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Sexual Assault in LGBTQ Communities


Author: Tidmarsh, Kevin
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Abstract:
Furthermore, it's worth noting that even when discussing male-on-female sexual violence, women who identify
as lesbian or bisexual see much higher rates of sexual assault and intimate partner violence than do their
straight counterparts.
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Publication: The Student Life, Pomona College, Claremont CA.
The results of last spring's Sexual Assault and Campus Climate Survey, released yesterday to students at the
Claremont Colleges, are an incredibly valuable resource to any student at the Claremont Colleges attempting to
wrap their head around the issues of sexual violence as it impacts our campuses. Sam McLaughlin's article on
page one highlights many interesting facts and discrepancies relating to the consortium.
One takeaway worth noting from the report is the particular implications that the data have for queer and trans
people. Too often, sexual assault is framed in a heterosexual male-on-female context, but other gender
identities and sexual orientations may see higher rates of sexual violence than their cisgender and straight
counterparts.
Furthermore, it's worth noting that even when discussing male-on-female sexual violence, women who identify
as lesbian or bisexual see much higher rates of sexual assault and intimate partner violence than do their
straight counterparts.
The survey conducted by the Claremont Colleges corroborates the findings of another recent survey conducted
by the Association of American Universities, which found that the LGBTQ students surveyed at 27 universities
across the country had experienced higher rates of sexual assault than their straight, cisgender peers. For as
much as the data are empirically limited, the study underscores a particularly salient point: at the Claremont
Colleges, and society at large, queer and trans people face particular threats to their bodily safety and security.
As such, students and activists must work doubly hard to bring the stories of queer and trans people, and others
that have been marginalized, to the center of conversations of sexual assault. The double stigma of queerness
and sexual assault means that this is difficult but necessary work& Mdash;talking about sexual assault is hard
enough without having to come out at the same time.
Daily threats to the health and safety of queer and trans people, especially trans people of color, still pervade
our society. Gay marriage may be legal, but there's still a lot of work to do.
Credit: Kevin Tidmarsh
Subject: Sex crimes; Colleges & universities; Domestic violence;
Company / organization: Name: Claremont Colleges; NAICS: 611310;
Publication title: University Wire
Publication year: 2015
Publication date: Nov 6, 2015
Year: 2015

Section: Opinions
Publisher: Uloop, Inc.
Place of publication: Carlsbad
Country of publication: United States
Publication subject: General Interest Periodicals--United States
Source type: Newspapers
Language of publication: English
Document type: News
ProQuest document ID: 1731143926
Document URL:
http://du.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1731143926?accountid=14608
Copyright: 2015 UWIRE, a division of Uloop
Last updated: 2015-11-06
Database: ProQuest Central,Social Science Premium Collection

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