 S
77/ 60 T
72/ 63 S
89/ 59 S
67/ 42 PC
62/ 42 S
85/ 74 PC
90/ 71 PC
75/ 63 PC
89/ 61 S
81/ 67 PC
80/ 65 W
86/ 76 Sh
89/ 69 S
80/ 62 PC

Tomorrow
70/ 54 C
82/ 51 S
39/ 29 C
80/ 59 PC
69/ 59 S
91/ 68 PC
73/ 58 PC
88/ 67 PC
86/ 62 S
61/ 45 R
70/ 56 S
71/ 56 R
68/ 52 R
65/ 39 W
78/ 54 PC
83/ 57 S
74/ 66 R
81/ 63 PC
79/ 63 R
83/ 50 S
80/ 63 PC
70/ 53 S
90/ 72 S
83/ 48 S
81/ 67 C
73/ 63 R
90/ 58 S
68/ 46 R
69/ 53 S
85/ 74 PC
91/ 72 PC
80/ 65 PC
88/ 63 S
80/ 67 PC
83/ 69 PC
85/ 75 T
85/ 68 S
82/ 63 PC

Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Mpls.-St. Paul
Nashville
New Orleans
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Me.
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Raleigh
Reno
Richmond
Rochester
Sacramento
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
San Juan
Seattle
Sioux Falls
Spokane
St. Louis
St. Thomas
Syracuse
Tampa
Toledo
Tucson
Tulsa
Virginia Beach
Washington
Wichita
Wilmington, Del.

69/
73/
72/
71/
88/
64/
66/
71/
88/
64/
76/
68/
85/
65/
96/
60/
57/
63/
62/
69/
62/
66/
59/
66/
75/
86/
74/
69/
72/
88/
57/
74/
57/
69/
90/
56/
88/
64/
94/
76/
65/
65/
73/
65/

60
60
61
62
77
53
59
62
71
53
64
61
70
44
67
41
33
54
38
49
47
44
39
55
51
69
63
60
61
79
51
59
45
60
79
35
72
42
61
66
54
49
63
40

0.59
0
0
0.95
Tr
0
0
0.03
0
0
0.04
0
Tr
0
0
0
0
0.40
0
0
0.31
0
0
0.36
0
0
0
0.15
0.03
0.14
0.56
0
0.26
0
0.12
0
0
0
0
0.06
0
0
0
0

84/
75/
82/
85/
88/
70/
72/
84/
88/
67/
84/
79/
85/
67/
95/
73/
57/
61/
61/
69/
67/
69/
72/
71/
75/
89/
74/
71/
73/
89/
58/
74/
56/
81/
89/
67/
88/
75/
94/
87/
67/
68/
85/
66/

62
62
65
65
76
62
50
63
74
55
67
56
72
48
66
57
40
53
44
51
53
49
57
60
55
70
67
63
64
78
52
45
44
68
78
50
73
62
60
69
55
53
65
46

PC
PC
PC
PC
Sh
C
Sh
PC
PC
PC
W
C
PC
S
S
S
S
R
S
PC
Sh
PC
S
R
PC
PC
PC
Sh
PC
PC
R
PC
R
PC
PC
S
PC
S
S
W
PC
S
W
S

85/
73/
85/
87/
84/
71/
72/
83/
87/
73/
87/
81/
83/
73/
93/
76/
64/
60/
67/
74/
62/
73/
75/
66/
65/
90/
75/
69/
71/
89/
58/
75/
55/
86/
89/
72/
86/
76/
94/
89/
72/
73/
88/
71/

66
62
67
67
74
63
60
62
73
57
69
61
69
57
66
60
51
51
54
56
46
57
57
52
49
70
66
58
59
76
49
54
43
71
78
53
71
61
61
71
59
60
68
55

S
PC
PC
S
T
Sh
C
S
T
PC
S
PC
T
S
S
C
S
R
S
PC
C
PC
R
Sh
C
PC
PC
Sh
Sh
PC
R
C
Sh
PC
PC
R
T
R
S
S
PC
PC
S
S

Africa
Algiers
Cairo
Cape Town
Dakar
Johannesburg
Nairobi
Tunis

Yesterday
77/ 60 0.12
91/ 71 0
82/ 50 0
86/ 79 0
77/ 51 0
82/ 52 0
88/ 72 0

Today
80/ 56 PC
86/ 67 PC
70/ 55 PC
86/ 78 PC
82/ 61 Sh
84/ 52 S
80/ 63 S

Tomorrow
87/ 61 S
86/ 67 S
69/ 54 PC
87/ 79 PC
84/ 57 PC
85/ 56 PC
79/ 63 PC

Asia/Pacific
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Damascus
Hong Kong
Jakarta
Jerusalem
Karachi
Manila
Mumbai

Yesterday
96/ 67 0
91/ 79 0.04
77/ 51 0
85/ 54 0
86/ 75 0
85/ 77 0
86/ 66 0
89/ 77 0
88/ 77 0.03
91/ 78 0

Today
97/ 63 S
90/ 78 T
67/ 55 Sh
88/ 48 S
87/ 78 S
88/ 76 T
80/ 60 PC
90/ 74 S
84/ 76 C
90/ 78 PC

Tomorrow
94/ 63 PC
89/ 77 T
68/ 49 C
85/ 50 S
88/ 79 PC
88/ 76 C
79/ 59 S
92/ 76 S
82/ 78 R
91/ 77 PC

71
63
48
65
77
47
75
58
61

0
0
0
0.05
0.22
0
0.19
0
0

Forecast
range
High

Actual
High

New Delhi
Riyadh
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo

97/
92/
73/
72/
90/
68/
83/
83/
66/

94/
97/
77/
74/
90/
79/
87/
81/
73/

69
65
55
68
79
59
78
56
60

PC
S
PC
C
PC
W
PC
S
S

94/
97/
71/
80/
90/
84/
89/
78/
73/

68
64
53
67
78
64
79
54
66

PC
S
R
PC
PC
PC
PC
S
PC

Europe
Amsterdam
Athens
Berlin
Brussels
Budapest
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Helsinki
Istanbul
Kiev
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Moscow
Nice
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rome
St. Petersburg
Stockholm
Vienna
Warsaw

Yesterday
54/ 43 0
77/ 59 0
54/ 36 0
56/ 43 0.08
55/ 37 0
52/ 46 0
54/ 43 0.10
54/ 43 0.85
59/ 44 0.02
54/ 45 0.67
39/ 32 0.03
66/ 55 0
43/ 28 0
68/ 56 0
58/ 46 0
66/ 50 0.08
39/ 33 0.04
66/ 58 0.93
37/ 24 0.04
55/ 48 0.65
51/ 39 0
79/ 64 0.07
45/ 37 0.02
43/ 32 0
57/ 43 0
54/ 32 0

Today
60/ 49 R
75/ 60 S
54/ 46 PC
60/ 49 R
61/ 49 PC
53/ 48 R
56/ 46 Sh
54/ 41 R
61/ 42 PC
63/ 45 S
44/ 35 Sh
66/ 57 PC
43/ 29 C
69/ 55 S
63/ 50 Sh
67/ 43 S
42/ 33 C
71/ 56 PC
37/ 32 C
62/ 48 S
58/ 46 PC
73/ 57 T
47/ 39 C
45/ 39 C
63/ 51 R
47/ 38 R

Tomorrow
64/ 52 S
78/ 63 PC
56/ 44 C
66/ 50 S
57/ 47 R
51/ 49 C
56/ 47 Sh
57/ 45 Sh
65/ 47 S
64/ 49 PC
45/ 33 C
70/ 58 PC
44/ 26 PC
71/ 59 PC
61/ 49 T
70/ 52 PC
40/ 30 C
71/ 59 PC
43/ 40 Sh
69/ 49 S
59/ 43 C
73/ 54 S
46/ 39 C
48/ 37 C
64/ 44 R
48/ 36 S

North America
Acapulco
Bermuda
Edmonton
Guadalajara
Havana
Kingston
Martinique
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Nassau
Panama City
Quebec City
Santo Domingo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg

Yesterday
95/ 78 0
81/ 77 0.02
30/ 21 0.11
81/ 56 0
88/ 72 0.08
88/ 80 0
91/ 75 0.17
72/ 51 0.05
88/ 70 0
52/ 33 0
86/ 75 0.08
91/ 73 0
47/ 32 0
90/ 75 0.08
58/ 39 0
55/ 49 0.63
55/ 33 0

Today
90/ 77 T
80/ 70 PC
34/ 22 I
82/ 57 PC
84/ 70 T
90/ 78 T
87/ 74 Sh
75/ 52 PC
90/ 68 S
63/ 46 PC
87/ 73 PC
87/ 75 T
57/ 38 PC
88/ 73 T
68/ 58 PC
56/ 50 R
58/ 34 PC

Tomorrow
91/ 77 T
77/ 70 PC
39/ 26 I
81/ 56 PC
85/ 69 T
90/ 81 T
87/ 74 PC
76/ 51 PC
90/ 68 PC
68/ 49 R
84/ 72 T
85/ 75 T
59/ 43 R
88/ 73 T
69/ 52 R
56/ 48 R
55/ 42 Sh

South America
Buenos Aires
Caracas
Lima
Quito
Recife
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago

Yesterday
77/ 53 0
89/ 75 0.37
72/ 62 0
79/ 51 0.19
86/ 78 0.08
90/ 73 0.20
70/ 50 0

Today
74/ 62 R
89/ 76 PC
74/ 61 PC
71/ 56 C
86/ 77 PC
88/ 75 S
67/ 48 R

Tomorrow
77/ 53 T
90/ 78 PC
74/ 61 PC
70/ 56 Sh
87/ 78 PC
92/ 76 PC
59/ 42 R

Temperature

80

Precipitation (in inches)

THU.

Record
high 84
(1920)

YESTERDAY

61
4 p.m.

Normal
high 64

60

Normal
low 50

50

12
a.m.

6
a.m.

Avg. daily departure


from normal
this month ............. +0.6

For the last 30 days


Actual ..................... 2.29
Normal .................... 4.44

LAST 30 DAYS

Air pressure

Humidity

High ......... 30.40 11 a.m.


Low ............ 30.23 1 a.m.

High ............. 67% 6 a.m.


Low.............. 37% 3 p.m.

Heating Degree Days


An index of fuel consumption that tracks how
far the days mean temperature fell below 65

47
8 a.m.

40

Yesterday ............... 0.00


Record .................... 1.76

For the last 365 days


Actual ................... 38.71
Normal .................. 49.92

70

4
p.m.

Record
lows

Low

Record
low 37
(1988)

12
4
p.m. p.m.

Avg. daily departure


from normal
this year ................ +2.4

Reservoir levels (New York City water supply)

Yesterday ................................................................... 11
So far this month ........................................................ 66
So far this season (since July 1) ................................ 83
Normal to date for the season ................................. 131

Trends

Last

Temperature
Average
Below
Above

Precipitation
Average
Below
Above

10 days
30 days
90 days
365 days

Chart shows how recent temperature and precipitation


trends compare with those of the last 30 years.

Yesterday ............... 67%


Est. normal ............. 74%

Recreational Forecast
Sun, Moon and Planets

Northeast Foliage

Full

Last Quarter

New

First Quarter

Oct. 16
12:24 a.m.

Oct. 22

Oct. 30
1:38 p.m.

Nov. 7

Past peak
Peak

Sun

RISE
SET
NEXT R

Jupiter

R
S

Saturn

R
S

7:08 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
5:52 a.m.
5:44 p.m.
11:18 a.m.
8:50 p.m.

Moon

S
R
S

Mars

R
S

Venus

R
S

6:11 a.m.
6:16 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
1:44 p.m.
10:41 p.m.
10:06 a.m.
7:43 p.m.

Near peak
Some color
Still green
Burlington

Portland
Boston

Albany

Boating
From Montauk Point to Sandy Hook, N.J., out to 20
nautical miles, including Long Island Sound and New
York Harbor.
Wind will be from the northeast, then southeast at 5-10
knots. Waves will be 2-4 feet on the ocean and a foot
or less on Long Island Sound and on New York Harbor.
Visibility will be clear to the horizon.

High Tides
Atlantic City ................... 7:07 a.m. .............. 7:30 p.m.
Barnegat Inlet ................ 7:22 a.m. .............. 7:47 p.m.
The Battery .................... 7:52 a.m. .............. 8:15 p.m.
Beach Haven ................. 8:48 a.m. .............. 9:12 p.m.
Bridgeport ................... 10:58 a.m. ............ 11:26 p.m.
City Island .................... 10:48 a.m. ............ 11:18 p.m.
Fire Island Lt. ................. 8:16 a.m. .............. 8:40 p.m.
Montauk Point ................ 8:34 a.m. .............. 8:58 p.m.
Northport ..................... 11:06 a.m. ............ 11:34 p.m.
Port Washington .......... 11:04 a.m. ............ 11:34 p.m.
Sandy Hook ................... 7:30 a.m. .............. 7:54 p.m.
Shinnecock Inlet ............ 7:16 a.m. .............. 7:40 p.m.
Stamford ...................... 11:01 a.m. ............ 11:29 p.m.
Tarrytown ....................... 9:41 a.m. ............ 10:04 p.m.
Willets Point ................. 10:51 a.m. ............ 11:22 p.m.

New York
Pittsburgh

Philadelphia

Washington
Charleston

Norfolk

A large area of high pressure will provide


a mostly sunny sky across all of New
England and New York and south through
Maryland and Delaware. There will also
be seasonably cool air. Many areas north
of the Mason-Dixon line will have a frost
or a freeze in the morning. Areas farther
south will be partly sunny.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

B7

MARKET GAUGES
S.&P.
U
500

DOW
U
INDUSTRIALS

2,132.98
+0.43

NASDAQ
U
COMPOSITE

18,138.38
+39.44

Standard & Poors 500-Stock Index

5,214.16
+0.83

Nasdaq Composite Index

3-MONTH TREND

CRUDE
OIL D

1.81%
+0.06

10-YEAR
TREASURY YIELD U

GOLD
D
(N.Y.)

$50.35
$0.09

THE
D
EURO

$1,253.10
$1.90

Dow Jones Industrial Average

3-MONTH TREND

$1.0970
$0.0078

3-MONTH TREND

5,600

2,400
+10%

+10%

+10%
20,000

5,400

2,300
+ 5%

+ 5%

5,200

+ 5%
19,000

2,200
5,000

0%

0%

0%
18,000

2,100
4,800

5%

5%

5%

2,000

17,000
Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

When the index follows a white line, it is changing at a constant pace; when it moves into a lighter band, the rate of change is faster.

STOCK MARKET INDEXES


Index

Close

MOST ACTIVE, GAINERS AND LOSERS


%
Chg

Chg

52-Wk
% Chg

YTD
% Chg

Index

DOW JONES

Close

%
Chg

Chg

52-Wk
% Chg

YTD
% Chg

Stock (TICKER)

Industrials
Transportation
Utilities
Composite

18138.38
8039.29
651.79
6356.00

+ 39.44 + 0.22 +
16.05 0.20
3.26 0.50 +
1.32 0.02 +

7.17
0.65
11.03
5.57

+
+
+
+

4.09
7.07
12.80
6.32

Nasdaq 100
Composite
Industrials
Banks
Insurance
Other Finance
Telecommunications
Computer

STANDARD AND POORS

100 Stocks
500 Stocks
Mid-Cap 400
Small-Cap 600

946.89
2132.98
1519.82
736.68

+
+
+

0.47
0.43
0.22
0.97

+
+
+

0.05
0.02
0.01
0.13

+
+
+
+

7.33
6.96
7.21
9.49

+
+
+
+

3.89
4.36
8.67
9.67

NYSE Comp.
Tech/Media/Telecom
Energy
Financial
Healthcare

10521.30
7532.97
10778.85
6185.40
12101.45

1.64 0.02
+ 5.36 + 0.07
22.77 0.21
+ 22.07 + 0.36
83.48 0.69

+
+
+

2.85
4.18
0.67
0.97
0.02

+
+
+

3.73
5.09
15.36
1.91
2.29

4808.48
5214.16
4318.13
2982.30
7941.82
5902.14
276.32
2883.29

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

5.38
0.83
0.20
18.91
41.61
26.85
0.09
11.00

+ 0.11 +
+ 0.02 +
0.00 +
+ 0.64 +
+ 0.53 +
+ 0.46 +
+ 0.03 +
+ 0.38 +

10.62
9.02
8.32
8.61
11.18
7.38
8.23
16.73

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

4.69
4.13
5.29
4.53
9.94
5.72
10.10
10.64

%
Chg

Chg

Volume
(100)

Stock (TICKER)

2325.05
22168.82
4843.93
1212.41
81.03
809.39
71.23
164.82

21.36 0.91 +
+ 1.04
0.00 +
5.06 0.10 +
3.34 0.27 +
1.56 1.89 +
+ 6.34 + 0.79 +
+ 0.33 + 0.47 +
1.02 0.62

1.34
6.17
9.18
6.63
40.24
25.35
2.77
9.10

+
+
+
+
+
+

8.18
4.73
11.13
6.74
78.87
21.99
2.53
4.50

Close

%
Chg

Chg

Volume
(100)

Stock (TICKER)

20 TOP GAINERS
16.00
16.88
6.75
6.56
7.06
44.71
117.63
7.03
48.61
28.89
57.42
9.66
11.91
74.27
67.52
17.13
14.48
30.18
11.14
37.45

Bank of Ameri (BAC)


Twitter (TWTR)
AMD (AMD)
Chesapeake En (CHK)
Rite Aid (RAD)
Wells Fargo (WFC)
Apple (AAPL)
Sprint Corp (S)
Citigroup (C)
GE (GE)
Microsoft (MSFT)
Freeport Mcmo (FCX)
Ford Motor (F)
Salesforce.co (CRM)
JPMorgan (JPM)
Micron Tech (MU)
HP (HPQ)
Cisco System (CSCO)
Ariad Pharm (ARIA)
Intel (INTC)

OTHER INDEXES

American Exch
Wilshire 5000
Value Line Arith
Russell 2000
Phila Gold & Silver
Phila Semiconductor
KBW Bank
Phila Oil Service

NEW YORK
STOCK EXCHANGE

Close

20 MOST ACTIVE

NASDAQ

+0.17
0.91
+0.26
+0.13
0.14
0.04
+0.65
+0.26
+0.14
+0.12
+0.50
+0.02
0.00
+3.64
0.22
+0.28
0.67
+0.01
1.93
+0.48

+1.1
5.1
+4.0
+2.0
1.9
0.1
+0.6
+3.8
+0.3
+0.4
+0.9
+0.2
0.0
+5.2
0.3
+1.7
4.4
+0.0
14.8
+1.3

21.50
5.63
24.75
29.20
11.65
32.24
7.77
14.15
26.88
20.16
17.32
30.17
6.99
25.14
51.94
74.27
5.67
6.28
10.48
12.80

First Bancsh (FBMS)


Enzo Biochem (ENZ)
Donnelley Fi (DFIN)
KMG Chemicals (KMG)
Assembly (ASMB)
Resolute (REN)
Invitae (NVTA)
Lake Shore (LSBK)
Fiesta Rest (FRGI)
Clearside (CLSD)
Delek US Hldg (DK)
IMAX (IMAX)
vTv (VTVT)
Terex (TEX)
CIRCOR Intl (CIR)
Salesforce.co (CRM)
Digital Ally (DGLY)
Avon Prdcts (AVP)
DSP Group (DSPG)
Chefs (CHEF)

1084066
735467
668907
498480
490458
454022
356189
318312
282870
281783
272213
260264
257661
249901
240882
235245
231070
205411
197623
190907

Close

%
Chg

Chg

Volume
(100)

20 TOP LOSERS
+3.68
+0.56
+2.01
+2.08
+0.79
+2.18
+0.46
+0.78
+1.48
+1.05
+0.90
+1.55
+0.35
+1.25
+2.58
+3.64
+0.26
+0.28
+0.46
+0.55

+20.7
+11.0
+8.8
+7.7
+7.3
+7.3
+6.3
+5.9
+5.8
+5.5
+5.5
+5.4
+5.3
+5.2
+5.2
+5.2
+4.8
+4.7
+4.6
+4.5

13.20
22.80
7.09
11.14
56.57
13.02
18.21
12.30
10.89
29.03
10.11
16.17
8.61
5.28
18.48
12.05
6.39
61.57
16.14
5.93

Taylor Devic (TAYD)


NHTC (NHTC)
Flex Pharma (FLKS)
Ariad Pharm (ARIA)
bluebird bio (BLUE)
Proteostasis (PTI)
Audentes (BOLD)
CN Customer (CCRC)
Zynerba Phar (ZYNE)
Theravance (TBPH)
Gemphire (GEMP)
Bellicum Pha (BLCM)
Fulgent Gene (FLGT)
Titan Pharma (TTNP)
La Jolla Pha (LJPC)
Esperion The (ESPR)
Roka Bioscie (ROKA)
Ultragenyx (RARE)
Vanda Pharma (VNDA)
Agenus (AGEN)

417
5635
5968
1406
754
22912
897
200
31341
537
18186
19384
191
16086
9865
249901
3004
55650
1213
1656

6.56
4.39
1.34
1.93
8.67
1.95
2.13
1.37
1.11
2.83
0.98
1.53
0.79
0.48
1.58
0.96
0.50
4.61
1.18
0.43

33.2
16.1
15.9
14.8
13.3
13.0
10.5
10.0
9.3
8.9
8.8
8.6
8.4
8.3
7.9
7.4
7.2
7.0
6.8
6.8

2654
7007
2917
197623
41401
3789
1763
1302
5115
6852
383
3682
706
3716
1993
5868
171
5987
5452
16397

S&P 100 STOCKS


Stock (TICKER)

52-Week Price Range


1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close () High Close Chg %Chg % Chg

Stock (TICKER)

52-Week Price Range


1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close () High Close Chg %Chg % Chg

Stock (TICKER)

52-Week Price Range


1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close () High Close Chg %Chg % Chg

Stock (TICKER)

52-Week Price Range


1-Day
1-Yr
YTD
Low Close () High Close Chg %Chg % Chg

Apple (AAPL)
AbbVie (ABBV)
Abbott (ABT)
Accenture (ACN)
Allergan (AGN)
AIG (AIG)
Allstate (ALL)
Amgen (AMGN)
Amazon.com (AMZN)
American E (AXP)
Boeing (BA)
Bank of Am (BAC)
Biogen (BIIB)
BONY Mello (BK)
BlackRock (BLK)
Bristol-My (BMY)
Berkshire (BRKb)
Citigroup (C)
Caterpilla (CAT)
Celgene (CELG)
Colgate (CL)
Comcast (CMCSA)
Capital On (COF)
ConocoPhil (COP)
Costco Who (COST)

89.47
45.45
36.00
91.40
195.50
48.41
56.03
139.02
474.00
50.27
102.10
10.99
223.02
32.20
280.55
49.12
123.55
34.52
56.36
93.05
61.40
52.34
58.03
31.05
138.57

117.63
60.17
40.79
118.25
227.55
59.86
69.33
161.90
822.96
60.15
133.50
16.00
290.50
39.47
354.91
49.77
144.18
48.61
87.67
98.50
72.31
65.20
71.53
41.67
150.15

Cisco Syst (CSCO)


CVS Health (CVS)
Chevron (CVX)
Du Pont (DD)
Danaher (DHR)
Walt Disne (DIS)
Dow (DOW)
Duke Energ (DUK)
Emerson El (EMR)
Exelon (EXC)
Ford Motor (F)
Facebook (FB)
FedEx (FDX)
Twenty-Fir (FOX)
Twenty-Fir (FOXA)
General Dy (GD)
GE (GE)
Gilead Sci (GILD)
GM (GM)
Alphabet (GOOG)
Alphabet (GOOGL)
Goldman Sa (GS)
Halliburto (HAL)
Home Depot (HD)
Honeywell (HON)

22.46
85.41
75.33
50.71
75.93
86.25
40.26
65.50
41.25
25.09
11.02
89.37
119.71
22.65
22.66
121.61
27.10
72.21
26.69
641.73
670.70
138.20
27.64
109.62
93.71

30.18
88.80
101.08
69.03
76.16
91.30
53.38
77.21
49.88
32.70
11.91
127.88
170.98
24.86
24.73
151.34
28.89
72.75
31.87
778.53
804.60
170.52
46.97
126.42
109.00

IBM (IBM)
Intel (INTC)
Johnson&Jo (JNJ)
JPMorgan (JPM)
Kinder Mor (KMI)
Coca- Cola (KO)
Eli Lilly (LLY)
Lockheed (LMT)
Lowes (LOW)
Mastercard (MA)
McDonalds (MCD)
Mondelez I (MDLZ)
Medtronic (MDT)
MetLife (MET)
3M (MMM)
Altria Gro (MO)
Monsanto (MON)
Merck & Co (MRK)
Morgan Sta (MS)
Microsoft (MSFT)
NextEra (NEE)
Nike (NKE)
Oracle (ORCL)
Occidental (OXY)
Priceline (PCLN)

116.90
27.68
94.28
52.50
11.20
40.75
67.88
200.47
62.62
78.52
101.60
35.88
71.03
35.00
134.64
56.15
83.73
47.97
21.16
46.53
96.19
51.48
33.13
58.24
954

154.45
37.45
117.56
67.52
20.36
41.67
79.27
232.57
71.35
100.88
114.09
42.05
82.71
46.89
170.33
62.44
102.11
62.14
32.07
57.42
124.03
51.62
38.41
73.22
1440

PepsiCo (PEP)
Pfizer (PFE)
Procter Ga (PG)
PMI (PM)
PayPal Hld (PYPL)
Qualcomm (QCOM)
Raytheon (RTN)
Starbucks (SBUX)
Schlumberg (SLB)
Southern C (SO)
Simon Prop (SPG)
AT&T (T)
Target (TGT)
Time Warne (TWX)
Texas Inst (TXN)
UnitedHeal (UNH)
Union Paci (UNP)
United Par (UPS)
US Bancorp (USB)
UTC (UTX)
Visa (V)
Verizon (VZ)
Walgreens (WBA)
WalMart (WMT)
Exxon Mobi (XOM)

93.25
28.25
73.50
83.27
30.52
42.24
109.83
52.63
59.60
43.38
176.11
32.22
65.50
55.53
46.73
107.51
67.06
87.30
37.07
83.39
66.12
43.79
71.50
56.30
71.55

123.82
68.12
46.38
124.96
322.68
64.31
70.38
176.85
847.21
77.61
150.59
18.09
333.65
44.73
376.65
77.12
151.05
56.46
89.87
128.39
75.38
68.36
81.62
57.24
169.73

+
+

+
+

+
+

+
+
+

+
+
+

0.65
0.98
0.19
0.14
4.81
0.27
0.24
2.39
6.32
0.26
0.12
0.17
3.91
0.38
5.57
0.47
0.96
0.14
0.70
2.13
0.15
0.08
0.46
0.48
0.07

+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+

5.16
7.18
2.58
15.59
16.98
1.13
12.57
6.14
46.32
21.62
2.83
1.17
8.23
2.50
8.99
21.77
7.76
8.23
23.78
16.19
8.62
6.87
4.01
24.55
1.07

+
+

+
+

11.8
1.6
9.2
13.2
27.2
3.4
11.7
0.3
21.8
13.5
7.7
4.9
5.2
4.3
4.2
27.7
9.2
6.1
29.0
17.8
8.5
15.5
0.9
10.8
7.0

31.95
106.67
107.58
75.72
102.79
120.65
57.10
87.75
56.82
37.70
15.84
131.98
177.36
31.58
31.40
156.97
33.00
111.11
36.88
792.28
819.86
199.90
47.96
139.00
120.02

+
+
+
+

+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+

0.01
0.80
0.29
0.89
0.05
0.18
0.47
0.73
0.32
0.15
0.00
0.06
0.03
0.10
0.17
0.33
0.12
0.31
0.36
0.34
0.52
3.10
0.05
0.13
0.74

+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+

+
+

+
+
+

7.21
13.29
11.42
21.75
12.83
15.38
12.19
5.08
6.54
5.62
21.75
33.26
12.41
15.56
15.48
7.11
3.07
28.42
4.35
N.A.
16.10
7.81
19.64
3.78
11.29

+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+

11.1
9.2
12.4
3.7
8.2
13.1
3.7
8.2
4.3
17.8
15.5
22.2
14.8
8.7
9.0
10.2
7.3
28.1
6.3
N.A.
3.4
5.4
38.0
4.4
5.9

165.00
38.36
126.07
69.06
32.79
47.13
88.16
266.93
83.65
103.49
131.96
47.42
89.27
52.45
182.27
70.15
114.26
64.86
35.74
58.70
131.98
68.19
42.00
78.48
1502

+
+

+
+

+
+

+
+

0.73
0.48
0.70
0.22
0.19
0.09
0.73
0.42
0.25
0.23
1.32
0.18
0.60
0.21
0.31
0.25
0.43
0.37
0.34
0.50
0.60
0.41
0.38
0.68
2.95

+
+
+
+

+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+

2.90
14.35
21.01
9.10
36.83
0.60
0.74
11.18
1.79
3.83
10.06
6.51
12.64
3.12
14.17
7.90
12.59
22.52
4.58
22.14
20.18
19.84
2.29
1.97
8.46

+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+

12.2
8.7
14.5
2.3
36.5
3.0
5.9
7.1
6.2
3.6
3.4
6.2
7.5
2.7
13.1
7.3
3.6
17.6
0.8
3.5
19.4
17.4
5.2
8.3
12.9

110.94
37.39
90.33
104.20
41.75
70.40
143.39
64.00
83.97
54.64
229.10
43.89
84.14
81.33
72.58
144.48
98.84
111.83
44.58
109.83
83.79
56.95
95.74
75.19
95.55

106.83
32.66
88.43
95.83
39.24
65.70
137.34
53.08
81.32
50.56
196.99
39.22
68.11
79.55
68.49
133.92
96.84
108.42
42.85
100.16
82.45
50.28
78.31
68.45
86.54

+
+
+

+
+

+
+

+
+

0.91
0.10
0.19
0.37
0.04
0.00
0.76
0.13
0.21
0.20
1.80
0.15
0.22
0.15
0.72
0.27
0.10
0.12
0.03
0.31
0.58
0.01
0.11
0.22
0.02

+
+
+
+
+

+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+

8.70
4.17
19.07
11.34
13.34
10.87
22.70
11.07
6.78
10.34
0.30
17.11
9.34
9.74
30.63
11.44
2.74
4.45
4.49
7.49
9.44
12.56
10.26
15.37
6.21

+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+

6.9
1.2
11.4
9.0
8.4
31.4
10.3
11.6
16.6
8.1
1.3
14.0
6.2
23.0
25.0
13.8
23.8
12.7
0.4
4.3
6.3
8.8
8.0
11.7
11.0

indicates stocks
Prices shown are for regular trading for the New York Stock Exchange and the American Stock Exchange which runs from 9:30 a.m., Eastern time, through the close of the Pacific Exchange, at 4:30 p.m. For the Nasdaq stock market, it is through 4 p.m. Close Last trade of the day in regular trading. +
or
that reached a new 52-week high or low. Change Difference between last trade and previous days price in regular trading. or indicates stocks that rose or fell at least 4 percent. indicates stocks that traded 1 percent or more of their outstanding shares. n Stock was a new issue in the last year.

GOVERNMENT BONDS

FINRA TRACE CORPORATE BOND DATA


Yields

52-Week Total Returns

FINRA-BLOOMBERG
CORPORATE BOND INDEXES

FINRA-BLOOMBERG
CORPORATE BOND INDEXES

10%

+20%

high yield +6.39%

high yield +11.74%

6
0
4

10
invest. grade +3.38%
2015 2016

20

Yest.

All
Investment High
Issues
Grade
Yield

+10

Yield Curve

Market Breadth

invest. grade +6.00%


2015 2016

Total Issues Traded


Advances
Declines
Unchanged
52 Week High
52 Week Low
Dollar Volume*

7,124
2,965
3,631
162
200
125
20,548

4,821
1,951
2,668
46
80
73
11,725

Conv

2,084
937
834
111
114
49
8,137

219
77
129
5
6
3
684

End of day data. Activity as reported to FINRA TRACE.


Market breadth represents activity in all TRACE eligible
publicly traded securities. Shown below are the most
active fixed-coupon bonds ranked by par value traded.
Investment grade or high-yield is determined using
credit ratings as outlined in FINRA rules. C Yield is
unavailable because of issues call criteria.
*Par value in millions.
Source: FINRA TRACE data. Reference information from
Reuters DataScope Data. Credit ratings from Moodys,
Standard & Poors and Fitch.

Most Recent Issues

Key Rates

1-mo. ago

1-yr. ago

4%

10-year Treas.
2-year Treas.

4%

Prime Rate
Fed Funds

Mat.

1
Maturity

0
3

5 10

Months

Rate

BONDS & NOTES


2-yr. Sep 18
5-yr. Sep 21
10-yr. Aug 26
30-yr. Aug 46

Date

T-BILLS
3-mo. Jan 17
6-mo. Apr 17

2015 2016

Years

Issuer Name (SYMBOL)

Credit Rating
Moodys S&P

Coupon%

Maturity

Fitch

3.800
2.700
2.500
4.200
3.200
6.625
3.700
2.950
4.625
7.625

Nov46
Nov26
May22
Jul46
Sep26
Jun35
Nov46
Mar21
Oct44
Aug22

NR
NR
A1
Baa3
Baa3
Baa3
NR
A1
Baa2
NR

BBB+
A
AA
BBB
BBB
BBB+
A
A
BBB
BBB+

A
BBB
BBB+

9.750
4.250
3.550
2.600
8.750
8.375
7.875
3.875
7.625
5.375

Feb20
Nov66
Mar22
Nov26
May26
May21
Apr22
Mar23
Feb25
Jan21

C
NR
B1
NR
B3
B3
C
B1
Caa1
B3

NR

BB

BBB

B+
B+
D
BB
B
B+

BB
BB
NR
BBB
B+
BB

4.750
1.500
2.125
1.000
1.750
1.000
1.000
0.250
1.000
2.375

Dec66
Mar19
Sep26
Dec18
Dec16
Nov21
Dec20
Mar19
Jul18
Apr22

C
NR
NR
NR
NR

D
NR
CCC
BBB
NR
NR
BB
B
NR
NR

BBB+
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR

Price
High

Low

Last

Chg

Yld%

99.431
101.656
102.400
102.986
99.821
105.150
100.934
102.772
105.822
116.375

98.534
99.540
102.060
101.946
99.392
103.113
99.854
102.605
104.890
116.125

98.534
99.581
102.112
101.998
99.392
103.113
99.854
102.772
105.822
116.125

1.145
0.187
0.171
1.250
0.412
2.446
0.546
0.149
0.355
0.500

N.A.
N.A.
2.085
4.082
3.272
6.337
N.A.
2.279
4.263
4.451

4.394
100.550
99.550
99.727
114.801
113.500
64.125
92.340
99.990
102.400

3.750
99.075
89.680
99.282
110.880
111.250
60.900
89.688
98.125
99.900

3.875
99.566
90.750
99.391
112.100
112.300
63.000
91.760
98.875
101.073

0.125
0.543
1.250
0.293
0.730
1.050
1.250
2.760
0.375
0.427

N.A.
N.A.
5.567
N.A.
6.996
5.320
N.A.
5.414
7.809
5.090

7.800
108.681
110.423
331.000
226.281
90.319
100.417
89.802
201.356
5.250

5.900
108.000
106.750
322.750
220.200
83.350
98.879
89.540
200.511
5.250

6.125
108.406
106.750
326.100
223.443
90.319
100.104
89.540
201.244
5.250

1.075
1.406
3.829
1.644
1.943
3.369
0.637
0.710
5.344
1.125

N.A.
1.898
1.391
48.216
471.338
3.076
0.974
4.991
36.533
N.A.

INVESTMENT GRADE

Csx Corp (CSX)


Ecolab Inc (ECL)
Oracle Corp (ORCL)
Molson Coors Brewing Co (TAP)
Shire Acquisitions Invts Ireland Dac (SHPGF)
Pemex Proj Fdg Master Tr (PEMX.GF)
Ecolab Inc (ECL)
Mitsubishi Ufj Finl Group Inc (MTU)
Dow Chem Co (DOW)
Ubs Ag Stamford Brh (UBS)

A+
BBB
BBB+

HIGH YIELD

Samson Invt Co (KKR)


Csx Corp (CSX)
Freeport-mcmoran Inc (FCX)
Csx Corp (CSX)
Petrobras Global Fin B V (PBR)
Petrobras Global Fin B V (PBR)
Breitburn Energy Partners L.p. (BBEP)
Freeport-mcmoran Inc (FCX)
Sprint Corp (SFTBF)
Petrobras Intl Fin Co (PTRB)

Peabody Energy Corp (BTU.GH)


Vipshop Hldgs Ltd (VIPS)
Advanced Micro Devices Inc (AMD)
Nvidia Corp (NVDA)
Take-two Interactive Software Inc (TTWO)
Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc Del (ISIS)
On Semiconductor Corp (ONNN)
Tesla Mtrs Inc (TSLA)
Take-two Interactive Software Inc (TTWO)
Sunedison Inc (SUNE)

CONSUMER RATES

NR
NR

C
NR

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Yesterday

Foreign Currency
in Dollars
AMERICAS
Argentina (Peso)
Bolivia (Boliviano)
Brazil (Real)
Canada (Dollar)
Chile (Peso)
Colombia (Peso)
Dom. Rep. (Peso)
El Salvador (Colon)
Guatemala (Quetzal)
Honduras (Lempira)
Mexico (Peso)
Nicaragua (Cordoba)
Paraguay (Guarani)
Peru (New Sol)
Uruguay (New Peso)
Venezuela (Bolivar)
EUROPE
Britain (Pound)
Czech Rep (Koruna)
Denmark (Krone)
Europe (Euro)
Hungary (Forint)

0.31
0.45

0.30
0.44

+0.02
+0.01

0.29
0.44

99.82
99.21
97.27
93.50

99.83
99.22
97.28
93.53

0.01
0.13
0.52
1.64

0.84
1.26
1.75
2.48

101.90
+0.02 -0.27
100.01
0.22
0.11
125.43
0.48
0.36
106.94
1.02
0.71
Source: Thomson Reuters

.0660
.1456
.3121
.7612
.0015
.0003
.0217
.1147
.1338
.0442
.0526
.0349
.0002
.2943
.0356
.1003

1.2185
.0406
.1475
1.0970
.0036

Dollars in
Foreign Currency

15.1550
6.8700
3.2036
1.3138
670.23
2918.1
46.0000
8.7220
7.4720
22.6500
19.0050
28.6200
5603.8
3.3982
28.0900
9.9750

.8207
24.6200
6.7809
.9116
278.62

Foreign Currency
in Dollars

One Dollar in Euros


0.96 euros

$1 = 0.9116

0.94
0.92
0.90
0.88
0.86
15 2016
Norway (Krone)
Poland (Zloty)
Russia (Ruble)
Sweden (Krona)
Switzerland (Franc)
Turkey (Lira)

.1217
.2545
.0159
.1131
1.0102
.3237

8.2190
3.9288
62.8500
8.8380
.9899
3.0890

Dollars in
Foreign Currency

ASIA/PACIFIC
Australia (Dollar)
China (Yuan)
Hong Kong (Dollar)
India (Rupee)
Japan (Yen)
Malaysia (Ringgit)
New Zealand (Dollar)
Pakistan (Rupee)
Philippines (Peso)
Singapore (Dollar)
So. Korea (Won)
Taiwan (Dollar)
Thailand (Baht)
Vietnam (Dong)

.7611
.1486
.1289
.0150
.0096
.2382
.7081
.0096
.0207
.7194
.0009
.0316
.0283
.00004

1.3139
6.7277
7.7580
66.7073
104.18
4.1980
1.4122
104.48
48.3870
1.3901
1135.4
31.6930
35.3300
22256

MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA
Bahrain (Dinar)
Egypt (Pound)
Iran (Rial)
Israel (Shekel)
Jordan (Dinar)
Kenya (Shilling)
Kuwait (Dinar)

2.6552
.1126
.00003
.2621
1.4114
.0099
3.3072

.3766
8.8799
30055
3.8156
.7085
101.30
.3024

Friday

Year
Ago

Federal funds
Prime rate
15-yr fixed
15-yr fixed jumbo
30-yr fixed
30-yr fixed jumbo
5/1 adj. rate
5/1 adj. rate jumbo
1-year adj. rate

0.41%
3.50
2.70
3.50
3.47
4.43
2.99
3.89
2.76

0.13%
3.25
2.86
3.76
3.80
4.35
3.15
3.36
2.60

0% 1

9 10

Aug. 16
July 16

0.3%
+1.3

Corn
Soybeans
Wheat
Live Cattle
Hogs-Lean
Cocoa
Coffee
Sugar-World

+15%

Monetary
units per
Exchange quantity
CBT
CBT
CBT
CME
CME
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYBOT
COMX
COMX
COMX
NYMX
NYMX
NYMX

Lifetime
High
Low

Date

Open

Settle

Change

Open
Interest

560.00 314.75
1250.00 850.00
652.00 386.75
147.05
94.30
74.80
47.63
3359.00 2625.00
230.45 119.40
24.10
12.05

Dec
Nov
Dec
Oct
Oct
Dec
Dec
Feb

16
16
16
16
16
16
16
17

349.50 358.75 348.75 354.25


955.50 974.25 952.00 962.50
415.25 428.25 414.75 421.00
94.53
96.33
94.50
95.90
52.53
52.73
52.43
52.60
2700.00 2738.00 2693.00 2718.00
153.40 155.90 153.15 155.40
22.95
23.33
22.73
22.91

+ 4.75
+ 6.25
+ 5.00
+ 1.45
0.02
+ 22.00
+ 2.70
0.01

694,659
269,286
300,833
9,528
11,995
110,392
93,016
476,896

$/oz
$/oz
$/lb
$/bbl
$/gal
$/mil.btu

1380.90 1050.20
20.77
17.20
2.74
1.97
84.40
34.10
2.76
1.03
7.35
2.17

Oct
Oct
Oct
Nov
Oct
Oct

16
16
16
16
16
16

1253.90 1253.90 1250.60 1253.10


17.35
17.43
17.33
17.39
2.12
2.12
2.10
2.10
50.58
51.14
49.90
50.35
1.58
1.59
1.56
1.57
3.35
3.36
3.26
3.29

369
121
725
181,562
70,349
148,961

Aug. 16
July 16
4

+5.7%
+5.6

9 10

% Total Returns

+15%

11

16
60

ISM; over 50 indicates


expansion; seasonally adjusted

51.5
49.4

46

11

16

9 10

Balance of Trade

30

In billions of dollars
Seasonally adjusted
0% 1

9 10

0.28%
0.26
0.37
0.60
0.83
1.46

*Credit ratings: good, FICO score 660-749; excellent, FICO score 750-850.

Aug. 16 40.7
July 16 39.6

100
90

Lebanon (Pound)
Saudi Arabia (Riyal)
So. Africa (Rand)
U.A.E (Dirham)

.0007
.2667
.0699
.2723

55

11

16

Housing Supply

Prices as of 4:45 p.m. Eastern Time.


Source: Thomson Reuters

High

Low

1.90
0.02
0.01
0.09
0.01
0.06

Crude Oil
$55

$50.35 a barrel

50
45
40
35
30
15 2016

Type

YTD

1 Yr

(mil.$)

LARGEST FUNDS
DFA Emerging Markets Core Equity I(DFCEX)
DFA Emerging Markets Value I(DFEVX)
Oppenheimer Developing Markets Y(ODVYX)
American Funds New World A(NEWFX)
Lazard Emerging Markets Equity Instl(LZEMX)
Vanguard Emerging Mkts Stock Idx Adm(VEMAX)
Fidelity Series Emerging Markets F(FEMFX)
T. Rowe Price Emerging Markets Stock(PRMSX)
Virtus Emerging Markets Opportunities (HIEMX)
DFA Emerging Markets Small Cap I(DEMSX)
DFA Emerging Markets I(DFEMX)
Vanguard European Stock Index Adm(VEUSX)
GMO Emerging Markets VI(GEMMX)
Fidelity Emerging Markets(FEMKX)
Parametric Tax-Managed Emerg Mkt Instl(EITEX)
Matthews Asia Dividend Investor(MAPIX)
Matthews Pacific Tiger Investor(MAPTX)
T. Rowe Price New Asia(PRASX)
Parametric Emerging Markets Instl(EIEMX)
Matthews Asian Growth & Inc Investor(MACSX)
Vanguard Pacific Stock Index Adm(VPADX)
Matthews Japan Investor(MJFOX)
Baron Emerging Markets Institutional(BEXIX)
Average performance for all such funds
Number of funds for period

% Total Returns

Exp. Assets

5 Yr* Ratio

Fund Name (TICKER)

Type

YTD

1 Yr

Exp. Assets

5 Yr* Ratio

Source: Bankrate.com

4.6
4.7

11

16

(mil.$)

LEADERS
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
EM
ES
EM
EM
EM
DP
PJ
PJ
EM
PJ
DP
JS
EM

+17.2
+21.1
+12.4
+7.4
+23.3
+15.6
+16.1
+18.4
+11.6
+16.7
+16.8
2.6
+21.0
+11.3
+14.1
+10.0
+8.5
+7.6
+14.3
+7.9
+6.3
+7.7
+12.3

+9.7
+11.2
+10.2
+7.2
+14.7
+7.7
+9.7
+12.9
+7.6
+12.7
+8.8
5.2
+12.7
+9.5
+6.2
+11.0
+11.1
+7.9
+6.1
+6.0
+8.3
+16.1
+11.0

+2.2
+0.5
+3.0
+4.4
+1.9
+1.6
+3.5
+3.1
+3.8
+5.1
+1.7
+5.2
+0.2
+3.1
+1.8
+8.6
+7.9
+5.4
+1.2
+5.8
+6.2
+11.9
+6.4

+11.4
181

+7.8
181

+3.7
171

0.61
0.57
1.08
1.08
1.10
0.14
0.87
1.26
1.34
0.73
0.57
0.10
0.91
1.02
0.95
1.09
1.10
0.97
1.12
1.11
0.10
0.92
1.13

18,581
16,112
13,762
11,332
9,804
9,062
8,518
8,021
6,215
5,485
4,894
3,786
3,570
3,063
3,054
2,847
2,810
2,671
2,073
2,042
2,007
1,957
1,849

Deutsche Latin America Equity S(SLAFX)


T. Rowe Price Latin America(PRLAX)
Delaware Emerging Markets A(DEMAX)
BlackRock Latin America Instl(MALTX)
Fidelity Latin America(FLATX)
Invesco Developing Markets A(GTDDX)
Hennessy Japan Institutional(HJPIX)
T. Rowe Price Japan(PRJPX)
DFA Asia Pacific Small Company I(DFRSX)
Matthews Japan Investor(MJFOX)
Templeton Instl Emerging Markets Ser A(TEEMX)
Fidelity Pacific Basin(FPBFX)

LS
LS
EM
LS
LS
EM
JS
JS
PJ
JS
EM
DP

+50.2
+42.7
+23.8
+36.0
+34.4
+25.3
+15.2
+14.8
+15.5
+7.7
+22.2
+9.9

+37.8
+32.3
+24.6
+23.1
+22.6
+21.7
+21.0
+20.4
+19.1
+16.1
+15.8
+15.4

1.2
4.4
+4.5
4.8
7.5
+2.5
+14.1
+11.1
+3.8
+11.9
+0.9
+11.2

1.50
1.43
1.79
1.40
1.17
1.44
1.23
1.04
0.55
0.92
1.32
1.20

273
627
476
50
555
822
63
417
259
1,957
50
701

LAGGARDS
BlackRock EuroFund Inv A(MDEFX)
T. Rowe Price European Stock(PRESX)
Henderson European Focus C(HFECX)
Putnam Europe Equity A(PEUGX)
Morgan Stanley European Equity B(EUGBX)
JPMorgan Intrepid European C(VEUCX)
Columbia European Equity A(AXEAX)
Ivy European Opportunities A(IEOAX)
Vanguard European Stock Index Inv(VEURX)
Invesco European Growth C(AEDCX)
Templeton Frontier Markets A(TFMAX)
Franklin Mutual European C(TEURX)

ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
EM
ES

8.8
8.7
10.0
7.2
5.1
7.5
7.6
5.2
2.8
4.3
+6.3
4.0

10.8
10.6
10.4
10.1
9.1
8.5
8.4
5.4
5.3
4.6
3.6
3.3

+4.6
+6.9
+6.2
+7.0
+3.1
+6.8
+5.2
+5.6
+5.1
+5.8
+0.2
+6.1

1.28
0.95
2.07
1.31
1.39
1.89
1.35
1.64
0.26
2.09
2.15
2.05

169
1,205
262
171
104
53
127
82
635
93
57
222

*Annualized. Leaders and Laggards are among funds with at least $50 million in assets, and include no more than one class of any fund. Todays fund types: CH-China Region. DP-Divers.
Pacific Asia. EI-India Equity. EM-Divers. Emerging Mkt.. ES-Europe Stock. JS-Japan Stock. LS-Latin America Stock. PJ-Pacific Asia ex-Japan. NA-Not Available. YTD-Year to date. Spotlight tables
rotate on a 2-week basis.
Source: Morningstar

In months

Aug. 16
July 16

1507.5
3.7496
14.3118
3.6726

MUTUAL FUNDS SPOTLIGHT: REGIONAL AND EMERGING MARKETS

Manufacturing Index
Sept. 16
Aug. 16

110

Key to exchanges: CBT-Chicago Board of Trade. CME-Chicago Mercantile Exchange. CMX-Comex division of NYM. KC-Kansas City Board of Trade. NYBOT-New York Board of
Trade. NYM-New York Mercantile Exchange. Open interest is the number of contracts outstanding.
Source: Thomson Reuters

16

Percent of
disposable income

120

11

Personal Savings Rate

$1 = 104.18

15 2016

/bushel
/bushel
/bushel
/lb
/lb
$/ton
/lb
/lb

Fund Name (TICKER)

3.31%
3.11

CDs and Money Market Rates

5-YEAR HISTORY

Change from
previous year

0% 1

0.26%
0.25
0.34
0.58
0.76
1.36

3.96%
3.88
4.10
4.08

Auto Loan Rates


3.26%
3.04

Construction Spending

0% 1

4.38%
4.26
4.01
3.98

One Dollar in Yen


130 yen

FUTURES
Future

Gold
Silver
Hi Grade Copper
Light Sweet Crude
Heating Oil
Natural Gas

Change from last week


Up
Flat
Down

1-year range
Home
Mortgages

Money-market
$10K min. money-mkt
6-month CD
1-year CD
2-year CD
5-year IRA CD

Yield

Source: Thomson Reuters

CONVERTIBLES

36-mo. used car


60-mo. new car

}
1[
1
2

Chg

FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Most Active

Home Equity
$75K line good credit*
$75K line excel. credit*
$75K loan good credit*
$75K loan excel. credit*

Ask

TREASURY INFLATION BONDS


[ 101.81
5-yr. Apr 21
[ 99.89
10-yr. Jul 26
2 125.13
20-yr. Jan 29
1.000 106.59
30-yr. Feb 46

0
30

Bid

ONLINE: MORE PRICES AND ANALYSIS

Information on all United States stocks, plus bonds, mutual funds, commodities and foreign stocks along
with analysis of industry sectors and stock indexes: nytimes.com/markets

B8

THE NEW YORK TIMES OBITUARIES SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Louis Stettner, Photographer of the Everyday in New York and Paris, Dies at 93
By WILLIAM GRIMES

Louis Stettner, a photographer


who explored the streets of the
two cities he called his spiritual
mothers, New York and Paris, recording the daily lives of ordinary
people, died on Thursday at his
home in Saint-Ouen, France. He
was 93.
His death was announced by
the Centre Georges Pompidou in
Paris.
Mr. Stettner, a New Yorker, was
a product of the Photo League and
its emphasis on socially conscious, documentary work, exemplified
by
members
and
supporters like Weegee, Berenice
Abbott and Robert Frank.
I have never been interested in
photographs based solely on aesthetics, divorced from reality, he
wrote in his photo collection Wisdom Cries Out in the Streets, published in 1999. I also doubt very
much whether this is possible.
While living in Paris after World
War II, he also found inspiration in
a new wave of French photographers, including Robert Doisneau,
Brassa and Henri Cartier-Bresson, whose outlook seemed to
dovetail with the leagues.
He was particularly taken with
Brassa. Brassa showed me that

Chronicling the poetry


of routine in two
cities, usually as an
unseen presence.
it was possible to find something
significant in photographing subjects in everyday life doing ordinary things by interpreting them
in your own way and with your
own personal vision, Mr. Stettner
told The Financial Times in June.
With an unerring eye for the poetry of the everyday, he trained
his camera on subway riders and
pedestrians in New York the
unceasing human ebb and flow in
the old Penn Station and ordinary Parisians going about their
daily rounds, like the woman
walking her dog on a deserted and
misty Avenue de Chatillon in 1949.
Always, his subjects seemed
completely unaware they were
being photographed, whether it
was the chic woman reading, one
elbow pointed outward, in Elbowing Out of Town Newstand,
NYC (1954); the man leaning
back on a bench in Manhattan
From the Brooklyn Promenade
(1954); or the immigrant father
and his child, swaddled in blankets on the wind-whipped deck of
a ship, in Coming to America
(1951).
Stettners work continues to
attract with an apparently egoless
respect for fact and the unforced
directness of its transmission, the
critic Alan Artner wrote in The
Chicago Tribune in 1997, reviewing an exhibition. His photographs are, he added so quiet and
undemonstrative, they appear inevitable.
Louis Stettner was born on Nov.
7, 1922, in Brooklyn and grew up in
the Flatbush and Bensonhurst
neighborhoods. His father, Morris, gave him a box camera when
he was a boy, and after reading an

LOUIS STETTNER, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, VIA BENRUBI GALLERY, NYC

LOUIS STETTNER, VIA BENRUBI GALLERY, NYC

article by the photographer Paul


Outerbridge Jr. on the camera as
an interpreter of reality, Louis realized, he later wrote, that the
camera could become my personal language for telling people what
I was discovering, suffering or immensely joyous about.
He began studying photo-

Deaths
Higgins, James

Rohatyn, Elizabeth

Lowenstein, Carol

Saul, Ralph

O'Brien, Ellin

Signorile, Anthony

HIGGINSJames Francis,
age 68, passed away on Wednesday, October 12, 2016 in his
home surrounded by his loving family. Jim was born on
February 19, 1948. He attended high school at Don Bosco
Prep in Ramsey, NJ, and
earned a basketball scholarship to Georgetown University, where he graduated in
1970. He remained an active
alumnus, serving on many
Georgetown
boards
and
committees. Jim had a lengthy career with Dean Witter
ultimately retiring as President and COO of Morgan
Stanley. Jim and his wife
Jackie raised their three
children in Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ;
more recently, they lived in
Palm Beach, FL and Bay
Head, NJ. Jim is predeceased
by his son Christopher (2008).
Jim was the devoted husband
to Jacquelyn (nee Zanone),
loving father to Erin Davies
and Michael Higgins. He was
the devoted grandfather to
Molly, Chris and Paige Davies; and Annie, Emma and
Henry Higgins. Jim is survived by his brother, Tim Higgins, and many other longtime friends and family. A
viewing will be held at C.C.
Van Emburgh Funeral Home
in Ridgewood, NJ on Sunday,
October 16 from 2-7pm. The
Funeral Mass will be held on
Monday,
October
17
at
10:30am at Saint Gabriel the
Archangel Church in Saddle
River, NJ. Jim will be greatly
missed by all his friends and
family who will never forget
his kindness, generosity and
joyful spirit.

LOWENSTEINCarol.
To Michael, Jeffrey, Brad,
Melanie and all of Carol's family, four generations of us
Lowensteins, from California,
Colorado and Seattle to
Washington D.C., Virginia,
Massachusetts
and
New
York are thinking of you and
send our condolences and all
of our love. We miss her, too.

LOUIS STETTNER/CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU

Clockwise from top, Louis Stettners Manhattan From the Brooklyn Promenade (1954); his Aubervilliers (1947); and his selfportrait, taken in 1949. More images from Mr. Stettners portfolio can be seen online in a slide show at nytimes.com/obits.

O'BRIENEllin C.,
of Spring Lake Heights, New
Jersey, after a brief illness.
Beloved wife of the late Francis J. O'Brien, loving mother
of Dr. Francis (and Thomas
Fazio),
Paul
(and
Polly
O'Brien), Matthew, and Christopher (and Donna Farina)
and devoted grandmother of
Robert and Ellin. She was the
daughter of the late Dr. Leo
and Irene Amorosi, cherished
sister of Dr. Angela Bennett,
Dr. Edward Amorosi, and the
late Dr. Leo Amorosi. Dear
aunt of many nephews and
nieces. Born in Brooklyn, Ellin
attended
Fontbonne
Hall
Academy, Marymount College and Fordham University
where she earned an MS in
mathematics. She was an esteemed mathematics teacher at Regis High School in
New York City for 25 years.
Ellin loved her family and
friends, she was an avid
bridge player and she was a
fabulous cook. Her optimism,
quiet grace and dignity were
an inspiration to all who knew
her. Visitation at O'Brien's
Funeral Home, 2028 Route 35,
Wall, New Jersey on Sunday,
October 16 from 2-5pm and
7-9pm. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Mark's Church, 215
Crescent Pkwy, Sea Girt, New
Jersey on Monday, October
17 at 9:30am. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made
to Regis High School, 55 East
84 Street, New York, NY 10028
in honor of Ellin O'Brien.
ROHATYNElizabeth.
Lazard mourns the passing of
Elizabeth Rohatyn, beloved
wife of Felix Rohatyn, our
longtime partner. Elizabeth
was a vibrant presence in
American and French cultural circles, who inspired us
with her energy, her generous spirit, and her many accomplishments. Her steadfast support of public education, cultural institutions and
the arts made a lasting difference on both sides of the Atlantic. We extend our deepest
condolences to Felix and
his family.

graphs at the print room of the


Metropolitan Museum of Art and
observing, through the cameras
lens, the streets around him. New
York was his subject, the place he
described as a city I love, a city
that forgives nothing but accepts
everyone a place of a thousand
varied moods and vistas, of count-

Deaths
SAULRalph S.,

Deaths
SIGNORILEAnthony J.,

less faces in a moving crowd, each


one silently talking to you.
At the Photo League, he took a
short course on basic techniques
and found a mentor in Sid Grossman, one of its founders, but he
was largely self-taught, working
initially with an old-fashioned
wooden camera on a tripod, using

glass plates. Until late in his career, he photographed almost exclusively in black and white.
After graduating from Abraham Lincoln High School in
Brooklyn, he enlisted in the Army
Signal Corps during World War II
and served with its photography
section in New Guinea, the Phil-

ippines and Japan.


Mr. Stettner joined the Photo
League on returning to New York
and became fast friends with the
photographers Lewis Hine and
Weegee.
A visit to Paris in 1946 turned
into a stay of five years. While in
Paris, he selected work for a New
York exhibition by the Photo
League that introduced American
audiences to Brassa, Doisneau
and their French peers. He also
studied photography at the Institute
for
Advanced
Cinematographic Studies and exhibited his work in a group show in
1949 at the National Library.
He returned to New York in 1951,
the same year his work was
shown at the influential exhibition
Subjective Photography in
Saarbrcken, Germany. He found
a night job at a security company,
prowling the streets during the
day with his camera. To supplement his income, he also photographed for magazines and advertising agencies. He had his
first solo show at the Limelight
Gallery in Greenwich Village in
1954.
Mr. Stettner taught photography at Brooklyn College, Queens
College and Cooper Union in the
late 1960s and early 70s and from
1973 to 79 was a professor of art at
the C. W. Post Center at Long Island University. In the 1970s he
wrote a monthly column for the
magazine Camera 35.
In the 1980s he worked on a series of photographs documenting
life on the Bowery, and toward the
end of the decade embarked on
two projects in New York and
Paris, the Manhattan Wall Series. and the Seine Series, that
captured snippets of the urban
landscape defined by light and
shadow.
After moving to Saint-Ouen, a
suburb of Paris, in 1990, Mr. Stettner photographed passengers on
the Paris subways for the series
Heroes of the Metro, and in the
giant flea market near his home
he scavenged for vintage photographic images, which he transformed into collages. With a camera on a tripod, he also took landscape photographs in the forests
near Aix-en-Provence.
A collection of his work from
1947 to 1972, Early Joys, was
published in 1987 after a retrospective exhibition in Geneva in
1986. He was given a retrospective
at the Bonni Benrubi Gallery in
Manhattan in 2002 and at the
Franois-Mitterrand Library in
Paris in 2012. In 1996, Rizzoli published Louis Stettners New York,
1950s-1990s.
Mr. Stettners first three marriages ended in divorce. His survivors include his wife, Janet Iffland, and three sons, Anton, Arion and Patrick.
In 2015, Thames & Hudson published his 1950s photographs of
Penn Station in Penn Station,
New York. Several were included
in Ici/Ailleurs (Here and
There), a retrospective exhibition at the Pompidou Center
that closed in September.
My photographs are acts of eloquent homage and deep remorse
about the city, Mr. Stettner wrote
of his New York work. I am profoundly moved by its lyric beauty
and horrified by its cruelty and
suffering.

Thomas Mikal Ford, 52, of the Sitcom Martin


By CHRISTOPHER MELE

passed away on the evening


of October 4th at the age of
94. He is survived by his son
Bob and daughter Jane, and
his four grandchildren Southey, Ryan, Jack and Ellie. His
professional
accomplish ments include CEO of INA
from 1975-1982 and co-CEO
and Chairman of the Board of
CIGNA Corp. after the merger of INA and Connecticut
General. Prior to joining INA
he was Co-CEO and Chairman of the Management
Committee of the First Boston Corporation and director
of the Division of Trading and
Markets of the Securities and
Exchange Commission. He
was the President of the
American Stock Exchange
from 1967-1971. He served on
the Board of the Brookings Institute, the Committee for
Economic Development and
the
Regulatory
Advisory
Committee of the New York
Stock Exchange and the Advisory Board to the Graduate
School of Education of the
University of Pennsylvania.
During his career, he also
served on the boards of Sun
Company, Fidelity Group of
Funds, The New York Times,
AMF Corporation, The New
York Stock Exchange, Paine
Webber and Co., Pennwalt
Corporation,
Saint - Gobain
and the Gesu School in Philadelphia. He served as an
enlisted gunnery officer in
World War II on the SS Lamson in the South Pacific and
an Assistant Consulate at the
US Embassy in Prague. He
sustained a dignified, gracious and loving nature to all
who knew him as husband,
father,
grandfather,
col league and friend. His life was
full. Gifts in his honor can be
made to the Gesu School at
1700 West Thompson Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19121.

92, of Manhasset, NY and


New York City, passed away
on October 10, 2016. A Stuyvesant High School and Baruch
College graduate and WWII
veteran, he served as a navigator in the U.S. Army Air
Corps from 1942 to 1946 rising
to the rank of 1st Lieutenant.
A.J. married high school
sweetheart,
Frances
M.
Tucci in 1945 and they were
married for 68 years. She predeceased him in 2013. He became a CPA in 1956. Mr. Signorile founded the New York
accounting firm of A. J. Signorile & Co in 1967. He
worked at Arthur Young &
Co, Leslie Banks and Co.,
Lybrand Ross Bros and
Montgomery later Coopers
& Lybrand/PriceWaterhouse
Coopers before leaving to
found his own firm. Mr. Signorile served as tax advisor
to the Charles A Dana family
and chief outside auditor for
the Charles A Dana Foundation. Known for his philanthropic work, he was Trustee
and later Chairman of the
Eleanor Naylor Dana Charitable Trust major supporter
of performing arts, music,
theatre, bio-medical research
and health organizations. He
is survived by a brother, William Signorile, two children,
Linda S. Ehrlich and Stephen
A. Signorile as well as five
grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Visitation at
Fairchild Sons Funeral Chapel, 1570 Northern Blvd, Manhasset, Saturday, October 15,
3-5pm and 7-9pm. Funeral at
Lutheran Church of Our Savior 12 Franklin Ave, Port
Washington NY, Sunday, October 16, 3pm.

In Memoriam
HOCHMANRubin.
On your birthday and always
you are missed and loved
every minute. XOXO.
Nettie, Kathy & Joel

Thomas Mikal Ford, who


played the pragmatic yet charming character Tommy on the 1990s
sitcom Martin, died on Wednesday. He was 52.
His family confirmed his death
in a statement released by the J
Pervis Talent Agency but did not
give a cause. News accounts said
that Mr. Ford had had an abdominal aneurysm and died in a hospital in Atlanta. He had knee replacement surgery last week, according to his Instagram account.
Mr. Ford, whose first and middle names were Tommy Mykal but
who used a slightly different stage
name, appeared in more than 75
movies and television series in a
career that began in the
mid-1980s.
He was probably best remembered for his role as Tommy
Strawn from 1992 to 1997 on Martin, which starred the comedian
Martin Lawrence as an often ornery Detroit disc jockey who later
became the host of a public-access
television talk show. Mr. Fords
Tommy was often Mr. Lawrences
straight man and the subject of his
jokes.
A running gag on the show was
the disconnect between Tommys
lofty aspirations and his fuzzy employment status, which often
played out with other characters
reminding him that he had no job.
His performance earned him a
nomination for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy series at
the 1996 N.A.A.C.P. Image
Awards.
He was born on Sept. 5, 1964, in
Los Angeles. Information on survivors was not immediately avail-

FOX, VIA PHOTOFEST

From left, the actors Thomas Mikal Ford, Martin Lawrence and
Carl Anthony Payne II in Martin, a 1990s sitcom.

Playing a character
with a disconnect
between reality and
lofty aspirations.
able.
Mr. Fords films included the
1989 crime comedy Harlem
Nights, which starred Eddie
Murphy, Richard Pryor and Redd
Foxx. His other films included
Against the Law (1997), Baby
Mamas Club (2010) and Love
Different (2016).
On television he played a police
lieutenant on the detective drama
New York Undercover in 1998
and 1999 and Mel Parker, a fun-

loving father, in seven episodes of


the sitcom The Parkers from
1999 to 2001.
Mr. Ford was a regular on four
seasons of Whos Got Jokes?, a
comedy competition in which he
was billed as the Pope of Comedy, on the TV One cable channel.
Mr. Ford had turned his attention to directing and producing
both dramas and comedies for
television, according to his website. He was most recently filming
Reverse the Lynch Curse, a documentary about curses of distrust
and envy.
His website noted that, pursuing a longtime dream, he had also
begun writing a series of childrens books intended to promote
healthy, spiritual and nonviolent
living.

C1

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

ACKERMAN + GRUBER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Prince, the Hometown Hero


ST. PAUL A dashiki. A fake-alligator trench
coat. A sequined slip dress. A velvet blazer.
Shirts, scarves and necklaces. Football jerseys,
neckties, boas and silk robes.
Hair dye and wigs. Nail polish
and eye shadow and lipstick.
Purple popped up in all sorts
of places at the Xcel Energy
MUSIC
Center here Thursday night, on
REVIEW
Prince loyalists who had come
from all over the city and all over the world for
The Official Prince Tribute Concert, envisioned by his estate as a grand celebration of

JON
CARAMANICA

the legacy of a transformative rock and pop


icon, who died April 21 of an accidental overdose
of painkillers.
Here, just next to Minneapolis, the city he
honed his skills in and never strayed far from
his residential and recording complex, Paisley
Park, is in nearby Chanhassen and is being
converted into a museum he is a god, and
also a local kid done good. He is so much a part
of the areas fabric that it made utter sense that
almost everyone in the sold-out crowd of 17,000
was keen to show off a little bit of inner Prince.
That strong sense of ownership also high-

lighted the tension that underscored this decidedly uneven concert, and eventually almost
undermined it between Prince as a local hero
and Prince as a global superstar.
Judging by the execution of the concert,
hometown Prince was the clear victor, or at
least the more achievable inspiration. For almost five hours, the New Power Generation
one of Princes long-running backing bands
held steady court while several Prince collaborators known best to intimates and committed

The Official Prince Tribute Concert


featured performances on Thursday by many artists, including
Judith Hill, at the Xcel Energy
Center in St. Paul.

Continued on Page 5

The Coolest Class


At Harvard?
Its Bob Dylan
By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER and DINA KRAFT

For the Harvard classics professor Richard F. Thomas, who has been gently teased by colleagues for teaching a freshman seminar about Bob Dylan as well as
for the students who sometimes get double takes for
choosing the course the announcement of the newest
Nobel laureate in literature was hailed as vindication.
And cause to break out celebratory cupcakes at the
fortuitously timed Thursday afternoon session.
Mr. Thomas uses the course, simply called Bob
Dylan, to put the artist in context of not just popular
culture of the last half-century, but the tradition of
classical poets like Virgil and Homer. The class follows
Mr. Dylans career chronologically, listening to
selections from most of
his dozens and dozens of
albums while also reading his memoir, Chronicles, which Mr. Thomas
calls in the course description a work of genius, a sprawling Dylan
prose song posing as an
autobiography.
One of the coolest
things is learning about
Bob Dylan from a world
expert on Virgil, said
Ethan McCollister, 18,
from East Montpelier, Vt.
Both are poets, and both
are lyricists even more
than that.
Prof. Richard F. Thomas
Each session features
teaches a freshman
student presentations,
seminar on Bob Dylan.
and on Thursday it was
Jake Suddlesons turn to
go first after Mr. Thomas played Diamonds and Rust,
which recounts Joan Baezs memories of her romantic
relationship with Mr. Dylan.
A discussion about the complicated relationship
between the two segued into Mr. Suddlesons presentation on Just Like a Woman. He described the lingering mystery over the subject of the song, Ms. Baez or
perhaps the model and heiress Edie Sedgwick. Or as
Mr. Thomas suggested, perhaps it was about both or
neither.
Mr. Suddleson, 18, from Los Angeles, asked his classContinued on Page 2

AN RONG XU FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

No Suits. And No Canned Sketches.


By JON CARAMANICA

This past Tuesday afternoon, in a conference


room on the third floor of Vices sprawling
Williamsburg offices, the comic team of Desus &
Mero was going through its daily calisthenics.
Watching a video of Donald J. Trump kissing a
baby, Desus said, They gotta throw that baby
away now. Presented a news story about a police officer caught masturbating in his squad car,
the two took an optimistic approach: We might
have just solved the police brutality thing,
Desus said. Every cop clear a chamber before
you roll out.
Discussing a recent controversy involving one
of the newest New York Knicks, the point guard
Brandon Jennings, Desus asked, Did he say All
lives matter? Mero replied, Yeah, but drop 30,
and that goes away.

Desus Nice, left, and the Kid Mero, comics


from the Bronx, on the set of their new latenight show on Viceland, Desus & Mero.
Such humor is the stock in trade for this pair
Desus Nice and the Kid Mero the hip-hop-inspired, slapstick-and-social-commentary comedians from the Bronx. But this was a bigger
stage: the final rehearsals for their new latenight, half-hour show, Desus & Mero, which,
starting on Monday, will air four nights a week
on Viceland, the fledgling network that began in
February, and which has been rolling out new
shows at a relaxed, irregular pace.
To date, the channels programming has been
split between big-personality-focused shows,
like the ones starring the chef Eddie Huang and

the rapper/chef Action Bronson, and fish-out-ofwater travelogues. Desus & Mero is its first bet
on comedy, and its first attempt at a daily anchor
franchise. Its also an upending of late-night orthodoxy no suits, no canned sketches, no
white guys.
Our priority is voice, it isnt formats or scheduling, said Spike Jonze, the channels co-president. Thats really what I want the channel to be
brains Im interested in being near. Viceland
is licensing no old content, only making new
shows.
Desus and Mero have been an established duo
since 2013, when they took their jokes off Twitter
and onto the web series Desus vs. Mero. Last
year, they started a podcast, Bodega Boys, that
still continues.
Continued on Page 2

C2

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

AN RONG XU FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

It shouldnt feel like Yo, heres the news. It should feel like youre looking on the internet with your friends.
THE KID MERO

on Desus & Mero, a new late-night show on Viceland that he stars in with Desus Nice, left.

Desus & Mero: No Suits. And No Canned Sketches.


From First Arts Page
Together the pair are drumroll quick,
and Desus & Mero is mainly a distillation of their conversation there is
no writers room. Desus, 34, with a thin
whisper of a beard, is the straight man,
providing structure and delivering
withering jabs with cool reserve. Mero,
32, permanently in a hoodie and ball
cap, provides impressionistic color
commentary, bulging his eyes, peppering in dance moves with his voice
sometimes thinning to a squeak.
Desus & Mero is loose, cheerful
and profane. Late night as a structure
of programming does not matter,
Mero said. It shouldnt feel like Yo,
heres the news. It should feel like
youre looking on the internet with
your friends. Yo, you saw this video?
Thats wild!
Indeed, the show is much more akin
to sparring-partner chat shows like
Pardon the Interruption, or clip-driven reaction comedy shows like Ri-

diculousness and Tosh.0. In fact, the


executive producer of Desus & Mero
is Erik Rydholm, who created the
ESPN banter show Highly Questionable (and Pardon the Interruption,
too). When he first came across Desus
vs. Mero a couple of years ago,
within five minutes I was like, This is
the ultimate extension of all this stuff
weve been building over the years,
he said. Its role models, he said, include
Siskel & Ebert, Crossfire, and The
Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour.
The show will be taped the same day
it airs, in that converted conference
room, well-worn Chesterfield sofas on
either side, with the stars seated in
front of a wall covered in a nature motif
and a stuffed, prowling bear that has
wheat-colored Timberlands at its feet.
Every time theres a break in filming,
music begins blasting Gucci Mane
and Rae Sremmurds Black Beatles,
French Montanas remix of Young
M. A.s OOOUUU, and more.
For the last two weeks, the shows

team has been sandpapering its format


and appearance, though Mr. Rydholm
said more changes were likely to come
once theres comfort with the sameday taping-and-editing schedule. (Hed
especially like to tape Desus and Mero
in a local elementary school, delivering
their cracks from tiny chairs.) On Oct.
5, the seemingly obligatory late-nightshow desk was plain wood. The next
day, it had been replaced with one covered in graffiti written by Mero. By
Tuesday, the desk had given way to a
pair of Masterpiece Theater-esque
black leather chairs. Last week, Mr.
Rydholm popped over to suggest to his
producers that the onscreen topic descriptions be rewritten in language
that Desus and Mero might use. If we
need any help with words, he said, go
to the people that know them.
According to Nick Weidenfeld, Vicelands president for programming,
They have a camaraderie thats really
specific. He added that the goal of the
show was to preserve that. Topics that

fall outside of their natural enthusiasms are cut.


Viceland has so far favored flamboyant personalities in its programming,
but Desus & Mero is both the funniest
and most biting show it has developed.
It comes with the idea of the old Vice,

Something comedic,
something satirical,
something hard-hitting.
Mr. Weidenfeld said, something comedic, something satirical, something
hard-hitting that doesnt pull any
punches.
The show is being filmed in old-Vice
fashion, too not on a soundstage, but
just steps away from rows of young,
artfully dressed Vice employees work-

ing on the companys television and online properties. Mero, in particular,


seemed to relish the dissonance.
Tuesday morning, he strolled in
about an hour after Desus and began
rolling a blunt. I dumped the blunt
guts in the organic trash can, he said,
musing on whether they would be composted. Im trying to stay humble,
dump my own blunt guts. I do be using
the paper cutter to cut it, though. Then
he went to the office paper cutter, over
by the staffers working on some of
Vices fashion properties, and trimmed
the blunt edge.
Both men still live in the Bronx, but
Mero is about to close on a house in
New Jersey, his first time living anywhere else. Its Paramus, though; I
can be on Dyckman in 20 minutes, he
said. That was my thing I cannot
move more than 30 minutes out from
fried pork ears.
Desus, without missing a beat, replied, Theres a box for that on Zillow,
right?

Whats Now the Coolest Class at Harvard? Bob Dylan


the Aeneid by the ghost of Aeneass
father, Anchises, who he sees in the
underworld, and who basically says to
him: Other people will make sculpture. Your art, your job as a Roman, is
to spare defeated peoples, tame the
proud.

From First Arts Page


mates if they thought the song was
misogynistic, citing the chorus that
includes the words she aches just like
a woman/But she breaks just like a
little girl.
He said he thought they merely
reflected Mr. Dylans own heartbreak.
But Sam Puopolo, 19, from Manhattan,
disagreed. It seems like he is infantilizing the woman, he argued.
Mr. Thomas brought the discussion
back to Ms. Baezs Diamond and
Rust. It was a reminder, he suggested,
of Mr. Dylans genius at obfuscation,
recalling the lyrics, You who are so
good with words/And at keeping things
vague.
But keeping things vague is not part
of an academics job description. Before
class, we talked with Mr. Thomas about
the class, the intergenerational appeal
of Mr. Dylan and just how deep into
Greek and Roman literature the latest
Nobel laureate seems to have read.
These are edited excerpts from the
conversation.

What about other Latin and Greek poets?

The album Modern Times, from


2006, includes 18 lines from Ovids exile
poems. Other people had noticed them,
but Ive found a few extras. Theres
also a reference to the Odyssey on a
song from Tempest (2012) called
Early Roman Kings. The title turns
out to be a reference to a Latino gang
in the Bronx in the 1960s. But theres
also a direct quote from Robert Fagless translation of the Odyssey, at the
end of the song. Its undeniable.
Is there any kind of analogy in the classical world to the kind of hybrid performer-writer figure that Dylan is?

Not really. There were people called


rhapsodes, who would sing Homeric
songs at Greek festivals. But they were
craftsmen, rather than figures who
were creating the songs.

Youve taught the class four times since


2004. What was the reaction from your
Harvard colleagues initially?

The [course] committee at first


didnt want to accept it, but they were
eventually convinced. The process was
like what the Nobel Prize committee
must have gone through, realizing just
what Dylan is. Hes not just a protest
singer, or a pop singer, but a phenomenon who rolls into his art lots of disparate musical, literary and other
strands.
You mentioned that one student just
went with her father to Desert Trip, last
weekends concert in California, also
known as Oldchella, featuring Dylan,
the Rolling Stones, the Who and other
acts now in their 70s. What does Dylan
mean to 18-year-olds like your students?

A lot of them obviously come to him


through their parents, maybe even
their grandparents. Each time Ive

What about Dylan just as a writer?

SHIHO FUKADA FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

The classics professor Richard F. Thomas celebrating the news that Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in Literature on
Thursday. Each session of the freshman seminar he teaches on Mr. Dylan at Harvard features student presentations.
taught the class, there have been a few
students who know him pretty much as
well as I do. Hes alive for them. Others
know him through something like the
movie Hurricane [about the boxer
Rubin Carter, which includes Mr.
Dylans song of the same name]. Others are taking it out of a curiosity to see
why their parents have been so obsessed with him their entire lives.
Much has been said by scholars like
Christopher Ricks and Sean Wilentz
about the way Dylan draws on English

ballads, American folk music, minstrel


songs, blues, the Bible. Your scholarly
article Streets of Rome: The Classical
Dylan unpacks a less noted aspect of
his lyrics allusions to ancient Greek
and Roman literature. Whats your impression about how deeply he knows
that literature?

He did Latin in school in Hibbing,


Im not sure how much. Hes always
read eclectically. Thats why I think in
recent years hes come to classics stuff.
I started teaching the seminar after I

noticed some of the classical layers,


particularly since 2001, in songs like
Lonesome Day Blues.
As you note, that song includes allusions
to Huckleberry Finn and a Japanese
gangster novel. Where do the classical
references come in?

Theres a stanza that goes: Im


gonna spare the defeated Im gonna
speak to the crowd/ . . . Im goin to
teach peace to the conquered/Im
gonna tame the proud. Thats pretty
much a direct quote of lines spoken in

In his intertextuality, hes like Virgil


or Ovid: someone who came late
enough in the tradition and has enough
tradition behind him T. S. Eliot wrote
about this that he can control it and
also be part of it, recreating and refreshing it. I dont see any difference
between a poet like Catullus or Virgil
and Bob Dylan. I think they are doing
the same things. It has to do with control of language, connecting of lyrics
and melodies. Thats what makes it
timeless. If I tried to teach a course on
Hermans Hermits, no one would turn
up.
Youve never met Dylan. If you did, what
would you ask him?

Whatever I asked him, he wouldnt


tell me. Dylan is very careful at controlling what he gets asked.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

A Space
With Room
To Invite
Immersion
Many of Kaija Saariahos orchestral pieces unfold with
minute and seemingly constant
shifts of subtle sounds and colorings. Dense chords murmur
restlessly, as wavering melodic
lines escape from
sustained, quivering sonorities and
MUSIC
spin off, sometimes
REVIEW
disappearing into
an ether. The instrumental writing is continually varied and
wondrously strange.
Though it might seem counterintuitive, Ms. Saariahos most
ruminative and mystical orchestral works are often best perceived in large, open spaces,
where myriad sounds can be
dispersed to create an enveloping experience for listeners.
So, when Pierre Audi, the new
artistic director of the Park Avenue Armory, suggested that the
New York Philharmonic play a
Saariaho program there, the
composer embraced it.
That sold-out program, Circle
Map, conducted by Esa-Pekka
Salonen, opened on Thursday,
the first of two consecutive
performances presented by the
armory in its 55,000-square-foot
drill hall. This vast space proved
ideal for the 90-minute program,
performed without intermission.
Seating for some 1,000 audience
members, in bleachers and on
the floor, surrounded about twothirds of the orchestra.
The programs four works
explored Ms. Saariahos interests
in medieval arts and sacred texts
from all religions. The concert
also provided a helpful immersion in Ms. Saariahos music
before the Dec. 1 opening of the
Metropolitan Operas production
of her 2000 opera, LAmour de
Loin (Love From Afar), a tale
of idealized medieval love. To
enhance the armory experience,
atmospheric videos and projections designed by Jean-Baptiste
Barrire were shown on a large
screen behind the orchestra.
The first work, Lumire et
Pesanteur, set the mood for the
evening. Ms. Saariaho wrote the
piece for Mr. Salonen, inspired by
his 2009 performance with the
Los Angeles Philharmonic of her
oratorio La Passion de Simone,
which explores the life and writ-

Philharmonic Saves
Its New-Music Series
By MICHAEL COOPER

ANTHONY
TOMMASINI

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SARA KRULWICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES

New York Philharmonic Above,


Kari Kriikku and, at rear, EsaPekka Salonen, at the Park Avenue Armory. Left, Jennifer Zetlan.

ings of the Jewish French philosopher and social activist Simone


Weil. Lumire has eight sections, or stations, like a passion
ritual. The mostly slow, pensive
music churns and breathes with
hazy and mystical harmonies
that linger, swell and overlap.
Sudden bursts will take off,
sometimes inciting a fluttering
tremolo or gnashing percussion
volley. But an overall cosmic
feeling pervades.
Moment to moment, the music
is filled with haunting variations
of texture and color. Yet pieces
like this one can have a surface
sameness, which was the one
downside of a program that
mostly emphasized Ms. Saariahos contemplative side. Also, Mr.
Barrires videos, dominated by
swirling clouds and shapes,

emphasized the murky qualities


of the music, whereas images
that provided more contrasts and
activity might have been better.
Dom le Vrai Sens (2010), the
next work, a substantial concerto
for clarinet and orchestra, was
written for her Finnish compatriot Kari Kriikku, a brilliant
clarinetist, who performed it
here commandingly. The piece
was inspired by six medieval
tapestries, The Lady and the
Unicorn, exploring the five
senses, as well as a mysterious
sixth one. There was more in the
way of jarring undercurrents and
agitation in this work. During
whole sections, Mr. Kriikku
played while circulating either
among the audience, directing
his clarinet right at those seated
on the floor, or at his player

colleagues, who would stand up


and reply with some animated
phrase. In certain episodes, he
sounded like an avant-garde jazz
clarinetist, all reedy lines, rude
bleats and banshee shrieks. I
wish there had been more of
these moments.
Ms. Saariaho wrote Lonh, for
soprano and electronics, in 1996,
and describes it as a prologue to
LAmour de Loin. The title
comes from a Provenal word
meaning far away; the text is a
poem attributed to the medieval
troubadour Jaufr Rudel, one of
the three characters in the story.
Jennifer Zetlan brought her
luminous soprano to the solo
part, while also moving ritualistically among people seated
on the floor. Her warm sound
carried the elegiac vocal lines
beautifully and mingled with the
diaphanous, tingling electronic
sounds.
Mr. Salonen ended with Circle
Map (2012), scored for orchestra
and electronics, inspired by a
Persian poem by Rumi. Muttered
Persian lines from the text were
woven into the restless music,
though, even here, the piece over
all had a self-contained, contemplative character.
Its good to see the Philharmonic and the armory taking
advantage of Ms. Saariahos
presence in New York for the
Met premiere of her opera. This
kind of collaboration between
New York institutions should
happen much more often.

1886 BROADWAY BETWEEN 62ND & 63RD STREETS


Advance Tickets - lincolnplazacinema.com For more information call (212)757-2280

CERTAIN WOMEN

BEING 17 12:10, 4:25, 8:55PM


INDIGNATION

1 Something

that
might be built
around a police
station

36

tracks

37

15

Came aboard, in
a way

38

16

Long-running
Joel McHale
show on E!

42

8 Hen

41

43

17

Not free

18

Seedy place

45

19

Bengali who
won the 1913
Literature Nobel

46

20

47

Small glass
disk used as an
ornament in a
stained-glass
window
49

21

Melted munchie

22

Kind of bean

23

Follower of a
team

24

Rear

25

Source of anago
sushi

52

27

Golf units: Abbr.

53

28

Roughly half of
all binary code

29

Friendly staff
or For a limited
time only

50
51

54
55

N
O
F
A
I
R

S
T
E
I
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S

L
A
S
H
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S

D
O
G
P
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A
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R I B S
H E M A T
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G A R
A R I
T R A N S
I N T I A
M A I N N
Z A G
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H R
T O
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P O
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C
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B A N
I R E
D C A
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R

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R
E
A
D
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R

I
N
J
O
K
E

EQUITY 12:05, 2:20, 6:50PM


THEO WHO LIVED

Edited by Will Shortz

Y
E
S
Y
O
U

MIA MADRE 1:40, 5:20, 9:10PM


NEWTOWN 12:25, 8:20PM
THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUER

10

11

12

13

14

2:05, 10:00PM

15

16

17

18

19
21

26

29

40

43

33

34

CAF SOCIETY
THE DRESSMAKER
11:45 , 4:30, 7:15
WHITE GIRL 2:30, 10:00 , 12:00
AM

45

51
53

54

55

10

On a pension:
Abbr.

33

Doctors patient,
e.g.

11

Lent symbols

34

12

Unclear, as
thinking

Create a tunnel
beneath

35

Put off guard

The Brady
Bunch bunch

13

Shot glass?

Blender settings

38

14

39

20

Goes without a
leash

Bchamel
sauce with
Gruyre added

22

A child can have


a blast with it

40

Font of
knowledge

25

People ruled
by an elective
monarchy

44

Brilliance

46

Easily
outscores

26

___ al Khaymah
(one of U.A.E.s
seven emirates)

48

What
calisthenics
improve

30

Isolate

49

One up front?

32

Go head-to-head
with?

51

High-pitched
cry

1 Words

3 Brightly

colored
marine fish

4 Three

albums
bound together,
e.g.

5 Hero-worship,

say
6 Jazz

pianist
Allison

7 Raid

target

8 Forte

in
tennis after
odd-numbered
games

HALLOWEEN
at Midnight

Theyve been taught that faith is about waiting, but these girls are tired of waiting.
10/15/16

sweet potatoes
provide

AM

46

52

2 Something

NEWTOWN

12:00, 1:50, 3:40, 5:30, 7:20

PM

49

50

of
explanation

12:10, 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:20

42

48

DOWN

12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 7:05, 9:00

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

10:10AM, 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50PM

35

37

44

AMERICAN HONEY

DONT THINK TWICE

7:00, 8:00, 9:35, 10:30PM

30

41

47

1:00, 3:45, 7:00, 9:30

10:00AM, 12:55, 4:00, 7:05, 10:10, 11:55PM

PM

39

CHRISTINE
12:05, 3:10, 4:05, 7:15, 8:00, 9:10

AQUARIUS
DENIAL
10:00, 11:20 , 12:25, 1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25,

27

32
36

38

SKYPE Q&A w/Star REBECCA HALL 3:45 TODAY

DUBBED: 10:00AM, 12:10PM


SUBTITLED: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30, 11:45PM

AM

31

TOWER

12:30, 2:20, 4:15, 6:10, 8:00, 9:50


MARLON BRANDOS ENDS THURS

MISS HOKUSAI

23

25

28

Houston St (w. of 6 Av) 212-727-8110


TICKETS ONLINE lmforum.org

ANGELIKA FILM CENTER

22

24

Other points of view


on the Op-Ed page
seven days a week.
The New York Times

www.angelikalmcenter.com
Corner of Houston & Mercer 995-2000

20

9 Directive

G
O
O
F
E
D

a concert this fall and works for a


chamber-size orchestra have
been scrapped.
Other new-music initiatives at
the Philharmonic are continuing,
officials said, including its composer-in-residence program and
the NY Phil Biennial, the contemporary-music festival that Mr.
Gilbert started in 2014. Mr. VanBesien said that discussions
about the 2018 biennial, which Mr.
Gilbert is helping plan, were already underway and that he had
already spoken about the 2020 installment with Mr. van Zweden.
Mr. Gilbert said that while he
did not consider himself a newmusic specialist, he felt that new
music was important for the orchestra and its audiences. Because at the end of the day, thats
whats going to carry music as a
field forward, he said. The constant influx of new ideas and new
pieces.

1:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9:45

12:00, 3:35, 7:20PM

PUZZLE BY MARK DIEHL

Swallowing worry
in an old wives
tale
Potential libel
defendant
Next ___
Latin trio leader
No-brainers?
Call from the
lobby, perhaps
Utopia writer,
1516
___ thou love
me?: Juliet
Completely block
The difference
between
ordinary and
extraordinary,
per Vladimir
Horowitz
Steve Buscemis
role in Reservoir
Dogs
Reveal
Triple-platinum
Lady Gaga hit of
2011
Longtime fitness
guru Jack
Keep close
relations?
Part of a physical
Common
dorm room
decorations

A program is defined
by intimate concerts
away from Lincoln
Center.

ONE-EYED JACKS

1:55, 3:50, 5:50, 7:45, 9:45PM

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE


I
D
I
D
S
O

12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30PM

CAF SOCIETY

Crossword

been a signature initiative of


mine, he said. I think for this
city that we serve, for the profile
of the organization, for the musicians who are so passionate about
this music, I think it was a wonderful outlet and a wonderful experience.
His successor, Mr. van Zweden,
agreed. Mr. van Zweden, who had
faced questions about his commitment to new music when he
was appointed, was dismayed
when he heard that the Contact!
series was being canceled and
agreed to contribute his own
money to help save it. This is
something he believes in, said
his spokeswoman, Mary Lou Falcone, who said he hoped to continue it when he arrives.
This curtailed Contact! series
this season will probably involve
a pair of chamber music concerts
this spring, possibly at National
Sawdust in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Mr. VanBesien said. Plans for

12:50, 3:10, 4:10, 5:25, 6:15, 7:40, 9:55PM

ELLE

31

The New York Philharmonic


nearly lost Contact!.
The orchestra had quietly decided to suspend the Contact!
new-music series, a defining feature of the Alan Gilbert era at the
orchestra, just as Mr. Gilbert was
beginning his eighth and final
season as the Philharmonics music director, in an effort to save
money.
But after Mr. Gilbert expressed
his disappointment at its pending
cancellation, a very unusual
group of donors got together at
the last minute to salvage at least
a curtailed Contact! season. The
donors who stepped up to keep
the series alive come from the orchestra itself: Matthew VanBesien, the orchestras president,
who had reluctantly made the decision to suspend it; Mr. Gilbert,
the music director; Jaap van Zweden, who will succeed him as music director; and Esa-Pekka Salonen, the orchestras composer in
residence.
It kind of needed that 11th-hour
moment to crystallize what we
could do, Mr. VanBesien said.
Although the Contact! series
has been small it involves a
handful of concerts each season
in which the Philharmonic leaves
Lincoln Center to play contemporary chamber works and pieces
for small ensembles in less formal
settings it helped give the orchestra vital new-music cred. So
its fate took on added importance
amid questions over how committed the Philharmonic would remain to new music after the departure of Mr. Gilbert, who has
raised its profile during his tenure. Like many other orchestras,
the Philharmonic has been grappling with questions of how to
broaden the repertoire and reach
new audiences while facing fiscal
pressures. The orchestra has run
deficits for more than a decade.
The Philharmonic had decided
over the summer to end the series
and to focus its new-music resources on larger-scale projects
and symphonic commissions. The
costs of the series were not very
high Mr. VanBesien said it added between $150,000 and $200,000
in expenses each year but it required significant staff time and
planning, and reached only about
800 people a year, since concerts
were given in small spaces.
In an interview soon before the
series was saved, Mr. Gilbert said
that it had played an important
role for the orchestra and for the
city. Forget the fact thats its

LINCOLN PLAZA
CINEMAS

If youve been seeking a DIVINE (in every sense)


debut novel, youll savor Sarah Domets The Guineveres .

ACROSS

C3

Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 9,000 past puzzles,
nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).
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THE GUINEVERES
Thoughtful and dazzling. HARPERS BAZAAR

KenKen

Answers to
Previous Puzzles

Fill the grid with digits so as not to repeat a digit in any row or column, and so that the digits within each
heavily outlined box will produce the target number shown, by using addition, subtraction, multiplication
or division, as indicated in the box. A 4x4 grid will use the digits 1-4. A 6x6 grid will use 1-6.
For solving tips and more KenKen puzzles: www.nytimes.com/kenken. For feedback: nytimes@kenken.com
KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. Copyright 2016 www.KENKEN.com. All rights reserved.

C4

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

Disillusioned Spook,
And Spilled Secrets
Olen Steinhauer is a successful espionage novelist (his latest
is All the Old Knives) whos
now created a television series,
Berlin Station, for the premium-cable channel
Epix. It appears to
be his first dramatic
work, and as rookie
efforts go, its more
TELEVISION than solid.
REVIEW
Berlin Station,
which is part of Epixs first foray
into scripted programming
(along with the political comedy
Graves), is a little talky, maybe
a little over-plotted and populated though a lot of 10episode serials feel that way in
the early going. But, on the
evidence of its first four
episodes, it keeps you interested
in the central question of whos
leaking information about the
inner workings of the C.I.A.s
Berlin office. (The agency is
battling its own Edward Snowden, here called Thomas Shaw.)
For that, Epix can primarily
thank an excellent cast that
includes Richard Armitage
(Thorin in the Hobbit films) as
an agent sent to Berlin to find

MIKE
HALE

Shaw; Michelle Forbes, Leland


Orser, Tamlyn Tomita and a more
restrained than usual Rhys Ifans
as fellow spies; and the redoubtable Richard Jenkins as the
embattled station chief.
Mr. Steinhauer, in an interview
with The New York Times Book
Review, cited Tinker Tailor
Soldier Spy as his favorite spy
novel, and the influence of its
author, John le Carr, is evident
in the shows emphasis on the
politics and personalities of the
station, which looks and feels like
a midsize corporate office warren. Its pop le Carr, more lightweight (you could say shallower)
and verging on soap opera in its
romantic and familial entanglements. Over all, on the spy-show
spectrum, Berlin Station sits
somewhere between the angst
and high polish of Homeland
and the cotton-candy escapism of
Covert Affairs.
It helps, when the spy-story
mechanics become a little too
obvious, that the show is shot on
location in Berlin, which provides
an endless variety of intriguing
backdrops. Berlin Station also
dips into the citys all-night pan-

Arts, Briefly
Artists Next Project:
Presidency of Cuba

STEPHANIE KULBACH FOR EPIX/PARAMOUNT

Berlin Station Michelle Forbes and Richard Armitage, center, in this spy drama that debuts Sunday on Epix.
sexual bacchanalia, using as its
ticket Mr. Ifanss character, a
lounge-lizard type with questionable motives. And the German
characters, both the espionageagency counterparts and the
suspected terrorists, add exotic
Euro-flavor one shaggy-

maned bad guy looks as if hes


constantly suffering the sorrows
of young Werther.
Berlin Station, based on the
early episodes, isnt going to say
anything very profound about
the real consequences of the war
on terrorism it doesnt get any

From Red
To Blue
To Gruff
And Gray
You probably need to be leftleaning or at least politically
neutral to enjoy the new Epix
comedy Graves, which begins
Sunday, though really everybody
should savor Nick
Noltes performance in it. The guy
was born to be a
growly old man.
TELEVISION
Mr. Nolte plays
REVIEW
Richard Graves, a
former Republican president of
the United States, now grumbling through retirement on his
ranch out West. To the party
faithful, he was the last great
Republican president. To many
others, he was the worst president in American history, as Bill
Richardson yes, the real Bill
Richardson, a former governor of
New Mexico reminds him in
the premiere, teasingly citing an
article on Slate.com.
Says you beat James Buchanan and he dissolved the Union, Mr. Richardson says.
Cheeky cameos like Mr. Richardsons are not uncommon in
this series, whose early episodes
also feature glimpses of Rudolph
W. Giuliani and Michael Steele,
the former chairman of the Republican National Committee.

In Search
Of Whodunit
And Also
Who Saw It

STEPHANIE KULBACH FOR EPIX/PARAMOUNT

Graves , a comedy starting Sunday on Epix, stars Nick Nolte as an ex-president and Sela Ward as his wife.
That such Republican stalwarts
would take part is a little odd in
that Graves has a late-life identity crisis and realizes that the
conservative policies he put into
effect when in office 25 years
earlier have done long-term
damage, which he sets about
trying to undo.
For Graves, of course, you
might well read Ronald Reagan
this fictional president even
survived an assassination attempt. But an element of the
Clinton story is also woven in:
Party leaders are urging

OFFBROADWAY

Today at 2:30 & 8, Tom'w at 2:30 & 7

CHICAGO

The Musical
The #1 Longest-Running American
Musical in Broadway History!
Telecharge.com/chicago 212-239-6200
ChicagoTheMusical.com
Mo, Tu, Th, Fr 8; Sa 2:30 & 8; Su 2:30 & 7
Ambassador Theatre (+) 219 W. 49th St.

Today at 2 & 8, Tomorrow at 3


A Blissful Experience! - TheaterMania

CAGNEY

Hollywood's Tough Guy In Tap Shoes


Tu 7, Wed 2&8, Thu 2,Fri 8, Sat 2&8, Sun 3
Tickets At Telecharge.com 212 239 6200
Groups (10+) 212 757 9117
CagneyTheMusical.com
Westside Theatre (+) 407 W. 43rd.St.

A Reagan-like leader
retires, then rethinks
his old ideas.
Gravess wife, Margaret (Sela
Ward), to run for the Senate.
The former first lady is the
crisis manager of the Graves
household, and there are a lot of
crises to manage. In addition to
her husbands unpredictability
she has her daughter, Olivia
(Helne Yorke), to deal with.
Olivia was Americas sweetheart
when President Graves was in
office, but now shes a bit reckless, and her marriage is falling
apart. Olivias brother, Jeremy
(Chris Lowell), is a soldier who
early in the series returns from
Afghanistan, bearing assorted
resentments toward his father.
This place feels like the real
war zone, he says of the family
homestead.
Caught in the swirl of crazy is
the idealistic Isaiah, newly hired
as the former presidents assistant. Skylar Astin, who plays the
role and was so good in the
underappreciated TBS comedy
Ground Floor, is good again
here. Callie Hernandez, as a
waitress who becomes something of a muse for Richard

Graves, also enlivens things.


The series is a little vague as
to what brings about the former
presidents transformation, and
its treatment of his first big
about-face, on immigration, is
simplistic. Dont scrutinize this
series too closely; just enjoy the
performances. And perhaps
shed a small tear for the road
not taken. Ms. Ward is fine, but
originally Susan Sarandon, who
is a serious political activist, was
cast in the role. What fun that
would have been.
Weirdly, on the same opening
night of a series that dismantles
a somewhat Reagan-like presidents legacy, the National Geographic Channel serves up
Killing Reagan, a somewhat
timid version of the book by Bill
OReilly and Martin Dugard. The
authors have made the Killing
series into a cottage industry,
but the Reagan volume, which
looked at the 1981 assassination
attempt and its aftermath, attracted more criticism than
some of the other books, especially over its contention that
Reagan was substantially diminished after the shooting.
The TV treatment doesnt go
very far down that road, instead
concentrating on a ticktock of
the event itself. Its a formulaic
treatment that seems intent on
not making waves.

Limited Engagement! Now in Previews


Today at 2 & 8, Tomorrow at 3
Lincoln Center Theater Presents

New York Times Critics' Pick!


An astonishing work of theater that takes
you places you never expected.
-Ben Brantley, The New York Times
Today at 2pm & 8pm
The Complicite Production of

THE ENCOUNTER

Conceived, Directed and Performed by


SIMON McBURNEY
Tu 7; We 2&8; Th 7; Fr 8; Sa 2&8; Su 3
Strictly Limited Engagement
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
TheEncounterBroadway.com
GOLDEN THEATRE (+), 252 W. 45TH ST.

Special Added Perf Monday 11/7 at 7:30

WAITRESS

Starring Jessie Mueller


Music and Lyrics by Sara Bareilles
Book by Jessie Nelson
Directed by Diane Paulus
WaitressTheMusical.com
Ticketmaster.com or 877-250-2929
Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St.

Broadway's Biggest Blockbuster


The New York Times
Today at 2 & 8; Tom'w at 2 & 7

WICKED

Tu & We 7; Th & Fr 8; Sa 2 & 8; Su 2 & 7


Ticketmaster.com or 877-250-2929
Groups: 646-289-6885/877-321-0020
WickedtheMusical.com
Gershwin Theatre(+) 222 West 51st St.

EXTRAORDINARY-TheaterMania
HERSHEY FELDER as Leonard Bernstein
in

Presented by

MAESTRO

Book by HERSHEY FELDER,


Music by LEONARD BERNSTEIN
Directed by JOEL ZWICK
MUST CLOSE OCT 23!
www.59E59.org / 212-279-4200
59E59 Theaters, 59 E. 59th Street

at CARNEGIE HALL

Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage

LESS CONDUCTOR,
MORE MUSIC!

100% HILARIOUS. - Roseanne Barr


Today at 2pm & 8pm

NOT THAT JEWISH

A New Comedy Written by & Starring


Emmy Award-winning Monica Piper
Mon 7, Thu 2 & 7, Fri 8, Sat 2 & 8, Sun 3
Telecharge.com or 212-239-6200
New World Stages (+), 340 W. 50th St.
NotThatJewish.com

FINAL 2 PERFORMANCES TODAY!


SUSPENSEFUL! - The New Yorker

THE TRIAL OF AN
AMERICAN PRESIDENT

TODAY AT 2 & 8
BushOnTrialPlay.com
Telecharge.com or 212-947-8844
Theatre Row, 410 West 42nd Street

Photo by Matt Dine

FALSETTOS

Music & Lyrics by William Finn


Book by William Finn & James Lapine
Directed by James Lapine
Ticketmaster.com or 800-982-2787
Groups (12+): 212-889-4300
www.FalsettosBroadway.com
Walter Kerr Theatre (+), 219 W.48th St.

Not every role is a good fit for


Julianne Nicholson, but Helen
Torrance, the upstate New York
sheriff she plays in the USA
series Eyewitness, is well
tailored. Duty
bound, methodical
and possessing only
a nodding acquaintance with humor,
TELEVISION Helen is someone
REVIEW
you would probably
like to know but wouldnt necessarily want to hang out with.
Shes perfect for Ms. Nicholson,
an actress who seems to keep
everything inside.
Ms. Nicholsons performance
is also a good fit for Eyewitness, which was created by Adi
Hasak (Shades of Blue) based
on a Norwegian original and
begins its 10-episode run on
Sunday. An anthology series in
which the season tells the story
of a crime and its effects on those
who witnessed it, the show emphasizes choked emotions and
wintry cinematography the

MIKE
HALE

NEIL
GENZLINGER

BROADWAY

deeper than a disillusioned


spooks complaint that beneath
one secret theres another and
another and another, one big
mess of our own creation. Its
the TV show as page-turner, if
you have room on your night
stand.

THUR, OCT 27 | 8PM


Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Christian Zacharias, piano
Mozart
Beethoven
J. Montgomery
Bizet

Overture to La Clemenza di Tito


Piano Concerto No. 1
Records from a Vanishing City (NYC Premiere)
Symphony in C Major

TICKETS START AT $25


Carnegiehall.org | 212.247.7800
Box ofce at 57th & Seventh

CHRISTOS KALOHORIDIS/USA NETWORK

Eyewitness , starring Julianne


Nicholson as an upstate New York
sheriff, begins Sunday on USA.
washed-out palette ranges from
near black and white to muted,
blue-tinged color. Catherine
Hardwicke, whose experience in
achieving a mood of artful dread
includes the first Twilight film
and an episode of Low Winter
Sun, was brought on to direct
the first two episodes.
Repression quickly surfaces as
a theme in the story, as well. The
witnesses to a drug-related
slaughter are young best friends,
Philip (Tyler Young) and Lukas
(James Paxton), who realize that
theyre more than friends just
before the gunfire breaks out. So,
terrified of being found by the
killer and terrified of coming out,
they have two secrets to keep.
Staying cool is especially difficult
because their cascading emotions fear, guilt, lust keep
driving them to tear their shirts
off and throw each other up
against the nearest shed.
Eyewitness has more than
its share of the formulaic elements of rural crime drama and
family soap opera. Helen and
Philip are part of the same
blended family. Helen and her
deputy (he has the sense of
humor she lacks) engage in a
turf war with the F.B.I.
Theres a biological mom whos
a drug addict and an informers
widow whos a little too close to a
drug dealer. It carries some of
the DNA of a Lifetime movie of
the week, but the writing and
direction are better than that,
and Mr. Paxton and especially
Mr. Young are quite good. Ten
episodes is probably more than
the story needed, but if you like
your small-town-folks-in-peril
stories to be on the tasteful side,
Eyewitness fits the bill.

Tania Bruguera, below, the


Cuban artist whose high-profile
performances challenging the
limits of freedom on the island
have drawn support from the art
world, threw down another
gauntlet to Cubas Communist
authorities on
Friday when
she said that
she would like
to run for office
even for
president.
In a video
released at the
Creative Time
Summit, a conference in Washington about art and politics, Ms.
Bruguera proposed that she
and any Cuban should be able
to run for any job. By phone, she
said that included that of Ral
Castro, who has said he will step
down as president in 2018.
Lets use the 2018 election to
change the culture of fear, Ms.
Bruguera said in the one-and-ahalf-minute video. Today I put
myself forward as a candidate
for the 2018 election, Ms.
Bruguera added, talking to the
camera in an unfurnished room.
Her bid is largely hypothetical.
Under Cubas single-party system, the president is elected by
the National Assembly, which is
made up of candidates drawn
from existing provincial assemblies or nominated by members
of organizations allied to the
Communist Party.
The video was performance, as
well as a real declaration of
intent, she said: Its artivism.
The video, Ms. Bruguera said
in the interview, would be part of
an interactive project in which
Cubans could upload videos of
themselves talking about the
political platforms they would
run on if they were candidates.
VICTORIA BURNETT

New Friend for Pooh


Winnie-the-Pooh is back, and
he has a new friend.
Penguin, a friendly winter
bird, makes his first appearance
in Winter one of four stories
released this month in The Best
Bear in All the World, a new
sequel to A .A. Milnes original
Winnie-the-Pooh stories.
The book
was published
in Britain and
Australia to
coincide with
the honeyloving bears
90th birthday,
and will be
released in the
United States on Oct. 25. Milnes
Winnie-the-Pooh, the first full
volume dedicated to the bear,
was released in October 1926.
Brian Sibley, who wrote Winter, is one of four authors who
contributed to the new book,
which features stories focused on
each season of the year. A photograph of Milne and his son,
Christopher, playing with a teddy
bear and a toy penguin inspired
Mr. Sibleys creation, he said.
CHRISTOPHER D. SHEA

Artworks Grim History


They are works by Picasso,
Lger, Degas and Corot that all
once passed through the Paris or
New York galleries of Paul Rosenberg, a Jewish art dealer
whose collection was looted
when the Nazis occupied France.
Now, 63 of the paintings have
been gathered in 21 Rue la
Botie, a roving exhibition at La
Boverie, the newly renovated
arts palace in Lige, Belgium.
The exhibition is named for the
address of Rosenbergs Paris
gallery. During the war the building that housed the gallery was
transformed into the Institute for
the Study of the Jewish Question.
The exhibition, organized by
Rosenbergs granddaughter, the
journalist Anne Sinclair, has
benefited from loans from collectors and museums. David
Nahmad, an art dealer and a
Monaco billionaire, loaned nine
works by Picasso, Matisse and
other artists. For almost five
years he has been fending off a
legal claim for his 1918 Modigliani
portrait of a merchant, pressed
by the French grandson of a
Jewish antique dealer whose
artworks were seized by the
Nazis. Mr. Nahmad has argued in
court that long-sealed French
postwar documents demonstrate
the grandson is chasing the
wrong painting.
Mr. Nahmad, who is Jewish,
has been stung by publicity over
the case, but said his participation in the exhibition has nothing
to do with his legal struggle.
He appeared at the opening
with Ms. Sinclair, who had asked
him to join the exhibition. To see
Hitler, the occupation, the gallery
and the Institute for the Study of
the Jewish Question . . . It
touched me, Mr. Nahmad said.
DOREEN CARVAJAL

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

The War on Weight Never Ends


The strange thing about
Stuffed, the new ensemble
piece by Lisa Lampanelli, is that
shes the only one in its cast of
four who is portraying a real
person. Long established as an insult
comic with a toughbroad stage persona,
she plays herself in
this WP Theater
production, unveiling
THEATER her issues with food
REVIEW
and fat for public
consumption.
That takes guts, if youll pardon the allusion to a part of the
body that for these women may
never be the right size. For most
of them, feeling comfortable in
their own skin isnt so much
elusive as it is unimaginable
nearly as foreign an idea as
getting bigger jeans when the
old ones are too small.
With jeans, its not the size
that needs to change, Britney
(Jessica Luck) says. It is me
that needs to change. I will
change in order to fit the jean.

LAURA
COLLINSHUGHES

She happens to be twig-thin with


an eating disorder, but shes not
the only one who thinks this way.
Lust for food, twinned with a
wariness of it, is a consistent
theme in Stuffed, whose author
lost 107 pounds with gastric
sleeve surgery in 2012. Shes
brash here, and vulgar (a solid
joke about Donald J. Trump, her
would-be boss several seasons
ago on Celebrity Apprentice, is
particularly repulsive), but
without the bravado of her
stand-up persona. Shes trying a
kinder, gentler sisterhood approach.
Its an awkward attempt, and
so, unfortunately, is the show as
a whole. Directed by Jackson
Gay at the McGinn/Cazale Theater, its billed as a play Ms.
Lampanellis first but its
more of a play manqu: a patchwork of stand-up comedy and
monologues only loosely sewn
together. (Ashley Austin Morris
contributed additional material.)
The shows array of women
includes Katey (Zainab Jah),

who eats whatever she likes but


cant gain weight to get the
curves she covets, and the confident Stacey (the excellent Ann
Harada), the only one at ease
with the way she looks. Coincidentally, Ms. Harada is the
lone actor who seems relaxed
during the strained sections
when the women sit around
apparently in someones home
(the set, with prominent refrigerator, is by Antje Ellermann)
and make conversation.
How the women know one
another and why theyve gathered are unexplained. We dont
know, either, why they occasionally talk to us, except when Ms.
Lampanelli steps downstage and
goes into professional-comedian
mode. This, actually, is where she
does her strongest, funniest,
most affecting work: in retelling
a love story, which she told for
The Moth in 2011, about a 400pound boyfriend she had to leave
when even his diabetes diagnosis
wouldnt move him to take care
of himself.

C5

Stuffed
By Lisa Lampanelli; additional material
by Ashley Austin Morris; directed by
Jackson Gay; scene design by Antje
Ellermann; costume design by Jessica
Ford; lighting by Yael Lubetzky; sound
by Elisheba Ittoop; hair and makeup by
Rob Harmon; production stage manager,
Danny Maly; production manager, Leah
Vogel; properties master, Theresa
Pierce; assistant stage manager, Leeann
Lisella. Presented by WP Theater, Lisa
McNulty, artistic director; Maureen
Moynihan, managing director. Through
Nov. 6 at McGinn/Cazale Theater, 2162
Broadway, at 76th Street, Manhattan;
866-811-4111, wptheater.org. Running time:
1 hour 10 minutes.
WITH: Ann Harada (Stacey), Zainab Jah
(Katey), Lisa Lampanelli (Lisa) and
Jessica Luck (Britney).

CAITLIN OCHS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Lisa Lampanelli in her play Stuffed at the McGinn/Cazale


Theater. The new show explores her issues with food and fat.
Ms. Gay leans hard on Yael
Lubetzkys lighting design to try
to unify the script, but transitions
between moments are often
jarring. And while Ms. Lampan-

elli has written four very different kinds of women, the three
who are fictional come across as
types rather than characters.
Still, there are some laughs

here, some genuine pain and


even a bit of insight. Recalling
the time in her pudgy adolescence when she lost 25 pounds
and didnt like the result, Stacey
says, This new body isnt mine
its like Im borrowing it from
someone who doesnt have my
appetites.
Its a sneaky idea: that women
and girls might live healthier
lives by honoring their own
longings.

ACKERMAN + GRUBER FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

Chaka Khan and Stevie Wonder performed at The Official Prince Tribute Concert, a nearly five-hour-long event that drew Prince loyalists from all over the city and the world.

Prince Tribute Puts the Hometown Hero Ahead of the Superstar


From First Arts Page
fans, and a handful of more
widely known performers, including Stevie Wonder and
Chaka Khan, celebrated Prince
with covers of his songs.
But when this concert was
originally announced in July, it
was scheduled for U.S. Bank
Stadium, a football arena three
times the size of the Xcel Energy
Center. It also promised to emphasize Princes vast influence
in the pop mainstream with
performances by more contemporary stars like Christina Aguilera and John Mayer. But both of
them withdrew from the downsized show this week under
dubious circumstances.
What remained was haphaz-

ard and inconsistent, a concert


that told no coherent story about
Prince apart from the fact that
he was widely admired and
almost impossible to emulate.
Some gamely tried: Luke James,
whose falsetto on Do Me, Baby
attracted the first lusty shrieks
of the night, and Bilal, the most
impressive male singer here not
named Stevie, who woke up
three-quarters of the way
through The Beautiful Ones
and kept putting his limber voice
to work through If I Was Your
Girlfriend (though his performance couldnt hold a candle to his
riveting Prince tribute at the
BET Awards in June).
A pair of vocally ambitious
young female soul singers, Tori
Kelly and Jessie J, tried for

Purple popped up
everywhere in a
crowd of 17,000.
similar energy. There is something tepid about Ms. Kellys
brilliance its familiar in shape
but has no flash. And Jessie J is
all pyrotechnics and no depth.
Neither fared well here. Ms.
Kellys Lets Get Crazy was
stagnant, and she wilted on
Take Me With U, a duet with
Mr. Wonder.
The Portuguese fado singer
Ana Moura played a perplexing
set, including a version of Little

Red Corvette that overlooked


many of the words. Early in the
night came a baffling appearance by Nicole Scherzinger,
former lead singer of the Pussycat Dolls, though it was less
arbitrary than the repeated bits
throughout the concert of Doug
E. Fresh, the 1980s hip-hop beatboxer who had little in common
with anyone else onstage. Even
Chaka Khan felt unmoored,
singing her own Sweet Thing
and Princes 1999 with the
same misty approach.
Everyones set was brief
sometimes mercifully, often
frustratingly. The show opened
with two excellent Minneapolis
stalwart bands: Mint Condition,
inheritors of the Prince sound,
and Morris Day & the Time,

Prince collaborators and antagonists (who were to perform a


late-night show at the storied
Minneapolis club First Avenue
later in the night). Both were
gone too soon.
Much of the heavy lifting fell
to elders: Mr. Wonder, wearing a
purple shirt and a purple kerchief in his blazer, who performed a gobsmacking version
of Donny Hathaways Someday
Well All Be Free, and later was
visibly weeping during the Purple Rain encore. And the extremely spry Andr Cymone, a
teenage friend and bandmate of
Princes who was the most visible performer here, with strong
versions of Uptown, Controversy and The Ladder, a duet
with Cassandra ONeal. (His

guitar playing was much louder


and more dexterous than his
singing, though.)
Mr. Cymone was one of several standouts from Princes
extended orbit others included Judith Hill (on How Come U
Dont Call Me Anymore?), Liv
Warfield (on Hot Thing) and
Saeeda Wright (on 7) performers who reinforced the
image of Prince as progenitor of
a whole citys worth of sounds.
Even though the gaps between
these moments and the rest of
the show were large, the concert
had a steady consistency
throughout onstage, Minneapolis was claiming its son, and
in the audience, locals were
grieving the loss of a neighbor.

The Road to Self-Revelation Can Take Head-Spinning Turns


If I had to categorize the
French-Algerian choreographer
Rachid Ouramdane, Id label him
an expressionist minimalist. I
cant think of anyone else to
whom that tag applies in dance, and
Mr. Ouramdane
reminds me of nobody else. His voDANCE
cabulary is small,
REVIEW
but it suggests that
he has urgent points to make
that go beyond dance. Hes original, peculiar, limited, irksome,
haunting.
In Far . . . , presented at
Dance Theater Workshop in
2008, he created a strange documentary theater about political
torture in which his dancing
seemed to express a numbed
state of post-invasion, posttraumatic stress syndrome.
Ordinary Witnesses, shown at

ALASTAIR
MACAULAY

New York Live Arts in 2011, was


partly a docudrama about peoples efforts to convey the effect
of mass killings and political
brutality, partly a dance quintet
that suggested the wordless
consequences of such violence on
individuals.
The subject of Tordre
(Wrought), the duet he is presenting this week at Baryshnikov
Arts Center, is female self-revelation, and the production has a
beginning, a middle and an end.
The beginning and end are deliberately trite, with showbiz music; but the middle is separate,
extended, odd. The start is a
joke, a series of entrances in
which Annie Hanauer and Lora
Tordre (Wrought) continues
through Saturday at the Baryshnikov Arts Center, 450 West 37th
Street, Manhattan; bacnyc.org.

Juodkaite keep returning to the


stage to strike Here we are
poses; the end, though with a few
more steps, is equally conventional.
Between these sections, most
of what occurs are extended
solos. Ms. Hanauer, tall and lissome, has a left arm that is visibly artificial from the elbow down
but deployed as an organic part
of her motion. Whats memorable
about her solos is the expressive
way she angles her body between
knee and neck: She leans, arches,
tilts. Ms. Juodkaite, dressed in
black tights and polo-neck sweater, spins around the stage for
several minutes on end, more
than once. As she spins, she
changes positions of arm, head
and upper body.
Although Ms. Juodkaites circuits of turns are certainly virtuosic, both these women present

Tordre (Wrought) Lora Juodkaite,


left, and Annie Hanauer at the
Baryshnikov Arts Center.

IAN DOUGLAS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

obviously restricted ranges of


movement. Above their heads
hang two wrought-metal constructions designed by Sylvain
Giraudeau, sometimes slowly

rotating. Stphane Graillots


overhead lighting casts the
dancers shadows on the floor;
you could say at times that were
seeing the latest update of the

famous Pas de lOmbre, created


by the choreographer Jules Perrot in 1843 for his Romantic ballet
Ondine, in which the title character, a water spirit, is enchanted
to find on dry land that she casts
a shadow with which she dances.
But these Tordre solos are on
the cusp of the soporific. I enjoy
the frank calm of both these
women Ms. Juodkaite even
talks as she spins until it tips,
repeatedly, into self-indulgence.
Ms. Hanauer dances to an incoherent, rambling rendition of
Feelings by Nina Simone, but
Simones voice, even on a bad
day, has a range of texture that
are more compelling than anything here.

C6

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

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What to Expect When Youre Expecting (2012). Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez. (PG-13)

CN

. Monster House (2006). (PG) (6) Regular Show

American Dad American Dad Family Guy (14) Family Guy (14)
American Greed Six Feet PlunAmerican Greed Hack Me if You
der. (PG)
Can/ Goodfella Gone Bad. (PG)
Unfinished Business: The Essential Hillary Clinton A look at the 2016
Presidential candidacy of Hillary Clinton.
Amy Schumer: Mostly Sex Stuff Dane Cook: Troublemaker Comic
Comic Amy Schumer performs. (MA) Dane Cook performs. (MA)
Cake Hunters
Cake Hunters
Sugar Showdo. Sugar Showdo.

COOK

Regular Show Bobs Burgers Bobs Burgers


American Greed Capturing The
American Greed Medical Gloves American Greed Silk Road: Digital
Fugitives. (PG)
With Holes. (PG)
Drug Dealers. (PG)
CNN Newsroom With Poppy
The Essential Donald Trump Looking back on the life of Donald J.
Harlow (N)
Trump: the moments that made the man and the controversy. (N)
I Think I Love My Wife (2007). Chris Rock, Kerry Washington. Bored
Kevin Hart: Seriously Funny The
banker questions the state of his marriage. Smart and likable. (R) (6:45) comics take on his family. (14)
Cake Hunters
Cake Hunters
All-star Halloween Spectacular (G) Cake Hunters
Cake Hunters

CSPAN

Washington This Week

CNBC
CNN
COM

CSPAN2 Book TV (6)

1984 Presidential Candidates Second Debate (N)

The Great Suppression (N)

1988 Presidential Candidates Second Debate (N)

TWA 800 The crash of TWA flight 800. (N) (8:45)

After Words (N)

Paolucci Award Amy Ellis Nutt

ELREY

The Substitute (1996). Tom Berenger, Ernie Hudson. (R) (6:30)

The Substitute 3: Winner Takes All (1999). (R)

ESPN

College Football Mississippi vs. Arkansas.

Scoreboard

ESPN2

College Football Tulsa vs. Houston.

College Football Colorado State vs. Boise State. (10:15)

DSC

ESPNCL 30 for 30 (6:30)

S.E.C. Storied

The Substitute 2: Schools Out (1998). Larry Gilliard Jr. (R)

Out of Nothing (2013).

College Football U.C.L.A. vs. Washington State.

30 for 30

ESQTV

. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989). Pursuit of father and Holy Grail. Great fun. (PG-13) (7:03)

FOOD

Diners, Drive

30 for 30

30 for 30

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008). Harrison Ford. (PG-13) (10:02)

Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Beat Bobby Flay Beat Bobby Flay Diners, Drive
The OReilly Factor (N)
Justice With Judge Jeanine (N)
The Greg Gutfeld Show (N)
The OReilly Factor
Justice With
(N)
Judge Jeanine
FREEFRM . Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005). Daniel Radcliffe. (PG-13) (5:30) Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009). Year 6 at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft. Potters around aimlessly. (PG)
FOXNEWS Fox Report Julie Banderas hosts.

FS1

Football

FUSE

FXX

Turn It Up (5:30) Moesha (PG)


Moesha (G)
Moesha (PG)
Moesha (G)
House Party: Tonights the Night (2013). Gary Anthony Williams. (R) Van Wilder: Freshman Year (2009).
22 Jump Street (2014). Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum. Cops go undercover at college, again. 22 Jump Street (2014). Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum. Cops go undercover at college, again. Mike & Molly
Exploding piata of gags. (R)
Exploding piata of gags. (R)
(14)
. Captain Phillips (2013). Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener. Somali pirates take U.S. freighter . Captain Phillips (2013). Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener. Somali pirates
The A-Team
FXM Presents
(2010). (PG-13) (5) (MA) (7:43)
hostage. Shattering. (PG-13)
take U.S. freighter hostage. Shattering. (PG-13) (10:45)
Riddick (2013). Vin Diesel. (R) (5:30) . Deliver Us From Evil (2014). Cop and priest battle demons. Delivers the creepy goods. (R) . Deliver Us From Evil (2014). Eric Bana, Edgar Ramirez. (R)

FYI

Tiny House Nation (PG)

Tiny House Nation (N) (PG)

GOLF

P.G.A. Tour Golf

Golf Central

P.G.A. Tour Golf Safeway Open, third round. From Napa, Calif.

GSN

Family Feud

Family Feud

Family Feud

HALL

Autumn in the Vineyard (2016, TVF). Rachael Leigh Cook, Brendan Penny. Pumpkin Pie Wars (2016, TVF). Bake-off rivals begin secret romance.

HGTV

Tiny House
Tiny House
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars The
Chum Fever.
Pawn Awakens.
Forensic Files Forensic Files
Dateline on ID The Queen of
County. (14)
Die Hard (1988). Explosions, shootings,
hangings, splatterings. Huge hit. (5)
Tyler Perrys Temptation (2013).
Jurnee Smollett-Bell. (PG-13) (6)
Premonition (2007). Sandra Bullock, Julian McMahon. (PG-13) (6)

FX
FXM

HIST
HLN
ID
IFC
LIFE
LMN

M.L.B. Pregame M.L.B. Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Chicago Cubs. NLCS, Game 1.

Family Feud

7:00

7:30

8:00

The Golden
Girls (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

The Golden
The Golden
Girls Ebb Tide. Girls (PG)

MSG

The Game 365

Rangers Pre.

MSGPL

N.H.L. New York Islanders vs. Washington Capitals.

MSNBC Dateline Extra The Face of Evil.

Idiotest (PG)

Idiotest (PG)

M.L.B. on FS1 Postgame (N) (Live) Pirates Story

Home Sweet Headache (N) (PG)


Idiotest (PG)

8:30
The Golden
Girls (PG)

9:00
The Golden
Girls (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

9:30
The Golden
Girls (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

N.H.L. New York Rangers vs. St. Louis Blues.


Isles Postgame Giants Life

Dateline Extra House of Secrets. In Other News: Lost in the

Family Feud

Family Feud

Scare Tactics

Golden Girls

Golden Girls

Golden Girls

10:30
Threes Company (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

11:00
Threes Company (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

11:30
Threes Company (PG)

12:00
Threes Company (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

Rangers Postgame

Knicks in 60 From Oct. 15, 2016.

N.Y. Giants 1st & 10

N.H.L. Devils vs. Lightning

In Other News: Lost in the

Dateline Extra The Deed.

Dateline Extra

MTV

Ridiculousness Texas Chainsaw 3D (2013). Alexandra Daddario, Dan Yeager. (R) (7:45)

NBCS

N.H.L. Boston Bruins vs. Toronto Maple Leafs.

NGEO

Life Below Zero Lost in the Wild. Drugs, Inc. High in Houston. (14) Drugs, Inc. Hardcore Heroin. (14) Drugs, Inc. Detroit Halloween. (14) Drugs, Inc. Salt Lake Sinners. (14) Drugs, Inc. (14)

NICK

Henry Danger

Henry Danger

The Thundermans (G)

School of Rock Henry Danger

Full House (G)

NICKJR

Paw Patrol (Y)

Paw Patrol (Y)

Peppa Pig (Y)

Peppa Pig (Y)

Peppa Pig (Y)

Peppa Pig (Y)

Team Umizoomi Team Umizoomi Wallykazam! (Y) Dora Explorer

NY1

News

On Stage

News

In Transit (8:44) News

News

New York Times Close Up

OVA

. Fried Green Tomatoes (1991). Two tales of the Whistlestop Cafe. Engrossing, with evocative Southern charm. Versailles The Road. (N) (MA)

OWN

Undercover Boss (PG)

OXY

Snapped Michelle Reynolds. (PG) Snapped Renee Poole. (PG)

Dawn of the Dead (2004). Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames. (R) (10:05)
Nascar Racing

Post Game
Full House (G)

Friends (PG)
News

Onward Notre
Friends (PG)

Premier League
Friends (14)
Dora Explorer

Sports on 1 The Last Word. (11:35)

The Rise and Fall of Versailles

Versailles

Iyanla, Fix My Life (Part 1 of 2) (14) Iyanla, Fix My Life (N) (Part 2 of 2) Oprah: Where Are They Now? (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life (Part 1 of 2) (14) Fix My Life
Snapped Denise Bozarth. (PG)

Snapped Erika Sifrit. (PG)

Snapped Narcy Novack. (PG)

Dark Matters: Twisted but True

The Unexplained Files The Yeti. The Unexplaine

True Hollywood

SCIENCE The Unexplained Files (PG)

The Unexplained Files The Yeti. The Unexplained Files (PG)

SMITH

Sacred Sites Oracles. (PG)

Sacred Sites Egypt. (PG)

SNY

College Football James Madison vs. New Hampshire.

SPIKE

Cops Arizona.

STZENF

TRAV

. Monsters, Inc. (2001). Billy Crystal. (G) (9:05)


. Dr. Dolittle (1998). Eddie Murphy. (PG-13) (10:39) So I Married
Ratatouille (2007). Voices of Patton Oswalt, Ian Holm. (G) (7:13)
. Pale Rider (1985). Clint EastBig Jake (1971). John Wayne, Richard Boone. A kidnapped grandson. Mild tongue-in-cheek . The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). James Stewart. Civilized
wood, Michael Moriarty. (R) (5:30) western. Mild everything. (PG-13)
Eastern lawyer meets Wild West bandit. Good, crisp John Ford western.
Stake Land (2010). Nick Damici, Connor Paolo. A vampire hunter and an Stake Land 2 (2016). Connor Paolo, Nick Damici. Vampire epidemic
Timeless Pilot. A fugitive time trav- Timeless (14)
orphan search for a safe haven. (R)
forces hero to retreat to badlands.
els back to 1937. (PG)
M.L.B. Blue Jays M.L.B. Postsea- The Big Bang
The Big Bang
The Big Bang
The Big Bang
The Big Bang
The Big Bang
Full Frontal With Get Smart (2008). Updated Max Smart
vs. Indians
son Show
Theory (14)
Theory (14)
Theory (PG)
Theory (14)
Theory (14)
Theory (14)
Samantha Bee battles KAOS. Amusing in spots.
. The Innocents (1961). Deborah Kerr, Martin Stephens. First-rate version . The Chalk Garden (1964). Bagnolds brilliantly eccentric play diluted
. Eye of the
How the West Was Won (1963).
James Stewart, John Wayne. (G) (5) of Jamess Turn of the Screw. Stunning ghost tale, beautifully played.
with sentimental elegance. Even so, gleams when the original surfaces. Devil (1967).
Untold Stories of the E.R. (PG)
Untold Stories of the E.R. (PG)
Untold Stories of the E.R. (14)
Untold Stories of the E.R. (PG)
Untold Stories of the E.R. (PG)
Stories of ER
Disturbia (2007). Shia LeBeouf,
Divergent (2014). Shailene Woodley, Theo James. Teenager battles segregated postwar society. Dumb deTwister (1996). Helen Hunt. Divorcing scientists chase
David Morse. (PG-13) (6)
spite dashing stars. (PG-13)
tornadoes. Fantastic roller-coaster ride. (PG-13)
Ghost Adventures (PG)
Ghost Adventures (PG)
Ghost Adventures (N) (PG)
Ghost Adventures (PG)
The Dead Files (PG)
Ghost Adv.

TRU

Carbonaro Eff.

SUN
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT

Cops (PG)

Carbonaro Eff.

Cops (N) (14)

Carbonaro Eff.

Cops (PG)

Carbonaro Eff.

Sacred Sites Chaco Canyon. (PG) Air Disasters Miracle Escape. (14) Sacred Sites Egypt. (PG)
Jail: Big Texas

Carbonaro Eff.

Cops (PG)

Carbonaro Eff.

Cops (PG)

Carbonaro Eff.

SportsNite

Cops (14)

. The Waterboy (1998). Adam Sandler. (PG-13)

Carbonaro Eff.

Late Snack

SportsNite

Sacred Sites

SportsNite

TVLAND Reba (PG)

Late Snack

SportsNite

Carbonaro Eff.

WGN-A

Reba (PG)
Reba (PG)
Reba (PG)
Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond
NCIS Engaged, Part 2. Searching NCIS The Good Son. The team
NCIS Shabbat Shalom. Zivas
NCIS Shiva. The team unites to
for a missing Marine. (Part 2 of 2) investigates a murder. (PG)
father visits. (14)
find answers. (14)
Notorious (2009). Derek Luke. (5:30) The Temptations Fame brings rewards and pressures to the quintet. (PG)
Law & Order Past Imperfect. A
Law & Order Terminal. Gunfire
Law & Order Thrill. A young deliv- Law & Order Denial. Two teens
cover girls death unearths secrets. disrupts fund-raiser. (PG)
ery man is killed. (PG)
may have killed their newborn. (14)
Blue Bloods Privilege. (14)
Blue Bloods Officer Down. (14) Blue Bloods Smack Attack. (14) Blue Bloods Chinatown. (14)

King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens


Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family
Halloween. (PG) (PG)
(PG)
Bask. Wives LA
Law & Order Navy Blues. Squad Law & Order
probes a naval death. (PG)
Harvest. (14)
Engagement
Engagement
Engagement

YES

Best of CenterStage

Yanks Magazine Boxing 30

USA
VH1
WE

Best of CenterStage

Best of CenterStage

VENUS IN FUR (2014) on Hulu. A director


(Mathieu Amalric) thinks he has found the
perfect woman (Emmanuelle Seigner) to star in
a play about masochistic relationships, in this
film adaptation of David Ivess drama directed
by Roman Polanski, Ms. Seigners real-life
husband. But where does fantasy end and
reality begin? While it is certainly possible to
quarrel about the feminist and misogynist
implications of Mr. Polanskis film, A. O. Scott
wrote in The Times, what is beyond dispute is
the sheer exuberant virtuosity Ms. Seigner and
Mr. Amalric bring to the material.

WHATS ON TV

L.P.G.A. Tour Golf


Idiotest (PG)

10:00
The Golden
Girls (PG)
M.L.B. Tonight

SUNDANCE SELECTS

Emmanuelle Seigner and Mathieu Amalric.

Home Sweet Headache (N) (11:01) Tiny House

Property Brothers (G)


Property Brothers (G)
House Hunters Renovation (G)
House Hunters Hunters Intl
Property Bro
Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars Fly- Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG) Pawn Stars (PG)
ing High. (PG) (9:03)
(9:32)
(10:04)
(10:34)
(11:04)
(11:33)
(12:03)
Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files
Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio Four (2016). After On the Case With Paula Zahn 22 Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio
a young woman recants her testimony, four women are exonerated.
Hours of Terror. (14)
Four (2016).
Die Hard 2 (1990). Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. Mercenaries take over airport communica- Die Hard With a Vengeance (1995). Bruce Willis, Jeremy Irons. Blood,
tions. Crunch and splatter, as before. (R)
bombings, car chases, you know. (R) (10:45)
Surviving Compton: Dre, Suge & Michelle (2016, TVF). Rhyon Nicole Beyond the Headlines: Michelle Streets of Compton Hour 3.
Surviving CompBrown, Curtis Hamilton. Turbulent life of R&B singer Michelle.
(N) (14) (10:02)
(Part 2 of 2) (14) (11:02)
ton: Dre, Suge
Hidden Truth (2016). Shawn Christian, Heidi Fielek. Woman tries to
Revenge Porn (2016, TVF). Tiera Skovbye, Elisabeth Rohm. Mother
Hidden Truth
prove brothers innocence.
fights back when daughters nude pictures are posted.
(2016).

MLB

LOGO

Downtown Shabby (N) (PG)

BLUE JAY (2016) on Amazon and iTunes. After


unexpectedly running into each other 20 years
after breaking up, two former high school
sweethearts (Sarah Paulson and Mark Duplass)
relive a magical past in Alexandre Lehmanns
black-and-white chamber drama. Nostalgia
gives way to melodrama, and dramatic truth to
soapy histrionics, Stephen Holden wrote in The
Times, and Blue Jay falters on a formulaic
revelation about mistakes made and lessons
learned too late.

Beth Macy Dis.

E!

DIY

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (2016) on Amazon and


iTunes. A former college professor (Viggo
Mortensen) who has been raising his six
children to be physically and intellectually
rigorous in an isolated compound in the Pacific
Northwest is forced back into society after a
death. By day, he trains them to navigate the
woods like Special Ops forces; at night, they
play music together and read by firelight before
bedding down in a communal tepee. But
whether their seclusion makes them the
spiritual heirs to Thoreau or merely fanatics
remains unclear. Mr. Mortensen, who can
make menace feel like vulnerability and turn
vulnerability into a confession is the most
obvious reason to see Matt Rosss drama,
Manohla Dargis wrote in The New York Times,
although Mr. Rosss insistence on taking your
intelligence for granted is itself a great turn on.

2008 Presidential Candidates Third Debate (N)


TimesTalks (11:10)
Stoler Rpt
Best Friends
My Babysitters Mostly Ghostly
Whenever (11:05) a Vampire (PG) 2: Ghoulfriend
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
Alaska: The Last Frontier Epic
Alaska: The Last
Adventures. (14)
Frontier (14)
Hes Just Not That Into You (2009).

DIS

WILSON WEBB/BLEECKER STREET

Viggo Mortensen and Annalise Basso.

Dragon Ball Z
American Greed
(PG)
The Essential
Donald Trump
Kyle Kinane:
Loose
Halloween

Eldridge & Co. City Talk


CUNY Special
Theater Talk (G) . The Red House (1947). Allene Roberts, Lon McCallister.
Bizaardvark (G) K.C. Undercover . Toy Story 3 (2010). Voices of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen. Animated. Toys Lab Rats: Elite K.C. Undercover
Bounty Hunter. are sent to day-care center. Sweet, touching, humane. (G)
Force (Y7) (9:50) (Y7) (10:40)
Rehab Addict
Rehab Addict
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
First-Flippers
Alaska: The Last Frontier: Life on Alaska: The Last Frontier: Life on Alaska: The Last Frontier: Life on Alaska: The Last Frontier: Life on
the Homestead (N) (14)
the Homestead (N) (14)
the Homestead (N) (14)
the Homestead (N) (14)
Friends With Benefits (2011). Justin Timberlake, Mila Kunis. (R) (6:30) Friends With Benefits (2011). Justin Timberlake, Mila Kunis. (R)

CUNY

WHATS STREAMING

Video Mus. Box

49

Keeping Up

WHATS ON SATURDAY
Viggo Mortensen goes off the grid and then
comes back again in Captain Fantastic.
Sarah Paulson and Mark Duplass play former
teenage lovers who unexpectedly reconnect in
Blue Jay. And Emily Blunt takes the Saturday
Night Live stage.

Best of CenterStage

Running

20TH CENTURY FOX

Jennifer Lawrence
JOY (2015) 8 p.m. on HBO. Jennifer Lawrence
teams with the director David O. Russell again
and earns yet another Oscar nomination
as Joy Mangano, a housewife, mired in family
ugliness, who builds a dynasty, and calms the
noise, with a newfangled mop. Bradley Cooper
and Robert De Niro, Ms. Lawrences co-stars in
Mr. Russells Silver Linings Playbook and
American Hustle, rejoin her here. But the
movie, in all its mess and glory, belongs almost
entirely to Ms. Lawrence, A. O. Scott wrote in
The Times. Like some of the great screen
goddesses of old for some reason, Lauren
Bacall seems like the best point of comparison
she seems at once impossibly magnetic and
completely down to earth, regal and
democratic, ordinary and perfect. The movie
struggles to keep up with her.
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE 11:30 p.m. on NBC.
Emily Blunt, now starring in The Girl on the
Train, makes her hosting debut; Bruno Mars is
the musical guest.
KATHRYN SHATTUCK

ONLINE: TELEVISION LISTINGS


Television highlights for a full week, recent
reviews by The Timess critics and complete
local television listings.
nytimes.com/tv
Definitions of symbols used in the program listings:
Recommended film
Recommended series
 New or noteworthy program

(N) New show or episode


(CC) Closed-captioned
(HD) High definition

Ratings:
(Y)All children
(Y7) Directed to older children
(G) General audience

(PG) Parental guidance suggested


(14) Parents strongly cautioned
(MA) Mature audience only

The TV ratings are assigned by the producers or network.


Ratings for theatrical films are provided by the Motion Picture
Association of America.

2 BASEBALL

5 CYCLING

Crowds for Tim Tebow in


the fall league, but no hits.

Bradley Wiggins and


Team Sky enter an
ethical gray area
over doping.

3 BASEBALL

Dave Roberts, the Dodgers


manager, is a quick study.

SCORES

COMMENTARY

ANALYSIS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016


+

D1

Agency Reassures U.S. Athletes After New Hack


By REBECCA R. RUIZ

The United States Anti-Doping


Agency is seeking to reassure American
athletes that their private medical information is safe after Russian hackers
gained access to the email account of one
of the agencys officials.
The same cyberespionage group that
stole private medical information from
the World Anti-Doping Agencys athlete
database last summer more recently
compromised the email account belonging to the science director of the American agency. The agency believes the

breach occurred in early September in


Rio de Janeiro, at the start of the Paralympic Games.
The federal authorities have assessed
the extent of the damage and are investigating the attack, the United States
agency said.
Travis Tygart, chief executive of Usada, called the attacks deplorable on
Friday, adding: Our athletes here in the
U.S. get it, and they see these
cyberattacks for exactly what they are:
A blatant attempt to baselessly smear
the reputations of clean athletes and to

An antidoping officials
email account was
compromised.
distract from the state-supported doping
system that corrupted the Sochi Games.
The hackers, calling themselves
Fancy Bear a group believed to be
associated with the G.R.U., the Russian

military intelligence agency suspected


of involvement in the recent cyberattack
on the Democratic National Committee
published files this month relating to
American athletes whom the sports authorities had granted waivers to take
prohibited drugs.
Such waivers, known as therapeutic
use exemptions, have been central to the
recent Fancy Bear hacks. When the
group began publishing athlete files in
mid-September, it argued that the exemptions granted by top sports authorities and approved by WADA and the

International Olympic Committee


constituted sanctioned doping and delivered an unfair advantage.
Russias president, Vladimir V. Putin,
expressed that view this week, suggesting that athletes with drug exemptions
should compete in special, segregated
categories. The Russian government has
denied ties to the Fancy Bear attack.
More than 25 American athletes including high-profile Olympians like Simone Biles and Serena and Venus
Williams were affected by the hackContinued on Page D4

Taking $14 Million,


And All of the Risk
EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES

The 49ers are returning quarterback Colin Kaepernick to a starting spot, but only after he gave up an injury guarantee.
When the San Francisco 49ers play the
Buffalo Bills on Sunday, Colin Kaepernick
will make his first start of the season as the
49ers quarterback. Although Kaepernick is
currently best known for refusing to stand for the national
anthem a protest against
racial injustice that has spread
across the sports landscape it
SPORTS wasnt all that long ago that he
BUSINESS
was the dynamic young quarterback who led his team to a Super Bowl
appearance and a conference championship
game in back-to-back seasons.
In 2014, though, the 49ers missed the
playoffs, and by the middle of last season,

JOE
NOCERA

With Little Choice, Quarterback Returns


After Letting 49ers Off Hook for Injury
Kaepernick was playing so poorly that he
lost his starting spot to Blaine Gabbert.
This season, Gabbert has been awful, and
so have the 49ers (1-4). The teams desolate
fans have taken to chanting, We want
Kap. So Chip Kelly, the teams coach, is
giving Kaepernick another shot at running
the team.
As woeful as the 49ers have been, and as
much as the fans need that sliver of hope,

the team would never have let Kaepernick


onto the field unless he had agreed to renegotiate his contract. The new deal was
completed Wednesday. For Kaepernick to
play, the 49ers told him, he had to be willing
to accept all the financial risk of a serious
injury. Given Kaepernicks three operations
in the last year, that possibility is not exactly remote.
(The team declined to talk about Kaeper-

nicks reworked contract.)


Major League Baseball and N.B.A.
players sign contracts that pay them even if
they sustain career-ending injuries. Football players, who have the highest risk of
serious injury, are, for the most part, not
afforded such financial protection. That
hardly rises to the level of the racial injustice Kaepernick has been protesting, but it
sure doesnt seem right.
When you read that a basketball player
has signed a four-year, $60 million contract,
those numbers can generally be taken at
face value: The player is guaranteed to
Continued on Page D5

BASEBALL PLAYOFFS AMERICAN LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

Indians Limit the Damage, and Claim Game 1


By TYLER KEPNER

CLEVELAND The Toronto Blue


Jays muscled their way to the American
League Championship Series, blasting 10
home runs in four games before meeting
the Cleveland Indians in Game 1 on Friday. The teams
had played seven
INDIANS
2
games in the regBLUE JAYS
0
ular season, and
Toronto
had
Cleveland leads
homered in all of
series, 1-0
them.
Its similar to the Red Sox, who we
just faced, said Andrew Miller, the
Indians relief ace. These guys know the
strike zone so well, and when you miss
over the plate, they do a lot of damage. So
theres a fine line. Its a challenge. Its
something you can smile about and appreciate when youre done with it.

But its one of those things: You know


that theyre going to put their swings on
the ball, and theyre going to do some
damage. Its just a matter of trying to limit it.
The Indians limited it as well as they
possibly could on Friday. Corey Kluber,
Miller and Cody Allen combined for a 2-0
shutout at Progressive Field, supported
by a 412-foot, two-run homer from Francisco Lindor.
The Indians, who are seeking their
first World Series title in 68 years, have
never been hotter in the postseason.
They have won just two championships,
in 1920 and 1948, and by sweeping Boston
in the division series and taking Game 1
from the Blue Jays, they have tied their
franchise record for consecutive postseason victories, with four.
The Blue Jays had a longer winning

streak coming into the game, having won


their final two in the regular season before blitzing the Baltimore Orioles and
the Texas Rangers in the playoffs. They
managed seven hits on Friday, but went
0 for 5 with runners in scoring position.
Kluber is one of the elite pitchers in
the game as is Miller, as is Cody Allen,
Toronto Manager John Gibbons said. If
youre a fan of pitching, it was a dream
game for you. We got some guys on base
early a lot of the innings and we
couldnt get that big hit. Lindor got the
big hit.
Lindor, 22, was the runner-up for the
A.L. Rookie of the Year Award in 2015 and
made his first All-Star team this July. After Marco Estrada walked Jason Kipnis
with one out in the sixth, Lindor pounded
a down-and-in changeup over Kevin PilContinued on Page D2

GENE J. PUSKAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Clevelands Francisco Lindor after hitting a two-run homer off Torontos


Marco Estrada in the sixth. Lindor sent a changeup over the right-field wall.

D2

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

B A S E B A L L L E AG U E C H A M P I O N S H I P S E R I E S

MATT SLOCUM/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Blue Jays Edwin Encarnacion, center, had words for the plate umpire, Laz Diaz, right, as his teammate Jose Bautista attempted to intervene after Encarnacion struck out looking in the eighth.

By Limiting Damage, Indians Get off to a Fast Start Against the Blue Jays
From First Sports Page
lars head in right-center field.
When it cleared the fence, Lindor
punched the sky in celebration.
First of all, I thought Pillar was
going to catch it, he said. As soon
as it went out, I put my hands out
and said, Thank God. And I
looked at the dugout and everybody was going insane. And the
crowd today: unreal. I just tried to
go with the flow.
The Indians learned before the
game that Trevor Bauer, their

scheduled Game 2 starter, had cut


the pinkie on his pitching hand
while fixing a drone. It was a new
injury for these Indians perhaps a new injury for baseball
players everywhere but this
team is used to medical misery.
They simply find a way to keep
winning.
The Indians expect Bauer to be
ready by Monday, but his fragile
condition only underscored the
importance of Game 1. The
Indians best pitcher is Kluber,
and he was still healthy. They

needed his best to have a realistic


chance to win this series, and they
got it.
Over and over, Kluber fooled
the Blue Jays with his curveball,
using it to finish five of his six
strikeouts, including to Jose
Bautista with two on and one out
in the first inning. The Blue Jay
never reached third base again.
We were just flipping breaking
balls in there; we were hitting corners away, catcher Roberto Perez
said. His breaking ball was unbelievable tonight.

Kluber left to a rousing ovation


from the crowd of 37,727, who
stood and chanted Kluuuu as he
walked off the mound with one out
and the bases empty in the
seventh. Kluber did not acknowledge the fans, but said he meant
no harm.
Im still locked in at that point
in time, said Kluber, who now has
13 scoreless innings in the playoffs.
That was in keeping with his
nickname, Klubot, befitting a robotic pitcher whose machinery
works so well that he won the 2014

A.L. Cy Young Award. He sat on a


podium after the game in his
Indians cap, a contrast to Lindor,
who wore a stylish fedora and
plays with an effervescence that
came out on his homer.
I just think you can tell how
much he enjoys playing the
game, Manager Terry Francona
said. Shoot, if I had his ability, Id
feel confident, too.
As a team, the Indians have not
lacked for confidence. If they did,
they probably would have succumbed to the injuries that befell
them this season. They have lost a

star outfielder, Michael Brantley


(shoulder), starters Danny Salazar (forearm) and Carlos Carrasco (finger) and several other
contributors.
Now they have grabbed the
lead in the A.L.C.S., silencing a
Blue Jays team that grumbled
about the strike zone but never
did anything about it. They were
punchless in Game 1 but could appreciate great pitching in defeat.
It wasnt like we faced the average Joe out there and he struggled, Gibbons said. It was a heck
of a game, it really was.

Tebows Audition So Far:


A Hit at the Ticket Office,
But None on the Field
By KAREN CROUSE

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. The


player came to home plate, bat in
hand, and was greeted by the opposing catcher, Nick Ciuffo, who is
acquainted with most of his opponents in the Arizona Fall League
from a youth spent on baseball diamonds.
This hitter, though, Ciuffo knew
only by reputation.
So as Tim Tebow was getting
comfortable in the batters box,
Ciuffo introduced himself.
I cant really like you because
Im a big South Carolina fan,
Ciuffo said he told Tebow, who
laughed and responded, Well, nobodys perfect.
The scene, from a game on
Thursday between the Peoria
Javelinas and the Scottsdale
Scorpions, was a postcard-perfect
tableau of Tebows opening week
here.
Two months ago, Ciuffo, a former first-round draft pick of the
Tampa Bay Rays, did not know
that Tebow, the former Heisman
Trophy-winner from Florida and a
former N.F.L. quarterback, even
played baseball. Yet here Tebow
was, competing with and against a
group of top-level prospects, like
Ciuffo, in an advanced league that
is often a steppingstone to a career in the majors.
One of Tebows Scorpions teammates is Greg Bird, a first baseman who hit 11 home runs for the
Yankees as a rookie in 2015 before
missing all of this year following
shoulder surgery.
Another teammate, and a fellow
member of the Mets organization,
is Gavin Cecchini, who made his
major league debut in September
after a late-season call-up from
Class AAA; Cecchini doubled
twice in one of the few games he
played in the majors.
The 29-year-old Tebow, meanwhile, last played baseball as a junior in high school in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., in 2005. It is a daunting task to try to knock off 11 years
of cobwebs and the cover of the
baseball against pitchers like
Thursdays Peoria starter, Kyle

McGrath, who had a cup of tea at


Class AAA this season, pitching
one and two-thirds innings for San
Diegos team in El Paso.
Not surprisingly, in his first
week here, Tebow sometimes
looked outclassed.
He went hitless in 11 plate appearances in his first three games,
recording six groundouts, three
strikeouts and two walks against
the highest quality pitching he has
faced by far in his new baseball
adventure. On the flip side, he has
already demonstrated a good eye,
chasing few bad pitches.
I totally get that its a process,
Tebow said.
And whether he is polished on
the diamond seems not to matter
to the fans who show up in their
Jets replica No. 15 Tebow jerseys
or their Denver Broncos replica
No. 15 jerseys or their Florida replica No. 15 jerseys.
Daniel Kelly, a one-time Jets
scout who left football to become a
debt counselor and a minister in

I totally get that its


a process, a player
says of his struggles
in the fall league.
Arizona, showed up at Tebows Arizona Fall League debut at Camelback Ranch Stadium on Tuesday
night in a No. 15 pinstriped Mets
jersey. It was a gift from his wife,
Samantha, who paid extra for express delivery last week from
Florida so that Hurricane
Matthew would not prevent the
shirt from arriving in time for the
game.
The day after his debut, Tebow
played his first home game at
Scottsdale Stadium in front of
nearly 1,800 fans, which was well
above last years average of 500
for Scorpions games.
At home or on the road this past
week, the fans were like the tides:
When Tebow was preparing to hit,

they spilled down from their seats


in the shade to vantage points
near the on-deck circle, where
they snapped selfies with Tebow
in the background or trained their
lenses on him. After his at-bat
they retreated, to get out of the
mid-90s heat.
Tebow is excellent for business,
but is baseball excellent for him?
His fall league manager has kept
an open mind.
I want to look at it with clear
eyes, said Tom Goodwin, the
Mets first-base coach during the
major league season.
During his 14-year playing career, Goodwin was a teammate of
Barry Bonds for one season in San
Francisco, which proved great
preparation for presiding over the
Tebow media show.
Its a show that generates inevitable cynicism from others that
this is all a publicity stunt or simply an effort by the Mets to build
up credit with Tebows agent, who
also represents the All-Star outfielder Yoenis Cespedes.
Cespedes can opt out of his current contract after the World Series and the Mets, perhaps with
the help of his agent, are hoping
they can convince him to stick
around.
Goodwin, however, maintained
that Tebow is on the Scorpions for
the same reason as his teammates: to improve as a player. He
may have a lot to learn on the field,
Goodwin added, but Tebow also
has leadership skills, a factor that
Mets General Manager Sandy Alderson cited when the team
signed Tebow for $100,000 last
month.
Those attributes were on display Tuesday, when after going 0
for 3 at the plate in his first game
and crashing face-first into the
left-field wall while chasing a fly
ball, Tebow comforted a fan who
had collapsed in convulsions and
stayed with him until his seizures
subsided and the paramedics arrived.
Noticing that the fan was wearing a Batman T-shirt, Tebow
asked him if he liked the comic
book character. I was just trying

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTIAN PETERSEN/GETTY IMAGES

Tim Tebow playing for the


Scottsdale Scorpions of the
Arizona Fall League, a steppingstone to the big leagues.
In his first 11 plate appearances, he went without a hit.

to find something that hed relate


to, Tebow said later.
Tebow ended up spending more
than 15 minutes talking to the man
about a wide range of topics, from
fly fishing in North Carolina to
football in the Southeastern Conference. The rest of the Scorpions
waited on the team bus.
He was a little late for the bus,
center fielder Champ Stuart said.
But he had a great excuse.
Tebow, who is also continuing
his stint as a weekend college football analyst while he plays in the
fall league, is aware his every
move, his every good Samaritan
act, is scrutinized for ulterior motives.
Its not something I can control, so I really dont spend time
worrying about it, he said, adding: When you stand for something, or you try to, youre going to

be criticized. And thats part of the


world.
Tebow said he does not pay attention to what is being said or
written about him, or at least tries
not to. They tell you to let it go in
one ear and out the other, he said.
I try not to let it even get to an
ear.
But he is open to what his
younger teammates have to say,
and they have already said a lot.
Scorpions catcher Taylor Ward,
a Los Angeles Angels prospect,
joked that Tebows glove looked so
dated that he would not be surprised if it was the one he used in
high school 11 years ago (it is not).
Ward also took a playful swipe at
Tebows uniform pants, which are
hemmed so they fall to the tops of
his shoes.
Definitely, I would have his
pants over his cleats, Ward said

with a laugh, adding, Just kind of


have to talk to him a bit because
baseball players have to have that
swag.
Every time Tebow batted in his
first three games, players with
conspicuously longer baseball rsums than his leaned on or over
the railing of the opponents dugout to watch. From his catchers
crouch on Thursday, Ciuffo had
the best vantage point.
After their initial exchange,
Ciuffo and Tebow kept up their
banter. During one plate appearance that day, Tebow complimented Ciuffo on a throw he had
made. Ciuffo said he replied, Now
if I could figure out the offense
part.
Tebow told him he would be
fine.
In Ciuffos next at-bat, he tripled. When Tebow later came to
the plate for another at-bat, he
grinned at Ciuffo and said, Man, I
should be your coach.
Ciuffo beamed as he told the
story.
Its really cool to see him out
here, he said. I think everybody
deserves a chance. If hes good
enough, put him in the big
leagues. If hes not, hes not.

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

D3

BASEBALL

Another Chapter, Another Sad Ending for the Nationals


WASHINGTON You know
what the Nationals clubhouse
sounded like Thursday night,
past midnight, after Washington
lost the deciding Game 5 of its
National League
division series?
It was so quiet
that you could
almost hear the
SPORTS
Champagne corks
OF THE TIMES
popping down the
hall, where the Los Angeles
Dodgers celebrated because they
were headed to Chicago to play
the Cubs in the N.L. Championship Series.
Back in the Nationals clubhouse, the lights on a boom box
were flashing purple, red and
white, but no music was coming
from it. Instead, the soundtrack
for the teams excruciating 4-3
loss was the teams members,
including Manager Dusty Baker,
slapping one another on the back
as they exchanged hugs.
Slap.
Travel safe, they said as they
prepared to part ways until next
spring training.
Slap, slap.
You did real good, outfielder
Bryce Harper said to Max
Scherzer, the best pitcher on the
Nationals and one of the best
pitchers in the game, but one
who, on Thursday night, could
not win when it counted the
most.
More hugs. More slaps. All
came after the stinging slap in
the face to a team that has won
its division in three of the past
five years but just cant get past
the divisional round of the playoffs.
The Nationals had a chance to
end their postseason misfortunes, but blew it. Yet again,
somehow, some way perhaps
because an invisible Maginot
Line exists between these Nationals and the N.L.C.S. they
blew it.
So much for this seasons
motto, One pursuit, which was
supposed to be the pursuit of a
World Series title, the first one
for Washington since 1924. Maybe that pursuit should have been
something less daunting, like just
getting past the first round. This
city, home base of political
misery during this dirty election
season, might have thrown a
party for that.
Despite the painful outcome
Thursday, the locker room talk
afterward was civil. No one
cursed or cried or complained, or
even blamed anyone or any one
play. A few players opened frosty
cans of Coors Light. At least one,
second baseman Wilmer Difo,
the rookie who made the last out
of the game, began cleaning out
his locker, angrily tossing items
from it into his bag.
Mark Lerner, one of the Nationals owners, left the clubhouse looking shaken, with red,
watery eyes. His team showed
less emotion.
Could it be that the Nationals
were stunned by what had occurred, taking a two-games-toone lead in this series but failing
to close it out? Last year, they

JULIET
MACUR

Email: juliet@nytimes.com

PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES

The Nationals Jayson Werth after being tagged out at home in the sixth. I wish I could have it back, but no, said Bob Henley, the coach who waved Werth home.
were the preseason favorites to
win the World Series and didnt
even make the playoffs. Now
this?
What more could they have
done to break through to the
second round? They won 95
games in the regular season for
the second-best record in the
National League. Sure, they
battled some late-season injuries,
including one to the starting
catcher Wilson Ramos. But this
easily could have been their year.
But once again, it wasnt.
This is some of the greatest
baseball Ive ever been part of,
outfielder Jayson Werth said
before flopping into a leather
chair at one end of the clubhouse.
Sitting there, he epitomized the
Nationals postgame demeanor:
face blank and baseball cap
barely on his head and askew,
silently staring at a blank television screen. In a locker nearby
was a cap that said, 2016 Postseason, a sad reminder that the
Nationals, once more, deserved
only a participation medal.
Before falling into his stupor,

Werth said the feeling after the


Game 5 loss was too heavy to
describe. He also said it was a
crazy series, and he was right.
Craziest of all might have been
when the Dodgers ace, Clayton
Kershaw, came out of the bullpen
on one days rest to close out the
game in the bottom of the ninth
with two runners on base and
one out.
Game 5 was also crazy because the Nationals missed some
obvious chances to win it.
There was an inexplicable
moment in the sixth inning,
when the Nationals were ahead,
1-0, with Werth on first with two
outs. Ryan Zimmerman lined a
hit down the left-field line and
Werth blazed around the bases
and past the third-base coach,
Bob Henley, whose arm was
windmilling as he sent Werth
home.
Except that the ball got to the
Dodgers catcher before Werth
did. About two hours before
Werth did. The fans, just about
all 43,936 of them at Nationals
Field, yelled, No! Henley fi-

nally said the word no, too, but


hours later.
I wish I could have it back,
but no, he said. I think everybodys heartbroken now.
There was also Bakers decision to leave in Scherzer to start
the seventh inning. He had

Out in the divisional


round for the third
time in five seasons.
pitched a no-hitter through the
fourth, and a shutout through the
sixth. By then, he was closing in
on 100 pitches, with seven strikeouts and two walks. That might
have been the time to pull him,
considering his escalating pitch
count and the fact that he had
given up a lot of home runs this
season.
But in stayed Scherzer, and,

immediately, out went a baseball


from the park Dodgers outfielder Joc Pederson homered to
tie the score, 1-1.
Scherzer departed, the
Dodgers scored three more
times, and the seventh inning,
which lasted more than an hour,
ended with the Dodgers ahead,
4-3.
This is a tough one to be on
the wrong side of, Scherzer said.
I gave as good an effort as Ive
ever given in my life.
And what an effort he gave
this season. Two baseballs, each
inside a clear plastic box, in his
locker showed it. One was for a
game when he struck out 20
batters, tying a major league
record for a nine-inning game.
Another was for his 20th win this
season. Yet Thursday, even the
best effort of his life did not help
the Nationals win.
It was a night when trying to
win just didnt cut it. Back in the
clubhouse, players talked about
their fruitless efforts.
I tried to hit a home run for
you today, but it didnt work,

Dodgers Rookie Manager


Learns, and Acts, Quickly
By JAMES WAGNER

CHICAGO Watching the


thrilling theater of Game 5 of the
National League division series
against the Washington Nationals
unfold on Thursday night, Los Angeles Dodgers General Manager
Farhan Zaidi was filled with pride.
His rookie manager, Dave Roberts, was pulling the right strings
some of them unconventional
to propel his team to the National League Championship Series.
After starter Rich Hill was
yanked in the third inning, Roberts brought in the setup man Joe
Blanton. He inserted closer Kenley Jansen in the seventh inning.
He used starter Clayton Kershaw
to get the games final two outs.
Pinch-hitter Carlos Ruiz produced
a big hit at the right time.
It was really aggressive managing, which is exactly what
youre hoping your manager does
in a do-or-die game, Zaidi said afterward. I told him when I saw
him that it was the best game Ive
ever seen managed, and I really
meant it. To pull out those stops
not just to bring guys in early, but
to have them ready to do it and
ready to do the job its unbelievable.
Baseball, especially in the pressure cooker of the playoffs, can occasionally move too fast for some
managers. But Roberts has
proved to be a fast learner. A former major league outfielder and
coach, best known until now for
his dramatic steal of second base
in the 2004 American League
Championship Series, Roberts
more than held his own against
the Nationals Dusty Baker, who
has been managing for 21 years.

And now Roberts will face off


against another veteran manager,
the Chicago Cubs Joe Maddon,
who is highly unconventional and
even more esteemed than Baker
is.
On Friday, as the Dodgers and
the Cubs prepared for Game 1 of
the N.L.C.S. on Saturday night at
Wrigley Field, Maddon was full of
compliments for Roberts.
Very bright, engaging, gregarious hes got all those different
qualities, said Maddon, who, at
62, is 18 years older than Roberts.
And hes obviously a quick study,
too.
Roberts said of Maddon: I just
pride myself in being a lifelong
learner. I think that Joe is a guy
that we all know and respect as an
outside-the-box thinker, a forward
thinker. He loves to teach players
and people.
Maddon and the Cubs boss,
Theo Epstein, have rightly been
credited for making their team
into the strongest in baseball this
season, but Roberts and the
Dodgers analytics-driven front
office, headed by Zaidi and the
teams president, Andrew Friedman, deserve a lot of plaudits, too.
Because of many injuries, the
Dodgers used 31 pitchers this season, including 15 starters. As a result, the bullpen carried a heavy
load, leading the major leagues in
innings thrown but also ranking
No. 1 in earned run average. It was
daunting, but Roberts found a way
to keep the Dodgers on course.
I give a lot of credit to our front
office, he said. Theyve allowed
me to open my mind, to grow and
help me make decisions.
Many of those decisions stem
from one of the biggest tasks any
modern baseball manager faces,

Anthony Rendon said to Chris


Heiseys 2-year-old son, Caden,
who was in his fathers arms.
But you know who hit a home
run?
Caden lit up and shouted, My
daddy!
On Thursday night, that was it
for the joy in the home teams
clubhouse.
Heisey had hit a pinch-hit
homer in that epic seventh inning to put the Nationals back in
the game. But despite Bakers
prayers and hopes and the fact
that Baker even packed for Chicago that morning, anticipating
his team would win Game 5,
Heiseys home run wasnt
enough. Nothing was enough.
In his extraordinary career,
Baker had somehow fallen short
again.
You know, we got some improvements to make and, hopefully, well be back in this same
position next year, Baker said.
Nationals fans have heard
those words before. Its what
defeat sounds like.

Orchestrating a
do-or-die game like a
veteran, and a winner.

ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES

Manager Dave Roberts, center, after guiding the Dodgers


to the National League Championship Series. Next up, a
showdown with Cubs Manager Joe Maddon, near left.

BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

which is how to properly deploy a


bullpen.
Roberts said that earlier in the
season, he was conventionally
minded in his bullpen use. He

tried to assign specific roles and


specific innings to relievers, perhaps trying to replicate the success of the Kansas City Royals
World Series teams of 2014 and

2015. But that did not last long.


It just didnt go great, and I didnt have a great feeling about it,
Roberts said. So it kind of
evolved into with conversations
with the guys in the pen of eliminating a certain role, and just
classifying yourself as someone
who is in the pen as a reliever, outside of Kenley.
Now the Dodgers will again
have to move puzzle pieces
around after a taxing series
against the Nationals.
The Cubs Jon Lester was
scheduled to start Game 1 opposite Kenta Maeda of the Dodgers.

Roberts said he was not prepared


to name a Game 2 starter or to declare which game Kershaw would
pitch. He said he hoped that
Jansen, despite a career-high 51
pitches on Thursday, could pitch
one inning on Saturday if needed.
Well see more after he goes
out there and throws, Roberts
said.
Before the Dodgers took Game
5 batting practice on Thursday in
Washington,
Roberts
pulled
Jansen aside and explained situations that might occur, including
bringing him into the game as
early as the seventh inning and
using Blanton as the closer.
Half of that potential situation
came about.
He was prepared, Jansen said
of Roberts.
And while Roberts and members of the Dodgers front office
talked through many pitching situations that might occur in Game
5, using Kershaw on one day of
rest was not seriously considered.
Until, that is, Roberts brought him
in to save the game. Afterward,
Zaidi commended Robertss ability to think decisively on the fly.
At the end of the day, hes the
guy in the dugout and were up in
the suite watching the game from
afar, Zaidi said. There are so
many things that can happen that
can take you off track or a different track. He just managed the
game beautifully.
Guys have a lot of respect for
him and what hes done, Justin
Turner, the Dodgers third baseman, said of Roberts. He doesnt
push anything aside. When something happens, hes the leader of it.
He addresses everything right
away and gets it taken care of.

D4

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

S C O R E B OA R D

Agency Reassures U.S. Athletes After Hack


From First Sports Page
ers first several rounds of disclosures,
staggered over several weeks.
Ms. Biles, 19, subsequently said that
she had received a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
years earlier, adding that she was not
ashamed of her disorder or by the disclosure of her sensitive medical information.
Also affected were more than 100
athletes from 26 other countries including one from Russia who had
permission to take a range of medications to treat conditions like allergies,
asthma and attention disorders.
But with the latest batch of files,
published Oct. 7 and drawing on the
American antidoping agencys emails,
the hackers focused squarely on the
United States, citing more than 200
American athletes who have permission to take banned drugs whose
names and waivers they had gained
access to via a spreadsheet stored on
email.
(The United States files, first reported on by Forbes, were taken down
for roughly five days, during which the
Fancy Bear site was down.)
The email breach affected one individuals account, the United States antidoping agency said this week; that
account belonged to Matthew Fedoruk, the organizations science di-

rector.
Dr. Fedoruk was working at the
oceanside hotel where the International Paralympic Committee was
headquartered, in the Barra da Tijuca
neighborhood of Rio. His account was
thought to have been compromised
through the Wi-Fi network he was using there.
The organization was not aware of

A group believed to be
associated with Russian
intelligence is suspected.
the breach until Fancy Bear announced it roughly a month later.
The American agency said this
week that its email servers had not
been compromised and that the
breach had affected Mr. Fedoruks account alone. The agency said it had determined that Fancy Bear made failed
attempts through different channels to
gain access to other files, including the
agencys financial records.
Russia was barred from participating in the Paralympics after
revelations of government-sponsored
doping and coordinated cover-ups that

relied on help from Russias Federal


Security Service.
In recent days, Mr. Tygart sent a video message to all American athletes
whose information had been made
public. He said he had spoken with
dozens of athletes and their parents by
phone.
Mr. Tygart called on global sports
leaders to condemn the hacks. Thomas
Bach, president of the International
Olympic Committee, has called the
breaches unacceptable while suggesting that responsibility lies with
WADA, which ought to significantly
improve its information security
standards to comply with the international data privacy regulations and to
prevent data leakage of critical information.
The Fancy Bear hackers have
threatened to continue to release information, suggesting last Friday that Dr.
Fedoruks emails were only the start of
the correspondence they had obtained.
As investigations into elaborate
government-ordered cheating by Russia at the last Winter Olympics continue, some leaders in Olympic sport
have taken the bait and are talking
more about this, Mr. Tygart said of the
hacks, than about imposing meaningful consequences on a state-run doping program and how to ensure that it
never happens again.

BASEBALL

PRO FOOTBALL

POSTSEASON SCHEDULE

N.F.L. STANDINGS

DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Toronto 3, Texas 0
Thursday, Oct. 6: Toronto 10, Texas 1
Friday, Oct. 7: Toronto 5, Texas 3
Sunday, Oct. 9: Toronto 7, Texas 6, 10
innings
Cleveland 3, Boston 0
Thursday, Oct. 6: Cleveland 5, Boston 4
Friday, Oct. 7: Cleveland 6, Boston 0
Sunday, Oct. 9: Cleveland at Boston, ppd., rain
Monday, Oct. 10: Cleveland 4, Boston 3
National League
Chicago 3, San Francisco 1
Friday, Oct. 7: Chicago 1, San Francisco 0
Saturday, Oct. 8: Chicago 5, San Francisco 2
Monday, Oct. 10: San Francisco 6, Chicago
5, 13 innings
Tuesday, Oct. 11: Chicago 6, San
Francisco 5
Los Angeles 3, Washington 2
Friday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 4, Washington 3
Saturday, Oct. 8: Los Angeles at
Washington, ppd., rain
Sunday, Oct. 9: Washington 5, Los Angeles 2
Monday, Oct. 10: Washington 8, at Los
Angeles 3
Tuesday, Oct. 11: Los Angeles 6,
Washington 5
Thursday, Oct. 13: Los Angeles 4,
Washington 3

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
All Games on TBS
Cleveland 1, Toronto 0
Friday, Oct. 14: Cleveland 2, Toronto 0
Saturday, Oct. 15: Toronto (Happ 20-4) at
Cleveland (Tomlin 13-9), 4:08 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 17: Cleveland (Bauer 12-8) at
Toronto (Stroman 9-10), 8:08 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 18: Cleveland (Clevinger 3-3)
at Toronto (Sanchez 15-2), 8:08 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct. 19: Cleveland at
Toronto, 4:08 p.m.
x-Friday, Oct. 21: Toronto at Cleveland,
8:08 p.m.
x-Saturday, Oct. 22: Toronto at Cleveland, TBA
National League
All Games on FS1
Chicago vs. Los Angeles
Saturday, Oct. 15: Los Angeles (Maeda
16-11) at Chicago (Lester 19-5), 8:08
p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 16: Los Angeles at Chicago,
8:08 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 18: Chicago at Los Angeles,
8:08 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 19: Chicago at Los
Angeles, 8:08 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 20: Chicago at Los
Angeles, 8:08 p.m.
x-Saturday, Oct. 22: Los Angeles at
Chicago, TBA
x-Sunday, Oct. 23: Los Angeles at Chicago,
TBA
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Tuesday, Oct. 25: NL at AL
Wednesday, Oct. 26: NL at AL
Friday, Oct. 28: AL at NL
Saturday, Oct. 29: AL at NL
x-Sunday, Oct. 30: AL at NL
x-Tuesday, Nov. 1: NL at AL
x-Wednesday, Nov. 2: NL at AL

VINCE CALIGIURI/GETTY IMAGES

LEAD THEM TO WATER Horses

from the Ciaron Maher stable on the beach Friday near Melbourne, Australia.

C O LLEG E FO OTBAL L

Louisville Sews Up Win After Mistake by Duke


Lamar Jackson provided a cushion with a 2-yard touchdown run with 1 minute 32 seconds remaining, and No. 7
Louisville held off visiting Duke, 24-14, on Friday night.
The Cardinals caught a break after a 46-yard field goal
attempt by Evan OHara missed wide left. Dukes Breon
Borders was called for roughing the kicker, and the penalty
moved the ball to the 14. Jackson did the rest with a 12-yard
run followed by the short score that Louisville (5-1, 3-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) sorely needed.
We didnt blow them out, but we did win the game, said
Louisville Coach Bobby Petrino, whose team had averaged
58 points coming into the game. Ill take it.
Jackson accounted for 325 yards of offense and two
touchdowns, hitting Jaylen Smith with a 5-yard scoring pass
on the opening drive. Jeremy Smith added an 80-yard touchdown run in the third quarter, and OHara kicked a 22-yard
field goal.
Duke (3-4, 0-3) remained winless in A.C.C. play but gave
Louisville more than it had expected.
P R O B ASK ETB ALL

Sparks Take Lead in W.N.B.A. Finals


Candace Parker scored 24 points, Nneka Ogwumike
added 21, and the Los Angeles Sparks beat the visiting Minnesota Lynx, 92-75, to take a 2-1 lead in the best-of-five
W.N.B.A. finals.
The Sparks could win their first league championship
since 2002 with a victory in Game 4 on Sunday.
They built a 22-point advantage in the opening quarter
when the Sparks shot 60 percent in the game.
Rebekkah Brunson and Sylvia Fowles led Minnesota
with 14 points each. The Lynx had 13 turnovers.
ALL-W.N.B.A. TEAM ANNOUNCED Nneka Ogwumike, the leagues
most valuable player, was the only unanimous pick for the
All-W.N.B.A. first team, receiving 39 first-place votes and
195 points from the media panel. Liberty center Tina Charles
was second, with 38 first-team votes and 193 points. Completing the first team were guards Maya Moore of Minnesota and Sue Bird of Seattle and forward Elena Delle Donne.
ACCUSERS ACQUAINTANCES TESTIFY AT ROSE TRIAL Derrick
Roses civil rape trial concluded its second week, with his
fate undecided but nearing a resolution.
A verdict against Rose, a Knicks guard, and his codefendants, Ryan Allen and Randall Hampton, boyhood
friends who have served as Roses personal assistants,
could cost them at least $21 million.
The trial has been strewn with explicit details about the
defendants sexual encounters with the plaintiff, a 30-yearold woman. Testimony on Friday was less lurid as six witnesses, four of them acquaintances of the womans, took the
stand. Toward the end of the day, however, the judge,
lawyers and the woman read lewd text messages she and
Rose had exchanged.
The judge in the case, Michael W. Fitzgerald, also asked
the lawyers for the three men to provide information on
their net worth. Proceedings will resume on Tuesday.
MIKE TIERNEY

goal, and Ryan Johansen had three assists.


Marcus Kruger and Niklas Hjalmarsson scored for Chicago, which has lost its first two games this season playing
with six rookies in the lineup.

Mike Fisher redirected a shot by Roman Josi late in the


second period for the go-ahead power-play goal, and the
Nashville Predators won at home over Chicago, 3-2, in their
season opener.
Fishers goal was Nashvilles third with the man advantage. P. K. Subban, Nashvilles big off-season addition,
scored the first goal of the season. Josi had a power-play

All news by The Associated Press unless noted.

SOCCER
M.L.S. STANDINGS

Raiders Murray Out With Toe Injury

EAST
W
Red Bulls
14
New York City FC14
Toronto FC
13
Montreal
11
D.C. United
10
Philadelphia
11
New England 10
Columbus
8
Orlando City
7
Chicago
6

B AS E B A L L

Knee Surgery Sidelines Nationals Ramos


The Washington Nationals said catcher Wilson Ramos
had surgery on his right knee, and his rehabilitation was
expected to take six to eight months. Ramos was injured
last month, during the last week of the regular season. During the surgery, he had his knees anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed and the medial meniscus and lateral
meniscus repaired.

L
9
9
9
10
9
12
13
12
11
16

T Pts GF GA
9 51 56 42
9 51 57 53
10 49 46 35
11 44 47 48
13 43 48 42
9 42 52 51
9 39 40 52
12 36 47 51
14 35 49 58
10 28 38 54

W L
T Pts GF GA
WEST
Colorado
15 5 12 57 38 30
FC Dallas
16 8
8 56 48 39
Los Angeles
11 6 15 48 53 39
Seattle
13 13
6 45 41 40
Real Salt Lake 12 11
9 45 43 44
Kansas City
12 13
7 43 40 41
Portland
11 13
8 41 46 49
San Jose
8 11 13 37 32 38
Vancouver
9 15
8 35 41 51
Houston
7 13 12 33 38 43
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Thursday's Games
Columbus 2, Chicago 2, tie
Colorado 2, San Jose 1
Sunday's Games
Columbus at Red Bulls 3 p.m.
New York City FC at D.C. United, 3 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Toronto FC at Montreal, 3 p.m.
Colorado at Portland, 5 p.m.
Los Angeles at Houston, 5 p.m.
Seattle at FC Dallas, 5 p.m.
Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 5 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 5 p.m.

PRO BASKETBALL
W.N.B.A. PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

SOCCER

Dortmund Salvages Tie Against Hertha


Hertha Berlins dogged defense frustrated Borussia
Dortmunds high-scoring attack for 80 minutes before
Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang scored an equalizer for a 1-1
draw in a Bundesliga match in which both teams finished
with 10 men.
G OL F

Piercy Is in Front at Safeway Open


Scott Piercy pitched in for eagle, added two birdies and
kept a two-shot lead in the rain-delayed Safeway Open in
Napa, Calif., until it was too dark to continue. Piercy, who
opened with a course-record 62, was at 14 under par. Bill
Haas had a two-under 70 and finished 36 holes in eight-under 136.
AMERICAN LEADS IN SOUTH KOREA Brittany Lang of the United
States hit a driver for a tap-in eagle on the par-4 15th and
birdied the last for a seven-under-par 65 and the secondround lead in the L.P.G.A. KEB HanaBank Championship
in Incheon, South Korea.

HO C K EY

Predators Open by Edging Blackhawks

LOBToronto 8, Cleveland 4. 2B
Encarnacion (1). HRLindor (1), off
Estrada. RBIsLindor 2 (2). SCrisp 2.
DPToronto 1; Cleveland 1
Toronto
ip h r er bb so np era
Estrada L1-1
8 6 2 2 1 6 101 2.25
Cleveland
ip h r er bb so np era
Kluber W2-0 6/ 6 0 0 2 6 100 0.00
Miller H2
1/ 1 0 0 0 5 31 0.00
Allen S3-1
1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00
T2:44. A37,727 (38,000).

T E N N IS

Djokovic Bounces Back in Shanghai


Novak Djokovic, the defending champion at the Shanghai Masters, rebounded from a dismal opening set to beat
Mischa Zverev, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3, and reach the semifinals.
INJURY FORCES OUT MUGURZA Garbie Muguruza sprained
her left ankle and pulled out of her quarterfinal against Viktorija Golubic at the Generali Ladies in Linz, Austria. Because of other results, Muguruza still became the sixth
player to clinch a berth at the WTA Finals.

All Times EDT


(x-if necessary)
Finals
(Best-of-5)
Los Angeles 1, Minnesota 1
Sunday: Los Angeles 78, Minnesota 76
Tuesday: Minnesota 79, Los Angeles 60
Friday: Minnesota 75, Los Angeles 92
Sunday, Oct. 16: Minnesota at Los
Angeles, 8:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 20: Los Angeles at
Minnesota, 8 p.m.

N.B.A. PRESEASON SCHEDULE


Thursday's Games
Boston 100, Nets 97
Washington 100, Philadelphia 79
Detroit 99, Atlanta 94
Toronto 119, Cleveland 94
Memphis 110, Oklahoma City 94
L.A. Clippers 109, Portland 108
Sacramento 116, L.A. Lakers 104
Friday's Games
Orlando 114, Indiana 106
Toronto 122, San Lorenzo de Almagro 105
Chicago 118, Cleveland 108
Miami at San Antonio
Golden State at Denver
Dallas at Phoenix
Saturday's Games
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Washington at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Knicks, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 9 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS
M.L.B.
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Named Joe
McEwing bench coach, Nick Capra thirdbase coach and Curt Hasler bullpen coach.

N.B.A.
NBA Suspended Detroit assistant coach
Tim Hardaway three games for pleading
guilty to driving while intoxicated with an
excessive blood alcohol level.

L OT Pts GF GA

Florida

0 0

Buffalo

3 2 0 .600 117

87

Ottawa

0 0

Jets

1 4 0 .200

92 136

Montreal

0 0

Miami

1 4 0 .200

88 119

Boston

0 0

South

W L T Pct

PF PA

Tampa

0 0

Houston

3 2 0 .600

82 104

Toronto

0 1

Tennessee

2 3 0 .400

92 101

Detroit

1 0

Indianapolis

2 3 0 .400 137 148

Buffalo

1 0

1 3 0 .250

84 111

W L T Pct

PF PA

Metropolitan W

L OT Pts GF GA

Pittsburgh

0 0

Rangers

0 0

Carolina

0 1

Wash.

0 1

Jacksonville
North
Pittsburgh

4 1 0 .800 139

93

Baltimore

3 2 0 .600

94

88

Cincinnati

2 3 0 .400

92 110

Cleveland

0 5 0 .000

87 148

W L T Pct

PF PA

West
Oakland

4 1 0 .800 142 137

Denver

4 2 0 .667 140 108

Kansas City

2 2 0 .500

San Diego

2 4 0 .333 173 155

83

92

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East

W L T Pct

PF PA

Devils

0 1

Phila.

0 0

Columbus

1 0

Islanders

1 0

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central

St. Louis

L OT Pts GF GA
0 0

Dallas

0 0

Nashville

0 0

0 0

Dallas

4 1 0 .800 129

91

Phila.

3 1 0 .750 115

51

Washington

3 2 0 .600 115 122

Winnipeg

Giants

2 3 0 .400

89 108

Colorado

0 0

South

W L T Pct

PF PA

Minnesota

1 0

2 0

Atlanta

4 1 0 .800 175 140

Chicago

Tampa Bay

2 3 0 .400

Pacific

New Orleans

1 3 0 .250 114 130

Edmonton

0 0

Carolina

1 4 0 .200 123 135

San Jose

0 0

North

W L T Pct

94 142

PF PA

L OT Pts GF GA

Arizona

0 0

Minnesota

5 0 01.000 119

63

Vancou.

0 0

Green Bay

3 1 0 .750

83

Calgary

1 0

Detroit

2 3 0 .400 119 125

Anaheim

1 0

Chicago

1 4 0 .200

85 126

L.A.

1 0

W L T Pct

PF PA

NOTE: Two points for a win, one


point for overtime loss.

West

98

Seattle

3 1 0 .750

79

Los Angeles

3 2 0 .600

82 106

Arizona

2 3 0 .400 125 101

San Fran.

1 4 0 .200 111 140

SUNDAY

bi bb so avg.
0 0 1 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .500
0 0 1 .500
0 1 3 .000
0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 .250
0 0 2 .500
0 1 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 1 .000
0 2 12
bi bb so avg.
0 0 0 .250
0 1 1 .000
2 0 1 .500
0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 2 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 1 .000
2 1 6
0000 7 0
00x2 6 0

Atlantic

74

Toronto
ab
Carrera lf
3
Upton ph-lf
1
Donaldson 3b
4
Encarnacion 1b 4
Bautista rf
3
Martin c
4
Tulowitzki ss
4
Saunders dh
4
Pillar cf
3
Travis 2b
2
Goins 2b
0
Barney ph-2b
1
Totals
33
Cleveland
ab
Santana dh
4
Kipnis 2b
3
Lindor ss
4
Napoli 1b
3
Ramirez 3b
3
Chisenhall rf
3
Crisp lf
1
Davis lf
0
Naquin cf
3
Martinez cf
0
Perez c
3
Totals
27
Toronto
000
Cleveland
000

h
0
0
2
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
7
h
1
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
6
000
002

EASTERN CONFERENCE
PF PA

4 1 0 .800 114

THURSDAY

r
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
r
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

W L T Pct

N. England

INDIANS 2, BLUE JAYS 0

P R O FO OT B A L L

Oakland Raiders running back Latavius Murray will


miss his second consecutive game because of a toe injury,
the team said, leaving the rookies DeAndre Washington
and Jalen Richard to split a majority of carries against Kansas City on Sunday.
OTHER INJURY NEWS Jets cornerback Darrelle Revis gave his
hamstring a workout and came away feeling good about his
chances of playing Monday night at Arizona. He returned
to practice for the first time since injuring a hamstring two
weeks ago. Another N.F.L. star expected to start on Sunday: Cam Newton. Panthers Coach Ron Rivera said Newton would play against the New Orleans Saints barring a
setback in his recovery from a concussion.

East

PRO HOCKEY
N.H.L. STANDINGS

54

San Diego 21, Denver 13


Cincinnati at New England, 1
Pittsburgh at Miami, 1
Philadelphia at Washington, 1
Baltimore at Giants, 1
Jacksonville at Chicago, 1
Carolina at New Orleans, 1
Los Angeles at Detroit, 1
San Francisco at Buffalo, 1
Cleveland at Tennessee, 1
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:25
Dallas at Green Bay, 4:25
Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30
Open: Tampa Bay, Minnesota

MONDAY

Jets at Arizona, 8:30

N.F.L. CALENDAR
Oct. 18-19 Fall owners meeting, Houston.
Nov. 1 Trading deadline, 4 p.m. EST.
Jan. 1 Regular season ends.
Jan. 7-8 Wild-card playoff games.
Jan. 14-15 Division playoff games.
Jan. 21-22 Conference championships.
Jan. 29 Pro Bowl, Orlando, Florida.
Feb. 5 Super Bowl, Houston.

THURSDAY

Montreal 4, Buffalo 1
Rangers 5, Islanders 3
Boston 6, Columbus 3
Florida 2, Devils 1, OT
Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 4
Winnipeg 5, Carolina 4, OT
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2, SO
St. Louis 3, Minnesota 2
Dallas 4, Anaheim 2

FRIDAY

Nashville 3, Chicago 2
Edmonton at Calgary
Philadelphia at Los Angeles

SATURDAY

Anaheim at Pittsburgh, 7
Detroit at Florida, 7
Boston at Toronto, 7
San Jose at Columbus, 7
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 7
Devils at Tampa Bay, 7
Montreal at Ottawa, 7
Islanders at Washington, 7
Rangers at St. Louis, 8
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30
Dallas at Colorado, 9
Philadelphia at Arizona, 9
Calgary at Vancouver, 10

SUNDAY

Anaheim at Islanders, 6
Buffalo at Edmonton, 7
Carolina at Vancouver, 10

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
A.P. TOP 25 SCHEDULE
All Times EDT
Saturday
No. 1 Alabama at No. 9 Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State at No. 8 Wisconsin, 8 p.m.
No. 3 Clemson vs. NC State, Noon
No. 10 Nebraska at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
No. 11 Baylor vs. Kansas, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Mississippi at No. 22 Arkansas, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Houston vs. Tulsa, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Florida State vs. Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Boise State vs. Colorado State,
10:15 p.m.
No. 16 Miami vs. North Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Virginia Tech at Syracuse, 3:45 p.m.
No. 18 Florida vs. Missouri, 4 p.m.
No. 19 Oklahoma vs. Kansas State, Noon
No. 20 West Virginia at Texas Tech, Noon
No. 21 Utah at Oregon State, 4 p.m.
No. 24 Western Michigan at Akron, 3:30 p.m.

TENNIS
SHANGHAI ROLEX MASTERS
Friday
At Qizhong Tennis Center
Shanghai
Singles
Quarterfinals
Roberto Bautista Agut (15), Spain, d. JoWilfried Tsonga (9), France, 6-3, 6-4. Novak
Djokovic (1), Serbia, d. Mischa Zverev,
Germany, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Andy Murray
(2), Britain, d. David Goffin (11), Belgium,
6-2, 6-2. Gilles Simon, France, d. Jack
Sock, United States, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Doubles
Quarterfinals
Marin Cilic and Mate Pavic, Croatia,
d. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, and Marcel
Granollers, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Henri
Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers,
Australia, d. Jamie Murray, Britain, and
Bruno Soares (1), Brazil, 6-3, 7-6 (4).

WTA TIANJIN OPEN


Friday
At Tianjin Tennis Centre
Tianjin, China
Singles
Quarterfinals
Danka Kovinic, Montenegro, d. Monica
Puig (5), Puerto Rico, 6-4, 6-3. Alison
Riske, United States, d. Han Xinyun,
China, 6-3, 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova (2),
Russia, d. Naomi Osaka, Japan, 2-6, 6-4,
7-6 (3).
Doubles
Semifinals
Christina
McHale,
United
States,
and Peng Shuai (4), China, d. Lara
Arruabarrena,
Spain,
and
Oksana
Kalashnikova (2), Georgia, 6-3, 3-6, 10-5.

GENERALI LADIES LINZ


Friday
At Intersport Arena Linz
Linz, Austria
Singles
Quarterfinals
Carla Suarez Navarro (4), Spain, d.
Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 4-6,
6-2. Madison Keys (3), United States, d.
Oceane Dodin, France, 6-3, 6-3. Dominika
Cibulkova (2), Slovakia, d. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova (5), Russia, 7-6 (3), 6-4.
Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, d. Garbine
Muguruza (1), Spain, 5-7, 6-3, 4-4 retired.
Doubles
Semifinals
Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, and Johanna
Larsson (2), Sweden d. Demi Schuurs,
Netherlands, and Renata Voracova (4),
Czech Republic, 5-7, 6-3, 10-7.

HONG KONG OPEN


Friday
At Victoria Park Tennis Stadium
Hong Kong
Singles
Quarterfinals
Daria Gavrilova (8), Australia, d. Angelique
Kerber (1), Germany, 6-3, 6-1. Caroline
Wozniacki (5), Denmark, d. Wang Qiang,
China, 6-3, 7-5. Jelena Jankovic (7),
Serbia, d. Alize Cornet, France, 3-6, 6-4,
6-2. Kristina Mladenovic, France, d.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 3-6,
6-3, 7-6 (3).
Doubles
First Round
Quarterfinals
Naomi Broady and Heather Watson,
Britain, d. Liu Chang and Lu Jia-jing, China,
6-2, 7-5.
Semifinals
Chan Hao-ching and Chan Yung-jan (1),
Taiwan, d. Shuko Aoyama and Makoto
Ninomiya (4), Japan, 6-2, 7-6 (7).

GOLF
SAFEWAY OPEN
Friday
At Silverado Resort, North Course
Napa, Calif.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,166; Par: 72
Partial Second Round
Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-70136
J.J. Spaun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-67137
Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-69138
Tag Ridings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70138
Mackenzie Hughes. . . . . . . . . . 69-69138
Emiliano Grillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-70139
Peter Malnati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-72139
Tony Finau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-69139
Chez Reavie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-70139
Brandon Hagy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-67139
Jon Curran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-72140
Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69140
J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-72140
John Senden. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70140
Cameron Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70140
Kevin Tway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69140
Steven Alker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69140
Whee Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-71140
Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70141
Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-72141
Morgan Hoffmann . . . . . . . . . . 70-71141
Jamie Lovemark. . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71141
Chad Campbell . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71141
Hudson Swafford . . . . . . . . . . . 67-74141
Andres Gonzales . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70141
Brett Drewitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71141
Nicholas Lindheim . . . . . . . . . . 72-69141
Ryan Brehm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-68141
Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71142
James Hahn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71142
Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . . . . 69-73142
Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70142
Adam Hadwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-69142
Jonas Blixt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72142
Cheng Tsung Pan . . . . . . . . . . 70-72142
Russell Henley . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-73142
Bryce Molder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70142
Patrick Rodgers . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-75143
Brett Stegmaier . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-73143
Cameron Tringale. . . . . . . . . . . 69-74143
Julian Etulain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-75143
Kelly Kraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-71143
Collin Morikawa . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-69143

-8
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KEB-HANA BANK
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday
At Sky 72 GC (Ocean Course)
Incheon, South Korea
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,364; Par: 72
(a-amateur)
Second Round
Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-65134 -10
Alison Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65-70135 -9
Cristie Kerr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-65137 -7
Sung Hyun Park. . . . . . . . . . . . 72-65137 -7
In-Kyung Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70138 -6
Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70138 -6
Min-Sun Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-67139 -5
Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-69139 -5
Carlota Ciganda. . . . . . . . . . . . 69-70139 -5
Eun-Hee Ji. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-70139 -5
Minjee Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-70139 -5
Jeong Min Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-71139 -5
a-Eun Jeong Seong . . . . . . . . . 74-66140 -4
Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70140 -4
Haru Nomura. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-71140 -4
Ha Na Jang. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70141 -3
Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-73141 -3
Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-69142 -2
Min-Young Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-69142 -2
Amy Yang. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71142 -2
Jin Young Ko. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71142 -2
Jodi Ewart Shadoff. . . . . . . . . . 71-71142 -2
Seon Woo Bae . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72142 -2

BRITISH MASTERS
Friday
At The Grove
Chandlers Cross, England
Purse: $3.68 million
Yardage: 7,121; Par: 71
Second Round
Richard Bland, England . . . .
Alex Noren, Sweden . . . . . .
Andrew Johnston, England . .
Anthony Wall, England . . . . .
Tommy Fleetwood, England .
Scott Jamieson, Scotland . . .
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria . .
Chris Wood, England . . . . . .
Tyrrell Hatton, England . . . .
Richard Sterne, South Africa .
Marc Warren, Scotland . . . .
Peter Hanson, Sweden . . . .
Lee Westwood, England. . . .
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium . .
Graeme McDowell, N.Ireland .
Alexander Levy, France . . . .
Americans
David Lipsky . . . . . . . . . . .
Paul Peterson . . . . . . . . . .

.
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67-64131
67-65132
67-65132
68-65133
66-67133
68-65133
68-66134
68-66134
68-66134
66-68134
66-69135
70-65135
67-68135
69-67136
68-68136
70-66136

. 72-69141
. 71-75146

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

D5

PRO FOOTBALL

Kaepernick Takes $14 Million, and All of the 49ers Risk


From First Sports Page
receive $60 million over the next
four years, even if he is injured
or cut from the team.
But when you read about a
football players contract, the
numbers dont necessarily reflect reality. For years, the typical football contract allowed a
team to cut a player who got
hurt (or didnt play up to par)
and not pay him anything beyond the season in which he was
injured even if his contract
was for several years. The situation has improved markedly,
with many players now receiving signing bonuses and some
guaranteed money, but a football
contract that is entirely guaranteed is still the exception, not the
rule.
Kaepernicks contracts have
been typical. As a second-round
draft choice in 2011, he signed
what was described as a fouryear, $5.1 million deal. Of that,
however, only $3.8 million was
guaranteed, including a $2.2
million signing bonus. So if he
had flamed out or gotten hurt,
the 49ers would have been out
only $3.8 million rather than the
$5.1 million the contract suggested.
Three years later, after having
led the 49ers to a Super Bowl in
the 2012 season and the N.F.C.
championship game in the 2013
season, Kaepernick signed a
new deal with the team that was
reported to be worth as much as
$126 million over six years. It
included what was described as
a record $61 million in guaranteed money.
In fact, the deal was terribly
lopsided in the 49ers favor.
Although Kaepernicks annual
salary was in the range of what
top quarterbacks were getting
he was guaranteed almost $13
million in 2014 there was
clause after clause that benefited
the team. Most marquee players
have contracts calling for the
team to pay for a disability policy in case of a career-ending
injury; Kaepernicks contract
called for him to pony up for a
$20 million policy that would be
paid to the 49ers. If Kaepernick
didnt suit up for a game, it
would cost him $250,000 far
more than most other players.
There was an annual $2 million
salary de-escalator unless he
was named to the All-Pro first or
second team or won the N.F.C.
title game. And on and on.
And that $61 million in guaranteed money? It was a mirage.
Much of that money was tied to
an injury guarantee clause; it
said that if Kaepernick was
seriously injured in one season,
and remained injured as of April
Email: nocera@nytimes.com
Twitter: @NoceraNYT

A rare injury
guarantee in the
N.F.L. is wiped out.

DOUG MILLS/THE NEW YORK TIMES

Colin Kaepernick, who led his team to a Super Bowl appearance in 2013, negotiated a $61 million contract guarantee in 2014.
1 the next year, he would have to
be paid his entire salary for that
second year. That was certainly
more protection than players had
gotten in the past, but it was
hardly a $61 million guarantee.
Why, you might be wondering,
dont football players have the
kind of financial protection
against injury that baseball and
basketball players have? The
simple answer is that the owners
are fiercely opposed to it. Serious
injuries are far more common in
football than in baseball and
basketball. Paying players who
are hurt for more than one season would be expensive. In addi-

tion, the N.F.L. operates under a


hard salary cap. Using part of
the cap to pay injured players
would make it difficult to field a
roster of talented players.
And while marquee players
operate from a position of
strength, the average player
doesnt have much leverage. The
typical length of an N.F.L. career
is less than four years, and most
football players are surprisingly
fungible. So few of them are
willing to hold out for contract
guarantees. They know what
happened in 1987 when the
players went on strike only to
see the owners hire replacement

players and break the strike in


less than a month. More than
athletes in other sports, football
players fear for their jobs. And
the owners know it.
Which brings us back to
Kaepernick. Observers of the
49ers will tell you that by the
time he was benched in November 2015, the relationship between Kaepernick and the teams
management had soured.
Kaepernick felt he was being
blamed for the teams decline
even though the coach who had
transformed the team, Jim Harbaugh, had departed and the
talent surrounding Kaepernick

wasnt nearly what it had been


just a few years earlier. The front
office felt that his skills had
declined so much he was the
leagues 30th-ranked passer
that he no longer merited an elite
quarterbacks pay.
In late November, Kaepernick
had shoulder surgery (which,
because of his contract, cost him
money because he was no longer
suiting up for games). Two
months later, he had operations
on a thumb and a knee. And a
month after that, he demanded a
trade.
The 49ers shopped him
around, and though a few teams

were interested, they all wanted


Kaepernick to take a pay cut,
which he refused to do.
As the trade possibilities
faded, speculation grew in the
San Francisco news media that
the team would cut him. But the
49ers couldnt cut Kaepernick.
Before April 1, he was still recovering from football-related injuries, and under the collective
bargaining agreement, teams
cant cut players in that situation.
And if they had cut him after
April 1, they would have had to
pay him his full 2016 salary.
So he remained part of the
roster for 2016, and his injury
guarantee kicked in for 2017.
That meant that if Kaepernick
sustained a serious enough injury during the 2016 season, he
would be due his entire 2017
salary, which amounted to $14.5
million. The prospect of spending
that money on a player the team
no longer wanted could not have
been pleasant for the 49ers front
office to contemplate.
Kelly, the coach, asserts that
no one in the front office ever
said anything about the financial
ramifications of playing Kaepernick. But thats hard to believe.
Entering Sunday, Kaepernick
had been on the field for only
three plays, all of them handoffs
to a running back. And this week,
in anticipation of his start
against the Bills on Sunday, the
49ers and Kaepernick agreed to
a contract restructuring.
Under the new terms, he will
earn about $14 million in 2016,
and he has an option to remain
with the team in 2017. But the
remaining years of his old contract will be erased and, most
important to the 49ers, so will his
injury guarantee. Thus, if
Kaepernick sustains a serious
injury this season, the team will
no longer be on the hook for his
$14.5 million salary in 2017.
Some contend this is a win-win
for the team and the player. But
its not. Kaepernick agreed to the
deal because he wants to play
and wants to show other teams
that he still has the goods. He
hopes to score big in free agency
after this season is over.
But Kaepernick is the one
taking all the risk including
the risk of serious injury while
the 49ers have managed to eliminate their own financial risk and
move it onto the player.
Which is exactly the way they
like to do it in the N.F.L.

C YC L I N G

In Trying to Rise Above Doping, a British Team Lands in an Ethics Quagmire


By IAN AUSTEN

When Britains Team Sky made


its debut in 2010, two things dominated its agenda. It planned to develop a British Tour de France
winner within five years and to do
so with a zero-tolerance approach
to doping.
Under Dave Brailsford, its chief
executive, Skys roster excluded
cyclists and staff members who
had any past involvement in doping. He swiftly purged anyone on
his payroll who became the subject of doping allegations.
The team reached its first objective ahead of expectations when
Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de
France in 2012. With Chris
Froome, a Kenyan-born Briton, as
its leader, Team Sky went on to
win three of the past four editions
of cyclings largest event. Sky
transformed Britain from being
almost a nonentity in professional
road cycling into a world dominator.
In a sport repeatedly tainted by
artificial performance enhancement, that record inevitably led to
raised eyebrows and unproven
suspicions.
But as cyclings world championships wind up this weekend in
Doha, Qatar, a dark cloud has descended over both Wigginss career and Skys sometimes selfrighteous claims of doping purity.
No one is suggesting that Wiggins
or the team broke any antidoping
rules. But the release of Wigginss
World Anti-Doping Agency files
by Russian hackers has prompted
several prominent members of
the professional cycling community to suggest that Sky is, at the
least, pushing to the limits of
where the rules kick in. It also has
become clear that Sky uses
WADAs exemption system for
therapeutic drug use in a way
many other cycling teams long
ago rejected because of ethical
concerns.
With Sky, its either intentional
malevolence, or the other possibility is that they werent fully aware
of what that action meant because

they effectively eliminated anyone with any doping experience in


their employment base, said Jonathan Vaughters, a former rider
who confessed to doping and who
is the chief executive of the United
States-based Cannondale-Drapac
cycling team.
The critics even include some
members of Team Sky.
You can do whatever you want
against Wiggins, but unfortunately, as far as ethically, its
wrong he is within the rules,
Nicolas Roche, an Irish cyclist
who is switching teams for next
season, told Cyclingnews at the
world championships. It is wrong
that these rules are like that.
Thats where the main problem
is.
The drug at the center of the
controversy, triamcinolone acetonide, when used without permission is an old-fashioned sort of
performance enhancer. Unlike
many modern forms of doping, including the blood booster erythropoietin, or EPO, and human
growth hormone, it is easily detected in tests.
Triamcinolone belongs to a
group of hormones known as
corticosteroids. Its powerful antiinflammatory effects are useful
for cheating in a sport like cycling
in which riders can spend hours
racing every day for three weeks.
It also reduces body weight, another attraction in a sport in which
top riders obsess over leanness.
While Froome has chalked up
more Tour wins, Wiggins is by far
the biggest cycling star in cyclingmad Britain. In a clean-cut sport
in which most riders adopt an almost monastic approach to life,
Wiggins has reveled in publicly
savoring
cocktails,
sporting
beards with varying degrees of
stylish unkemptness and offering
opinions that could make publicrelations handlers cringe.
The hacked WADA records indicate that from 2011 to 2013, Wiggins was given a permit for medically required use of triamcinolone. The therapeutic-use exemption that has been the subject of

PRESS ASSOCIATION, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

Team Skys Chris Froome, left, and Bradley Wiggins at the 2012 Tour de France, which was won
by Wiggins. Wiggins had a therapeutic-use exemption for a drug that can boost performance.
the most scrutiny came before he
won the Tour in 2012.
Separately, the agency U.K.
Anti-Doping started an investigation after The Daily Mail reported
that an official from British Cycling, the governing body that
Brailsford once led, flew to Switzerland and then drove two hours
to France to deliver a package for
Wiggins in 2011. The next day, Wiggins secured the overall victory in
the Critrium du Dauphin, an Alpine stage race. British Cycling
has confirmed that the package
contained medical supplies but,
along with Sky, declined further
comment, citing the investigation.
Brailsford did not respond to a
request for comment, nor did Wigginss agent. Brailsford and Wiggins, however, have given extensive interviews with some British
news media outlets about the tri-

amcinolone permits.
In them, Wiggins said that he
suffers so badly from asthma and
hay fever that antihistamines, the
conventional allergy treatment,
did not bring him relief. According
to Wiggins, a specialist doctor recommended by the teams medical
staff said that intermuscular injections of triamcinolone would
end his symptoms.
One thing I would constantly
have is a blocked nose, Wiggins
told The Guardian. People would
say, Have you got a cold, youre
not ill, are you? No, Ive got hay
fever, allergies. It was just a constant thing.
Speaking with the BBC, Brailsford repeatedly said that the treatment was recommended by a specialist and then reviewed, and approved, by the International Cycling Union.

I trust and believe in that integrity of the process, Brailsford


said, adding: But lets get back to
the fact that it wasnt being used to
enhance performance. This was a
recognized treatment.
But teams, including Cannondale-Drapac, which belong to the
Movement for a Credible Cycling,
a group founded in 2007, take a
much different approach to
corticosteroids, including triamcinolone.
In the interests of the riders
health and to prevent the treatment from providing a performance enhancement, Roger Legeay, the groups president, said
that all riders on teams in the organization
who
received
corticosteroids were then suspended from racing for a
minimum of eight days. After that
time, they are given a blood test. If

it shows the riders cortisone


levels are below normal a side
effect of corticosteroids the suspensions are extended.
Through the cycling union, Legeays group has been pushing for a
ban on therapeutic exemption
permits for any corticosteroid
use.
Because this is such a good
way to improve performance, we
have to be very suspicious about
that gray area, said Legeay, who,
when he led a now-defunct French
team, once employed Wiggins as a
rider. It is necessary to have a
very clear rule, it is necessary for
the credibility of sport.
Vaughters, whose riders have
not had any therapeutic exemptions this season, said that the
groups rule eliminates the possibility of turning an illness into a
sanctioned way to enhance performance through inappropriate
treatment.
With all weve been going
through in cycling, its just easier
for us to tell the guy, Youre sick,
take the medicine, youre not going to race for two or three
weeks.
Ben Wright, a spokesman for
Team Sky, said that the team has
made changes and, among other
things, now requires two team
doctors to approve any application for a therapeutic exemption.
To date, Sky has received 13 of the
permits.
Brailsford, he added, hopes to
develop a system that will allow
the team to publicize its applications. But getting there will require riders to waive medical privacy rights.
As for Wiggins, while he has
vigorously defended his treatment and denied that it boasted
his performance, he did acknowledge that others might not view it
as ethical, whatever its legality.
Straight off, the way cycling is
today, yes, yes, he told The
Guardian. Because it doesnt
take much in cycling in this day
and age now because of whats
gone before. So I understand
that.

D6

THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

SOCCER

U.S. Hopes for Hosting


The World Cup in 2026
Get a Boost From FIFA
By ANDREW DAS

FIFAs governing council voted


on Friday to bar countries in Europe and Asia, which will host the
next two World Cups, from bidding to host the tournament in
2026. The decision significantly
increases the chances that the
event will take place in the United
States, either as the sole bidder or
in partnership with a neighbor
such as Mexico or Canada.
The change to the bidding
process a proposal to make the
host confederations of the 2018

Europe and Asia are


out because they are
the next two hosts.
and 2022 World Cups ineligible to
bid for the 2026 event was
among several approved Friday
in a meeting of the FIFA Council in
Zurich.
Russia will host the next tournament in Europe in two years,
and Qatar will carry Asias flag in
2022, so their confederations,
UEFA and the Asian Football Confederation, are already out of the
bidding for 2026. That is bad news
for England, which last hosted in
1966 and was bitterly disappointed to lose out to Russia for
2018, and for China, which is eager
to host its first World Cup.
But it was great news for Concacaf, which governs the game in
North and Central America and
the Caribbean. In an interview af-

ter the FIFA Councils session, the


president of U.S. Soccer, Sunil Gulati, feigned surprise when he was
asked if the decision was good
news for his confederation.
Oh, I hadnt noticed that, he
said with a grin. Perhaps.
The World Cup could look very
different in 2026. Led by its new
president, Gianni Infantino, FIFA
is considering expanding the tournament to 40 teams, or even 48,
for 2026, up from the current 32.
Infantino has pressed the expansion plan as a way to allow more
countries to take part in soccers
biggest event, but the plan has
drawn criticism inside the game.
FIFA said this week that a vote on
expansion would take place in
January.
The infrastructure required for
an expanded event stadiums,
hotels, transportation systems
would limit the field of host countries considerably. Brazil was
stretched to its financial and organizational limits by hosting the
2014 World Cup, and a 48-team
tournament would be an enormous challenge for any country in
FIFAs two other confederations,
Africa and Oceania.
Still, FIFA left a door open for
multiple-country bids, voting to
consider co-hosting proposals on
a case-by-case basis. UEFA has
had co-hosts for its continental
championship several times, and
it will host the 2020 European
Championship under an even
wider format, with 13 cities in 13
countries taking part.
But a joint bid among Concacaf
countries would have to overcome
significant logistical and security
concerns that did not exist the last
time the event was held in North

PHILIPP SCHMIDLI/GETTY IMAGES

Sunil Gulati, above, U.S. Soccers president, feigned surprise


when asked if the FIFA Councils decision was good news for
Concacaf, the confederation the United States belongs to. Oh, I
hadnt noticed that, he said with a grin. Gianni Infantino, left,
the president of FIFA, is considering expanding the World Cup
in 2026 as a way to allow more countries to participate.
America. The United States
hosted its only World Cup in 1994,
a 24-team tournament that, despite the events expansion to include more teams and more
games in later years, still holds
the World Cup attendance record.
Mexico has hosted twice, in 1970
and 1986. Canada hosted last
years Womens World Cup, a far

smaller tournament than the


mens version.
The vote on the 2026 World Cup
host had been scheduled for May
2017, but the corruption scandal
that rocked FIFA last year forced
a recalculation. In May, FIFA announced that a new four-phase
plan for the process would culminate in a decision in 2020.

Welsh Player Convicted of Raping a Waitress Is Acquitted in a Retrial


By JACK WILLIAMS

Ched Evans, the Welsh soccer


player whose career was derailed
by his conviction on charges of
raping a 19-year-old waitress in a
hotel, and whose consistent protestations of innocence brought
him both support and scorn, was
found not guilty Friday after a retrial of the case.
Evans, 27, has already restarted
his playing career, at Chesterfield
F.C. in English soccers third tier.
The retrial followed the British

Court of Appeals decision in April


to quash Evanss initial conviction
and refer the case to the Criminal
Cases Review Commission.
Evans spent two and a half
years in prison after he was convicted of rape in 2012 and was released in November 2014. A national debate followed about
whether Evans should be able to
return to the game before his case
was resolved.
The retrial in Cardiff followed a
well-financed campaign by Evans
and his supporters, and it re-

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DETROIT

8 p.m.

7 p.m.

8 p.m.

MSG

MSG

NBCSN

N.Y.C.F.C.

D.C. UNITED
3 P.M. SUNDAY

GIANTS

BALTIMORE
1 P.M. SUNDAY

YES
CBS

RED BULLS

COLUMBUS
3 P.M. SUNDAY

JETS

ARIZONA
8:30 P.M. MONDAY

MSG
CH.9, ESPN

ceived a great deal of attention


specifically to the offer of a reward
of 50,000 pounds (about $60,000)
to anyone who could provide information helping to bring about
an acquittal.
The waitress was named a number of times on social media and
was forced to relocate from her
home in Rhyl, Wales, before the
retrial.
Friday brought new fury from
some women after the court in the
retrial in a rare decision allowed two of the waitresss former
sexual partners to give explicit details about her sexual history in
Evanss defense.
Lisa Longstaff, a spokeswoman
for Women Against Rape, told The
Guardian: The whole way the
case has been handled trivializes
rape and puts women off reporting.
They know that if they come
forward they are going to be
trashed.
The jury deliberated for less
than three hours before deciding
unanimously to acquit Evans, who
rushed to his fiance, Natasha
Massey.
In a statement posted on his
website after the verdict, Evans
said, Whilst my innocence has
now been established, I wish to
make
it
clear
that
I
wholeheartedly apologize to anyone who might have been affected
by the events of the night in question.
A spokesman said that Evans,
who is currently injured, intended
to continue his career as a player.
A striker who played 13 times
for Wales, Evans had relatively
unheralded stints at Manchester
City, Norwich and Sheffield
United before his conviction.

BEN BIRCHALL/PRESS ASSOCIATION, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ched Evans, a Welsh soccer player, and his fiance, Natasha Massey, arrived at court on Friday.
One of the first teams to express
an interest in signing him after his
release from prison was his former employer, Sheffield United,
which in November 2014 stated
that it intended to allow Evans to
return to training. The decision
was met by a backlash from
supporters and sponsors; 150,000
people signed a petition urging
the club not to re-sign Evans, who
at that point had become a household name, and the club

Attempts at a career
restart spurred a
national debate.
eventually withdrew its offer.
Over the ensuing months, Evans continued to be linked with
teams in England and abroad, and
drew similar reactions from each
clubs fans.

Evans and his supporters


blamed teams unwillingness to
sign him on mob rule.
After failed attempts to secure
deals at Hartlepool United, Oldham Athletic and Grimsby Town
all of which currently play in
lower tiers than Evanss previous
clubs he signed a contract with
Chesterfield in June. Before his
current injury sidelined him, he
had played in seven league
games, scoring four goals.