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Miss Powells

5th Grade Syllabus


Instructional Materials and Resources/Required Text
All instruction is aligned with the South Carolina State Standards in each content area.
GO MATH! - Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Major concepts that are included are geometry, place value, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, graphing, data, and
measurement. Mathematics enables our students to develop a strong foundation in skills, concepts, investigation, reasoning
and problem solving.
ReadingStudents will use classroom and school library books as well as other reading texts given by classroom teacher.
Interactive Science Pearson
Science content for fifth grade is to teach South Carolina science standards. Major concepts are the relationship between
forces and motion, constructive and destructive land processes, ocean landforms, the relationships within and between
ecosystems, and the properties of matter. The district's adopted textbook, interactive kits, and weekly virtual science lab
will supplement and enhance all classroom instruction.
My World Social Studies: The Growth of Our Country - Pearson
Everyone has a story. Whats yours? myWorld Social Studies utilizes storytelling to bring Social Studies content to life.
Our exclusive interactive digital solution makes Social Studies personal for every student in a way thats easier for you.
With myWorld Social Studies, you can get to the heart of Social Studies in the time you have. Students are expected to
analyze the needs of different communities and cultures. Current events are also a part of their daily program. Students are
given an opportunity to examine past and current events and analyze the effects of each. The Districts adopted textbook
series, supplemental materials, and novels are used to explore the social studies standards. Also, some of the topics (such as
journal entries) in each strand will be mentioned throughout the year.
Units of Instruction Aligned with State Standards:
Math
In order to maintain our districts focus on standards, we will do daily spiral math practice throughout the year. Word
problems are included to help promote higher-order thinking skills. State Standards will be used to guide instruction along
with the Greenville Countys Math Curriculum Guide and Activities. Writing is also used when responding in words how to
solve a particular problem.
Modifications to this syllabus may be made to better accommodate the needs of our students.
First Quarter: Understanding Volume (5.MDA.3 a, b, c)
Developing Multiplication and Division Strategies (5.NSBT.5; 5.NSBT.6; 5.MDA.1)
Using Equivalency to Add and Subtract Fractions (5.NSF.1; 5.NSF.2)
Expanding Understanding of Place Value to Decimals (5.NSBT.1; 5.NSBT.2 a, b; 5.NSBT.3; 5.MDA.1)
Second Quarter: Understanding Multiplying Fractions by Fractions (5.NSF.3; 5.NSF.4 a, b, c)
Comparing and Rounding Decimals (5.NSBT.3; 5.NSBT.4)
Interpreting Multiplying Fractions as Scaling (5.NSF.5 a, b, c; 5.NSF.6)
Developing the Concept of Dividing Unit Fractions (5.NSF.7 a, b; 5.NSF.8)
Third Quarter: Solving Problems Involving Volume (5.NSBT.5; 5.MDA.3 a, b, c; 5.MDA.4)
Performing Operations with Decimals (5.NSBT.7; 5.MDA.1)
Classifying Two-Dimensional Figures (5.G.3; 5.G.4)
Solving Problems with Fractional Quantities (5.MDA.2)

Fourth Quarter: Representing Algebraic Thinking (5.ATO.1; 5.ATO.2)


Exploring the Coordinate Plane (5.G.1 a, b, c, d; 5.G.2; 5.ATO.3 a, b, c, d)
Finalizing Multiplication/Division with Whole Numbers (5.NSBT.5; 5.NSBT.6)

Language Arts
Writing:
State ELA Standards for Writing along with Greenville Countys ELA Curriculum Guide will be used to guide writing
instruction. We will use several items throughout the year to aid in the mastery of writing and language skills. These items
are the Editors Checklist to go over grammar and conventions, stems, portable student word wall for high frequency and
commonly misspelled words, Daily Language Reviews, and journal writing.
First Quarter: Narrative Writing (MCC3, L5, RC6), Opinion Writing (MCC1, L4)
Second Quarter: Opinion Writing (MCC1, L4), Informational Writing (MCC2, L4)
Third Quarter: Narrative Writing Creating Memoirs (MCC3, L4, L5), Argumentative Writing (MCC1, L5)
Fourth Quarter: Testing as a Genre Writing (all writing state standards), Authoring an Independent Writing Life (MCC2)
This plan may be modified to better serve students.
Reading
Reading is an essential component toward building college and career readiness. Reading provides access to a world of
information otherwise unobtainable. By developing foundational reading skills, students are able to obtain access to
information across the curriculum. There are four major components of reading: accuracy, comprehension, vocabulary, and
fluency. Accuracy involves being able to read each word with precision. Comprehension involves grasping the meaning of the
material. Vocabulary involves increasing the amount of words that the student understands and uses. Fluency involves the
ability to read words with speed and accuracy. By systematically teaching each of these four components, students are able
to develop their reading skills and become successful readers.
The reading program adapted by Greenville County is the Reading Workshop created by Fountas & Pinnell. This program
includes Book Talks, Mini-lessons, Independent Reading, Guided Reading, Literature Study, Group Share, and Evaluation.
South Carolina standards guide the program and higher-level thinking is promoted.
In correlation with Fountas and Pinnell, we will use leveled readers based on each students reading level. Students will use
the Journeys textbook by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt as supplemental material. We will read historical novels based on the
social studies curriculum throughout the year. Students will also read self-selected books.
Modifications to this syllabus may be made in order to better accommodate the needs of our students.
Unit 1 Launching Reading and Independence (MC5.1, MC6.1, MC8.1, LCS10.1, RC13.1, RC13.2, RC13.3)
Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions,
analyzing synthesizing, providing evidence, and investigating multiple interpretations.
Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of thematic development.
Analyze characters, settings, events, and ideas as they develop and interact within a particular context.
Apply a range of strategies to determine and deepen the meaning of known, unknown, and multiple-meaning words,
phrases and jargon; acquire and use general academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new
learning, and building stamina; reflect and respond to increasingly complex text over time.
Unit 2 Learning Through Reading (MC5.1, MC6.1, MC7.1, LCS8.2, LCS11.1)
Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions,
analyzing synthesizing, providing evidence, and investigating multiple interpretations.

Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of thematic development.


Research events, topics, or concepts through multiple media, formats, and in visual, auditory, and kinesthetic
modalities.
Interpret and analyze the authors use of words, phrases, text features, conventions, and structures, and how their
relationships shape meaning and tone in print and multimedia texts.
Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and multimedia texts to craft informational and
argument writing.

Unit 3 Tackling Complex Texts (MC5.1, MC6.1, MC7.2, MC8.1, LCS12.1)


Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions,
analyzing synthesizing, providing evidence, and investigating multiple interpretations.
Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of thematic development.
Analyze the relationship among ideas, themes, or topics in multiple media, formats, and in visual, auditory, and
kinesthetic modalities.
Analyze characters, settings, events, and ideas as they develop and interact within a particular context.

Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and multimedia texts to craft informational and
argument writing.
Unit 4 Exploring Social Issues (MC7.2, LCS10.1, LCS10.6, LCS11.2)
Analyze the relationship among ideas, themes, or topics in multiple media, formats, and in visual, auditory, and
kinesthetic modalities.
Apply a range of strategies to determine and deepen the meaning of known, unknown, and multiple-meaning words,
phrases and jargon; acquire and use general academic and domain-specific vocabulary.
Analyze and provide evidence of how the authors choice of purpose and perspective shapes content, meaning, and
style.

Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and multimedia texts to craft informational and
argument writing.
Unit 5 Navigating Informational Text Sets (MC5.1, MC7.1, LCS8.2, LCS10.1, LCS11.2)
Determine meaning and develop logical interpretations by making predictions, inferring, drawing conclusions,
analyzing synthesizing, providing evidence, and investigating multiple interpretations.
Research events, topics, or concepts through multiple media, formats, and in visual, auditory, and kinesthetic
modalities.
Interpret and analyze the authors use of words, phrases, text features, conventions, and structures, and how their
relationships shape meaning and tone in print and multimedia texts.

Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points, identifying which reasons and
evidence support which points.
Unit 6 Testing as a Genre

Test-taking skills are taught and practiced.


Unit 7 Authors Purpose and Point of View (MC7.1, MC7.2, MC8.1, LCS12.1, LCS12.2)
Analyze the relationship among ideas, themes, or topics in multiple media, formats, and in visual, auditory, and
kinesthetic modalities.
Analyze characters, settings, events, and ideas as they develop and interact within a particular context.
Analyze and critique how the author uses structures in print and multimedia texts to shape meaning and impact the
reader.
Social Studies
We will use the student textbook and binder as their main source of information for Social Studies class. They will be able
to write in their textbook this year! Students will have notes from the most recent SC Standards (2012) in their binders.
We will also use as a supplement the district adopted textbook, other supplemental materials, and novels to help guide our
units. Students will be responsible for taking notes, engage in cooperative group work, discussions, and journaling in order to
help understand and analyze past and current events related to United States history. Grades will be earned from their
class work, Checkpoint Quizzes, homework (essential question) and Unit Tests. Study guides will also be given to help

students prepare for upcoming tests. The Social Studies curriculum will be integrated with the ELA curriculum and reading
curriculum.
US History
1865- Present Day
First Quarter - Geography skills, Review the Civil War and Reconstruction, Westward Expansion
(Standards 5-1 and 5-2)
Second Quarter - Geography Skills, The Industrial Revolution, Immigration, World War I, The Roaring Twenties, The Great
Depression, The 1930's (Standards: 5-3 and 5-4)
Third Quarter - Geography, World War II, The 1940's, Korean War, The 1950's, The Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, The
1960's - 70's, The 1980's (Standards: 5-4 and 5-5)
Fourth Quarter - Geography Skills, The 1990s, Impact of 9/11, The 2000s, Government today, National and World
Economics (Standards 5-6)
Modifications to this syllabus may be made to better accommodate the needs of our students.
Science
South Carolina science standards from 2014 will be used to guide science instruction for fifth grade this year. There
will be a large focus on scientific vocabulary in each unit. A detailed interactive notebook will be used throughout the year
to involve students in personal science discovery and learning. Hands-on activities will also be included in each unit to help
students fully understand concepts and engage with them physically.
Modifications to this syllabus may be made to better accommodate the needs of our students.
First Quarter: Engineering Practices (5.S.1)
Force and Motion (5.P.5)
Landforms and Oceans (5.E.3)
Second Quarter: Landforms and Oceans (5.E.3)
Ecosystems (5.L.4)
Third Quarter: Ecosystems (5.L.4)
Properties of Matter (5.P.2)
Fourth Quarter: Properties of Matter (5.P.2)
Process Skills (5.S.1)
Evaluation of Student Progress
The following procedures will be used to record and document student progress:
District guidelines and scale
Grade Book All major tests and minor quizzes and assignments will be recorded.
Progress reports
Report cards
Student and teacher conferences
Teacher and parent conferences
Notes/emails/calls to parents
Grading Scale
A = 90 - 100
B = 80 - 89
C = 70 - 79
D = 60 - 69

F = 50 - 59
Minor assessments count 60% and major assessments count 40%.
Homework Policy
Homework will be used as a supplement to instruction in order to improve or increase skills. Homework may be in the nature
of enrichment activities, such as special reports, research work, and practice of a specific skill. Homework will be assigned
throughout the week and usually will take the student about 45 60 minutes to complete. Students will be given time to
record their homework assignments in their planners daily. In addition to homework, students should read for pleasure and
enrichment 20 minutes each night.
Classroom Rules:
1. Listen carefully.
2. Follow directions.
3. Work quietly. Do not disturb others who are working.
4. Respect others. Be kind with your words and actions.
5. Respect school and personal property.
6. Work and play safely.
7. Own your actions.
Robert E. Cashion is a Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports School. We believe it is important to be safe,
responsible, and respectful and have developed positive systems to encourage and support your child through his/her
education. We also believe that appropriate behaviors and routines, like academic subjects, must be thoroughly taught and
reviewed throughout the year, therefore students will have discussions to teach them our school expectations. If your
child continues to show undesired behavior, your child will receive a Classroom Discipline Report. This will be sent
home after your child has received punishment from their teacher and/or a note/call/email home. It will be sent
home after the teacher feels ample time has been allotted for mastery of a skill but the student has not shown
willingness to conform to the rules. Please sign and return the form to your childs classroom teacher letting the
teacher know you are aware of the behavior and are willing to work together to correct the behavior. Discipline
Reports are attempts to communicate with parents about their childs behavior before referrals are given. These are
behavior is not acceptable and needs to change before their child receives an office referral. Two classroom
discipline reports from the same teacher will result in an office referral.
Reward System
Your child will have the opportunity to earn tickets throughout the week for instructional involvement, completion of task,
following directions, caught completing a random act of kindness, etc. On Fridays, students can buy the following classroom
coupons, at a cost of 10 tickets per coupon, to use during class on a day of choice approved by the teacher:
-

Switch seats with a classmate for a day


Take off your shoes while learning
Sit in a comfy chair while learning
Wear a hat in class
Bring your own device to school for down time
Listen to your music while you do independent work
Be the line leader for the day
Have a lunch date with a friend at your own table

*The teacher has the right to take these coupons away at any time that she discerns it is necessary. She may also
add additional awards or new coupons throughout the year if students prove good, consistent behavior.
In order for students to receive the best possible education, there must be open communication between the school,
parents/guardians, and the students. Positive and open communication between home and school can result in a more pleasant
and successful experience in Fifth Grade. Everyone must accept responsibility and take an active part in the education of
the student.
Students must realize that they have an equally vital part in their education as their Teachers and Parents/Guardians. In
order for students to form this realization, they need to have respect for themselves and others. They must take full

responsibility for their own actions and decisions. They need to care about themselves and others. They need to be honest
with themselves and others. They must put forth their best effort and always be willing to try no matter how hard it may
seem. Students also need to be able to make wise choices and understand the consequences, both good and bad, that occur
because of their choices.
Procedures for non-instructional routines
Morning routine: Students will sign in for lunch, unpack their backpacks, place their signed agenda and any homework
listed on the front board out on the corner of their desk, sharpen 2 pencils and then begin the assigned morning
work.
All homework, class work, quizzes, tests, and projects will contain the first and last name of the student, their class
# and date. If it is added to their binder, then the student is responsible for adding it to the correct subject
section and table of contents, with a specific title and page number. This will be provided by the teacher.
Students will be dismissed from class only with the permission of the teacher.
The county tardy policy will be followed in this class. Students may present a note to the teacher if they are tardy.
If they do not have a note, they must go to the office to obtain a note.
In the event of a fire drill, earthquake drill, tornado drill, or bomb threat, students will leave the classroom in an
orderly fashion and will follow all appropriate procedures as outlined in the Faculty Handbook.
Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each day after the first bell @ 8:00am.
Bathroom breaks are on the way to class in the mornings, as a class on the way back from related arts, and as a
class on the way back from lunch. In case of emergencies, students may use the silent hand signal to ask to go
during non-instructional, transitional times of the class day. If your child needs to use the restroom more
frequently please let me know, by sending our school a doctors note.
Communicating with parents
Parents/Guardians will be contacted several times during the school year. Parents will receive:
A copy of the classroom rules and expectations in the form of a contract, signed by both student & parent, and
returned to the teacher.
Progress reports quarterly
Nine-week report cards
Graded student work
Telephone calls/emails/notes concerning student behavior or work, when necessary
Positive notes/emails/calls home
Parent and teacher conference as needed
If parents have other concerns, conferences may be requested during other times throughout the school year.