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Smart Antenna Technologies

Research at NPL
Tian Hong Loh

National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, UK

Smart
Antennas

Overview
Smart
Antennas

Overview
Smart Antennas Overview

Issues
intelecommunications
telecommunications
(Cont.)
!!! Issues
(Cont.)
Issuesinin
telecommunications
(Cont.)
Multipath
Distortion
(signals
bounce
off various
objects
Multipath
(signals
bounce
offvarious
various
objects
MultipathDistortion
Distortion
(signals
bounce
off
objects
and
reach
their
intended
target
out
of phase
because
they've
travelled
and
their
intended
target
outof
ofphase
phase
because
they've
travelled
andreach
reach
their
intended
target
out
because
they've
travelled
Issues
in
telecommunications
(Cont.)
more
than
one
path)
more
one
path)
morethan
than
one
path)
Multipath Distortion (signals bounce off various objects and reach their intended target out of phase because theyve
Power
consumption
travelled
consumption
more
than one path)
Power
Power
consumption

Smart Antennas Overview

! Issues in telecommunications

Issues in telecommunications
Limited
Limited spectrum

spectrum

Power consumption

Smart Antennas Overview

! Current Applications

Smart Antennas Overview

! What is Smart Antennas?

They can adjust their radiation patterns adaptively, thus they can:
Improve
capacity
of wirelesscommunication
network significantly
Smart
Antennas
Overview
They
can adjust their radiation patterns adaptively, thus
What
is
a
smart
antenna?
! Whatthe
is Smart
Antennas?
they can:
Increase
spectrum
efficiency
They consist of:
They can adjust their radiation patterns adaptively,
thus they
can: of wireless communication network
Improve
capacity
Phase controlled
arrays
Reduce
the
transmit
power or coverage extension
signifisignificantly
cantly
Improve capacity of wireless communication network
Adaptive Beamforming Algorithms

Increase the spectrum efficiency


Increase the spectrum efficiency
Reduce the transmit power or coverage extension
Reduce the transmit power or coverage extension

Base station
WiFi
W-LAN
WSN
GPS Smart Antennas
Current Applications
RFID! Current Applications

Base station
WiFi
W-LAN
WSN
GPS
RFID

Smart antenna connected to


Overview
a Notebook by ASCOM AR&T

Base station
WiFi
W-LAN
WSN
GPS
RFID

Smart antenna connected to


a Notebook by ASCOM AR&T

Smart WiFi antenna technologies


by Matek business media Ltd.

Smart WiFi antenna technologies


by Matek business media Ltd.

RF MEMS switch smart antenna modules


by Sofant Technologies Ltd.

RF MEMS switch smart antenna modules


by Sofant Technologies Ltd.

Research drive:

Smart Antenna for WSN application


by University of Trento

Smart Antenna for WSN application


by University of Trento

GPS Smart antenna modules by LOCOSYS Ltd.

Cost, Spectrum efficiency, Network capacity, Size,

Research drive: Cost, Spectrum efficiency, Network capacity, Size, Weight,


Weight, Power consumption, measurement cost
Power consumption, measurement cost

GPS Smart antenna modules by LOCOSYS Ltd.

Research drive: Cost, Spectrum efficiency, Network capacity, Size, Weight,


Power consumption, measurement cost

Smart Antennas Highlights

Smart Antennas Measurement Methogologies


Smart Antennas Measurement Methogologies

Smart Antennas Highlights

3 files IPs; 5 Granted Patents; 8


9 Journals (1 invited); 9 Conferences (1 best paper)

Main beam pointing loss: Required Link Margin (RLM):


Desired Signal Direction

RLM

Smart Antenna applied to wireless communication network


Smart Antenna

>x3

Monopole Antenna

D7: Smart Antenna Design Study For Imaging Radar Fuzing


Beam steering at low cost for enhanced lethality
Monopole Antenna with 8 dBm AWGN

A Low Cost Steerable Antenna For Military Applications

Research Headline

Assess NPLs novel steerable antenna technology for exploitation in


Gantry arm positioning system
missile proximity fuzing - VT1 & MICA

Smart Antenna no Broken


communication link!

Friday, 29 April 16

Smart Antenna with 15 dBm AWGN


(i.e. x 5 more noisy)

Ability to combat
environmental
RF Noise

Missile class addressed


Main findings
The technology appears very low cost and small enough to be
Target requirements defined for integrating the smart antenna
exploitable across a host of military applications
All including a Radar or Dual
technology into the VT1 and MICA proximity fuzes. Detailed antenna
Electronically beam-Steerable
- Imaging fuzing - e.g. next generation VT1, MICA, LMM, CAMM
Parasitic Array Radiator (ESPAR)
Mode Proximity Fuze, e.g.
studies and mechanical modelling to assess the feasibility of meeting
Radar Proximity Fuze uses antennas to
VT1
- VT1
transmit and receive conical beams of
these
targetfi
requirements.
MICA
Main
ndings Trade studies to understand associated
RF radiation
- MICA
addressed
cost,
performance and Size, Weight And Power (SWAP) aspects. Missile class
Target requirements defined for integrating the smart
- LMM
andMode
CAMM
updates
All including a Radar
or Dual
Proximity
Fuze,
Description
antenna
technology
into
the
VT1
and
MICA
proximity
fuzes.
Desired Antenna Beam Patterns
Partners & Core Competencies
e.g.
Design Study For Imaging Radar Fuzing
Detailed
antenna
studies
and
mechanical
modelling
to
assess
The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has low-cost, low-D7: Smart Antenna
Simplified
Target
Requirements
Beam steering at low
cost
for
enhanced lethality
NPL Detailed antenna concept design and evaluation
VT1

the feasibility of meeting these target requirements. Trade


power, light-weight, compact, Electronically beam-Steerable

Thales (Fr) Integration studies for VT1 and MICA fuze exemplars MICA

studies to understand associated cost, performance and Size,


Parasitic Array Radiator (ESPAR) smart antenna technology

Thales (UK) Systems design support


LMM and CAMM updates

Weight And Power (SWAP) aspects.


that could provide significant benefits over competing

Exploitation Path

An example application project

Monostatic (i..e single Tx/Rx port)


Beam Width In Tilt: ~20 or better
Forward Tilt Angle:: ~30

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has low-cost,


low-power, light-weight, compact, Electronically
beam-Steerable Parasitic Array Radiator (ESPAR)
smart antenna technology that could provide
significant benefits over competing antenna
technologies for weapon applications.

Sidelobes: Low

Large increments for replacement of existing antennas


Relatively small increments for imaging application

Key goal is to understand overall trade space

What can the technology offer for missile application?

Next generation radar and dual mode proximity fuzes

The benefits offered

The market
Next generation radar and dual mode proximity fuzes
The benefits offered
Beam steering at very low cost
Cross cuts variety of weapon groups
Improved system performance

Beam steering at very low cost


Cross cuts variety of weapon groups
The competitive advantage
Improved system performance

NPLS ESPAR antenna technology

Small size allows exploitation across a host of military


applications
Imaging fuzing giving enhanced lethality at lower system
cost for next generation VT1, MICA, LMM, CAMM

Thaless MICA Fuze

Objective of Research / Need


Objective of Research / Need

Small size allows exploitation across a host of military


applications
Imaging fuzing giving enhanced lethality at lower system
cost for next generation VT1, MICA, LMM, CAMM

The competitive advantage

Thaless VT1 Fuze

Using VT1 and MICA as exemplars, understand

feasibility
integrating
ESPAR smart antenna
Using VT1
andofMICA
as the
exemplars,
understand
technology into missile fuzing applications, and
associated
cost, performance
Size, Weight
& antenna
feasibility
of integrating
theand
ESPAR
smart
Power (SWAP) improvements
technology into missile fuzing applications, and
associated cost, performance and Size, Weight &
Power (SWAP) improvements

Partners & Core Competencies


NPL Detailed antenna concept design and evaluation
Thales (Fr) Integration studies for VT1 and MICA fuze
exemplars
Next
steps
The
next (UK)
steps Systems
(potentially
under
MCM ITP Task 10) would be to build
Thales
design
support
and test exemplar antenna hardware, to confirm performance and
physical characteristics identified under the current Task 8 research.
Next
stepsto also assess the capabilities of the smart
It would
be valuable
The next
steps (potentially
under MCM ITP
Task 10)
would be to build and
antenna
hardware
in wider (non-missile)
military
contexts.
test exemplar antenna hardware, to confirm performance and physical
identifito
edachieve
under theTRL
current
8 research.
It would be
Fromcharacteristics
now, 3 to 5 years
5 Task
component
level
valuable to also assess the capabilities of the smart antenna hardware in
wider (non-missile) military contexts.
From now, 3 to 5 years to achieve TRL 5 component level

Actual System proven through


successful operations

Actual system tested and


demonstrated

7
6

System prototype in an
operational environment

Breadboard demonstrated in a
relevant environment

Breadboard demonstrated in a
laboratory environment

Analytical and laboratory


studies to validate concept

Technology and concept


formulated

Basic principles of technology


observed and reported

System / subsystem prototype


in a relevant environment

Technology
Readiness
Level
2
Technology Readiness
Level:
2

www.npl.co.uk

11656/0416

Description

antenna technologies for weapon applications.

The market

Ideally steerable

Queens Printer and Controller of HMSO, 2016.

Beam Width In Roll: ~90


Roll Angle: Steerable