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Characteristics of Anti-Personality

4.ANTI-SOCIALPERSONALITY
Thisis a mentally- disturbed person who is opposed to the principles upon
whichsociety
is based.
Characteristics of Anti-Personality
a)
A classic manipulator or con artist.
b)
One of the most significant characteristicsof this personality is the absence of
conscience or any guilt feeling.
c)
The person has not incorporate the moralvalues of society into his life.
d)
He is often a glib and convincing speaker andpresents himself extremely well.
e)
The anti-social personality is selfish andstrives for physical pleasure.
f)
Most of his pursuits revolves aroundmanipulating people to acquire personal gains.
g)
He is often impulsive and demands immediatelysatisfaction.
h)
He is unable to learn from past experiences.
i)
He is also a chronic liar
SEXUAL DEVIANCY
A. Definitions
Sexuality- behaviorassociated with relation between sexes and reproductive organ.
Normal Sexuality- sexualcompletion that leads to mature and adjusted individual capable
of
enteringrelationships with a member of the opposite sex which are physically andmentally
stable and satisfying heterosexual.
Abnormal Sexuality/ Sexual Deviancy- sexual behavior which seek stimulation
and
gratificationby means other than heterosexual.
B. Classification of SexualAbnormalities
1.

As to Choice of Sexual Partner

Typesof Abnormality
1.
Heterosexua
2.
Homosexual
3.
Infantisexual
4.
Bestosexual
5.
Autosexual
without
6.
Gerontophilia
7.
Necrophilia
desire
8.
Incest
2.

Characteristics
Sexualdesire towards opposite sex; socially
Andmedically acceptable
Sexual desiretowards the same sex
Sexual desiretowards an immature person
Sexual desiretowards animals
A form of selfabuse or solitary vice carried
the cooperation ofanother person
Sexualdesire with elder person
Sexualperversion characterized by erotic
or actual sexualintercourse with a corps
Sexualrelations between person who by reason of
blend relationshipcannot legally married

Asto Instinctual Sexual Urge

Types
1.
Satyriasis
2.
Nymphomania
3.
Sexual Anesthesia
sexual
4.
Dyspareunia
5.
Vaginisimus

Characteristics
Excessive sexualdesire of men to intercourse
Strongsexual feeling of a woman
Absence of sexual desire orarousal during
act in women
Painful sexual actin women
Painfulspasm of the vagina during sexual act

6.

Old Age

Weakening ofsexual feeling in the elderly

3.

Asto the Mode of Sexual Expression or Way of Sexual Satisfaction

Types
1.
Oralism( Irrumation)
sexualgratification
2.
Sado- Masochism
(Algolagnia)
3.
Fetishism
bodily

Characteristics
The use of mouth as a way of
such as Fellatio, Cunnilingus,Anilingus
Pain o cruel acts as afactor for gratification
suchas: sadism and masochism
A form of sexual perversion where in the realor
fantasized presence ofan object or
part is necessary for sexual stimulation or
gratification.
Ex. Anatomic, Clothing, Necrophilia, Odor,etc.

4.Asto the Parts of the Body


Types
1. Sodomy
2.

Uranism

3.

Frottage

4.

Pantialism

Characteristics
Sexualact through the anus of another human
being
Sexualgratification is attached by fingering,
fondling the breast,licking parts of the body, etc.
Afrom of sexual gratification characterized by the
compulsivedesire of a person to rub his sexual
organ against some parts of the body of another
Aform of sexual deviation wherein a person has
special affinity tocertain parts of the female body
5. As to Visual Stimulus

Types
1.Voyeurism
undress or
activities
2. Mixoscopia
(Scoptophilia )

Characteristics
A form of sexualperversion characterized by a
compulsionto peep to see a person
performother
Sexualperversion wherein sexual pleasure is
attached by watching a couple undress or during
Theirsex intimacies
6.As to Number

Types
1.Froilism

Characteristics
Aform of sexual perversion in which three
(3)persons are participating in

the sexual orgies


2.Pluralism
(sexual

(Suixante-neve)
Aform of sexual deviation in which a group of
personparticipate in the sexual orgies
festival)
7.Other Sexual Deviates

Types

Characteristics

1. Corpolalia

A formof sexual deviation characterized by the


needto use obscene language to

obtain orgies
2. Don Juanism
and making
women as part of his career
3. Indecent Exposure
(Exhibitionism)

Itdescribes a form of sexual deviation


characterizedby promiscuity
seductionof many
The willful exposure in public places ofones
genitalorgan in the presence of other persons
Usuallyof the opposite sex

HANDLING OF PERSONS WITH ABNORMAL ORDEVIANT BEHAVIOR


AbnormalBehavior
1. Anxiety
2. Depressed
hospital;

Hints in Handling
Reassurance
Putself on the shoes of the sufferer; place in the

Word of caution; alert of possiblesuicide


3. Obsessive-Compulsive
Understand that sufferer isdisturbed and not crazy;
refer
to appropriate facility
4. Phobia
Supportive intervention

5. Psychoses

Displayof guns, force and restraints should be avoided


Unlessthere is a manifestation of danger tolife and
thepsychotic to the hospital. If he desists,

send
be firm.
6. Psychopathy

1.Review arrest records


2.Recognize con-mans glib conversation
3.Dont bluff, he is a master of this and certainly better
than anybody
4. The best is to interview him afterknowing every detail
of the case.
5. Psychopathic can beat lie detector. He isimmune to
anxiety unless placed understress
6. Be firm and clear. Psychopath maybecharming but can
also make very angry and maymaneuver to violate
hisrights.

7. Drug- Dependent
2. Keep

1.Patience, but firm- the person is not himself


himtalking to relieve the stress; use form of
restraints.
3. Do not place in drunk tank, butappropriate hospital

8. Paranoid Behavior

1. Understanding-never give theimpression that he is


crazy.
2.Friendliness & neutrality is usually the best approach
3. Do notfurther or heightens anxieties, to provoke

anxiety is
toinvite violent reactions.

4.Assure the paranoidthat your presence is to help and protect


him.
5.Do not frighten or order the paranoid around with weapon.
Paranoidmay panic and react violently. However,not to let down guard.
Remember,paranoid is suicidal and homicidal.
CRISIS MANAGEMENT
I. INTRODUCTION
A.
Definitions
1. Crisis- Came from the GREEK word CRISIS, which means to SEPARATE. Itis a turning
point in the progress of an affair or a series of events.
2. Emergency- Came from the LATIN word EMERGENTIA, which meansDIPPING;
PLUNGING. It is a sudden condition or state of affairs calling forimmediate action.
3.
Crisis Management- An expert handling of a crisis or emergencyto reduce or
eliminate danger or damage, or the like, especially on the part ofthe government.
B.
Emergency, Crisis and Disaster Distinguished
If the situationis still controlled and the response given is for the purpose of
containing thesituation from getting out of control then it is just an EMERGENCY. If the
situationis already beyond normal control what is happening is already a CRISIS. If the
effects ofthe crises can no longer be controlled even by its author, it is now a DISASTER.
C.

Two EssentialElements of Crisis Management

1.
Incident Management- Refers to anact containing the situation within certain level
mostly by law enforcementinterventions.
2.
Consequence Management- An act focused on mitigation of adverse effects that
may be brought aboutby the incident by utilizing non-law enforcement elements such as
medical andfire services.
D.
Purpose of CrisisManagement
SALVARI VITAS (to save lives)
E.
Objectives of CrisesManagement
1.
Resolved without further incident
2.
Safety of all participants
3.
Apprehension of all participants
4.
Accomplish the task within the framework of currentcommunity standards.
F.
Theory of CrisesManagement
1.
Contain and Negotiate
2.
Protect the innocent from harm
3.
Allow passage of time so that the perpetrators canbe reasoned with through
negotiation
4.
Allow the passage of time so that the response forcecan evaluate the situation gather
information, explore alternatives andformulate a plan of action
G.
Musts in CrisesManagement
1.
Rely on continuous flow of information from allsources
2.
Press perpetrators to abandon their position
3.
Receive, analyze and disseminate all information
4.
Prepare for a rapidly escalating series of events
H.
a.
1.

Types ofCrises /Emergencies


Man-Made Crises/Emergencies
Civil Disturbance

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
3
4
5
5.1
5.2
6
7
7.1
7.2
7.3
8
9
10

Labor strikes /demonstration


Riots
Anarchy
Welga ng Bayan
Revolt
Mutiny
Insurrection
Coup d' etat
Revolution
Border Incident
War
Conventional
Nuclear
Kidnapping
Hijacking
Air
Sea
Land
Hostage-taking
Terrorists Activities
Attacks /Raids on government installations/facilities & vitalfacilities

b.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Natural Crises/Emergencies
Fire
Marine/Air Disaster
Structural Collapse
Hazardous Spills
Utilities Failure (Power, Water, telephone)
Nuclear Accidents
Food Scarcity/ Famine
Fuel Shortage
Pestilence/Epidemic
Floods
Volcanic Eruption
Earthquake
Tidal Wave
Typhoons
Drought

I. Phases of Crisis Management[Four(4) Ps]


a.
1.
2.
3.
b.
4.
a.
b.
c.
J.

Proactive Phase
Prediction
Prevention
Preparation
Reactive Phase
Performance (implementation and Contingency Plan)
Initial Action
Action (Negotiation or Tactical Action Intervention)
Post Action
Legal Regimes in Dealing withCrises

1.
Section 6, ArticleXV, 1987 Constitution- The State shall establish andmaintain one
police force, which shall be national in scope and civilian incharacter, to be administered and
controlled by a National Police Commission.The authority of local executives over the police
units in their jurisdictionshall be provided by law.
2.
Section 444 and 445,R.A. 7160 (Local Government Code)
The mayor shall act as the deputized representativeof the National Police Commission,
formulate the peace and order plan of theCity or Municipality, and upon its approval,
implement the same; and as such,exercise general and operational control and supervision
over the local policeforcers in the city or municipality.
3.

Section 5 R.A. 6975as Amended (DILG Act of 1990)


The mayors shall exerciseoperational supervision and control over PNP units in their
respectivejurisdiction except during the thirty (30) day period immediately preceding andthe
thirty (30) day following any national, local and barangay elections.
Operational supervision and Control- the power to direct, superintend, oversee and
inspect the police unitsand forces, which shall include the power to employ and deploy units
orelements of the PNP, through the station Commander, to ensure public safety andeffective
maintenance of peace and order within the locality.
4.
Executive Order No.309 s. 1987 and Executive No. 366 s. 1996
- CreatingNational Peace and order Council, Local Peace and order Council and
BarangayPeace and Order Committees respectively.
5.
Memorandum Order No.21 - The government shall exhaust all peaceful meansin
seeking a resolution to a crisis to minimize, if not, prevent the loss oflife and destruction of
property. If all peaceful means are exhausted, thegovernment shall act promptly, decisively,
and effectively, choosing from thewhole range of police and military actions appropriate to
the circumstance, orotherwise known as the 'final option".
6.
PNP Manual on Crisismanagement s. 1996
II.
HOSTAGE SITUATION
A.
Hostage SituationDefined
A hostage situation is aset of circumstances wherein a suspected law violator is
holding a personcaptive with the use of force and threat of violence while the law
enforcementofficers are in close contact with the suspect and his captive.
B.
Motives in HostageTaking
1.
In political terrorism, reasons include showing thepublic that the government is
unable to protect its own citizens.
2.
Hostage taking guarantees immediate media coverage,and after repeated hostage
incidents, it is the hope of the hostage takers thatthe government might overreact and
become excessively restrictive with its owncitizen, thus causing civil discontent and a
grassroots movement to overthrowthe government.
3.
Warring nations seek peace after exchange ofhostages a guarantee of reciprocity
4.
In urban guerrilla warfare, hostages are taken withlittle regard for law and order.
5.
Law enforcement officers will most likely encounterhostage incidents that u\involve
either criminal or the mentally-disturbed.
6.
A husband or wife may take a child hostage incustody battles.
7.
A mentally disturbed person may take hostage inorder to right what he believed to be
wrong.
8.
Whatever the initial reason for hostage taking it isclear that the motive for holding
hostages may changes.
C.
Categories ofHostage-Taker
1.
Persons in Crisis - People who take hostages during a period of prolonged
frustration,despair and problems.

2.
Psychotics - Mentally-ill people who take hostage during a period of
psychiatricdisturbance.
3.
Common Criminals - People who take hostages for personal, rather than ideological
reason.
4.
Prisoner - People who take hostages because of dissatisfaction and
discontentregarding their living condition in prison.
5.
Political Terrorist - Ideologically-inspired individuals or groups of people who
takehostages because of political and ideological beliefs.
D.
1.
2.
3.
and
E.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Priorities in HostageSituation
Preservation of Life
Apprehend hostage taker
To successfully negotiate; there must be need to live on the part of thehostage taker
a threat of force by the authorities.
Four Courses ofAction that Can be Taken in a Hostage Taking Incident
The use of chemical agents to force the hostage-taker out of position.
Direct assault on the hostage-position either deception or by uniformedentry team
The use of marksmen to shoot and main the hostage taker.
Negotiation for the release of the hostages.

F.
General OperationProcedures During Hostage Taking
1.
Under all circumstances the use of force is justifiable only by virtue ofthe "Doctrine of
SelfDefense", and Defense of Stranger; as a last resort, and when all otherpeaceful means
have been exhausted.
2.
Whenever force is resorted, only necessary and reasonable to subdue orovercome a
clear and imminent danger.
3.
In actual shootout with the suspect avoid panic firing.
4.
Ensure that no bystanders are hit. Observe extreme caution in firing aweapon in the
congested area.
5.
After the shootout check whether the suspect still poses danger or hasbeen wounded
and maimed.
6.
Use police sirens and megaphones to influence or warn offenders to stopand
peacefully give up.
7.
Use of force shall be tempered with such considerations as keeping onminds the safety
of the hostages and prevention of crossfire casualties orinjuries to third parties.
8.
Immediate removal of casualtiesfrom the scene shall be undertaken after the
necessary sketches, pictures andother investigative requirements are accomplished victims'
bodies shall besegregated from those of the suspects.
9.
Strictly respect human rights at all times.
G.
OperationalProcedures and Guidelines During Hostage Situations
1.
Safety of all participants-victims, suspects, police officers andbystanders is paramount
2.
There shall be a Crisis Management Team (CMT) in every locality trainedand ready for
deployment.
3.
There shall be only one ground Commander in the area.
4.
The incident area shall be condoned off.
5.
Assaults shall be well planned and assaulting team must be alerted fordeployment in
case negotiations failed.
6.
Negotiations shall be designated and no one shall be allowed to talk tothe suspects
without clearance from the negotiating panel or ground Commander.
7.
An ambulance with a medical crew and a firetruck shall be detailed at theincident area.

8.
Proper Coordination with all participating elements is necessary to unifyefforts in
solving the crisis.
H.
1.
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6

Tactical Proceduresto Followed in Hostage-taking Incident


Containment of theHostage Position
Stabilize the incident
Determine the exact location of the hostage-taker
Physically contain the action to the smallest area
Isolate the scene
Evacuating the adjoining areas
Blocking avenues for escape

2.
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5

Communication
By the use of telephone
By written notes
By the use of loudspeaker
By the use of bullhorn
By the use of megaphone

3.
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8

Visual and AudioSurveillance


Binoculars
Telescopes
Portable searching lights
Night vision devices
Television camera
Spike or contact microphone
Telephone
Intercoms

4.
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4

Assault Alternative
When the victims are in imminent danger of injury
When the victims are in imminent danger of death
When the hostage takes gained the control of crime or potential victims
If hostages have already been killed

I.
Important Factors tobe Considered in a Hostage Taking Incident
1.
Intelligence Gathering- It must focus on identifying the hostage takers and hostages,
determiningthe hostage-takers capabilities to resist an assault and identifying the
weaponbeing used.
2.
Motive- Determines firstwhat type of hostage-takers you are dealing with, identifying
the hostagestakers will lead to his motives.
3.
Hostage Location- The exact locationof the hostages and how they are secured.
4.
Setting- A detailedknowledge of the hostage scenes immediate vicinity. A complete
reconnaissanceof the hostage area; terrain leading to the hostages site; obstruction; areasof
concealment; viewing points; possible and/or potential escape route;location of doors,
windows and entrances; exits and fire escapes.
5.
Formulation of the Plan- In casethat assault will be opted, it must be planned to
occur at a time that permitsthe assault team members to take their position without
detection as well as tolimit the opportunity of the hostage takers to resist because when
thesurprised element is used, the hostage-takers have a reduced capability toreact violently,
escape, hide or harm the hostages.
J.
The Command Post

a. Command Post Considerations


1. Establish outer and inner perimeters
2. Safe accessible routes to responding personnel
3. Defense against snipers, mobs onlookers
4. Sufficient parking
5. Adequate staging area
6. Availability of water supplies, restrooms andtelephones
7. Accessibility to helicopters
8. Maintain communication lines
9. Notify administrators
10. Maintain command post chronological log
11. Only authorized personnel will be given access
12. Public Information Officer (PIO) to give pressbriefings
b.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Command Post Staffing


Commander
Asst. Commander
Negotiators
Emergency Services team Tactical Adviser
Radio Operator
Intelligence Officers
Investigators
Staff Psychologists
Chronographers
Communications Specialists
Liaison Personnel
Police Administrators

K.
Time-Events BarricadeMatrix
Time
Incident Matrix
-oIncident occurs
0+1
Notification
0+2
Police Response
0+5
Location (Most dangerous time
0+6
Confrontation 9firearms, discipline)
0+7
Notification (of the dispatcher & CMT)
0+8
Containment
0+9
Preparation (for the arrival of CMT)
0+10
Isolation
0+15
Evaluation
0+16
Evacuation
0+17

Segregation
0+19
Pre-Conflict Management team Actions
0+25
Actions of the Crisis Management Team
0+26
Pre-Negotiations Actions
0+30
Negotiations Begins
III. HOSTAGE NEGOTIATIONAND RECOVERY
A. Definition
NegotiationApproach is a systematic process of starting to work on a task ofnegotiating
and dealing with hostage takers, wherein the primary considerationare the arrangements of
terms and conditions between the authorities andsuspects necessary fir the release of the
hostages.
B. Principles of Hostage Negotiation and Recovery
1. Thehostage has no value to the hostage taker. His only value is a tool to get whatthe he
wants; not from the hostage but from the authorities.
2. Prioritiesin hostage situations is preservation of life and the apprehension of
hostagetaker, recover, and protect property.
3. Hostagesituation must not go violently, for the interest of the hostage, the hostagetaker
and the authorities. In any case, if it goes violent, the authoritiesmust always come out the
victor.
4. Tosuccessfully negotiate, there must be a need to live on the part of the hostagetaker
because a hostage taker who is bent of killing himself is anon-negotiable case.
C. The Crisis Negotiating Team (CNT)
Providesverbal and tactical support to the SWAT Team, responsible for controlling
abarricaded suspect or hostage situation.
ThreeKey Objectives:
1. Safetyfor all people involved
2. Saferelease or rescue of hostage
3. Apprehensionand prosecution of suspect involved
Composition
1. TeamSupervisor
2. PrimaryNegotiator
3. SecondaryNegotiator
4. Psychologist
Note:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Commander should Not Serve as Negotiator because:


HTwill have a sense of importance;
Hemay make impossible demand, knowing that he is dealing with Commander;
Conflictof Commander as negotiator and Commander; and
Asa cardinal rule, Commander dont negotiate, negotiator don't command.

D.

Hostage takers Intent and Wants

Types
Intent
Wants
1. Professional Criminal

Crime
Escape
2. Psycho Case
Attention
Varies - vindication, relief
3. Prisoners
Attention
Escape, better treatment
4. Terrorist
Attention
Political, economic leverage

E.

Handling of Specific Hostage Situation

Type of Hostage Taker


Description
Proper Handling
1. Professional Criminal
Usually the easiest to deal with considered relatively rational thinker, after assessing the
situation and weighing the odds, in most cases, come to terms with the police
Show force but refrain from unnecessary violence or useless killing.
2. Psychotic Individual
Presents different and somewhat complex problems. Tends to be irrational, and less
predictable. These actions, works and the demands he makes are valuable clue to his
mental condition. He harbors great inner conflicts and frustrations.
The hostage taker may feel a degree of pleasure form has predicament as he finds himself
important, being a center of attraction. Prolonging tome is essential that will positively work
for authorities.
3. Terrorist
A more difficult hostage situation- viewed a psychopathic with a cause, under a leader of the
group. When caught they rationalize by claiming to be revolutionaries a situation they
resolve to die for the cause.
Their causes may deteriorate in the passage of time. In any case, if they kill one of the
several hostages, the negotiators then must set to save the remaining hostages - they will
likely kill them all.
F. Immediate Actions of the Negotiator Upon Arrival at theScene of Incident
1. Containment - controlling situation and area by peopleinvolved. Other people
bystanders must be obliged to get from the areas as theymay add more problems.
2. Established Contract - Immediately after positioning atadvantage position,
communicate with the leader. He may introduce himself bysaying "My name is ___________, I
am a ___________. I am willing tohelp. Never tell him your rank; the hostage taker might think
you can giveall. So that he may ask for impossible demand. Neither, should the
negotiatorgive the feeling that he has the authority to decide. Do not bluff.
3. Time Lengthening - Give more time for the police toorganize and coordinate plan of
action.
4. Telephone Negotiation technique - Be the caller, planand prepare, be ready with
graceful exit, and discipline yourself to listen.Where a demand is impossible to get, still time

by explaining that you need totalk to other people. Hold on to your concession. But release
of sick oldpeople in exchange. When there is no demand, hostage taker may really have
nodemand at all.
5. Need to face to face - Don't be over anxious, prepare forproper psychological,
physical and emotional confrontation. Wear body armor,posses a weapon, but if ask to come
without a weapon, ensure that theyshould too should lay down arms before entering. In
entering, see to t that youre protected with tactical back-up. And consider that hostage taker
might havebody trap in some portions of the area, door or window of the building. Comingup
on face-to-face situation, maintain proper distance, observe their movement.Elicit a promise
or motivate them to surrender. In retreating, or in gettingout of the room, face hostage taker
slowly back out the door with good cover ortactical back-up.
6. Surrender Approach- starts with a positive approach; act as ifhostage taker will
surrender. Do not talk too much. Gradually ask him tosurrender. Reassurance is the wisest
thing to do. Talk details of surrenderprocess. And explain why not is better than later.
Advantage ofTelephone Negotiations
1. Easierto say No
2. Easierto conclude the conversation
3. Conversationis quicker
4. Importantitems are more easily committed
5. Callerhas the advantage
G. Hostage Takers' Demands
Demands of Hostage Takers
1.
Negotiable
a. Food
b. Cigarettes
c. Drinks
d. Alcohol
e. Transportation
f. MediaCoverage
g. Freedom
2. Not Negotiable
a. Weapons/Ammunition
b. Drugs
c. Release of prisoners
d. Exchange of hostages
Handling Demands
1. Avoidasking for demands
2. Avoidoffering anything
3. Donot give anything not specifically asked for and should not give more thanabsolutely
necessary to fulfill the agreement
4. Nevergive anything without getting something in return
5. Avoiddismissing any demand as trivial
6. Ignoredeadlines and do not set deadlines for the incident resolution
7. Negotiatefirst for the sick or injured hostages
8. Monitorthe types of demands
9. Assesthe personality type of the hostage taker based on the types of the demandsmade
10. Delay,impress hostage taker even simple demands are hand to get; that you need totalk
with commander or other people etc.
H.Effects of Time in the Negotiation
a. Positive Effect of Time

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

1. Hostage taker will wear downemotionally/psychologically


Hostagetaker have more demand for food and water
Anxietyreduces; hostage taker will be given a chance to organize his true self.
Hostagetaker's rationally increase
Hostage taker-negotiator relationships getimprove
Hostagetaker's demand may be reduces
Stockholm Syndrome may develop

b.Negative Effect of Time


Exhaustion and boredom may havecreeping effects on both hostage takers and
authorities; for hostage takers mayeventually commit suicide or may forget all demands
altogether.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

I.On Life and Death Negotiation


Keepin mind that in one H.T., show of force may be unnecessary
Speakfirmly but nit in threatening manner
Donot be overfriendly, it may be interpreted as weakness
HTshould not be driven to desperation (give hope, security etc.)
Showof force in necessary if there are several hostage taker (HT)

J. Failure of Negotiation ( or Situation Permits)


1. Final move must be made swiftly withoutlooking back
2. Any assault must proceed with skill andprofessionalism, when:
a. HTbegins executing hostages
b. HTthrows out first body
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

K.Concluding a Hostage Incident


Removeperpetrators as quickly as possible
Secure the Scene
Brief Media
Collect Evidence
Assemble involved personnel
Retrieve equipment
Identify all property damaged

8. Identify critique data and handledebriefing