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Cauchy principal value and

hypersingular integrals
1 Introduction

1.1

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.2

Mathematical considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Definitions and characteristics

2.1

Cauchy principal value integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

2.2

Hypersingular integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

2.3

Generalizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

3 Singular integrals: analytically calculated

19

3.1

Cauchy principal value integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

3.2

Hypersingular integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

3.3

Generalization and a variety of cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

4 Singular integrals: numerically calculated


4.1

4.2

4.3

53

Cauchy principal value integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

4.1.1

Newton-Cotes quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

4.1.2

Gauss quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54

Hypersingular integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

4.2.1

Newton-Cotes quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

4.2.2

Gauss quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67

Generalizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

4.3.1

Newton-Cotes quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

4.3.2

Gauss quadrature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77

5 Bibliography

79
0

Chapter 1
Introduction
In this introduction to Cauchy principal value and hypersingular integrals two aspects will
be presented. In the first place a general overview will be given to this work to motivate
its existence. In the second place an introduction to the mathematical content will be
given.

1.1

Overview

Everybody working in the field of singular integrals and integral equations will know that
during the last few decades an entirely new mathematical field of Cauchy principal value
integrals and hypersingular integrals has developed.
Since this is a recent mathematical development, it is not always easy for readers, including academics, engineers and researchers, to get a grasp on this field. For assistance, such
readers will have to consult research articles or books, where they will be confronted by a
mass of information at an advanced level. To the best of my knowledge, there presently
does not exist any concise and compact book on this topic.
This led me to the conclusion that a need exists for a single reference work that addresses
at least the following topics:
a presentation of the historical development of Cauchy principal value integrals and
hypersingular integrals;
a summary of different definitions of such integrals;
a discussion of analytical integration results;
a discussion of available numerical integration techniques (including derivations of
these methods, convergence results, error analyses, etc);
a list of relevant tables with constants for the different numerical formulae (for
example, nodes and weights);
a theoretical example illustrating every method presented;
1

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
practical examples that give more flesh to the bone;
a discussion of extensions that could be made in this field (for example, to supersingular integrals), and lastly,
a comprehensive list of bibliographic information.

As anyone would realize, the writing of a book comprising of all this would be a major
task. A simpler and more practical way out of this situation would be to begin with a
smaller set of ideas, starting for example with the following themes:
a summary of different definitions of Cauchy principal value integrals and hypersingular integrals,
a discussion of analytical integration results, and
a discussion of available numerical integration techniques, together with tables of
nodes and weights for the different formulae.
Presenting these themes is therefore the intention of the present work.
One practical way of presenting such a work is by giving lists of results. Books like Mathematical handbook by MR Spiegel, Handbook of mathematical functions by M Abramowitz
& IA Stegun and Tables of integrals, series and products by IS Gradshteyn & IM Ryzhik
may be cited as examples. These books, however, are not mentioned here with the idea
of comparing the present work to them, only to explain the idea.
Some practical aspects of the present work need to be mentioned.
In compiling an index one normally keeps in mind a typical person for whom the book is
written and the same goes for the present work. The typical person for whom this work
on Cauchy principal value integrals and hypersingular integrals should be accessible, is a
chemical engineer looking for the solution of a singular integral.
Let us say this engineer wants to evaluate the integral
Z 1
sin t
dt,
I ==
3
0 (t x)
for 0 < x < 1. The index should then be such that it is easy to find the result. The index
of topics at the beginning of Chapter 3 shows that Section 3.3.1(c) will give the required
result. The user then should have no difficulty in finding the result and can apply it to
whatever larger problem may be solved, namely:
For 0 < x < 1, there is the expression

1.2. MATHEMATICAL CONSIDERATIONS

#
"
Z 1

2j+3
X

sin t

=
dt = cos x
+
(1)j+1
(1 x)2j+1 (x)2j+1
3
(t

x)
x(x

1)
(2j
+
1).(2j
+
3)!
0
j=0
"


(1 x)2 x2 2
1x
+ sin x

ln
2x2 (x 1)2
2
x
#

2j+2
X


+
(1)j+1
(1 x)2j (x)2j .
(2j).(2j
+
2)!
j=1
Some remarks on this and similar results also need to be made:
It is clear that when x 0 or 1, a problem will be encountered.
It is not immediately clear how many terms in the infinite sums have to be computed.
However, on closer inspection one realizes that due to the terms (2j + 3)! and (2j + 2)!
in the denominators the calculation will most probably lead to a quick convergence.
Experimenting a little will produce an acceptable answer. The point is: one should
not use the published results blindly but should use them with the necessary degree of
discretion.
This work is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 attention is paid to definitions and
characteristics of singular integrals, in Chapter 3 to the analytical calculation and in
Chapter 4 to the numerical calculation of such integrals. In all three cases the subsections
are then devoted to (i) Cauchy principal value integrals, (ii) hypersingular integrals and
(iii) generalizations.
It is certainly clear that a work like this will never really be complete. Remarks will
be welcomed, for example on the presentation of the information. Kindly email any
suggestions to johan.deklerk@nwu.ac.za .
I hope that this introduction will clarify the intention with this work and will place the
aim with the text in the correct perspective. Much effort has been put in this work,
especially to evaluate problems and to organize them in a logical way. I trust that it will
be useful to people at all levels, not in the least also to young upcoming scientists.

1.2

Mathematical considerations

In calculus an improper integral may be defined as the limit of a definite integral when
an endpoint of the interval of integration approaches either (i) a specific real number or
(ii) or . Specifically, an improper integral is a limit of either the form
Z
lim

Z
f (t) dt,

lim

f (t) dt
a

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

or of the form
c

Z
lim

cb

Z
f (t) dt,

lim+

ca

f (t) dt.
c

These may also include cases where the integrand is undefined at one or more interior
points of the domain of integration.
It is often necessary to use an improper integral in order to compute a value for an integral
that does not exist in the more conventional sense (for example, as a Riemann integral)
because of a singularity in the integrand, or of an infinite endpoint of the domain of
integration.
Consider the following two examples:
The integral
Z

I1 =
1

1
dt
t2

does not exist as a Riemann integral (because the domain of integration is unbounded,
and the Riemann integral is only well-defined over a bounded domain). I1 may, however,
be assigned a value by interpreting it instead as an improper integral, namely,
b

Z
I1 = lim



1
1
dt = lim + 1 = 1.
b
t2
b

The integral
Z
I2 =
0

1
dt
t

also does not exist as a Riemann integral (because again, the integrand is unbounded,
and the Riemann integral is only well-defined for bounded functions). I2 may, however,
also be assigned a value by interpreting it instead as an improper integral, namely,
Z
I2 = lim+
a0




1
dt = lim 2 1 2 a = 2.
a0+
t

Consult the following reference for more detail: Improper integral (Wikipedia)

It may sometimes happen that not even an improper integral can be used to define an
integral. Depending on the type of singularity in the integrand f, one can however define
an improper integral in the sense of a Cauchy principal value integral. For example,
suppose that f (t) is unbounded at an interior point t0 of the interval [a, b]. Then one can
define
Z
a

Z
f (t) dt = lim+
1 0

t0 1

Z
f (t) dt + lim+
2 0

f (t) dt.
t0 +2

1.2. MATHEMATICAL CONSIDERATIONS

However, it may happen that the limits in this expression do not exist if 1 and 2 approach
0 independently. In the special case of equality, that is, 1 = 2 = , however, it may be
possible that the limit in
Z
a

Z
f (t) dt = lim+
0

t0 

f (t) dt +
a


f (t) dt

t0 +

exists. If that is the case, the expression is known as the Cauchy principal value of
the given integral.
Consider as an example the following two different scenarios for the same expression, I3 :

Z 5
I3 =
0

Z 5
1
1
lim+
dt + lim+
dt
1 0
2 0
4t
0
4+2 4 t
h
i41
h
i5
= lim+ ln |4 t|
+ lim+ ln |4 t|
1 0
2 0
0
4+2
h
i
h
i
= lim+ ln 1 ln 4 lim+ ln 1 ln 2 ,
Z

1
dt =
4t

41

1 0

2 0

that does not exist if 1 and 2 approach 0 independently. On the other hand, one has,
for 1 = 2 = , that

Z 5
I3 =
0

Z 5
1
1
lim+
dt + lim+
dt
0
0
4t
0
4+ 4 t
h
i4
h
i5
= lim+ ln |4 t|
+ lim+ ln |4 t|
0
0
0
4+
h
i
= lim+ ln || + ln 4 ln 1 + ln ||
Z

1
dt =
4t

4

0

= ln 4.
There are different nomenclatures in use for the Cauchy principal value integral. Among
these are the following:
Z
Z
Z
C f (t) dt,
PV
f (t) dt,
f (t) dt.
Of these, the last one mentioned is used in this study, specifically in the form
Z b
f (t)

dt,
a tx

a < x < b.

In the following chapters results on the Cauchy principal value integrals will be given
in the first section of each chapter. Also consult the following reference for more detail:
Cauchy principal value (Wikipedia)

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

It is known that if the Cauchy principal value integral is differentiated with respect to x,
it gives the result
Z
Z b
f (t)
d b f (t)

dt ==
dt, a < x < b.
2
dx a t x
a (t x)
This result is called the Hadamard finite part integral or hypersingular integral.
For this integral there are also different nomenclatures, but the one given above will be
used throughout this text.
Writing this in the reverse form, namely,
Z b
=

Z
f (t)
d b f (t)
dt =

dt, a < x < b,


2
dx a t x
a (t x)
one then naturally can use this expression as a definition. There are also other definitions,
among them,
Z b
=
a

h
f (t)
dt = lim
0
(t x)2

x

f (t)
dt +
(t x)2

x+

f (t)
2f (x) i
dt
.
(t x)2


Information on hypersingular integrals can be found in all of the next three chapters,
each time in the second section. Also consult the following references for more detail:
Hypersingular/Hadamard integral (Wikipedia) and Hypersingular integral (WT Ang)
The third sections in all three of the following chapters cover results that can be labeled
as generalizations. Among these you will find extensions of different kinds. One that
can be mentioned here, by way of an example, is that for a < x < b and p 3, the result
is

Z b
=
a

"Z

Z b
f (t)
f (t)
dt +
dt
p+1
p+1
(t x)
a
x+ (t x)
#

 X
 pk
p1  pk1
Y
1 dp1
2f (x)
1
d Sk
+

+
+ Sp ,
pk
p! dxp1

p

j
dx
j=0
k=2

f (t)
dt = lim
0
(t x)p+1

x

and
with S2 = f (x)

( P
l1
Sl =
Pk=1,3,...
l1
k=0,2,...

kl f (k) (x)


,
l
k!
(k) (x)
kl
f

,
l
k!

l even
l odd.

To conclude, it should again be mentioned that a work like this will never be complete.
If there are any queries or suggestions, please let me know at johan.deklerk@nwu.ac.za .
In Chapter 4 a variety of algorithms may be found for the numerical evaluation of singular integrals. This chapter has not been completed yet and comments on the different

1.2. MATHEMATICAL CONSIDERATIONS

techniques are still being awaited. Please use the algorithms and if necessary, make comments. Also, at the end of chapter 4 a pro forma may be found for suggestions and
details of other algorithms. It would be appreciated if you would make use of it and
would forward it to the above email address.
Although brief and cursory, I hope that with this introduction I have given an idea of
what is to be expected in this work. Please use the information (definitions, formulae,
algorithms, etc) in your own work. It would be appreciated if you would also distribute
it among your colleagues and students.
Johan DeKlerk
Mathematics and Applied Mathematics
North West University
Potchefstroom
South Afrika
Last update: November 2011

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

Chapter 2
Definitions and characteristics
Theme

Section

Definitions

2.1.0

Rb
a

f (t)+g(t)
tx

d
dx

Rb
a

f (t)
tx

2.1.1

dt

2.1.2

dt

...

2.1.3

...

2.1.4

Change of interval

2.1.5

Definitions

2.2.0

Rb
a

f (t)+g(t)
(tx)2

d
dx

Rb
a

f (t)
(tx)2

dt

2.2.1

dt

2.2.2

Change of power

2.2.3

Change of power

2.2.4

Change of interval

2.2.5

Definitions

2.3.0

Rb
a
d
dx

f (t)+g(t)
(tx)p+1

Rb
a

f (t)
(tx)p+1

dt

2.3.1

dt

2.3.2

Change of power

2.3.3

Change of power

2.3.4

Change of interval

2.3.5

10

2.1

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Cauchy principal value integrals

2.1.0(a) For respectively a < x < b, a < x = b and a = x < b, one has the definitions
Z b

a
Z x

a
Z b

Z b
h Z x f (t)
f (t) i
f (t)
dt = lim
dt +
dt ,
0
tx
tx
a
x+ t x
h Z x f (t)
i
f (t)
dt = lim
dt f (x) ln  ,
0
tx
tx
a
Z b
h
i
f (t)
f (t)
dt = lim
dt + f (x) ln  .
0
tx
x+ t x
Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005) (5.4.4) and (5.4.5)

2.1.0(b) For a < x < b


Z b
Z b
f (t)
f (t) f (x)
bx

dt =
dt + f (x) ln
.
tx
xa
a tx
a
Source: Special case of 2.3.0(b)

2.1.1 For a < x < b


Z b
Z b
Z b
f (t) + g(t)
f (t)
g(t)

dt =
dt +
dt.
tx
a
a tx
a tx
Source: Special case of 2.3.1

2.1.2
(a) For a < x < b
Z
Z b
d b f (t)
f (t)

dt ==
dt.
2
dx a t x
a (t x)
(b) For x = a
Z
Z b
d b f (t)
f (t)

dt ==
dt f 0 (x).
2
dx a t x
(t

x)
a
Source: Special case of 2.3.2

2.1.5(a1) For a < x < b

with X =

2xba
ba

Z b
Z 1
f (t)
g(u)

dt =
du
a tx
1 u X

and g(u) = f 12 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .

2.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

11

2.1.5(a2) For x = a


Z 1
Z b
g(u)
ba
f (t)

dt =
du + f (a) ln
2
1 u + 1
a ta

with g(u) = f 21 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .
Source: Special case of 2.3.5

12

2.2

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Hypersingular integrals

2.2.0(a0) For a < x < b, one has the definition


Z b
=
a

h
f (t)
dt
=
lim
0
(t x)2

x

f (t)
dt +
(t x)2

x+

f (t)
2f (x) i
dt

.
(t x)2


Source: Sun & Wu (2005) (p298); Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005) (p254); Kolm & Rokhlin (2001)
(p329); Hui & Shia (1999) (p206); Linz (1985) (p346); Paget (1981) (p447)

2.2.0(a1) For a < x = b, one has


Z x
=
a

h
f (t)
dt
=
lim
0
(t x)2

Z
a

x

i
f (x)
f (t)
0
dt

f
(x)
ln
|x|
,
(t x)2


and for x = a < b, one has


Z b
hZ b
i
f (t)
f (x)
f (t)
0
dt
=
lim
dt

+
f
(x)
ln
|x|
.
=
2
2
0

x+ (t x)
x (t x)
Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005) (p254)

2.2.0(b) For a < x < b


Z b
Z b

f (t) dt
1 
0
=
=
f
(t)

f
(x)

f
(x)(t

x)
dt
2
2
a (t x)
a (t x)
Z b
Z b
dt
dt
0
+ f (x) =
+ f (x)
.
2
a (t x)
a tx
Source: Special case of 2.3.0(b)

2.2.1 For a < x < b


Z b
Z b
Z b
f (t) + g(t)
f (t)
g(t)
=
dt = =
dt + =
dt.
2
2
2
(t x)
a
a (t x)
a (t x)
Source: Special case of 2.3.1

2.2.2
(a) For a < x < b
Z b
Z b
d
f (t)
f (t)
=
dt
=
2
=
dt.
3
dx a (t x)2
a (t x)
(b) For x = a
Z b
Z b
d
f (t)
f (t)
f (2) (x)
=
dt
=
2
=
dt

.
3
dx a (t x)2
2
a (t x)

2.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

13
Source: Special case of 2.3.2

2.2.3 For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

Z b 0
h f (b)
f (t)
f (a) i
f (t)
dt =

+
dt.
2
(t x)
bx ax
a tx
Source: Special case of 2.3.3

2.2.4 For a < x < b

Z b
=
a

Z
f (t)
d b f (t)
dt =

dt.
(t x)2
dx a t x
Source: Special case of 2.3.4

2.2.5(a1) For a < x < b


Z b
=

with X =

2xba
ba

 2  Z 1 g(u)
f (t)
dt =
=
du
2
b a 1 (u X)2
a (t x)

and g(u) = f 12 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .

2.2.5(a2) For x = a


 2  Z 1 g(u)
ba
f (t)
0
dt =
=
du + f (a) ln
2
b a 1 (u + 1)2
2
a (t x)

with g(u) = f 21 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .
Z b
=

Source: Special case of 2.3.5

14

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS

2.3

Generalizations

2.3.0(a3) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

"Z

f (t)
dt = lim
0
(t x)3

x

f (t)
dt +
(t x)3

x+

#
f (t)
2f 0 (x)
.
dt
(t x)3

Source: De Klerk

2.3.0(a4) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

f (t)
dt = lim
0
(t x)4

"Z

x

f (t)
dt +
(t x)4

x+

#
f (t)
2 f (x) f 00 (x)
dt

.
(t x)4
3 3

Source: De Klerk

Generalization:
p 3,

2.3.0(an) For a < x < b,

Z b
=
a

"Z

Z b
f (t)
f (t)
dt
+
dt
p+1
(t x)p+1
a
x+ (t x)
#

 X
 pk
p1  pk1
Y
1 dp1
2f (x)
1
d Sk
+

+
+ Sp ,
p! dxp1

p j dxpk
j=0
k=2

f (t)
dt = lim
0
(t x)p+1

x

with S2 = f (x)
and

( P
2 l1
Sl =
Pk=1,3,...
2 l1
k=0,2,...

kl f (k) (x)


,
l
k!
kl f (k) (x)
,
l
k!

l even
l odd.

Remark: This result also holds for the case p = 2 taking in mind that

Pq (<1)
k=1

= 0.

Source: De Klerk

2.3.0(b) For a < x < b, p 0, r > p, r an integer,

Z b
=
a

f (t)
dt =
(t x)p+1

Z
a

"
#
r
X
1
f (j) (x)(t x)j
f (t)
dt
(t x)p+1
j!
j=0
Z
r
X
f (j) (x) b
dt
+
=
.
p+1j
j!
a (t x)
j=0
Source: Monegato (1994) (2.5)

2.3. GENERALIZATIONS

15

Special case: For a = x, x = 0 and p 0 an integer,


Z b
Z b
p
p1 (j)
X
X
f (t)
1 h
f (j) (0)tj i
f (p) (0)
f (0) bp+j
= p+1 dt =
f
(t)

dt
+
+
ln b.
p+1
j!
j! p + j
p!
0 t
0 t
j=0
j=0
Source: Ramm & Van der Sluis (1990) (2)

Special case: For a = x, x = 0 and p > 0 not an integer, k > p, k an integer and a free
choice,
Z b
Z b
k
k
X
X
1 h
f (j) (0)tj i
f (j) (0) bp+j
f (t)
= p+1 dt =
f
(t)

dt
+
.
p+1
j!
j! p + j
0 t
0 t
j=0
j=0
Source: Ramm & Van der Sluis (definition) (1990) (2)

2.3.1 For a < x < b, p 0,


Z b
Z b
Z b
f (t) + g(t)
f (t)
g(t)
=
dt
=

=
dt
+

=
dt.
p+1
p+1
(t x)p+1
a
a (t x)
a (t x)
Source: Monegato (1994) (p12)

2.3.2
For a < x < b and > 0,
Z b
Z b
i
d
f (t)
h
1
=
dt ==
f (t) dt.
p
dx a (t a)p
a x (t x)
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (12)

Special cases:
(a) For a < x < b and p > 0 an integer,
Z b
Z b
d
f (t)
f (t)
=
dt = p =
dt
p
p+1
dx a (t x)
a (t x)
or, of course also,
Z b
=
a

Z b
f (t)
1 d
f (t)
dt =
=
dt.
p+1
(t x)
p dx a (t x)p
Source: Monegato (1994) (2.6)

(b) For x = a and p > 0 not an integer,


Z b
Z b
d
f (t)
f (t)
=
dt = p =
dt.
p
p+1
dx a (t x)
a (t x)

16

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS


Source: Monegato (1994) (2.6)

(c) For x = a and p > 0 an integer,


Z b
Z b
f (t)
f (t)
f (p) (x)
d
=
dt
=
p
=
dt

.
p+1
dx a (t x)p
p!
a (t x)
Source: Monegato (1994) (2.6)

2.3.3 For a < x < b


Z
Z b
f (t)
1 h f (b)
f (a) i 1 b f 0 (t)
=
dt =

+ =
dt.
p+1
p (b x)p (a x)p
p a (t x)p
a (t x)
Source: Monegato (1994) (2.8)

2.3.4 For a < x < b and p an integer


Z b
Z b
1 dp
f (t)
f (t)
dt =

dt.
=
p+1
p
p! dx a t x
a (t x)
Source: Monegato (1994) (2.7); Korsunsky (1997) (8)

2.3.5(a1) For a x b and p not an integer,


Z b
=

with X =

2xba
ba

 2 p Z 1
f (t)
g(u)
dt =
=
du
p+1
p+1
ba
a (t x)
1 (u X)

and g(u) = f 12 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .

2.3.5(a2) For a < x < b and p an integer,


Z b
=

with X =

2xba
ba

 2 p Z 1
f (t)
g(u)
dt =
=
du
p+1
p+1
ba
a (t x)
1 (u X)

and g(u) = f 12 (b a)u + 12 (b + a) .

2.3.5(a3) For x = a and p an integer,


Z b
=



 2 p Z 1
f (t)
g(u)
f (p) (a)
ba
dt =
=
du +
ln
p+1
p+1
ba
p!
2
a (t a)
1 (u + 1)

with g(u) = f 12 (b a)u + 21 (b + a) .
Source: Monegato (1994) (p 13)

2.3. GENERALIZATIONS

17

18

CHAPTER 2. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Chapter 3
Singular integrals: analytically
calculated
Theme
Rb
a
R1
1
Rb
a

tn
tx

dt,

Rb
=a

Pn (t)
tx

dt,

R1
=1

sin t/ cos t
(tx)2

tn 1t
tx

dt,

Rb
=a

tn 1t
(tx)2

tn 1t2
tx

dt,

Rb
=a

tn 1t2
(tx)2

tn
(tx) 1t

n
t
(tx) 1t2

Un (t) 1t2
(tx)p

dt,

dt,

dt,

3.1.1(b), 3.2.1(b), 3.3.1(b)

dt

sin t/ cos t
(tx)p+1

tn 1t
(tx)p+1

Rb
=a

3.1.1(a), 3.2.1(a), 3.3.1(a)

dt

Pn (t)
(tx)p+1

Rb
=a
Rb
=a

dt,

R1
1

tn
(tx)p+1

R1
=1

dt,

Rb
=a

Rb
a

Rb
a

Pn (t)
(tx)2

dt,

Rb
a

Rb
=a

dt,

sin t/ cos t
tx

Rb
a

Rb
a

tn
(tx)2

Section

3.1.1(c), 3.2.1(c), 3.3.1(c)

dt

3.1.2(a), 3.2.2(a), 3.3.2(a)

dt

tn 1t2
(tx)p+1

3.1.3(a), 3.2.3(a), 3.3.3(a)

dt

3.1.3(b), 3.2.3(b), 3.3.3(b)

Tn (t) dt

(tx)p 1t2

dt,

Rb
=a

tn
(tx)2 1t

dt,

Rb
=a

tn
(tx)p+1 1t

dt,

Rb
=a

tn
(tx)2 1t2

dt,

Rb
=a

tn
(tx)p+1 1t2

Rb
a

Tn (t)

(tx) 1t2

dt
dt

3.1.4(a), 3.2.4(a), 3.3.4(a)


3.1.5(a), 3.2.5(a), 3.3.5(a)
3.1.5(b)

dt

Variety of cases

3.3.6

19

20

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.1

Cauchy principal value integrals

3.1.1(a0) For a < x < b


Z b
dt
bx

= ln
.
xa
a tx
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a0)

Special case: For x = 0


Z 1
dt

= 0.
1 t
Special case: For 0 < x < 1
Z 1
1x
dt

= ln
.
x
0 tx
3.1.1(a1) For a < x < b
Z b

bx
t
dt = (b a) + x ln
.
tx
xa
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a1)

3.1.1(a2) For a < x < b


Z b 2
1
bx
t

dt = [(b x)2 (a x)2 ] + 2x(b a) + x2 ln


2
xa
a tx
or

Z b 2
1
bx
t

dt = (b2 a2 ) + x(b a) + x2 ln
.
2
xa
a tx
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a2)

3.1.1(a3) For a < x < b


Z b 3
t

dt =
a tx

1
[(b
3

x)3 (a x)3 ] + 32 x[(b x)2 (a x)2 ]

+3x2 (b a) + x3 ln

bx
xa

or
Z b 3
bx
t

dt = 13 (b3 a3 ) + 12 x(b2 a2 ) + x2 (b a) + x3 ln
.
xa
a tx
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a3)

3.1.1(an) For a < x < b and > 0 rational,


Z b
Z b 1
t
t
1

dt = x
dt + (b a ).

a tx
a tx

3.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

21

Source: Compare Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005), p249

For = n an integer,
Z b n
n1

t
b x X xk  nk
n

dt = x ln
+
b
ank ,
x a k=0 n k
a tx
or, alternatively,
 
Z b n
n
b x X nk n (b x)k (a x)k
t
n

dt = x ln
+
x
.
x a k=1
k
k
a tx
Source: De Klerk

3.1.1(b) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
Pn (t)

dt = 2Qn (x),
1 t x

n 0,

where Pn and Qn are respectively the Legendre polynomials of the first kind and Legendre
functions of the second kind.
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (28)

3.1.1(c1) For a < x < b and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


"
#
Z b kt

  X
i
i
i
k
(

)
e
dt = ekx ln
+
.

i.i!
a
i=1
Special cases:
"
#
Z b t

  X
i
i
e

dt = ex ln
+
,

i.i!
a tx
i=1
"
#
Z b t

  X
i
i
i
e
(1)
(

dt = ex ln
+
.

i.i!
a tx
i=1
"
#

 
i
i
i
i
X
X

= ex ln

+
.

i.i!
i.i!
i=1,3,...
i=2,4,...
Z 1 t
e

dt = 2.114 501 751.


1 t
"
#
Z t

i
X
e
x

dt = ex ln x1
,
tx
i.i!
0
i=1

22

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

where is the Euler constant, with value = 0.577 215 664 9... .
Source: De Klerk

3.1.1(c2) For a < x < b and = a x,

= b x,

< 0 < ,

Z b it
e

dt =
a tx
#
"
#
"

  X
2i
2i
2i1
2i1
X

sin x
(1)i1
cos x ln
+
(1)i

(2i).(2i)!
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
i=1
i=1
(
"
#
"
#)

  X
2i1
2i1
2i
2i
X

+ i cos x
(1)i1
+ sin x ln
+
(1)i
(2i

1).(2i

1)!

(2i).(2i)!
i=1
i=1
Z 1 it
e
dt = 2.107 833 859i.
Special case:
1 t

Source: De Klerk

3.1.1(c3) For a < x < b and = a x,

Special case:

= b x,

< 0 < ,

"
#
Z b
2i1
2i1
X
sin t

dt = cos x
(1)i1
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
a tx
i=1
#
"

  X
2i
2i

+
(1)i
+ sin x ln

(2i).(2i)!
i=1
Z 1
sin t

dt = 2.107 833 859.


1 t

Source: De Klerk

3.1.1(c4) For a < x < b and = a x,

Special case:

= b x,

< 0 < ,

"
#
Z b

  X
2i
2i
cos t
i

dt = cos x ln
+
(1)

(2i).(2i)!
a tx
i=1
"
#
2i1
X
2i1
i1
sin x
(1)
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
i=1
Z 1
cos t

dt = 0.0.
t
1

Source: De Klerk

3.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

23

3.1.1(c5) For a < x < b, k a constant and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


"
#
Z b
2i1
2i1
X

sin kt
dt = cos kx
(1)i1 k 2i1

(2i 1).(2i 1)!


a tx
i=1
"
#

  X
2i
2i
i 2i
+ sin kx ln
+
(1) k
.

(2i).(2i)!
i=1
Special case: For 0 < x < 1
Z 1

hX
2i1
sin t
+ x2i1 i
i1 2i1 (1 x)

dt = cos x
(1)
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
0 tx
i=1

h 1 x X
(1 x)2i x2i i
+ sin x ln
+
(1)i 2i
x
(2i).(2i)!
i=1
h
i
h

i
= cos x Si (1 x) + Si(x) + sin x Ci(x) Ci (1 x) ,
where
Z
Si(x) =
0

Z
Ci(x) =
x

X
sin u
x2i1
du =
(1)i+1
,
u
(2i

1).(2i

1)!
i=1

X
x2i
cos u
du = ln x +
(1)i+1
,
u
(2i).(2i)!
i=1

= 0.577 215 664 9... .

Source: De Klerk

3.1.1(c6) For a < x < b, k a constant and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


"
#
Z b



2i
2i
X
cos kt

dt = cos kx ln
+
(1)i k 2i

(2i).(2i)!
a tx
i=1
"
#
2i1
2i1
X

sin kx
(1)i+1 k 2i1
.
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
i=1
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 0 < x < 1


Z 1

h 1 x X
cos t
(1 x)2i x2i i

dt = cos x ln
+
(1)i 2i
x
(2i).(2i)!
0 tx
i=1

hX
2i1
+ x2i1 i
i1 2i1 (1 x)
sin x
(1)
(2i 1).(2i 1)!
i=1
h
h
i
i

= cos x Ci(x) Ci (1 x) sin x Si (1 x) + Si(x) ,

24

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

where
x

sin u
x
x3
x5
x7
du =

+ ... ,
u
1.1! 3.3! 5.5! 7.7!
0
Z
cos u
x2
x4
x6
x8
Ci(x) =
du = ln x +

+ ... ,
u
2.2! 4.4! 6.6! 8.8!
x
Z

Si(x) =

= 0.5772156649... .
Source: De Klerk

3.1.2(a0) For a < x < b 1


Z b

1t

dt = 2 1 b 2 1 a + 1 x ln |B |,
tx
a
with

a + 1 + 1 x b + 1 1 x

.
B =
a + 1 1 x b + 1 + 1 x

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

1t

dt = 1 x ln |B| 2 2,
1 t x

1+

1x
2

1x
2

B=

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (21)

3.1.2(a1) For a < x < b 1


Z b
h
i
t 1t

dt = 23 (1 b)3/2 (1 a)3/2
tx
a
h
i

+x 2 1 b 2 1 a + 1 x ln |B | ,

with B as in 3.1.2(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.2(a2) For a < x < b 1


Z b 2


t 1t
2
(3b + 2)(1 b)3/2 (3a + 2)(1 a)3/2

dt = 15
tx
a


32 x (1 b)3/2 (1 a)3/2
h
i

+x2 2 1 b 2 1 a + 1 x ln |B | ,

3.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

25

with B as in 3.1.2(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.2(a3) For a < x < b 1


Z b 3


t 1t
2
dt = 105
(15b2 + 12b + 8)(1 b)3/2 (15a2 + 12a + 8)(1 a)3/2

tx
a
Z b 2
t 1t
+x
dt,
tx
a
together with 3.1.2(a2).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.2(an) For a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


!
Z b n
Z b
n1
X

t 1t
i
n1i

dt =
x
t
1 t dt
tx
a
a
i=0
h

i
+xn 1 x ln |B | 2 a + 1 b + 1 ,
with B as in 3.1.2(a0) and
Z b
Z b

2tm (1 t)3/2 b
2m
m
t
1 t dt =
tm1 1 t dt,
+
2m + 3
2m + 3 a
a
a
repeatedly.
Source: De Klerk

3.1.3(a0) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b

1 t2

dt = 1 b2 1 a2 x sin1 b + x sin1 a + C ,
tx
a
where

21 x2 1 t2 + 2(1 xt) b



C = 1 x2 ln
.
tx
a
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
1 t2

dt = x.
1 t x
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (17)

3.1.3(a1) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
i b
h

t 1 t2

dt = ( 12 t + x) 1 t2 + ( 12 x2 ) sin1 t + xC
tx
a
a

26

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

with C as in 3.1.3(a0).
Special case:

Z 1

t 1 t2

dt = (1 2x2 ).
tx
2
1
Source: De Klerk

3.1.3(a2) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b 2
h
i b

t 1 t2

dt = 13 (1 t2 )3/2 + ( 12 t + x)x 1 t2 + ( 12 x2 )x sin1 t + x2 C


t

x
a
a
with C as in 3.1.3(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.3(a3) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b 3
i b
h

t 1 t2
2
2

dt = ( 4t + x3 )(1t2 )3/2 +( 8t + tx2 +x3 ) 1 t2 +( 18 + x2 x4 ) sin1 t +x3 C


t

x
a
a
with C as in 3.1.3(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.3(an) For 1 a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


Z b n
Z b
n1
h
i b
X

t 1 t2

i
n1i
n
1
2
2

dt =
1 t dt + x
1 t x sin t + xn C ,
x
t
tx
a
a
a
i=0
with C as in 3.1.3(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1 n
n+1
X
t 1 t2

dt =
bk x k ,
tx
1
k=0

n 0,

with,

bk =
and with

0,
21

nk
2


,

nk+3
2

nk

even

nk

odd

( 21 ) = 2( 12 ) = 2 .
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (34, B6)

3.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

27

3.1.3(b1) For 1 < x < 1

Z 1
Un (t) 1 t2

dt = Tn+1 (x),
tx
1

n 0,

where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and second kind.
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (30); Spiegel 31.45

3.1.3(b2) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

Tn (t)

dt = Un1 (x),
(t x) 1 t2

n 1,

where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and second kind.
Source: Spiegel 30.44

3.1.3(c1) For 1 a < x < b 1


" j1
Z b
Z


X
1 t2 et
1 X  i b j1i
2

dt =
x
t
1 t dt
tx
j! i=0
a
a
j=0
+xj

with C as in 3.1.3(a0) and

Pq (<0)
i=0

1 t2 |ba x sin1 t|ba + C

#
,

= 0.
Source: De Klerk

3.1.4(a0) For a < x < b 1


Z b

with

dt
1

ln |B |,
=
1x
(t x) 1 t

a + 1 + 1 x b + 1 1 x

B =
.
a + 1 1 x b + 1 + 1 x

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

dt
ln |B|

,
=
1x
(t x) 1 t

1+

1x
2

1x
2

B=

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (23)

28

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.1.4(a1) For a < x < b 1


Z b

t
x

dt = 2 1 t|ba +
ln |B |,
(t

x)
1

t
1

x
a
with B as in 3.1.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.4(a2) For a < x < b 1


Z b
i b
h

x2
t2

ln |B |,
dt =
32 (t + 2) 1 t 2x 1 t +

a
1

x
(t

x)
1

t
a
with B as in 3.1.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.4(a3) For a < x < b 1


Z b
t3

dt =
a (t x) 1 t
h
i b

x3

2
15
(3t2 + 4t + 8) 1 t 23 x(t + 2) 1 t 2x2 1 t +
ln |B |,
a
1x
with B as in 3.1.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.4(an) For a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


Z b
Z b n1i
n1
X
tn
t
xn
i

dt =
x
dt +
ln |B |,
1t
1x
a (t x) 1 t
a
i=0
with B as in 3.1.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.1.5(a0) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
dt
1

=
ln |D |,
2
2
1x
a (t x) 1 t
with

1 x2 1 b2 + (1 xb) a x

.
.
D =
1 x2 1 a2 + (1 xa) b x

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

dt

= 0.
(t x) 1 t2

3.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

29
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (19)

3.1.5(a1) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
t
x

dt = sin1 t|ba
ln |D |,
2
2
(t

x)
1

t
1

x
a
with D as in 3.1.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

(t x) 1 t2

dt = .
Source: De Klerk

3.1.5(a2) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
i b
h
t2
x2

dt = 1 t2 + x sin1 t
ln |D |,
2
2
a
1x
a (t x) 1 t
with D as in 3.1.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

t2

dt = x.
(t x) 1 t2
Source: De Klerk

3.1.5(a3) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
t3

dt =
2
a (t x) 1 t
i b
h t

x3

ln |D |,

1 t2 + 12 sin1 t x 1 t2 + x2 sin1 t
2
a
1 x2
with D as in 3.1.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1

t3

dt = (x2 + 12 ).
2
(t x) 1 t
Source: De Klerk

3.1.5(an) For 1 a < x < b 1 and n an integer,


Z b
Z b n1i
n1
X
xn
tn
t
i

ln |D |,
dt

dt =
x
2
2
2
1

x
1

t
(t

x)
1

t
a
a
i=0

30

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

with D as in 3.1.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case:
Z 1

tn

dt =
(t x) 1 t2

(
0,
P
k
n1
k=0 dk x ,

n = 0,
n 1,

with,

dk =

0,
1

nk
2


,

nk+1
2

nk

even

nk

odd.
Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (36, B8)

3.1.5(b)
Z 1

Tn (t)

dt =
(t x) 1 t2

(
0,
Un1 (x),

n=0
n 1,

where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and second kind.
Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (32)

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

3.2

31

Hypersingular integrals

3.2.1(a0) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

1
1
dt
=

.
2
(t x)
bx xa
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a0); Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (9)

Special case: For 0 < x < 1


Z 1
=
0

!
dt
1
1
=
+
.
(t x)2
1x x
Source: Hui & Shia (1999) (5)

Special case: For x = 0


Z 1
dt
= 2 = 1.
0 t
Source: Hui & Shia (1999) (5a)

3.2.1(a1) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

t
b
a
bx
dt =
+
+ ln
.
2
(t x)
bx ax
xa
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a1)

3.2.1(a2) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

t2
b2
a2
bx
dt
=

+
+
2(b

a)
+
2x
ln
.
(t x)2
bx ax
xa
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a2)

3.2.1(a3) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

t3
b3
a3
dt
=

+
+ 3 [(b x)2 (a x)2 ]
(t x)2
bx ax 2
bx
+3.2x(b a) + 3x2 ln
.
xa
Source: Special case of 3.3.1(a3)

3.2.1(an) General cases: For a < x < b, and for (i) rational and (ii) = n an integer,
Z b
=
a

Z b 1
Z b 2
t
1
t
t
1
1
2
dt
=
(b

a
)
+
2x
=
dt

x
=
dt,
2
2
(t x)2
1
a (t x)
a (t x)
Source: De Klerk

32

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

Z b
=
a

n1

X kxk1
bx
ab
tn
n1
n
dt
=
nx
ln
+
x
+
(bnk ank ),
(t x)2
xa
(b x)(x a) k=1 n k
Source: De Klerk

or, alternatively,

Z b
=
a

X
bx
ab
tn
n1
n
dt
=
nx
ln
+
x
+
(t x)2
xa
(b x)(x a) k=2

n
k

xnk [(b x)k1 (a x)k1 ]


.
k1
Source: De Klerk

Special cases: For 0 < x < 1, and for (i) rational and (ii) = n an integer,

Z 1
=
0

X
t
1
xn
1
dt
=
x
cot

.
(t x)2
1x
n+1
n=0

Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter, p 259

Z 1
=
0

tn
xn1
1 x X (j 1)xj2
n1
dt
=
+
nx
ln
+
,
(t x)2
x1
x
n

j
+
1
j=2
Source: De Klerk

or, alternatively,
Z 1
=
0

tn
xn1
1x X
n1
dt
=
+
nx
ln
+
(t x)2
1x
x
j=2

n
j



xnj (1 x)j1 (x)j1
j1

Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter, p 259

3.2.1(b) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
i
Pn (t)
2(n + 1) h
=
dt
=

xQ
(x)

Q
(x)
,
n
n+1
2
1 x2
1 (t x)

n 0,

where Pn and Qn are respectively the Legendre polynomials of the first kind and Legendre
functions of the second kind.
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (29)

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS


3.2.1(c1) For a < x < b and = a x,
Z b
=
a

33
= b x,

< 0 < ,

"
#

 
  X
j+1
j
j
k
(

)
ekt
dt = ekx
+ k ln
+
.
(t x)2

j.(j + 1)!
j=1

Special cases:
"
#

 
  X
j
j
et

dt = ex
+ ln
+
.
2
(t

x)

j.(j + 1)!
a
j=1
"
#
Z b

 
  X
j+1
j
j
et
(1)
(

)
=
dt = ex
ln
+
.
2
(t

x)

j.(j
+
1)!
a
j=1
Z 1 t
e
= 2 dt = 0.971 659 519.
1 t
Z b
=

Source: De Klerk

3.2.1(c2) For a < x < b and = a x,


Z b
=
a

Special case:

= b x,

< 0 < ,

"
#

 
  X
j
j
eit

dt = eix
+i
+
ij+1
(t x)2

j.(j + 1)!
j=1
Z 1 it
e
= 2 dt = 2.972 770 753.
1 t

Source: De Klerk

3.2.1(c3) For a < x < b and = a x,


Z b
=
a

Special case:

= b x,

< 0 < ,

"
#

  X
2j
2j
sin t

dt = cos x ln
+
(1)j
(t x)2

2j.(2j + 1)!
j=1
"
#

  X
2j1
2j1

+ sin x
+
(1)j
.

(2j

1).(2j)!
j=1
Z 1
sin t
=
dt = 0.0.
2
1 t

Source: De Klerk

34

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.2.1(c4) For a < x < b and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


#
"
Z b

  X
2j1
2j1
cos t
j
dt = cos x
+
=
(1)
2

(2j 1).(2j)!
a (t x)
j=1
#
"

  X
2j
2j

sin x ln
+
(1)j
.

2j.(2j
+
1)!
j=1
Z 1
cos t
Special case:
=
dt = 2.972 770 753.
2
1 t
Source: De Klerk

3.2.1(c5) For a < x < b, k a constant and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


"
#
Z b

  X
2j
2j
sin kt

=
dt = k cos kx ln
+
(1)j k 2j
2
(t

x)

2j.(2j + 1)!
a
j=1
"
#

2j1
2j1
X

+
(1)j k 2j1
.
+k sin kx
k
(2j 1).(2j)!
j=1
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 0 < x < 1,


Z 1






sin t
=
dt
=

sin
x
Si
(1

x)
+
Si
x
+

cos
x
Ci
x

Ci
(1

x)
,
2
0 (t x)
Z y
Z
sin u
cos u
Si(y) =
du, Ci(y) =
du.
u
u
0
y
Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter, p 259

3.2.1(c6) For a < x < b, k a constant and = a x, = b x, < 0 < ,


"
#
Z b

2j1
2j1
cos kt
X

=
dt = k cos kx
+
(1)j k 2j1
2
(t

x)
k
(2j 1).(2j)!
a
j=1
"
#

  X
2j
2j

k sin kx ln
+
(1)j k 2j
.

2j.(2j
+
1)!
j=1
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 0 < x < 1,


Z 1






cos t
=
dt
=

sin
x
Ci
x

Ci
(1

x)

cos
x
Si
(1

x)
+
Si
x
2
0 (t x)
1
1
+
,
1x Z x
Z
y
sin u
cos u
Si(y) =
du, Ci(y) =
du.
u
u
0
y

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

35
Source: De Klerk

3.2.1(d) Further cases


For 0 < x < 1
Z 1

[t(1 t)]3/2
3
=
dt =
6x(1 x)
(t x)2
2 4
0
Z 1 1 + tc
1
1
2
2|tc|
=
dt
=
+
(t x)2
x1 cx
0

Z 1 1
c + (1 2c)t + |t c|
dt = (c 1) ln |x| c ln |1 x| + ln |x c|
= 2
(t x)2
0

Z 1 1
+ 41 |t c + | + |t c |
1
1 x c 
2
=
dt =
+ ln

(t x)2
x 1 2
xc+
0
Z 1 3
(t c)2 14 (t c)|t c| + 12 (t c)(c2 + 2c 1) + 12 c(c2 1))
= 4
dt
(t x)2
0
c2
1
c2 1 
= (c + 1) + x +
ln |1 x| + (x c) ln |x c| 2x + c
ln x
2
2
2
2
Source: Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005), p 259

3.2.2(a0) For a < x < b 1


Z b

1t
ln |B |
1 dB

dt
=

+
1

x
,
2
B dx
2 1x
a (t x)
with

a + 1 + 1 x b + 1 1 x

.
B =
a + 1 1 x b + 1 + 1 x

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1

Z 1
1t
ln |B|
2
dt =

,
=
2
2 1x 1+x
1 (t x)

1+

1x
2

1x
2

B=

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (22)

3.2.2(a1) For a < x < b 1


Z b

t 1t
x
1 dB
b

dt
=
2
1

t|
+
1

x
ln
|B
|

ln
|B
|
+
x
1

x
,
=
a
2
B dx
2 1x
a (t x)
with B as in 3.2.2(a0).

36

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED


Source: De Klerk

3.2.2(a2) For a < x < b 1


Z b 2

t 1t
dt = 23 (1 t)3/2 |ba + 4x 1 t|ba
=
2
a (t x)

1 dB
x2
ln |B | + x2 1 x
,
+ 2x 1 x ln |B | 12
B dx
1x
with B as in 3.2.2(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.2(an) For a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


!
Z b n
Z b
n1
X

t 1t
i1
n1i
=
dt =
ix
t
1 t dt
2
a (t x)
a
i=0
h
i

+nxn1 1 x ln |B | + 2 t + 1|ba
"
#

ln
|B
|
dB
1
+xn 12
+ 1x
,
B dx
1x
with B as in 3.2.2(a0) and
Z

b
m

t
a

2tm (1 t)3/2 b
2m
1 t dt =
+
2m + 3
2m + 3
a

tm1 1 t dt.

Source: De Klerk

3.2.3(a0) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
1 t2
dC
1 b
dt
=

sin
t|
+
,
=
a
2
dx
a (t x)
with

21 x2 1 t2 + 2(1 xt) b



C = 1 x2 ln
.
tx
a

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
1 t2
=
dt = .
2
1 (t x)
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (18)

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

37

3.2.3(a1) For 1 a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


Z b
h
i b
dC
t 1 t2
2 2x sin1 t + C + x
=
dt
=
1

t
,

2
dx
a
a (t x)
with C as in 3.2.3(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case:

Z 1
t 1 t2
=
dt = 2x.
2
1 (t x)
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (35)

3.2.3(a2) For 1 a < x < b 1 and n an integer, one has


Z b 2
i b
h

t 1 t2
dC
2 + ( 1 t + x) 1 t2 + ( 1 3x2 ) sin1 t + 2xC + x2
=
dt
=
2x
1

t
,

2
2
(t x)2
dx
a
a
with C as in 3.2.3(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.3(an) For 1 a < x < b 1


!
Z b
Z b n
n
X

t 1 t2
dt =
ixi1
tn1i 1 t2 dt
=
2
(t

x)
a
a
i=1
h
i b
dC

n1
n
1
2
+ nx
1 t (n + 1)x sin t + nxn1 C + xn
,
dx
a
with C as in 3.2.3(a0) and

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1 n
n
X
t 1 t2
=
dt =
ck xk ,
2
(t

x)
1
k=0

n 0,

with, For k n,

ck =

0,

2k+1

and with ( 12 ) = 2( 12 ) = 2 .

nk1
2

nk+2
2


,

nk

odd

nk

even

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (37, B9)

3.2.3(b1) For 1 < x < 1

Z 1
Un (t) 1 t2
=
dt = (n + 1)Un (x),
(t x)2
1

n 0,

38

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

where Un are the Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind.


Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (31)

3.2.3(b2) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
Tn (t)
nTn (x) xUn1 (x)

=
dt =
,
2 1 t2
x2 1
1 (t x)

n > 1,
Source: De Klerk

or
Z 1
=
1

Tn (t)

dt =
(t x)2 1 t2

(
0,

1x2

n = 0, 1
h

i
n+1
n1
U
(x)
+
U
(x)
,
n
n2
2
2

n 2,

where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and second kind.
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (33)

3.2.3(c1) For 1 a < x < b 1


#
" j1 Z
Z b

h
i b
X
1 t2 et
1 d X i b j1i

=
dt =
x
t
1 t2 dt + xj 1 t2 x sin1 t + xj C ,
2
(t

x)
j!
dx
a
a
a
j=0
i=0
with

21 x2 1 t2 + 2(1 xt) b



2
C = 1 x ln
,
tx
a

and

Pq (<0)
i=0

= 0.
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For a = 1, b = 1 and x = 0,


Z 1
1 t2 et
dt = 2.339 556 253 339.
=
t2
1
Source: Ashour & Ahmed (2007), p 1682

3.2.3(c2) For 1 a < x < b 1


" 2j
Z b
Z

X
1 t2 sin t
(1)j d X i b 2ji
=
dt =
x
t
1 t2 dt
2
(t

x)
(2j
+
1)!
dx
a
a
j=0
i=0
#
h
i b

+ x2j+1 1 t2 x sin1 t + x2j+1 C ,
a

with C as in 3.2.3(c1).
Source: De Klerk

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

39

Special case: For a = 1, b = 1 and x = 0,


Z 1
1 t2 sin t
dt = 0.
=
t2
1
Source: De Klerk

3.2.3(c3) For 1 a < x < b 1


" 2j1 Z
Z b

X
1 t2 cos t
(1)j d X i b 2j1i
=
dt =
x
t
1 t2 dt
2
(t

x)
(2j)!
dx
a
a
j=0
i=0
#
h
i b

+ x2j 1 t2 x sin1 t + x2j C ,
a

with C as in 3.2.3(c1).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For a = 1, b = 1 and x = 0,


Z 1
1 t2 cos t
=
dt = 3.910 898 042 871.
t2
1
Source: Shand, Y. (2006), p 57, 58

3.2.4(a0) For a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

with

"
#

dt
1
ln |B |
1 dB

=
+ 1x
,
1x 2 1x
B dx
(t x)2 1 t

a + 1 + 1 x b + 1 1 x

B =
.
a + 1 1 x b + 1 + 1 x

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

"

dt
1
ln |B|
2

,
2
1x 2 1x 1+x
(t x) 1 t

1+

1x
2

1x
2

B=

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (24)

3.2.4(a1) For a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

"
#
x ln |B |
x dB
1

ln |B | +
+
,
dt =
2(1 x) B dx
1x
(t x)2 1 t
t

40

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

with B as in 3.2.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.4(a2) For a < x < b 1


#
"
Z b
2

dB
t2
x
ln
|B
|
x
1

,
=
2x ln |B | +
+
dt = 2 1 t|ba +
2
2(1 x)
B dx
1x
1t
a (t x)
with B as in 3.2.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.4(a3) For a < x < b 1


Z b
h
i b

t3

2

=
dt = 3 (t + 2) 1 t + 4x 1 t
2
a
1t
a (t x)
"
#
3

1
x
ln
|B
|
x
dB
+
3x2 ln |B | +
+
,
2(1 x)
B dx
1x
with B as in 3.2.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.4(an) For a < x < b 1


Z b n1i
Z b
n1
X
t
tn
i1

dt =
ix
=
dt
2
1t
1t
a
a (t x)
i=1
"
#
n

1
x
ln
|B
|
x
dB
+
+
,
nxn1 ln |B | +
2(1 x)
B dx
1x
with B as in 3.2.4(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.5(a0) For 1 a < x < b 1


"
#
Z b

x ln |D |
1 dD
dt
1

+
,
=
=
2
2
2
2
1x
D dx
1x
1t
a (t x)
with

2
1

x
1 b2 + (1 xb) a x

.
.
D =
1 x2 1 a2 + (1 xa) b x
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

(t

dt

x)2

1 t2

= 0.

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

41
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (20)

3.2.5(a1) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

(t x)2

#
"
x dD
1
x2 ln |D |

dt =
ln |D | +
+
,
1 x2
D dx
1 t2
1 x2

with D as in 3.2.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

(t

x)2

1 t2

dt = 0.
Source: De Klerk

3.2.5(a2) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

t2

(t x)2

#
"
2

x
dD
1
x
ln
|D
|
dt = sin1 t|ba
2x ln |D | +
+
,
1 x2
D dx
1 t2
1 x2

with D as in 3.2.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

t2

(t x)2

1 t2

dt = .
Source: De Klerk

3.2.5(a3) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

t3

(t x)2

1 t2

 b
1 t2 + 2x sin1 t a
"
#
1
x4 ln |D |
x3 dD
2


3x ln |D | +
+
,
1 x2
D dx
1 x2

dt =

with D as in 3.2.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

t3

(t x)2

1 t2

dt = 2x.
Source: De Klerk

42

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.2.5(an) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

tn

(t x)2

1 t2

dt =

n1
X

ix

i1

Z
a

i=1

tn1i

dt
1 t2

"

#
xn dD
1
xn+1 ln |D |
n1


nx
ln |D | +
+
,
1 x2
D dx
1 x2
with D as in 3.2.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

tn

dt =
(t x)2 1 t2

(
0,
P
k
n2
k=0 ek x ,

n = 0, 1
n 2,

with

ek =

0,

k+1


 ,

nk1
2
nk
2

nk

odd

nk

even.

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (37, B9)

3.2.5(c1) For 1 a < x < b 1


Z b
=
a

et

(t x)2

 j1 Z


X
1 d X i b tj1i
xj

x
dt =
dt
ln |D | ,
2
2
j!
dx
1 t2
1

t
1

x
a
j=0
i=0

with D as in 3.2.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.2.6 Further cases:


3.2.6(a) For 1 < x < 1
Z 1
=
1

1/(t2 + 2 )
(2 x2 )

dt =
,
(2 + 1)1/2 (2 + x2 )
(t x)2 1 t2

2 > 1.

Source: Paget, D.F. (1981), p 452; Tsamasphyros, G. & Dimou, G. (1990), p 23.

3.2.6(b) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

dt

(t x)2

"
#
x
(2 x2 )1/2 x(2 1)1/2
2(2 1)1/2
= 2
ln

,
( x2 )3/2
(2 x2 )1/2 + x(2 1)1/2
(2 x2 )(1 x2 )
2 t2

3.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

43

2 > 1.
Source: Paget, D.F. (1981), p 451

3.2.6(c) For 0 < x < 1


Z 1
6 3
1
1x
t6
=
dt = + x + 2x2 + 3x3 + 6x4 +
+ 6x5 ln
.
2
5 2
x1
x
0 (t x)
Source: Wu & Sun (2008), pp 161-163

3.2.6(d) For x = 0
Z 1 4
t + |t|4+
12 + 2
=
dt =
,
2
t
9 + 3
1

0 < 1.
Source: Wu & Sun (2008), pp 161-163

3.2.6(e) For x = 0
Z 1 4
t + |t|3+
10 + 2
=
dt
=
,
t2
6 + 3
1

0 < 1.
Source: Wu & Sun (2008), pp 161-163

44

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.3

Generalization and a variety of cases

3.3.1(a0) For a < x < b


Z b
=
a

dt
(t x)p+1

( bx
ln xa
h ,
p1

p = 0;

1
(bx)p

1
(ax)p

p = 1, 2, . . .

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (8); Monegato (1994) (2.8)

Special case: For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

i
dt
1 h (1)p
1
=

,
(t x)p+1
p (1 + x)p (1 x)p

p > 0.

Special case: For x = 0


Z 1
i
dt
1h
= p+1 = (1)p 1 ,
p
1 t

p > 0.

3.3.1(a1) For a < x < b

Z b
=
a

t
(t x)p+1

bx

(b a) + x ln xa ,
b
bx
+ a + ln xa
dt =
bxh ax
i,
 h

b
a
1
+ 1 1
p
p
p

(bx)

(ax)

p1

p = 0;
p = 1;
1
(bx)p1

1
(ax)p1

p = 2, 3, . . .

Source: De Klerk

3.3.1(a2) For a < x < b

Z b
=
a

t2
(t x)p+1

1
bx

[(b x)2 (a x)2 ] + 2x(b a) + x2 ln xa


,

2
2

b
bx

+ a + 2(b ia) +2x ln xa


,

bx1 h bax
2
a2
b
a
bx
2 (bx)2 (ax)2 + bx + ax + ln xa
,
dt =
i
 h
i
1 h b2
2

b
a
2 1
a

p
p
p1
p1
p (bx)
(ax)

 
h p p1 (bx) i (ax)

2
1
1
1
1
+

,
p

p1

p2

(bx)p2

(ax)p2

p = 0;
p = 1;
p = 2;

p = 3, 4, . . . .

Source: De Klerk

3.3. GENERALIZATION AND A VARIETY OF CASES

45

3.3.1(a3) For a < x < b


1
[(b x)3 (a x)3 ] + 23 x[(b x)2 (a x)2 ]

bx

+ 3x2 (b a) + x3 ln xa
,

3
3

b
a

bx
ax
+ 32 [(b x)2 (a x)2 ]

bx

,
+
a) +i3x2 ln

xa
h 3.2x(b
h
i

3
3
2

b
a
3 b
1
a2

2 (bx)2 (ax)2 + 2 bx + ax + 3(b a)

Z b

3
bx
t
+
h 3x3 ln xa , 3 i
h 2
i
=
dt =
p+1

1
b
a
1
b
a2
a (t x)

3 (bx)3
(ax)3
2 (bx)2
(ax)2

i
h

b
a
bx

bx
+ ln xa
ax
,

h
i
 h
i

3
3

1
b
a
3 1
b2
a2

p1
p1
p (bx)p
(ax)p

h p p1 (bx) i (ax)
 

3
2
1
b
a

+ p p1 p2 (bx)p2 (ax)p2

   h
i

+3 2
1
1
b
a

,
p3
p3
p p1
p2
p3
(bx)
(ax)

p = 0;
p = 1;
p = 2;
p = 3;

p = 4, 5, . . . .

Source: De Klerk

Special case: For 0 < x < 1


Z 1
=
0

t3
dt =
(t x)p+1

3
2

1
+ 3x + x1
+ 3x2 ln 1x
,
x
3
2
x
x 6x +6x
1 + 2 2(x1)2 + 3x ln 1x
,
x

p = 1,
p = 2.

Source: Wu & Sun (2005), p360

3.3.1(b) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

Z 1
Pn (t)
1 dp
Pn (t)
dt =

dt,
p+1
p
(t x)
p! dx 1 t x

or, alternatively,
Z 1
=
1



Pn (t)
2 dp1 nxQn (x) nQn1 (x)
dt =
,
(t x)p+1
p! dxp1
1 x2

where Pn and Qn are respectively the Legendre polynomials of the first kind and Legendre
functions of the second kind.
Special case:
Z 1
i
Pn (t)
2nx h
n
=
dt
=
xQ
(x)

Q
(x)
+
Qn (x)(1 + n),
n
n1
3
2
2
(1 x )
1 x2
1 (t x)

n 0.

Source: De Klerk

46

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.3.1(c1)
For a < x < b and = a x, = b x, < 0 < , it follows
Z b
ekt
=
dt =
p+1
a (t x)
"
#

 j
 X
 j1
 X
p

j
ekx p
k pj Y
k j+p p!
k ln
+
(p l)
+
( j j ) .
j
p!

j
()
j(j
+
p)!
j=1
j=1
l=0
Source: De Klerk

3.3.1(c2)
For a < x < b and = a x, = b x, < 0 < , it follows
Z b
eit
dt =
=
p+1
a (t x)
"
#

 X
 j1
 j
 X
p

eix p

ipj Y
j
p! ip+j
i ln
+
(p l)
+
( j j ) .
j
p!

j
()
j(j
+
p)!
j=1
j=1
l=0
Source: De Klerk

3.3.1(c3 and c4)


For a < x < b and = a x,
Z b
cos kt + i sin kt
dt =
=
(t x)p+1
a
+

+
+
+

= b x, < 0 < ,
 p1
 p
cos kx Y
p
(p l)
p.p!
()p
l=0
"
Y
 p+1j
pj
p1
X
k j1

p+1j
j sin kx
i
(p l)
p! p + 1 j l=0
()p+1j
j=1
#
 p1j
 pj
j
pj
Y

cos kx k
(p l)
+
p! p j
()pj
l=0
"
#




cos kx p

sin kx p1
ip
k ln
+
k
p!

p!

"
#


p+1
sin kx p

k ( )
ip+1
k ln
+ cos kx
p!

1.(1 + p)!
"
#

p+j
j
j
p+1+j
j+1
j+1
X
k
(

)
k
(

)
ip+1+j sin kx
+ cos kx
,
j.(j + p)!
(j + 1).(j + 1 + p)!
j=1

with
q (<1)

X
j=1

q (<1)

= 0,

= 0.

j=1

Source: De Klerk

3.3. GENERALIZATION AND A VARIETY OF CASES

47

Special cases:
For 0 < x < 1
"
#
Z 1

2j+3
X


sin t
=
dt = cos x
+
(1)j+1
(1 x)2j+1 (x)2j+1
3
(t

x)
x(x

1)
(2j
+
1).(2j
+
3)!
0
j=0
"


2
(1 x) x2 2
1x
+ sin x

ln
2x2 (x 1)2
2
x
#

2j+2
X


+
(1)j+1
(1 x)2j (x)2j .
(2j).(2j
+
2)!
j=1
Source: De Klerk

For 0 < x < 1


"


Z 1
cos t
(1 x)2 x2 2
1x
=
dt = cos x

ln
3
2x2 (x 1)2
2
x
0 (t x)

#
2j+2


+
(1 x)2j (x)2j
(1)j+1
(2j).(2j
+
2)!
j=1
"
#

2j+1
X


+ sin x
+
(1)j+1
(1 x)2j1 (x)2j1
x(1 x) j=1
(2j 1).(2j + 1)!
Source: De Klerk

3.3.1(d) Further cases:


For p = 1, 2,

Z 1 2
t + 2 + sgn(t) |t|p+1+1/2
24 10p
=
dt =
,
p+1
t
3
1

x = 0.

Source: Wu & Sun (2005), pp 360-361

For p = 1, 2,

Z 1 2
t + 2 + sgn(t) |t|p+1/2
=
dt = 16 6p,
tp+1
1

x = 0.

Source: Wu & Sun (2005), pp 360-361

3.3.2(a) For a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,

Z b
Z b
f (t) 1 t
1 dp
f (t) 1 t
dt =

dt.
=
p+1
p! dxp a
(t x)
a (t x)

48

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED


Source: De Klerk

3.3.2(a0) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,

Z 1
2 2(1)p+1
1t
=
dt =
p+1
p(1 x)(1 + x)p
1 (t x)
Z 1
1t
2p 3
dt.
+
=
2p(1 x) 1 (t x)p
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (25)

3.3.2(an) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 0, 1, . . . ,



Z 1 n
Z 1
p+1 
np1
X
X p+1
t 1t
n
1t
np1+m
=
dt
=
x
=
dt
+
Ak xnp1k
p+1
m
(t

x)
p
+
1

m
(t

x)
1
1
m=1
k=0
and n p, and
Ap+1
k


 k
  i
nk1 X
2
i k
.
=4 2
(1)
p
i 2i + 3
i=p+1
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (38, B5)

3.3.3(a) For 1 a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,

Z b
Z b
f (t) 1 t2
1 dp
f (t) 1 t2
=
dt =

dt.
(t x)p+1
p! dxp a
(t x)
a
Source: De Klerk

3.3.3(a0) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,


(
Z 1
,
1 t2
dt =
=
p+1
0,
1 (t x)

p = 1;
p = 2, 3, . . . .
Source: De Klerk

3.3.3(an) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,


(
Z 1 n
0,
p>n+1
t 1 t2
dt = Pn+1
=
kp
p+1
, p n + 1,
1 (t x)
k=p k(k 1) . . . (k (p 1)) bk x
p!
with

3.3. GENERALIZATION AND A VARIETY OF CASES

bk =

0,
21

nk
2


,

nk+3
2

nk

even

nk

odd.

49

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (34, B6); De Klerk

3.3.3(b1) For 1 < x < 1

Z 1
Z 1
1 dp
Un (t) 1 t2
Un (t) 1 t2
dt,
=
dt =

p+1
tx
p! dxp 1
1 (t x)
or, alternatively,





Z 1

Un (t) 1 t2
dp1 d
dp1
=
dt =
Tn+1 (x) =
(n + 1)Un (x) ,
p+1
p! dxp1 dx
p! dxp1
1 (t x)
n 0, where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and
second kind.
Special case:

Z 1
Un (t) 1 t2

dUn (x)
(n + 1)Tn+1 xUn
=
dt = (n + 1)
=
,
3
(t x)
2
dx
x2 1
1

n 0.
Source: De Klerk

3.3.3(b2) For 1 < x < 1


Z 1
=
1

or, alternatively,
Z 1
=
1

Z 1
Tn (t)
1 dp
Tn (t)

dt =

dt,
p
p+1
2
p! dx 1 (t x) 1 t2
(t x)
1t



Tn (t)
dp1 nTn (x) xUn1 (x)

dt =
,
p! dxp1
x2 1
(t x)p+1 1 t2

n 1, where Tn and Un are respectively the Chebyshev polynomials of the first and
second kind.
Special case:
Z 1
=
1



Tn (t)
d nTn (x) xUn1 (x)

dt =
2 dx
x2 1
(t x)3 1 t2




2 2
2
=
3nxTn (x) + n (x 1) + 2x + 1 Un1 (x) ,
2(x2 1)2

n 1.

50

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED


Source: De Klerk

3.3.3(c1) For 1 a < x < b 1


" ( j1 Z
Z b
1 t2 et
1 dp X 1 X i b j1i
=
dt =
x
t
1 t2 dt
p+1
p! dxp j=0 j! i=0
a (t x)
a
+xj

i b

1
2
1 t x sin t + xj C

)#
,

with

21 x2 1 t2 + 2(1 xt) b



2
C = 1 x ln

tx
a

and

Pq (<0)
i=0

= 0.

Special case:
" ( j1 Z
Z b
1 t2 et
1 d2 X 1 X i b j1i
=
dt =
x
t
1 t2 dt
(t x)3
2 dx2 j=0 j! i=0
a
a
+xj

i b

1
2
1 t x sin t + xj C

)#
,

with C as above.
Source: De Klerk

3.3.4(a) For a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,

Z b
=
a

Z b
f (t)
1 dp
f (t)

dt
=

dt.
p! dxp a (t x) 1 t
(t x)p+1 1 t
Source: De Klerk

3.3.4(a0) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 1, 2, . . . ,

Z 1
dt
2(1)p+1

=
=

p+1
p(1 x)(1 + x)p
1t
1 (t x)
Z 1
2p 1
dt

+
=
,
2p(1 x) 1 (t x)p 1 t

x < 1.

Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (26)

3.3. GENERALIZATION AND A VARIETY OF CASES

51

3.3.4(an) For 1 < x < 1 and p = 0, 1, . . . ,


Z 1
=
1

p+1 
X

tn

dt =
(t x)p+1 1 t
m=1


Z 1
np1
X p+1
n
dt
np1+m

Bk xnp1k
x
=
+
m
p+1m
1 t k=0
1 (t x)

and n p + 1, and
Bkp+1


 k
  i
nk1 X
2
i k
=2 2
(1)
.
p
i 2i + 1
i=0
Source: Kaya & Erdogan (1987) (39, B10)

3.3.5(a) For a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, 3, . . . ,


Z b
=
a

f (t)

(t x)p+1

Z b
f (t)
1 dp

dt =

dt.
p
2
p! dx a (t x) 1 t2
1t
Source: De Klerk

3.3.5(a0) For a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, 3, . . . ,


Z b
=
a

with



1
1 dp

=
ln |D | ,
p! dxp
(t x)p+1 1 t2
1 x2
dt

2
1

x
1 b2 + (1 xb) a x

D =
.
.
1 x2 1 a2 + (1 xa) b x
Source: De Klerk

3.3.5(an) For a < x < b 1 and p = 1, 2, 3, . . . ,


Z 1
=
1


 n1 Z
xn
1 dp X i b tn1i

ln |D | ,
dt
dt =
x
p! dxp i=0
1 x2
1 t2
(t x)p+1 1 t2
a
tn

with D as in 3.3.5(a0).
Source: De Klerk

3.3.6 Further cases:


3.3.6(a) For 1 < t < 1 and x = 0,
Z 1 1t
e 1
=
dt = 8.120 313 877 115.
3/2
1 (t x)
Source: Ashour, SA & Ahmed, HM. (2007), p 1680.

52

CHAPTER 3. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: ANALYTICALLY CALCULATED

3.3.6(b) For 1 < t < 1 and x = 0,


Z 1
1 t2 et
=
dt = 2.339 556 253 339.
t2
1
Source: Ashour, SA & Ahmed, HM. (2007), p 1682.

Chapter 4
Singular integrals: numerically
calculated
Theme (1990+)
dt Gauss quadrature
Ioakimidis (1993)
Korsunsky (1998)
Hui & Shia (1999)
Kolm & Rokhlin (2001)
Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005)
R b f (t)
=a (tx)
2 dt Newton-Cotes quadrature
Sun & Wu (2005)
Wu & Sun (2005)
Wu & Sun (2008)
R b f (t)
=a (tx)2 dt Gauss quadrature
Korsunsky (1998)
Hui & Shia (1999)
Kolm & Rokhlin (2001)
Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005)
Shen (2005)
R b f (t)
=a (tx)p+1 dt Newton-Cotes quadrature
Wu & Sun (2005)
R b f (t)
=a (tx)p+1 dt Gauss quadrature
Kythe & Schaferkotter (2005)
Rb
a

f (t)
tx

53

Technique
4.1.2.1
4.1.2.2
4.1.2.3
4.1.2.4
4.1.2.5
4.2.1.1
4.2.1.2
4.2.1.3
4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
4.2.2.5
4.3.1.1
4.3.2.2

54

4.1

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Cauchy principal value integrals

4.1.1

Newton-Cotes quadrature

4.1.2

Gauss quadrature

Technique 4.1.2.1
Author and date: NI Ioakimidis (1993)
Article: The Gauss-Laguerre quadrature rule for finite-part integrals
Journal: Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering, 9, 439-450.
Equations in article: 1, 12, 16, 22, 32
Numerical technique: Gauss-Laguerre quadrature
Z t
Z t
n
X
e
e f (t)

dt
[f (t) f (0)] dt f (0) '
win [f (tin ) f (0)] f (0).
t
t
0
0
i=1
Algorithm:
Either follow Procedure A or Procedure B:
Procedure A:
Step 1: Choose n, n 2, the number of nodes in the Gauss quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate
Pn

cn =

1
k=1 k
Pn1 1
k=1 k

+
+

with = 0.577 215 664 9... .


Step 3: Find the classical Laguerre polynomials Ln1 , Ln and Ln+1 and calculate the
polynomials Mn , Mn0 and Mn+1 where
Mn (t) = Ln (t) cn Ln1 (t), n 2.
Consult: Laguerre Polynomial
Step 4: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Mn .
Step 5: Calculate the weights
win =

cn
,
n(n + 1) Mn0 (tin ) Mn+1 (tin )

i = 1, 2, . . . , n,

or, alternatively,
win =

cn1
,
n(n 1) Mn0 (tin ) Mn1 (tin )

i = 1, 2, . . . , n.

Step 6: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z t
n
X
e f (t)

dt '
win [f (tin ) f (0)] f (0).
t
0
i=1

4.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

55

Procedure B:
Step 1: Choose n, n 2, the number of nodes in the Gauss quadrature.
Step 2: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z t
n
X
e f (t)

dt '
win [f (tin ) f (0)] f (0),
t
0
i=1
with = 0.577 215 664 9... , and tin and win as given in the appendix.
Appendix: For n = 10; otherwise, consult original article.

Comments:

tin

win

0.033 537 662 5


0.339 472 493 7
1.214 488 133 1
2.617 128 891 9
4.587 964 406 2
7.192 862 083 9
10.538 392 798 1
14.806 984 300 8
20.353 250 286 8
28.089 410 590 7

2.206 874 697 7


1.300 355 767 3
0.277 123 918 2
0.046 818 132 2
0.005 042 935 0
0.000 308 685 5
0.000 009 473 1
0.000 000 120 8
0.000 000 000 1
0.000 000 000 0

56

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.1.2.2
Author and date: AM Korsunsky (1998)
Article: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulae for strongly singular integrals
Journal: Quarterly of Applied Mathematics, 56, 461-472.
Equations in article: 24a, 27, 30a, 32, 33, 45, 46
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
Z
n
i
i
X
1 1 h f (t)
1 t2in h f (tin )
2

+ K(t, xk ) 1 t dt '
+ K(tin , xk ) ,
1 t xk
n + 1 tin xk
i=1
K(t, x) smooth.
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate the possible singular values xk , the zeros of Tn+1 , k = 1, . . . , n + 1,
namely


xk = cos (2k1)
.
2(n+1)
Step 3: Calculate the nodes tin , the zeros of the Chebyshev polynomial of the second
kind, Un given by
i
tin = cos
, i = 1, 2, . . . , n.
n+1
Step 4: Compute for k = 1, . . . , n + 1, the approximated value of the integral using the
quadrature formula
Z
n
i
i
X
1 1 h f (t)
1 t2in h f (tin )
2
+ K(tin , xk ) ,

+ K(t, xk ) 1 t dt '
n + 1 tin xk
1 t xk
i=1
K(t, x) smooth.
Comments:

4.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

57

Technique 4.1.2.3(a)
Author and date: CY Hui & D Shia (1999)
Article: Evaluations of hypersingular integrals using Gaussian quadrature
Journal: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 44, 205-214.
Equations in article: 6, 8, 9, 10, 11
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
Z 1
n
f (t)
2f (x)Qn (x) X win f (tin )

dt '
+
,
Pn (x)
tin x
1 t x
i=1

x 6= tin .

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, Pn and Pn+1 and the Legendre
function of the second kind Qn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial and Legendre functions
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2
(n +

1)Pn0 (tin )Pn+1 (tin )

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
n
f (t)
2f (x)Qn (x) X win f (tin )

dt '
+
,
Pn (x)
tin x
1 t x
i=1
Comments:

x 6= tin .

58

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.1.2.3(b)
Author and date: CY Hui & D Shia (1999)
Article: Evaluations of hypersingular integrals using Gaussian quadrature
Journal: International Journal of Numerical Methods in Engineering, 44, 205-214.
Equations in article: 6, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
Z 1
n1
X
f (x)
win f (tin )
1 t2 f (t)

dt '
Tn (x) +
,
tx
Un1 (x)
t

x
in
1
i=1

x 6= tin .

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Chebyshev polynomial of the first kind, Tn , and the Chebyshev polynomial of the second kind Un1 .
Consult: Chebyshev polynomial 1 and Chebyshev polynomial 2
Step 3: Calculate the nodes, tin , which are the zeros of Un1 given by
tin = cos

i
,
n

i = 1, 2, . . . , n 1.

Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,


win =

i
sin2 ,
n
n

i = 1, 2, . . . , n 1.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
n1
X
1 t2 f (t)
f (x)
win f (tin )

dt '
Tn (x) +
,
tx
Un1 (x)
t

x
in
1
i=1
Comments:

x 6= tin .

4.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

59

Technique 4.1.2.4
Author and date: P Kolm & V Rokhlin (2001)
Article: Numerical quadratures for singular and hypersingular integrals
Journal: Computers and Mathematics with Applications, 41, 327-352.
Equations in article: 3, 51, 71, 75
Numerical technique: Gauss Legendre-quadrature
Z 1
n h
n1
i
X
X
f (t)

dt '
win
(2j + 1)Pj (tin )Qj (x) f (tin ).
1 t x
i=1
j=0
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, P0 , . . . , Pn and the Legendre
functions of the second kind Q0 , . . . , Qn1 .
Consult: Legendre polynomial and Legendre functions
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
n
 t t 2
Y
jn
win =
dt,
1 j=1;j6=i tin tjn

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
n h
n1
i
X
X
f (t)

dt '
win
(2j + 1)Pj (tin )Qj (x) f (tin ).
1 t x
i=1
j=0
Comments:

60

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.1.2.5(a)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
"Z
#
Z b
n
n
b
X
X
w(t)f (t)
w(t)
f (tin )
win

dt '
win
+ f (x)
dt
.
tx
t

x
t

x
t

x
in
in
a
a
i=1
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, Pn and Pn+1 .
Consult: Legendre polynomial
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2(1 t2in )
,
(n + 1)2 [Pn+1 (tin )]2

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Legendre
quadrature formula
" 
#
 X
Z 1
n
n
X
f (tin )
1x
win
f (t)

dt '
win
+ f (x) ln

.
t

x
1
+
x
t

x
in
in
1 t x
i=1
i=1
Comments:

4.1. CAUCHY PRINCIPAL VALUE INTEGRALS

61

Technique 4.1.2.5(b)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
"Z
#
Z b
n
n
b
X
X
w(t)f (t)
w(t)
f (tin )
win

dt '
win
+ f (x)
dt
.
tx
t

x
t

x
t

x
in
in
a
a
i=1
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Tn , the Chebyshev polynomial of the first
kind, given by
(2i 1)
tin = cos
, i = 1, 2, . . . , n.
2n
Step 3: Calculate the weights, win , given by
win =

(1 t2in )
,
n

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Chebyshev
quadrature formula
"
#
Z 1
n
n
2
X
X
1 t f (t)
f (tin )
win

dt '
win
f (x) x +
,
tx
tin x
t x
1
i=1
i=1 in
Comments:

62

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

4.2

Hypersingular integrals

4.2.1

Newton-Cotes quadrature

Technique 4.2.1.1(a)
Author and date: W Sun & J Wu (2005)
Article: Newton-Cotes formulae for the numerical evaluation of certain hypersingular
integrals
Journal: Computing, 75, 297-309.
Equations in article: 1, 3, 3a, 4
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature
Z b
=
a

n h
X
f (t)
1 i0 ti x 1 in ti+1 x
i0
in i
dt
'
ln

ln

+
f (ti ),




(t x)2
h
t

x
h
t

x
x

t
x

t
i
i1
i+1
i
0
n
i=0

with ij the Kronecker-delta.


Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, with n 1 the number of internal nodes in [a, b].
Step 2: Let a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b a partition of the interval [a, b] with
hi = ti ti1 , i = 1, . . . , n.
Step 3: Assure that x 6= ti , i = 1, 2, . . . , n 1.
Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n h
X
f (t)
1 i0 ti x 1 in ti+1 x
i0
in i
=
dt
'
ln

ln

+
f (ti ),




2
h
t

x
h
t

x
x

t
x

t
i
i1
i+1
i
0
n
a (t x)
i=0
with ij the Kronecker-delta.
Comments:

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

63

Technique 4.2.1.1(b)
Author and date: W Sun & J Wu (2005)
Article: Newton-Cotes formulae for the numerical evaluation of certain hypersingular
integrals
Journal: Computing, 75, 297-309.
Equations in article: 16, 16a, 22, 23, 24
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature (with singular point equal to a node)
Z b
=
a

n
h
i
X
i f (ti )
i
ba
+ f (tk )

(i k)2 h
(a tk )(b tk ) i=0, i6=k (i k)2 h
i=0, i6=k
"
#
n
X
b tk
i
f (tk+1 ) f (tk1 )
ln
+

2h
tk a i=0, i6=k i k

f (t)
dt '
(t x)2

n
X

f (tk+1 ) 2f (tk ) + f (tk1 )


.
2h

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, with n 1 the number of internal nodes in [a, b].
Step 2: Let a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b be a uniform partition of the interval [a, b]
with h = hi = ti ti1 = (b a)/n, i = 1, . . . , n.
Step 3: Let x = tk where k is any specific choice from the values 1, . . . , n 1.
Step 4: Calculate i = 1 (i0 + in )/2, i = 0, . . . , n, with ij the Kronecker-delta.
Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n
n
h
i
X
X
f (t)
i f (ti )
ba
i
=
dt
'
+
f
(t
)

k
2
(i k)2 h
(a tk )(b tk ) i=0, i6=k (i k)2 h
a (t x)
i=0, i6=k
"
#
n
X
f (tk+1 ) f (tk1 )
b tk
i
+
ln

2h
tk a i=0, i6=k i k
+
Comments:

f (tk+1 ) 2f (tk ) + f (tk1 )


.
2h

64

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.1.1(c)
Author and date: W Sun & J Wu (2005)
Article: Newton-Cotes formulae for the numerical evaluation of certain hypersingular
integrals
Journal: Computing, 75, 297-309.
Equations in article: 16, 28, 29
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature (with singular point not very close
to either one of the end points a or b)
Z b
=
a

f (t)
dt '
(t x)2
+

n
X

n
h
i
X
i f (ti )
ba
i
+
f
(t
)

k
(i k)2 h
(a tk )(b tk ) i=0, i6=k (i k)2 h
i=0, i6=k

f (tk+1 ) 2f (tk ) + f (tk1 )


.
2h

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, with n 1 the number of internal nodes in [a, b].
Step 2: Let a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b be a uniform partition of the interval [a, b]
with h = hi = ti ti1 = (b a)/n, i = 1, . . . , n.
Step 3: Ensure that the singular point x is not very close to either one of the end points
a or b.
Step 4: Calculate i = 1 (i0 + in )/2, i = 0, . . . , n, with ij the Kronecker-delta.
Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n
n
h
i
X
X
i f (ti )
ba
i
f (t)
dt
'
+
f
(t
)

=
k
2
(i k)2 h
(a tk )(b tk ) i=0, i6=k (i k)2 h
a (t x)
i=0, i6=k
+
Comments:

f (tk+1 ) 2f (tk ) + f (tk1 )


.
2h

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

65

Technique 4.2.1.2
Author and date: J Wu & W Sun (2005)
Article: The superconvergence of the composite trapezoidal rule for the Hadamard
finite-part integrals.
Journal: Numerische Mathematik, 102, 343-363.
Equations in article: 1.1, 1.4, 2.1, 2.3
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature
Z b
=
a

X
f (t)
dt
'
wi (x)f (ti ).
(t x)2
i=0

Algorithm:
Step 1: Let a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b be a uniform partition of the interval
[a, b] with h = ti ti1 , i = 1, . . . , n, and with n 1 the number of internal nodes, to be
determined in step 2.
Step 2: Call the singular point x the node tm . Choose both m and n integers and in such
a way that
b a
n=
(m + 12 13 ).
xa
This will ensure superconvergence; otherwise make a choice so that x ' tm .
Step 3: Calculate the weights wi (x), i = 0, 1, . . . , n,
wi (x) =

1 i0 ti x 1 in ti+1 x
i0
in
ln
ln
+
,


h
ti1 x
h
ti x
x t0 x tn

with ij the Kronecker-delta.


Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n
X
f (t)
=
dt '
wi (x)f (ti ).
2
a (t x)
i=0
Comments:

66

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.1.3
Author and date: J Wu & W Sun (2008)
Article: The superconvergence of Newton-Cotes rules for the Hadamard finite-part integral on an interval.
Journal: Numerische Mathematik, 109, 143-165.
Equations in article: 2.2, 2.3
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature
Z b
=
a

n1

XX
f (t)
k
dt
'
wij
(x)f (tij ).
(t x)2
i=0 j=0

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n1, the number of internal nodes, with a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b
a uniform partition of the interval [a, b] with h = ti ti1 , i = 1, . . . , n.
Step 2: In order to construct a piecewise Lagrange interpolation polynomial of degree
k for each subinterval, choose k, and perform a further partition of each subinterval,
ti = ti0 < ti1 < . . . < tik = ti+1 , i = 0, . . . , n 1.
Step 3: Calculate for each subinterval the polynomials
k
Y
lki (t) =
(t tij ),

i = 0, . . . , n 1,

j=0
0
as well as the derivatives lki
(t),

i = 0, . . . , n 1.
(k)

Step 4: Calculate, for i = 0, . . . , n 1 and j = 0, . . . , k the weights wij (x),


(k)
wij (x)

Z tik (=ti+1 )
1
1
= 0
=
lki (tij ) ti0 (=ti )
(t x)2

k
Y

(t tim ) dt.

m=0; m6=j

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n1 X
k
X
f (t)
k
=
dt '
wij
(x)f (tij ).
2
(t

x)
a
i=0 j=0
Step 6: Remark: If x = t[n/2] + ( + 1)h/2, where is a zero of
Sk (t) =

k0 (t)

[k0 (2i + t) + k0 (2i + t)],

t (1, 1),

i=1

and where k is a function of second kind, associated with a polynomial of equallydistributed zeros, then this choice will ensure superconvergence. Consult the article for
technical details and published values of .
Comments:

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

4.2.2

67

Gauss quadrature

Technique 4.2.2.1
Author and date: AM Korsunsky (1998)
Article: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulae for strongly singular integrals
Journal: Quarterly of Applied Mathematics, 56, 461-472.
Equations in article: 45, 46, 47
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
"
#
Z
n
X
1 t2in
1
1 t2in (1)i+k
1 1 1 t2 f (t)
p
f (tin ).
dt '
+
=
2
2
n
+
1
(t

x
)
t

x
1 (t xk )2
1

x
in
k
in
k
k
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate the values xk , the zeros of Tn+1 (t), k = 1, . . . , n + 1, namely,
xk = cos

 (2k1) 
.
2(n+1)

Step 3: Calculate the nodes, tin , the zeros of the Chebyshev polynomial of the second
kind, Un (t) given by
i
tin = cos
, i = 1, 2, . . . , n.
n+1
Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
"
#
Z 1
n
2
2
i+k
2
X
1
1 t f (t)
1 tin
1
1 tin (1)
p
=
dt '
+
f (tin ).
2
2
1 (t xk )
n
+
1
(t

x
)
t

x
1 x2k
in
k
in
k
i=1
Comments:

68

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.2.2(a)
Author and date: CY Hui & D Shia (1999)
Article: Evaluations of hypersingular integrals using Gaussian quadrature
Journal: International Journal of Numerical Methods in Engineering, 44, 205-214.
Equations in article: 6, 8, 9, 18, 19
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
Z 1
=
1

f (t)
2f 0 (x)Qn (x) 2f (x)(1 x2 )1 X win f (tin )
dt
'

+
,
(t x)2
Pn (x)
Pn (x)2
(tin x)2
i=1

x 6= tin .

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, Pn and Pn+1 , and the Legendre
function of the second kind Qn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial and Legendre functions
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2
(n +

1)Pn0 (tin )Pn+1 (tin )

, i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
=
1

f (t)
2f 0 (x)Qn (x) 2f (x)(1 x2 )1 X win f (tin )
dt '

+
,
(t x)2
Pn (x)
Pn (x)2
(tin x)2
i=1

Comments:

x 6= tin .

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

69

Technique 4.2.2.2(b)
Author and date: CY Hui & D Shia (1999)
Article: Evaluations of hypersingular integrals using Gaussian quadrature
Journal: International Journal of Numerical Methods in Engineering, 44, 205-214.
Equations in article: 6, 8, 9, 18, 20
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
Z 1
0
(t)]|t=x
1 t2 f (t)
f 0 (x)Tn (x) f (x)[Un1 (t)Tn0 (t) Tn (t)Un1
=
dt
'

2
2
(t x)
Un1 (x)
[Un1 (x)]
1
n1
X win f (tin )
+
), x 6= tin .
(tin x)2
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Chebyshev polynomial of the first kind, Tn , and the Chebyshev polynomial of the second kind Un1 .
Consult: Chebyshev polynomial 1 and Chebyshev polynomial 2
Step 3: Calculate the nodes, tin , which are the zeros of Un1 given by
tin = cos

i
,
n

i = 1, 2, . . . , n 1.

Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,


win =

i
sin2 ,
n
n

i = 1, 2, . . . , n 1.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
0
(t)]|t=x
1 t2 f (t)
f 0 (x)Tn (x) f (x)[Un1 (t)Tn0 (t) Tn (t)Un1
=
dt
'

(t x)2
Un1 (x)
[Un1 (x)]2
1
n1
X
win f (tin )
+
), x 6= tin .
(tin x)2
i=1
Comments:

70

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.2.3
Author and date: P Kolm & V Rokhlin (2001)
Article: Numerical quadratures for singular and hypersingular integrals
Journal: Computers and mathematics with Applications, 41, 327-352.
Equations in article: 4, 51, 73, 77
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
" n2 [(n+j3)/2]
Z 1
n
X
X
X
f (t)
=
(2j + 1)(4k + 3 2i)Qj (x)P2k+1i (tin )
dt
'
w

in
2
1 (t x)
i=1
j=0
k=j
!#
n1
X
1
(1)j
2j + 1
+
Pj (tin )

f (tin )
2
x

1
x
+
1
j=0
where [(n + j 3)/2] denotes the integer part of (n + j 3)/2.
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, P0 , . . . , Pn and the Legendre
functions of the second kind Q0 , . . . , Qn1 .
Consult: Legendre polynomial and Legendre functions
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
n
 t t 2
Y
jn
dt,
win =
1 j=1;j6=i tin tjn

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the quadrature formula
Z 1
=
1

" n2
n
X
X
f (t)
dt
'
w

in
(t x)2
i=1
j=0
+

n1
X
2j + 1
j=0

[(n+j3)/2]

(2j + 1)(4k + 3 2i)Qj (x)P2k+1i (tin )

k=j

1
(1)j
Pj (tin )

x1 x+1

!#
f (tin ),

where [(n + j 3)/2] denotes the integer part of (n + j 3)/2.


Comments:

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

71

Technique 4.2.2.4(a)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss quadrature (general)
"Z
#
Z b
n
n
b
X
X
f (tin )
w(t)
win
w(t)f (t)
=
dt '
win
+ f (x) =
dt
2
2
2
(t

x)
(t

x)
(tin x)2
in
a (t x)
a
i=1
i=1
"Z
#
n
b
X
w(t)
win
.
+f 0 (x)
dt
t

x
in
a tx
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, Pn and Pn+1 .
Consult: Legendre Polynomial
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2(1 t2in )
,
(n + 1)2 [Pn+1 (tin )]2

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Legendre
quadrature formula
"
#
Z 1
n
n
X
X
f (t)
f (tin )
2
win
dt '
win
+ f (x) 2

=
2
(tin x)2
x 1 i=1 (tin x)2
1 (t x)
i=1
" 
#
 X
n
1

x
w
in
+f 0 (x) ln

.
1+x
t

x
in
i=1
Comments:

72

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.2.4(b)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss quadrature (general)
"Z
#
Z b
n
n
b
X
X
f (tin )
w(t)
win
w(t)f (t)
=
dt '
win
+ f (x) =
dt
2
2
2
(t

x)
(t

x)
(tin x)2
in
a (t x)
a
i=1
i=1
"Z
#
n
b
X
w(t)
win
.
+f 0 (x)
dt
t

x
in
a tx
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Tn (t), the Chebyshev polynomial of the
first kind, given by
(2i 1)
tin = cos
, i = 1, 2, . . . , n.
2n
Step 3: Calculate the weights, win , given by
win =

(1 t2in )
,
n

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Chebyshev
quadrature formula
"
#
Z b
n
n
X
X
1 t2 f (t)
f (tin )
win

dt '
win
f (x) +
(t x)2
(tin x)2
(tin x)2
a
i=1
i=1
"
#
n
X
w
in
f 0 (x) x +
.
t x
i=1 in
Comments:

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

73

Technique 4.2.2.5(a)
Author and date: Y Shen (2006)
Article: Numerical quadratures for Hadamard hypersingular integrals
Journal: Numerical Mathematics, 15, 50-59.
Equations in article: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
Z 1
=
1

X
f (t)
f (tin ) f (x)
0
dt
'
2Q
(x)f
(x)
+
win (x)
.
0
2
(t x)
tin x
i=1

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, P0 , . . . , Pn and the Legendre
functions of the second kind, Q0 , . . . , Qn1 .
Consult: Legendre polynomial and Legendre functions
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2
(1

t2in )[Pn0 (tin )]2

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Calculate
win (x) = win

n1
X

(2j + 1)Pj (tin )Qj (x),

i = 1, . . . , n,

j=0

or
win (x) = win

n
X

(2j 1)Pj1 (tin )Qj1 (x),

i = 1, . . . , n.

j=0

Step 6: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Legendre
quadrature formula
Z 1
=
1

Comments:

X
f (t)
f (tin ) f (x)
0
dt
'
2Q
(x)f
(x)
+
win (x)
.
0
2
(t x)
tin x
i=1

74

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.2.2.5(b)
Author and date: Y Shen (2006)
Article: Numerical quadratures for Hadamard hypersingular integrals
Journal: Numerical Mathematics, 15, 50-59.
Equations in article: 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature (1)

Z 1
n
X
f (tin ) f (x)
f (t) 1 t2
dt ' f (x) +
win (x)
.
=
2
(t x)
t

x
in
1
i=1
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, T0 , . . . , Tn and the Chebyshev
polynomials of the second kind, U0 , . . . , Un1 .
Consult: Chebyshev polynomial 1 and Chebyshev polynomial 2
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Tn ,
tin = cos

i
.
n+1

Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,


win =

i
sin2
,
n+1
n+1

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Calculate
win (x) = 2win

n1
X

Uj (tin )Tj+1 (x),

i = 1, . . . , n.

j=0

Step 6: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Chebyshev
quadrature formula

Z 1
n
X
f (tin ) f (x)
f (t) 1 t2
dt ' f (x) +
win (x)
.
=
2
(t x)
tin x
1
i=1
Comments:

4.2. HYPERSINGULAR INTEGRALS

75

Technique 4.2.2.5(c)
Author and date: Y Shen (2006)
Article: Numerical quadratures for Hadamard hypersingular integrals
Journal: Numerical Mathematics, 15, 50-59.
Equations in article: 3.16, 3.17, 3.18, 3.19
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature (2)
Z 1
=
1

X
1
f (tin ) f (x)
f (t)

dt
'
win (x)
.
2
(t x) 1 t2
t

x
in
i=1

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, T0 , . . . , Tn1 and the Chebyshev
polynomials of the second kind, U0 , . . . , Un2 .
Consult: Chebyshev polynomial 1 and Chebyshev polynomial 2
Step 3: Calculate the nodes tin , i = 1, . . . , n,
tin = cos

(2i 1)
.
2n

Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,


w1n = w2n = . . . = wnn =

.
n

Step 5: Calculate
win (x) = 2win

n1
X

Tj (tin )Uj1 (x),

i = 1, . . . , n.

j=1

Step 6: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Chebyshev
quadrature formula
Z 1
=
1

Comments:

X
f (tin ) f (x)
f (t)
1

dt
'
win (x)
.
2
2
tin x
(t x) 1 t
i=1

76

4.3
4.3.1

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Generalizations
Newton-Cotes quadrature

Technique 4.3.1.1
Author and date: J Wu & W Sun (2005)
Article: The superconvergence of the composite trapezoidal rule for the Hadamard
finite-part integrals.
Journal: Numerische Mathematik, 102, 343-363.
Equations in article: 1.1, 1.4, 2.2, 2.3
Numerical technique: Newton-Cotes quadrature
Z b
=
a

X
f (t)
dt
'
wi (x)f (ti ).
(t x)3
i=0

Algorithm:
Step 1: Let a = t0 < t1 < . . . < tn1 < tn = b be a uniform partition of the interval
[a, b] with h = ti ti1 , i = 1, . . . , n, and with n 1 the number of internal nodes, to be
determined in step 2.
Step 2: Call the singular point x the node tm . Choose both m and n integers and in such
a way that
b a
n=
(m + 12 ).
xa
This will ensure superconvergence; otherwise make a choice so that x ' tmn .
Step 3: Calculate the weights wi (x), i = 0, 1, . . . , n,
i
1 h i0
in
1 i0
1 in

,
wi (x) =
2 (t0 x)2 (tn x)2 (ti1 x)(ti x) (ti x)(ti+1 x)
with ij the Kronecker-delta.
Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Newton-Cotes quadrature formula
Z b
n
X
f (t)
=
dt
'
wi (x)f (ti ).
3
a (t x)
i=0
Comments:

4.3. GENERALIZATIONS

4.3.2

77

Gauss quadrature

Technique 4.3.2.1(a)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss-Legendre quadrature
Z 1
=
1

n
X
f (t)
f (tin )
dt '
win
p+1
(t x)
(tin x)p+1
i=1
"( 
#
)

p
n
(1)pj
1
1
X
X
f (j) (x)
w

,
j
<
p
in
pj
pj
pj (1+x)
(1x)
+

.
1x
j!
(tin x)p+1j
ln
,
j=p
1+x
j=0
i=1

Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Legendre quadrature.
Step 2: Find the Legendre polynomials of the first kind, Pn and Pn+1 .
Consult: Legendre Polynomial
Step 3: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Pn .
Consult: Legendre Polynomial zeros
Step 4: Calculate the weights, win ,
win =

2(1 t2in )
,
(n + 1)2 [Pn+1 (tin )]2

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 5: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Legendre
quadrature formula
Z 1
=
1

n
X
f (t)
f (tin )
dt '
win
p+1
(t x)
(tin x)p+1
i=1
"( 
)
#

p
n
(1)pj
1
1
X
X
f (j) (x)
w

,
j
<
p
in
pj
pj
pj (1+x)
(1x)
+

.
1x
j!
(tin x)p+1j
ln
,
j=p
1+x
j=0
i=1

Comments:

78

CHAPTER 4. SINGULAR INTEGRALS: NUMERICALLY CALCULATED

Technique 4.3.2.1(b)
Author and date: PK Kythe & MR Schaferkotter (2005)
Book: Handbook of Computational Methods for Integration.
Chapter: Singular Integrals
Section in book: 5.5
Numerical technique: Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature
Z 1
n
X
f (tin )
1 t2 f (t)
=
dt '
win
p+1
(tin x)p+1
1 (t x)
i=1

" 0,
#
p
n
j p 2 X

(j)
X
win
f (x)
, j = p 1
+
.

j!
(tin x)p+1j
i=1
j=0
x,
j=p
Algorithm:
Step 1: Choose n, the number of nodes in the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature.
Step 2: Calculate the zeros tin , i = 1, . . . , n of Tn (t), the Chebyshev polynomial of the
first kind, given by
(2i 1)
tin = cos
, i = 1, 2, . . . , n.
2n
Step 3: Calculate the weights, win , given by
win =

(1 t2in )
,
n

i = 1, . . . , n.

Step 4: Compute the approximated value of the integral using the Gauss-Chebyshev
quadrature formula
Z 1
n
X
1 t2 f (t)
f (tin )
=
dt '
win
p+1
(tin x)p+1
1 (t x)
i=1

" 0,
#
p
n
j p 2 X

(j)
X
f (x)
win
, j = p 1
+
.

j!
(tin x)p+1j
j=0
i=1
x,
j=p
Comments:

Chapter 5
Bibliography
Ashour, S.A. & Ahmed, H.M. 2007. A Gauss quadrature rule for hypersingular integrals.
Applied Mathematics and Computation, 186, 1671-1682.
Davis, P.J. & Rabinowitz, P. 2007(1984). Methods of numerical integration. Dover.
Hui, C-Y. & Shia, D. 1999. Evaluations of hypersingular integrals using Gaussian quadrature. International Journal for Numerical methods in engineering, 44, 205-214.
Ioakimidis, N.I. 1986. On the Gaussian quadrature rule for finite-part integrals with a
first-order singularity. Communications in Applied Numerical methods, 2, 123-132.
Ioakimidis, N.I. & Pitta, M.S. 1988. Remarks on the Gaussian quadrature rule for finitepart integrals with a second-order singularity. Computer methods in Applied Mechanics
and engineering, 69, 325-343.
Ioakimidis, N.I. 1993. The Gauss-Laguerre quadrature rule for finite-part integrals. Communications in Numerical methods in engineering, 9, 439-450.
Kaya, A.C.& Erdogan, F. 1987. On the solution of integral equations with strongly
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Kolm, P. & Rokhlin, V. 2001. Numerical quadratures for singular and hypersingular
integrals. Computers and Mathematics with Applications, 41, 327-352.
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D.B. Ingham, D. Lesnic.
Korsunsky, A.M. 1998. Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulae for strongly singular integrals. Quarterly of Applied Mathematics, 56, 461-472.
Kythe, P.K. & Schaferkotter, M.R. 2005. Handbook of Computational methods for
Integration. Chapman & Hall.
Linz, P. 1985. On the approximate computation of certain strongly singular integrals.
Computing, 35, 345-353.
Monegato, G. 1987. On the weights of certain quadratures for the numerical evaluation
of Cauchy principal value integrals and their derivatives. Numerische Mathematik, 50,
273-281.

79

80

CHAPTER 5. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Monegato, G. 1994. Numerical evaluation of hypersingular integrals. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 50, 9-31.
Paget, D.F. 1981. The numerical evaluation of Hadamard finite-part integrals. Numerische Mathematik, 36, 447-453.
Ramm, A.G. & of der Sluis, A. 1990. Calculating singular integrals as an ill-posed
problem. Numerische Mathematik, 57, 139-145.
Shand, Y. 2006. Numerical quadratures for Hadamard hypersingular integrals. Numerical mathematics, 15, 50-59.
Sun, W. & Wu, J. 2005. Newton-Cotes formulae for the numerical evaluation of certain
hypersingular integrals. Computing, 75, 297-309.
Tsamasphyros, G. & Dimou, G. 1990. Gauss quadrature rules for finite-part integrals.
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Hadamard finite-part integrals. Numerische Mathematik, 102, 343-363.
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finite-part integral on an interval. Numerische Mathematik, 109, 143-165.