Handbook | Travel Visa | Overdraft

where great futures begin

Message from Janet Ellis, Principal, Chief Executive
I would like to extend a warm welcome to Telford College, which we hope will be a deeply rewarding experience for you. We are delighted you have decided to join us. The education you will receive in the UK is recognised as world class and in choosing Telford College you have chosen a Grade 1 outstanding college. We are one of the highest performing colleges in the UK and received the prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Award in 2008. We are recognised as a Learning and Skills Beacon College and have won more national awards for the quality of our provision than any other college in the UK. The College has outstanding facilities. We are the only Further Education College in the UK to have a Super Dome as part of its sports facilities. Over £23 million has been invested in improving the learning environment over the past. You will be impressed with the friendly, dedicated staff who will go out of their way to ensure your experience at Telford College will help you to gain the skills and knowledge you need to succeed. You will make friends for life and bring cultural enrichment to our local society. We want to help you settle into life in the UK and your studies. This information will provide you with useful information to help you prepare for the exciting and challenging time ahead. We extend a warm welcome to you and wish you every success for your stay in the UK and your studies at Telford College. Janet Ellis Principal and Chief Executive

Welcome

British Quality Foundation
PROMOTING TOTAL QUALITY IN THE UK

Member

17 Individual Beacon Awards

Telford College of Arts and Technology I Haybridge Road I Wellington Telford I Shropshire I TF1 2NP Student Services 01952 642237 e-mail:studserv@tcat.ac.uk I minicom users 01952 247167

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where great futures begin

Before you come to the UK

Sponsor Licence no. DWD9199P4

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Before you come to the UK

Make sure you prepare well
What to do
Work out your study and living expenses and work out how to pay for them Start arranging accommodation in the UK Check your passport and, if you are going to need a new one, start the process. Processing times vary from country to country When you have your unconditional offer letter from Telford College, check how to apply for entry clearance to the UK with the nearest British Diplomatic Post or visit www.ukvisas.gov.uk Ask your home bank about transferring money to the UK and setting up a bank account here Book your flight or other travel to the UK

When to do it
At least one year before departure As soon as you have accepted a place on a course As soon as possible, but at least 6 months before departure. As soon as possible but at least six months before departure. Processing times vary from country to country Several months before departure As soon as possible, in order to get the best rates, but at least four to eight weeks before departure As soon as you know When you book your flight or other travel to the UK When you book your flight or other travel to the UK

Let Telford College know when you will be arriving Telephone + 44(0)1952 642292 Check with your airline or travel agent to find out what your baggage allowance is Plan your onward travel from the airport or seaport to Telford College. If you arrive at one of our feeder airports we will arrange to pick you up. (Feeder airports for Telford College are Birmingham, Coventry, Liverpool, Manchester and Nottingham East Midlands) Buy travel insurance Find out whether you will be entitled to NHS health treatment. If not, arrange health insurance Find out how many goods you are allowed to bring into the UK and which items are prohibited Find out whether your home insurance policy will cover your belongings while they are in the UK If you are taking any prescribed drugs or medicines, ask your doctor to write a letter explaining what they are and why you are taking them Buy sterling and traveller’s cheques to cover your first few weeks in the UK with your bank) Request a reference letter from your bank, in your own country – as this will help you to open a bank account in the UK Start gathering all the items and documents you are taking with you – make sure you have got everything before you start packing Buy any extra items you need, e.g. money belt, suitcase with wheels, clothes, photos of yourself and extra photos for student travel cards etc., dictionary Label all your luggage with your name and address in the UK Ensure that all important documents are in your hand luggage (plus essential overnight items in case your luggage gets lost).

When you book your flight or other travel to the UK About one month before departure About one month before departure About one month before departure Two to four weeks before departure

Watch the exchange rates and pick a good time – but do not leave it too late (check deadlines) Two weeks before departure

Two to three weeks before departure

Two weeks before departure

When you finish packing

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Entering the UK
You must have a valid passport before you travel to the UK (or a valid national identity card if you are an EEA national). Make sure you apply in plenty of time if you need a passport. Telford College has been granted a Tier 4 Sponsor Licence (DWD9199P4) so we can sponsor students to come to the UK.Telford College follow the guidelines set out by the UK Border Agency.

Nationals of all other countries:
If you want to stay in the UK for more than six months, then you must * obtain ‘entry clearance’ from the British Embassy or High Commission in your own country before you travel to the UK. You can find details on www.ukvisas.gov.uk. If you want to stay in the UK for six months or less, check whether you are a ‘visa national’. If you are a ‘visa national’, then you must obtain ‘entry clearance’ from the British Mission (Embassy), High Commission or ConsulateGeneral in your own country before you travel to the UK, even if you want to stay in the UK for six months or less. The UK government decides the list of countries whose citizens are ‘visa nationals’. Your nearest British Council office or British Mission will be able to tell you whether or not your country is a ‘visa national’ country. You can also check on the internet by going to www.ukvisas.gov.uk and selecting ‘Do I need a UK visa?’

Entry requirements – Entry clearance (Visas) Type of visa
You can come to the UK to study as a: ■ student; or ■ student visitor if you are undertaking a short course of study up to six months’ long within the period of your permission to stay. See Student Visitor section for more information) If you come to the UK as a student you must obtain entry clearance before travelling.* Look at the website www.ukvisas.gov.uk for information on immigration, then follow the guidelines carefully. You apply for entry clearance from your nearest British diplomatic post (Embassy or High Commission). You can find contact details of your nearest diplomatic post on the UKvisas website – www.ukvisas.co.uk European Economic Area and Swiss Nationals: If you are a national of a European Economic Area (EEA) country or a Swiss national, you do not need entry clearance to enter the UK. You are free to enter the country to work or study and the guidance below, on entering the UK, does not apply to you. If you need any advice, contact your local British Council office (contact details for all British Council offices are listed at www.britishcouncil.org/where/index.htm.) The countries of the EEA are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway are in the EEA, but are not members of the European Union. Switzerland is not in the EEA, but an international treaty means that from 1 June 2002 Swiss nationals have a similar right to live in the UK as EEA nationals.

* The only exceptions are British nationals (overseas), British overseas territories citizens, British protected persons and British Subjects. For these groups, entry clearance is not compulsory, but in most cases is advisable.

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Student Visitors
For short courses up to six months’ long. If you are coming to the United Kingdom as a visitor to study you must:

Further information
www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/studyingintheuk/eligibility/ Immigration enquiry bureau 0870 606 7766 www.visa4uk.fco.gov.uk - online visa applications

genuinely be seeking entry as a student visitor for the limited period you tell the UK Border Agency you require that does not exceed six months have been accepted on a course of study that will be provided by an organisation included on the Department for Children, Schools and Families’ register of education and training providers (Telford College is on the register) leave the United Kingdom at the end of the visit you told the UK Border Agency about support and pay for accommodation for yourself and any dependants without help from public funds; or ensure that you and your dependants will be supported and accommodated by relatives or friends and not take employment; and be able to meet the cost of the return or onward journey.

How to apply for entry clearance (as a student)
Look at the website www.ukvisas.gov.uk for information on immigration, then follow the guidelines. There is a charge for the application, see www.ukvisas.gov.uk for up to date fees. You must satisfy the Entry Clearance Officer (ECO) at the British Embassy that you meet the immigration requirements for students (see next page). The ECO will then issue you entry clearance in the form of a sticker in your passport. The entry clearance should normally be valid for the whole length of your course. When you arrive in the UK, the Immigration Officer at the port of entry (eg. Heathrow, Birmingham or Gatwick airports) will usually put a date stamp in your passport to show when you entered the UK. Your permission to be in the UK expires on the date indicated on the entry clearance. Keep a photocopy of all stamps and stickers placed in your passport by any Immigration authorities. Keep them in a safe place in case you lose your passport.

You must not:
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take employment in the United Kingdom engage in business, produce goods or provide services within the United Kingdom, including selling goods or services direct to members of the public study at a government-funded school be a child under the age of 18 undertake part-time (up to 20 hours), or fulltime vacation employment undertake a work placement or internship (paid or unpaid) as part of your course of study; or extend your stay in the United Kingdom

The forms you will need
To get an entry clearance, first contact your local British Embassy or High Commission. www.ukvisas.gov.uk will give you details of forms you will need. Complete the forms carefully then submit them to your local British Embassy or High Commission along with the documents they have asked for. They will include the following: ■ your passport ■ a recent passport-sized photograph of yourself ■ the appropriate fee paid in local currency ■ documents showing that you meet the entry requirements ■ an address of where you’ll be staying in the uk.

www.tcat.ac.uk

The requirements for student entry clearance
Citizens of non-EEA countries need permission to enter the UK. Under the UK immigration system this permission is called ‘leave to enter’. The relevant requirements to be met by a person seeking permission to enter the United Kingdom as a student at a further education college are that he or she:

The documents you need
You should make sure that you have the following documents and information before you apply for entry clearance. ■ your offer from Telford College ■ the title of the course and the qualification it leads to ■ when the course begins and ends ■ what qualifications were required for entry to the course ■ if you will be provided with English language support ■ confirmation that the course involves 15 hours of organised daytime study a week ■ how much the fees are, and if you are allowed to pay by instalments, then when each instalment is expected ■ if someone else is paying for you to study, a letter from them confirming what their connection to you is, how much they are going to give you, how often, for how long, and where that money is going to come from.You will also need evidence that they will be able to fulfil their promise (for example, their bank statements or wage slips, or a letter from their employer confirming their salary) ■ if you are being sponsored by a government or scholarship agency, a letter from them confirming how long the scholarship will continue and what costs it will cover ■ if you are going to pay for your studies through your own savings, original bank statements covering at least the last three months ■ if you already know of an employer in your home country who will want to employ you when you return with your qualification, a letter from them confirming that employment offer ■ any other evidence that you intend to leave the UK when you finish your studies (for example, evidence that you own your own home, or have a husband, wife, civil partner or children who you are leaving at home while you study in the UK, or advertisements for jobs requiring the qualification that you will be studying for) ■ certificates for any qualifications you have that are relevant to the new course

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has been given a valid continuation of acceptance for studies (CAS) which is to be provided by an organisation which is included on the Government’s Register of Sponsors. (Telford College is such a college) is able and intends to follow either: a level 3 course or Level A2 English Language course or a weekday full-time course involving attendance at a single institution for a minimum of 15 hours organised daytime study per week of a single subject or directly related subjects you must have the ability to do the course you must intend to do the course and you must intend to leave the United Kingdom at the end of your studies (except degree students who hope to stay on to work when they finish their studies, provided you are not sponsored by your government or an international scholarship agency) and does not intend to take employment or engage in business in the UK, unless the immigration authorities allow you to and you must have enough money without needing to work (or engage in business or claim public funds) to pay for: ■ your course fees ■ accommodation and maintenance of yourself and your husband, wife, civil partner and children, if they come with you ■ you must show a proven track record in education see www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk for current rates. English language requirements – An English language level acceptable for visa application

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Online visa applications
See www.ukvisas.gov.uk to see if you can apply online

Preparing for your interview
Be familiar with all your study plans – why you chose the particular institution and course, how the course will help your future career, and how it links with any previous study or courses you have followed in your country and with any future study or employment plans. For example, you should say clearly what link any preparatory English Classes will have with any subsequent study. ■ make sure you know which examination(s) you are planning to take and what hours you will be studying ■ If you are paying fees by instalments, you need to be able to explain how much they will be and how often they are due ■ be clear about the cost of living, the course fees and your finances. Can you prove that you have enough money to complete the course? ■ be as clear as you can about your future career – what are you going to do when you return? ■ show evidence that you can support your family if they are coming with you ■ show evidence that you can pay for your accommodation You should answer all questions carefully and honestly. If you are not sure of an answer then say so. Do not invent a reply which may prove to be incorrect. Try to remain calm and think about your reply before giving it. In some countries a medical may be required and this may increase the amount of time your application takes to be processed. Ask the British Embassy or High Commission in your country whether this is the case. It is important to note that some long-term students may be required to have a medical examination on entry. Contact the college on +44 1952 642292 if you need further information.

Health (TB) screening
Applicants for UK visas valid for longer than 6 months in certain countries now require a certificate to show that they are free from infectious pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Details are available from www.ukvisas.gov.uk

Biometric data
You will need to provide biometric data (10 digit finger scan and a digital photograph) when applying for a UK visa. See www.ukvisas.gov.uk for further details

Phone numbers
If you are calling from outside the UK, do not dial the (0) in the telephone numbers below. For example, if you want to call Telford College from outside the UK, dial +44 1952 642292. If you are within the UK, do not dial the +44, but do start the number with 0. For example, if you call Telford College from within the UK, dial 01952 642292.

www.tcat.ac.uk

Insurance
You need to organise the following types of insurance: ■ Travel Insurance – to make sure you and your luggage are protected during your journey. You can organise this through your travel agent, your bank or an insurance company. ■ Personal belongings insurance – if you are carrying expensive items such as jewellery, cameras, IPods, you need to check that these are insured whilst travelling and when you are in the UK. Telford College can give you information about suitable insurance policies.

What to pack and where to pack it
Carry on your person or in your hand luggage ■ your valid passport, with visa or entry clearance if relevant ■ your travel tickets ■ money – cash, travellers cheques, credit card – preferably in a money belt or a very secure inside pocket ■ Vaccination certificates if required ■ X-ray report if required ■ any prescribed drugs or medicines you are taking, plus a letter from your doctor explaining what they are ■ original letter of acceptance from your institution ■ original documentary proof that you have enough money to pay your fees and meet your living costs (e.g. recent bank statements, proof of scholarship, sponsor’s letter, reference letter from your bank in your own country) ■ originals (or certified true copies) of any certificates or technical qualifications ■ a pen or pencil and some paper, in case you need to write down directions, telephone numbers, etc. ■ confirmation of any accommodation you have booked, including full address and telephone number ■ address and telephone number of your final destination (if different) ■ details of your arrangements of onward travel within the UK ■ insurance documents ■ a list of what you packed in each item of your main luggage, in case you need to make an insurance claim ■ a warm sweater and waterproof coat ■ an umbrella ■ any particular fragile or valuable items ■ current driving licence, if you are considering driving in the UK in the future (see section 4) ■ name and telephone number of Telford College’s emergency number +44 0788 963 4281

Health Insurance – find out whether you will be covered by the UK’s National Health Service if you are ill or have an injury while you are in the UK. See Section 7 for more information.

If you are not covered, you will need to take out a medical insurance policy before you leave home. Check the excess clauses as some policies may mean you are liable for the first £50 or £100 of any claim. You can get more information from Student Services at Telford College.

Packing
CHECK! Before you pack up all your belongings, consider the following: ■ Find out what you are and are NOT allowed to bring into the UK, e.g. food items – check the lists on www.hmrc.gov.uk the Revenue and Customs website ■ Find out what your baggage allowance is from your airline ■ Before packing electrical equipment, make sure it’s compatible with UK standards: 240 volts, 50 cycles (50Hz), three pin (square-pin) plugs. You may need an adaptor and perhaps a voltage converter – or you may prefer to buy UK-compliant items when you get here (see Section 3 for typical prices) ■ If you want to bring a computer or audio equipment, you should also bring a receipt showing when and where it was bought. British Customs officials may ask you to certify that the equipment is for your own use and that you are not importing it permanently ■ If you are travelling from a non-EU country you may have to declare large amounts of cash

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Pack in your main luggage

What not to pack
DO NOT bring: ■ any prohibited items (e.g. weapons, certain drugs, certain foods and plants) check the website www.hmrc.gov.uk ■ too much clothing, especially if you’re coming from a very different climate – you will have a better chance of finding the clothes you need once you get here (see section 6) ■ lots of food – this is heavy and most of the ingredients you will need are available in the UK ■ lots of books – it may be cheaper to buy them once you get here, and you may not need to buy all the books on your reading list anyway ■ lots of stationery (papers, pens, pencils, etc.) you can buy these when you get here, so just bring one or two things to get you through the first few days ■ so many things that you exceed your baggage allowance – the surcharges will be expensive and carrying it will be tiring. Remember that you will have to carry your luggage with you from the airport to your final destination. This may mean changing your means of transport several times and it will be easier if your suitcase has wheels, and you do not have too many pieces of luggage to look after.

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a photocopy of each page of your passport, including its number and the date and place of issue and any entry clearances a note of the serial numbers of your traveller’s cheques back up photocopies of all essential documents at least nine passport size photos of yourself – you will need them for student identification cards, bus/rail, passes and various other purposes clothing – mostly comfortable and informal but do also bring some smart clothes for special occasions toiletries and personal items to last a week or so towels, and/or bed linen, if your accommodation doesn’t provide them, but remember that these are bulky and heavy to bring in your baggage a notebook, pen and pencil to use in the first few days a bilingual dictionary if English is not your first language a few small photos of family and close friends one or two SMALL souvenirs to keep you feeling connected to home

Further reading
UKCISA Guidance Notes for students: ■ Accommodation for International Students ■ Keeping healthy You can download these from www.ukcisa.org.uk

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where great futures begin

Accommodation

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Accommodation

Types of accommodation
It is important to arrange accommodation in advance. You have four possible choices I private accommodation I apply for a place in college accommodation (TCAT has a campus agreement with Wolverhampton University, Priorslee Campus) I arrange homestay accommodation through a recognised TCAT agent I book temporary accommodation through TCAT or by yourself. The college offers mainly single room accommodation, which is not suitable for families. If you plan to bring your family you should arrive first and then bring your family to the UK when you have found somewhere suitable for you all to live.

Homestay Families
You may stay with a homestay family. This will cost approximately £100 each week. Host families recommended by Telford College have been checked carefully by our agent.

Temporary accommodation
(if TCAT has not already confirmed accommodation for you) At the very least, you should arrange some temporary accommodation – you will need somewhere to stay for your first few days while you look for something more permanent. Here are your options: I contact the International Office at College on +44 (0)1952 642340.They may be able to make a booking for temporary accommodation for you at a hotel near to College I book a hotel yourself, this could cost up to £70 – you should check in advance I contact the British Council Hotel Reservation Service: telephone 0800 783 6695 (24 hour Freephone from within the UK) or +44 (0)20 7828 1506 (from overseas), fax +44 (0)20 7828 2881, email hotels@britishcouncil.org I contact VisitBritain, which can provide lists of hotels, guest houses or bed-and-breakfast places and should also be able to book a room for you. Check the phone book for the office in your country, look at www.visitbritain.com or contact the UK office: VisitBritain,Thames Tower Black’s Road, London,W6 9EL.Telephone +44 (0)20 8846 9000, Fax +44 (0)20 8563 0302 (written and telephone enquiries only).

Private Accommodation
This is usually difficult to secure before your arrival in the UK and is often best arranged when you can view the property in person. However, it may be useful to research the type, cost and availability of private accommodation in the UK by searching the internet using keywords, e.g. ‘accommodation + student + Telford’. Other ways of researching private accommodation include: I asking any friends or relatives you may have in the UK to look for advertisements in the local newspapers and follow them up on your behalf I contacting Student Services at college, as they can help you to find private accommodation available in the area I contacting a local accommodation agency in the UK I contacting your country’s Embassy or High Commission in the UK for information and advice It is sensible to check when arranging accommodation what will be provided in the terms of bed linen and/or kitchen equipment.

Tenancy Agreement
If you rent accommodation, you will have to sign a ‘tenancy agreement’ or ‘lease’. You should check the terms of the agreement carefully – they will contain details of the rent to be paid, length of the tenancy and the rights of you and your landlord and usually require a deposit. If you are not sure what the agreement means, show it to the Student Advisor at College and ask for help.

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where great futures begin

Financial and legal matters

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Financial and legal matters

Financial and legal matters
It is very important that you are aware of the costs involved in studying in the UK. Learn how to estimate your expenses, decide how to pay for them, sort out a bank account, and manage your money day to day. The figures quoted in this chapter are all in pounds (sterling). Convert each figure into your own currency so that you can get a realistic idea of the costs.

EU nationals
If you are a national or the child of a national of an EU country, you will qualify for home fees if:
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you were ordinarily resident in the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland for the three years leading up to 1 September, 1 January or 1 April (whichever is closest to the beginning of your course) and you were not there just because you were a fulltime student on a course; you were genuinely living in the EEA or Switzerland for reasons other than study.

Fees and the cost of study
To gain entry clearance to the UK, you will need to prove that you have enough money to cover all your course fees and living expenses (see section 1 – Entry requirements).To calculate whether you have enough money, you first need to work out how much you will need. You will have your course fee on your offer letter. Fees are also on our website: www.tcat.ac.uk When you become a full-time student you can access most other part-time courses free of charge.
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There are a few exceptions to these rules. Telford College makes the final decision about whether or not you qualify for home fees and will ask you to provide evidence. We will base the decision on the evidence you give us, so be sure to provide all the relevant documents and details.

Further information
See section 1 (Before you come to the UK) for a reminder of which countries are in the EU and the EEA See UKCISA Guidance Notes for students: Fees, funding and student support available on the internet at: www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/fees_student_support.php.

UK residents
If you have been living in the UK, you will qualify for home fees if you meet all three of the following conditions.
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You were ‘settled’ in the UK on 1 September, 1 January or 1 April (whichever is closest to the beginning of your course). For example, if your course begins in October 2007 you must be ‘settled’ by 1 September 2007. ‘Settled’ means you were ordinarily resident in the UK without any immigration restrictions on the length of your stay. To be settled, you must either be a full British Citizen, or have right of abode, or have indefinite leave to enter/remain. You were ordinarily resident in the UK for the full three years leading up to 1 September, 1 January or 1 April (whichever is closest to the beginning of your course). For example, if your course begins in October 2008, you must have been ordinarily resident in the UK from 1 September 2005 to 31 August 2008. Under the regulations, ‘ordinarily resident’ means living in the UK habitually, normally, lawfully and by choice During that entire three year period, at no time were you in the UK just because you were receiving full-time education; you were always living here for reasons other than study Check with the International Office at TCAT to see if you are a home fee payer

The cost of living in the UK
Apart from the fees for your course itself, how much will it cost you to live in the UK? As a rough guide, for a ninemonth academic year, you should allow (on average): I £7,000 (or £800 per month) These figures include the cost of homestay accommodation, heating, lighting, food, clothing, books and daily travel for one person for a nine-month academic year. Local rental agreements range from £350 to £1000 per month depending on your requirements.

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Cost breakdown
Here are some typical prices for specific items and services in the Telford area. Deposit on rented accommodation:Typically one month’s rent Heat and light (if charged separately): £20-£50 per month, depending on the season Food (if not included in accommodation): £30-£50 per week Wine: £3-£6 for a 75cl bottle (table wine) Beer: £1.30 for a half-litre can of lager; £2.00-£3.00 for a pint of beer in a pub or bar Personal hygiene items, cosmetics, etc: £15 per month Haircut: £7-£20 T-shirts, underwear: £10 and under Shirts and tops, lightweight sweaters, lightweight shoes: £25 and under Jeans and other casual trousers, skirts, lightweight outdoor jackets, heavier sweaters, heavier shoes: £35 and under Raincoats and other outerwear, boots: £60 and under Winter coats: £100 and under Laundry: £16-£20 per month Dry cleaning: £4 for skirt or trousers; £9 for heavy coat Small electrical appliances (e.g. hairdryer, kettle): £20 Textbooks: £10-£50 or more; some may be available second-hand for less Paperback books to read for leisure: £4-£10; second-hand books as little as £1 or less Newspapers: 30p-£1.50 per issue Magazines: 50p-£4 CDs: £5-£15 Television licence: you need a television licence to use any television receiving equipment such as a television set, settop boxes, video or DVD recorders, computers or mobile phones to watch or record television programmes as they are being shown. A television licence currently costs £139.50 per year per household. Further guidance can be obtained from www.tvlicensing.co.uk Phone card (for use in public telephones): choice of £2, £5, £10 or £20. Some excellent deals may also be available online. International phone cards may also be better value depending on your country of origin. Restaurant meal: £5 per head minimum, £15 per head average (drinks extra) Cinema ticket: £4-£10 Theatre ticket: £10-£30 Concert ticket: £5-£30 Swimming pool use: £3 Tennis/squash court: £3-£5 per hour Special reductions are offered for students at many local shops, theatres, cinemas, museums and galleries; and special student fares are available on buses and trains. Some stores operate loyalty schemes offering a range of rewards, from cashback to money-off vouchers. Ask at Student Services for a Student Union card. You will need money for entertainment expenses, which vary a great deal from student to student. Make an allowance for these in addition to monthly expenses such as rent and heat, and occasional expenses such as clothing and textbooks.

International student calculator
Many students have been coming to the UK without adequate financial preparation and running into financial difficulties. The UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) has teamed up with UNIAID, the independent charity helping students cope with finance, to give a helping hand. A new online International Student Calculator is available to help international students plan and manage their finances for studies in the UK. This is available free online for you to use. The International Student Calculator is an online tool developed with students from 13 different countries. It will help you to;
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Build a lifestyle budget and see how it balances by week, month or over a year Understand how you will spend their time as well as your money in the UK Get information on areas like insurance and banking as well as guidance on the costs of living Learn from case studies and top tips from other students Save your budget so you can use it before arriving or during your study

Log on to the International Student Calculator at www.studentcalculator.org.uk/international

Working in the UK EEA Students
If you are from a European Economic Area Country (EEA) you do not need permission to work in the UK. If you are a national from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, Estonia, Latvia, Poland or Slovenia you may need to check whether you need to register under the Worker Registration Scheme – look at the website www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk. Bulgarian and Romanian nationals should also check this.

Non EEA Students
You can work up to 20 hours a week during term time and full-time during your holidays. However, whilst in the UK with permission as a student you must be able to show that you can afford to live and study in the UK without needing to work. You should not work if your visa states ‘No work or recourse to public funds’ or ‘No recourse to public funds. Work prohibited’. Please ask Student Services for the leaflet ‘Find your way to work’.

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Finding part-time or vacation jobs
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Choosing an account
Check with International or Student Services department: they have information about the services offered by local banks. Your options include: I Banks: Some banks offer specific accounts for fulltime international students, featuring special facilities. Ask in Student Services. I Building societies: Offer a range of financial services, including banking. You may find that, unlike some banks, a building society will offer you interest on a current account. When you go to the bank to open an account, you will need to take your passport and letter of acceptance from College. Student Services can give you a letter to help you open a bank account.

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checking the notice boards in Student Services read the advertisements in the local newspaper look for ‘help wanted’ signs in the windows of local shops, restaurants and businesses word of mouth – tell your friends, your tutor, your landlord etc, that you are looking for a job – someone might know of an opening apply through local employment agencies

Banking
It is important to make secure arrangements for your cash. You should not carry large sums of money with you or leave a lot of cash in your lodgings. Instead open a bank account or building society account and make full use of the facilities it offers. Most banks in the UK are open from 9.30am to 4.30pm Monday to Friday and some are open at weekends. If you have a cash card for your account you can withdraw money from your account at any time of the day, any day of the week, by using a cash machine (see ‘Cash card’ below). Find out as much as you can about banking in the UK before you get here. Your fees can be paid by credit or debit card or cheque when you enrol on your course. Contact your bank in your home country and ask: I how best to transfer your money to the UK I about running a bank account in the UK I whether your bank has a special relationship with any of the UK banks I whether you can use cash cards from your home bank in cash machines in the UK

Speaking the language: UK banking terms
Balance:The amount of money in your account at any particular moment. Cash card: Also called ‘cashpoint card’. This plastic card allows you to take money from your account at any time of the day, including outside banking hours, by using a cash machine (also called ‘cashpoint’). You will find cash machines built into the wall outside the bank, and also in other places such as outside supermarkets, at petrol stations and in large shopping centres. You can use your card in the cash machines of other banks. To help limit fraud we recommend using the bank machines. There is a limit on how much money you can take out of your account each day by cash card. Cheque guarantee card: A plastic card which guarantees that your bank will pay the cheques you write, usually up to a fixed limit shown on the card. The cheque guarantee card and the cash card are usually combined as one card, often with debit-card facilities as well. Some shops have stopped accepting cheques. Current account: A bank account, with a cheque book, for depositing and withdrawing money. Most current accounts pay little or no interest. This is the most useful account. Debit card: A plastic card that allows you to spend money directly from your account without withdrawing cash or writing a cheque. Often combined with cash-card and cheque-guarantee facilities as one card. To deposit:To put money into an account. Also called ‘to pay in’.

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Deposit account: A savings account where money can earn interest. You may have to give notice if you wish to withdraw any money, and you cannot write cheques for this account. Interest: Extra money paid to you on money you have deposited, or extra money you pay on money you have borrowed by loans or overdraft. Overdraft/to overdraw:To overdraw your account means to spend more money that you have in your account.You will be charged for this. PIN:When you receive your cash card or debit card for your account, the bank will also send you a personal identification number (PIN). Memorise this number: you will need to key it into the machine each time you use your card. Do not tell anyone else your number. Once you are sure that you know the number, destroy the slip that had the number written on it and do not write the number down anywhere else. These are security precautions: if anyone else found out your PIN and found or took your card, they could access your account and take money from it. To withdraw:To take money from your account by writing a cheque or using a cash card.

1. Make full use of banking facilities
Once you have opened a bank account, you can ask the bank’s financial advisers to help you decide how to manage your money. I Pay your regular bills such as electricity and gas by direct debit on a regular basis. I If you have a sponsor, make sure you find out from them exactly when the money will become available to you and how much there will be.
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You can also use cheques to pay for goods and services, although some shops do not accept cheques. Find out whether you can use a cash card linked to an account that you have in your own country to draw money from your home account while you are in the UK. Cards carrying signs such as Cirrus or Maestro may have this facility. Ask your home bank about this before you leave, in order to ensure that you bring the right cards with you.

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2. Deal with financial problems promptly
Monitor your account in the UK carefully and make sure you do not overdraw – or, if you have arranged an overdraft, make sure you do not go over the amount you agreed with the bank. If you do run into any money problems, sort them out quickly – do not risk going into debt or falling behind with your rent. Problems may arise, for example, if there is a sudden change in the political situation in your country or if there are unexpected delays in transferring your money, or if your personal circumstances change (eg your accommodation arrangements). In these situations, do not be tempted to borrow money. Always get advice from the Student Advisor at College. He or she can tell you what to do about paying your tuition fees, and whether there are any college funds or charitable trusts that might be able to help you. If you are building up debts on credit cards or rent arrears, please go to Student Services for advice. If the problems are caused by political situations or changes in foreign exchange, ask your Embassy or High Commission for advice.

Mastering pounds and pence
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The basic unit of British currency – ‘sterling’ – is the pound (£) One pound is made up of 100 pence (p) The most common paper bank notes are for £20, £10 and £5; you may also see £50 notes from time to time Coins are for £2, £1, 50p, 20p, 10p, 5p, 2p and 1p

Managing your money
Keep your money under control and you can concentrate on the real business of studying and living in the UK. Here are two tips for managing your finances.

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Help with legal matters
Happily, most international students complete their courses in the UK without running into any serious legal problems. But if you do find yourself involved in a legal dispute of any kind, ask for help. Here are two options: I Contact the Student Advisor at College. Even if they cannot help you directly, they should be able to advise on where to go for help. I Contact the Citizens Advice Bureau in your area (see the local telephone directory for the address) for expert advice. They will be able to recommend a lawyer if you need one, and tell you if there is a local law centre providing free legal advice. They will also be able to tell you whether you can claim legal aid to help pay for any court and legal fees.

Reminder: obey the local laws
The laws in the UK may not be quite the same as in your own country. Here are a few examples of actions that are illegal in the UK. It is against the law to:
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possess offensive weapons, e.g. knives (including flickknives), guns, chemical sprays used for personal defence – even women are not allowed to carry sprays or other deterrents to protect themselves against possible assault (except for rape ‘alarms’) possess or supply hard or soft drugs disturb the peace – this is called ‘disorderly conduct’. You can be arrested for being too noisy or rowdy

The police
The police have the power to stop and search anyone who appears to be behaving in a suspicious manner. If you are arrested: I Try not to be aggressive I Do not try to bribe the police officer I If you are arrested by plain-clothes police officers, ask to see some form of identification I Give your name and address if the officer asks you to I Do not sign any statement until you have received advice from a lawyer (there is always a solicitor on duty at the police station) I You will be entitled to make one telephone call. The college has a 24 hour emergency phone number – this is 0788 963 4281 If you find yourself in trouble with the police, it is very important to get specialist advice. Contact any of the following: I Student Services I the students union at College I your local Citizens Advice Bureau I a local law centre I 0788 963 4281 in an emergency If you are convicted (found guilty) of an offence, it could seriously damage your position as an international student, so be sure to ask for help as early in the process as possible.

Further reading
The Educational Grants Directory, Directory of Social Change, annual, telephone +44 (0)20 7209 5151 Studying and Living in the UK – Fees and Funding www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/information_sheets.php UKCISA Guidance Notes for students: I Tuition Fees; will I pay the ‘home’ or ‘overseas rate’ I Student support; applying in England I Sources of Funding for International Students I Financial hardship The Department for Education and Skills (DfES) has produced a leaflet Find your way to work; International students;Working in the UK. Available at www.dfes.gov.uk/international-students or get a copy from Student Services The British Bankers’ Association has produced a leaflet: Opening a bank account if you are new or returning to the UK. It is available on their website at www.bba.org.uk

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where great futures begin

Arriving in the UK

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Arriving in the UK

Arriving in the UK
Make sure you have your student entry clearance BEFORE you travel to the UK.

home country, the immigration officer will put a stamp in your passport showing the date you entered the UK. The conditions of your stay will already be printed on your entry clearance.
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Immigration control/UK Border Agency
When you get to the UK your first step is to pass through immigration control. The UK offers a warm welcome to international students Here’s a step-by-step guide to the process. I When you enter the terminal building, follow the signs for ‘Arrivals’. These signs will lead you to the passport control area. (If you are transferring to another flight at the same airport, follow the signs for ‘Flight Connections’ instead. Then, at your final airport, follow the signs for ‘Arrivals’).
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As long as your documents are in order, you should pass through immigration smoothly. But if you find you need help for any reason, there are two things you can do:

Ask the immigration officer to telephone Telford College on 01952 642340 or 0788 963 4281 (mobile emergency number). Keep the numbers readily available. or I ask to speak to a representative of the Immigration Advisory Service. The service has offices in a number of UK cities, and can also be reached on the following telephone numbers:
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As you approach passport control, you will see electronic screens indicating where you should queue. There will be two types of queue: one for travellers with British or EEA (European Economic Area) passports, and another for all other passport-holders. Make sure you join the correct queue. At some major airports, arriving passengers are also sorted by flight number as they enter the immigration control area, so you should have this number to hand. You can find your flight number on your boarding card and ticket stub. You will also need to know your flight number later in order to collect your baggage, so keep this information with you even after you leave the plane. When you reach the front of the queue, the immigration officer at the desk will want to see that your documents are in order, so make sure you have them ready. In particular you should have ready:

Immigration Advisory Service England
Birmingham London www.iasuk.org +44 (0)121 616 3540 +44 (0)20 7967 1200

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Your letter of acceptance from Telford College Passport I Visa or entry clearance I Evidence of your funding, such as sponsor’s letter or bank statements
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See Section 1 for more information about Tier 4 sponsorship. You should also be prepared to answer some questions about yourself, including where you will be staying and what you intend to do during your time in the UK. You may be asked to undergo a brief, routine health check by the airport doctor, which might include an X-ray. The health check will take place in a separate room. Afterwards, you will need to return to immigration control. The immigration officer will put a stamp in your passport showing how long you are allowed to stay and any special conditions, such as registering with the police. If you obtained entry clearance (a visa or entry certificate) before you left your

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Customs control
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Transport Where to arrive in the UK By Plane
Try to arrange a flight to Birmingham International airport, which is closest to Telford College. Manchester, Liverpool, Nottingham East Midlands and Coventry airports are also quite easy to travel from. Telford College provides a free collection service from Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool, Nottingham East Midlands and Coventry airports. Please contact the International office on +44 (0)1952 642340 for details on charges for collection from London airports. If you have arranged for someone from Telford College to meet you let us know the time of your flight arrival and the flight number. Carry the instructions on how to get to Telford College or your accommodation in your hand luggage.

When you have been through Immigration control you can collect your luggage from the carousel that has your flight number on it. If you cannot find your luggage, ask a member of airport staff for assistance. If you have lost your luggage, fill in a lost baggage form. You must now pass through customs control. You should have a choice of three different channels:

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Choose the blue channel if you are travelling direct from an airport within the EU where you have already cleared your luggage through customs.When you enter the UK from another EU country, no taxes or duties apply to your goods. Choose the green channel if you are travelling from outside the EU and have nothing to declare. Customs officials may still stop you and ask you to open your luggage for inspection if they wish, or they may allow you to pass straight through. Choose the red channel if you are travelling from outside the EU and you have goods to declare. You have goods to declare if you are carrying more duty-free or tax-free goods than you are allowed to bring, or if you are carrying any prohibited goods. See Chapter 1 for advice on what you are allowed to bring.a customs official will ask you what you have to declare. He or she will probably also ask you to open your luggage so he or she can see what you are bringing into the UK. You will not be allowed to bring in any prohibited goods. If you are carrying more duty-free goods than you are allowed, you will be able to bring them in but you will have to pay duty on them before you can proceed. So if you choose to bring in more goods than your duty-free allowance, do make sure that you have a credit card or enough extra cash with you to pay the duty.

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By Ferry
Regular ferry services exist between France, Belgium, Holland and the UK Advice about onward travel If you are arranging your onward travel independently, contact your travel agent to find the best way to get to Telford. Further information VisitBritain for travel information:Thames Tower, Black’s Road, London,W6 9EL, telephone +44 (0)20 8846 9000, fax +44 (0) 20 8563 0302 (written and telephone enquires only), www.visitbritain.co.uk enjoyEngland: 1 Regent Street, London, SW1Y 4XT, telephone +44 (0)20 7808 3801, www.enjoyengland.com Finally, if you arrive at the airport or seaport and you are simply not sure where to go next, find the general information desk. The staff at the desk should be able to advise you about how to reach your destination and there is usually someone who speaks your language on the airport staff.

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Bookings Travelling by train
If you arrive at an airport and need to catch the train to Telford, you can check the train times in advance on the website www.nationalrail.co.uk Telephone 08457 484950 The cost of a train ticket from Birmingham to Telford is about £9 and from Manchester to Telford is about £30. The nearest train stations to Telford College are Telford Central and Wellington, Shropshire. It is cheaper to book your train ticket in advance as it can be expensive to travel at busy commuting hours during the week. You can book rail tickets: I In person at UK train stations with ticket offices or selfservice ticket machines, or at all National Rail-appointed travel agents throughout the UK.

The sign shows where to go. If you book this way, you can pay by cash, cheque, credit card or bank debit card.
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By telephone Many train companies have a booking line – call any of the numbers in the box on the next page, which will also help if you are not sure which train company you wish to use. To book by telephone, you’ll have to give your credit card number to the booking agent. Over the internet Some train companies operate websites and there are also specialised train ticket websites like www.thetrainline.com, which can also be used to book tickets. To book online, you will have to use a credit card.

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UK train company booking lines
Arriva Trains Wales Central Trains Eurostar First Great Western First Great Western Link Midland Mainline Virgin Trains 0870 0870 0870 0845 0845 0845 0845 900 609 518 700 730 712 722 0773 6060 6186 0125 0700 5678 2333

If you are landing at a London airport e.g. Gatwick or Heathrow, you will need to go to Euston Station to catch the train to Telford Central, Shropshire.

Travelling by bus or coach
If you want to travel by bus or coach check the time on the website www.traveline.org.uk .Telephone 0871 200 2233.

Further information
For more information about rail services, including fares, routes and schedules, look at www.nationalrail.co.uk, or telephone National Rail Enquiries on 08457 484950 (24 hours a day, from within the UK).

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Catching a coach
National Express is a major coach company that operates throughout the UK.

Fares
Fares tend to be much cheaper than for rail services but travel times are longer. A ticket from London to Telford may cost you approximately £20. For details of National Express coach fares and schedules, check www.nationalexpress.com, or telephone +44 (0) 08717 818181 (from 8.00am to 10.00pm daily). If you are arriving in London, you will need to go to Victoria Station to catch a coach to Telford.

Travelling by Taxi
The advantages: I Door to door service, you do not have to work out your own route, change trains or switch from one kind of transport to another I If you have lots of luggage with you, loading it into a taxi once is easier than hauling it on and off trains, coaches, etc The disadvantages: I Taking taxis can be expensive, especially if you have a long way to travel. for example: I a taxi from Birmingham to Telford can cost at least £60. Call our International Office on +44 (0)1952 642340 or the School of International Studies on +44 (0)1952 642368 for a precise quote for airport taxis to Telford Our advice I Try to arrive during the day as travelling will be easier – trains may not be running at night. We want you to be safe. I If you are travelling from a regional airport, ask College (ahead of time) for information and follow their advice I If you are going to visit someone’s home for the first time, ask him or her the best way to get there. Sometimes taking a taxi can be simpler than working out local bus routes. In smaller cities, typical taxi fares may be about £5-£10 I If you are out late at night after the buses and trains have stopped, take a taxi, do not walk I Make sure that you only take a licensed taxi. Unlicensed taxis operate in many cities, are illegal and may be unsafe – Look for a licence plate on the taxi (picture of licence on taxi) At Londan Heathrow there are the famous ‘black cabs. At airports the information desk can help you find a licensed taxi. Always remember: when taking a taxi, it is a good idea to ask the driver for a rough idea of what the fare will be before you start. It is customary to tip the driver about 10% of the total fare.
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Cars and motorcycles
With so many transport options available, most students get along very happily in the UK without their own vehicle. But if you do want to drive while here, this is what you need to know. To drive a car or motorcycle in the UK, you must have a valid licence and you must be at least 17 years old (16 years old to drive a moped). You must be at least 21 to drive a medium or large sized vehicle, minibus or bus. During your first year in the UK, you may use your driving licence from your own country or an international driving permit. After that, what happens depends on whether your driving licence is from an EEA country, another specified country, or any other country. Cars and motorcycles must be insured – it is an offence to drive without insurance. Cars and motorcycles must have an up-to-date tax disc. College will give you further information about driving in the UK – please telephone +44 (0)1952 642471 to request the information or call into the International Office.

Keeping Safe
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Take special care of your passport, travel documents and tickets. Keep them with you in a safe place and know where they are at all times. Before you travel take a photocopy of all the pages of your passport that show your details (name, photograph, passport number and its date and place of issue) and all the pages that have any entry clearances or immigration stamps on them, and pack them separately from your passport. If you do lose your passport, contact the police and your Embassy immediately and give them your passport details. Do not carry large amounts of cash with you; bring just enough for your immediate needs (at least £200). Bring a credit card, if you have one, to pay for things like rail tickets and hotel bills. If possible, your cash should include some coins and some small bank notes (£5 or £10) so that you can use public telephones and ticket machines if necessary.

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Carry cash, credit cards and travellers cheques in a safe place, such as an inside pocket, a money belt or a zipped handbag. Make a note of the serial numbers of your traveller’s cheques and pack this separately from the cheques themselves. Keep your travellers cheques separate from your passport. If you lose your travellers cheques or credit card, report the loss to the police and the issuing organisation immediately Keep the telephone number of Telford College handy (01952 642471) in case you need to call for advice or to tell us about a change in your plans. The college number will be texted to your mobile phone on arrival and a special 24 hour emergency number will be given to you. Bring as few valuable items as possible with you. Leave expensive jewellery at home. Pack your valuable items in your hand luggage, not your main luggage. Label your luggage clearly so that it can be forwarded to you if it gets separated from you during the journey. If you do lose your luggage at any stage, report the loss immediately to officials of the airline or shipping line. At airports or seaports, check the ‘lost property office’ to see whether it has been handed in there. Keep your luggage with you at all times. If you need to leave your luggage somewhere while you change money or make telephone calls, find an official ‘left luggage’ office (available at airports and at major rail and coach stations). For a small fee you will be able to leave your luggage in a supervised area. The attendant should give you a receipt so that you can collect your items later. Never take luggage through customs for another passenger

Personal safety
The UK is a safe country. However, as a visitor you need to be aware of the types of situations that may put you at risk and what you can do to avoid them. If you are involved in any incident involving theft or personal attack, report it as soon as possible to the police. The police have a duty to protect all citizens and can be safely approached. Also, you will need a certificate from the police if you need to claim for theft on an insurance policy. In an emergency you can contact the emergency services: fire, police or ambulance, by dialling 999 from any telephone. This call is free of charge but should be used only in an emergency. Nonemergency calls to the police should be made to your local police station using the local telephone number in the telephone directory.

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In buildings
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Make sure you know where the fire exits, fire-assembly points, fire-fighting equipment and first-aid facilities are located Make sure you know the procedures for emergency evacuation and follow them as instructed

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At home
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Use the safety chains or lock all outside doors when you are at home but leave the keys in the locks in case you need to get out in a hurry If you live in a flat or a house with an outside light, use it If you are female and live in a flat with a door-entry system do not put ‘Miss’, ‘Mrs’ etc. before your name, just use your surname. If in doubt about a visitor do not let him or her in If you have a telephone answering machine, do not say ‘I am not available’, as this indicates a single occupant. It is better to say ‘No one is available to take your call’ Close and lock all windows and outside doors whenever you go out When you go out on dark nights and mornings leave a table lamp or room light on to make the place look occupied If you have gas appliances in your home, make sure that they are checked annually by a professional to safeguard against carbon monoxide poisoning. If you are unsure about the safety of your gas appliances, ask your landlord or landlady to have them checked and use a carbon monoxide detector, which can be bought in hardware shops

If you live in rented accommodation, ask your landlord to have the cookers, heaters and fires checked. They are required by law to show you the most recent safety certificate.
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Whenever you go out, turn off gas and electrical appliances, such as the cooker, television, iron, etc. (but not the fridge)

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Your belongings
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When you first arrive in the UK you need to be well prepared. When moving into new accommodation, don’t leave luggage or belongings outside or in an open trunk/boot of a car or taxi Use an ultraviolet pen to mark your valuables with your name, postcode and student ID number (see Student Services for details) to enable the police to return them if they are stolen Keep your passport, travellers’ cheques, wallet/purse and other valuables locked away Make sure your television, video and other valuables can’t be seen through a window and never leave cash or credit cards lying around If you go away on holiday, leave your valuables in storage or with a trusted friend If you have a bicycle, always lock it up by its frame and wheel to a fixed object. Mark it with your postcode so that the police can return it if it is stolen Try not to use a computer case when carrying a laptop, use a less expensive bag to carry it in and think before using it and displaying other expensive items such as watches and jewellery in public places where they could be stolen Don’t leave your mobile phone unattended. If it is stolen, immobilise it by calling 08701 123123. You will need to have your IMEI number (15-digit serial number) when reporting a stolen mobile phone – this can be found by dialling *#06# on most mobiles or by looking behind the phone battery. You should keep a note of your IMEI number in a safe place in case it is required

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Keep the number of a local licensed taxi/minicab firm handy – never use an unlicensed company Agree the journey fare before you get into the taxi to avoid confrontation at your journeys end Always sit in the back It is quite acceptable to chat with the driver, but do not give away any personal information Have your cash ready and leave the cab before you pay the driver

When using public transport
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If you travel by train, tram or Underground (tube), avoid sitting in an empty carriage. Instead, try to sit near groups of people in a well-lit area When travelling on a long way by train, make sure someone knows which train you are travelling on and when you are due to arrive Try to avoid walking alone after getting off a bus or train. If you can, walk close to a group of people or arrange for someone to meet you Check the time of the last train or bus home to avoid being stranded

When walking or cycling
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In a taxi
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Keep valuables in a safe place and do not carry large amounts of cash Dress appropriately and make sure you (and your bicycle) are visible, especially after dark Walk on the pavement, facing oncoming traffic. When crossing the road remember that vehicles drive on the left in the UK so will approach you from the right Carry a torch after dark and do not take short cuts, for example, through dark alleyways or parks If you feel you are being followed, cross the street (more than once, if necessary), and if you are still unhappy move as quickly as possible to a public area, such as a restaurant or bar, and telephone for help. It is not necessarily the best idea to use the first telephone that you see if it is in an isolated spot To remain safe and alert don’t listen to a personal stereo/IPod or have long conversations on a mobile phone while you are walking

Further information is on the Home Office website www.good2bsecure.gov.uk or see Safety First – a personal safety guide for international students on the Education UK website www.educationuk.org (click on ‘Living in the UK’, then ‘Health and Safety’.This is available from Student Services and will be given to you when you have your induction.

01952 642237

email: studserv@tcat.ac.uk

Registering with the Police
Once you arrive in the United Kingdom, you may have to register your stay with the police. If you need to register, this requirement will be endorsed in your passport. You must register within seven days of arriving in the UK. To register you will need your passport, two passport size photographs of yourself and the registration fee.

Further reading
UKCISA Guidance Notes for students: www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/information

Useful websites
www.nationalrail.co.uk www.nationalexpress.com www.baa.com for information on railway timetables for information on travelling by coach for airport information for London Heathrow, London Gatwick, London Stansted, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Southampton for Birmingham Airport information for Manchester Airport information for Coventry Airport information for Liverpool Airport information for Nottingham East Midlands Airport information

www.bhx.co.uk www.manchesterairport.co.uk www.coventryairport.co.uk www.liverpoolairport.com www.eastmidlandsairport.com

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College Life
College Life

College Life
Telford College is a friendly college and we will help you to settle in and enjoy your studies. At the back of this pack you will find:
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Further reading
Study methods in the UK available on the website www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/info_sheets /study_methods.php

Directions of how to get to Telford College A map of the college campus A college calendar showing holiday dates

Student Services Support at college Mentor
At college you will be given a Mentor who you can see regularly to make sure you are settling into college. You can discuss any concerns with him/her on a confidential basis. If you are worried about anything, eg accommodation, money, your course, you can talk to your Mentor.

Personal Tutor
You will also have a Personal Tutor who will offer advice and suggestions about your work, your study methods, and be there to help you in any way to help you succeed.

Student Services
Student Services can also help you with
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Looking for part-time work Health concerns Future study in the UK Career guidance Financial advice whilst in the UK Learning support – ask your Tutor about Learner Centre Plus Looking for extra part-time courses Getting a Student Union card General advice on forms for re-applying for a visa General advice – there’s always someone available to talk to you or you can make an appointment Facilities for worship Details of local attractions

Organising your time
You may have ‘free’ time when you do not have lectures. Organise your time well and plan to complete your assignment work/reading to make sure you keep up with the work involved. Your Personal Tutor will advise you. Telford College will have trips you may like to go on. There may be a cost for these. If you have any concerns, talk to your Mentor or Personal Tutor.

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Living in the UK
Living in the UK

Culture
The culture in the UK may be quite different from the familiar culture of your own country and can sometimes be a shock. You will have a new environment, meet lots of new people and learn the ways of a new country. It may also be a shock to be separated from your family and friends, who you can normally talk to about things. You may notice differences in: Climate – the British weather may be very different – you may find it colder and damper than home. Dress – if you come from a warm climate, you may need to wear warmer clothing during both the British winter and summer. Social behaviour – you may find this confusing at first. People in large cities may appear to be always in a hurry and cold and distant. You may be surprised to see couples holding hands and kissing in public. Punctuality – British people have a reputation for punctuality and you should be on time for lectures and meetings. Animals – you may be surprised to find that British people share their homes with cats, dogs and other pets. Food and eating habits – you may find that food is very different to what you are used to. Smoking – smoking is not allowed in public indoor places. Drinking – alcohol is part of social life in the UK for many people – this may not be the same in your home country. Religious practice – Every major religion is represented in the UK – Student Services will advise you about finding a place of worship in the local area. This culture shock is normal and there are many things you can do to help yourself: I Keep in touch with home I Talk to your Mentor and Personal Tutor at college I Keep familiar things around you I Find a supplier of familiar food I Eat a healthy and balanced diet I Meet with other international students I Link with your faith community I Join the Student Council I Remember this culture shock is normal and temporary and within a short time you will start to integrate fully into your local community.

Further reading
International student and culture shock – www.ukcisa.org.uk Studying and living in the UK – www.educationuk.org

Shopping
There are different types of shop in the UK. These are some of the most popular:

Large supermarkets
e.g.Tesco, Asda, Morrisons,Waitrose, Sainsburys These are usually open every day from 8am to 8pm or later. Sunday hours may be shorter e.g. 11am to 5pm. Some stores are open 24 hours a day. They sell: food, clothes, shoes, electrical goods, CDs, books, magazines. Most large supermarkets also have a pharmacy (chemist)

Department stores
e.g. Debenhams, House of Fraser, Marks and Spencer, BHS usually open every day from 9am to 6pm. They may have a late night opening. They sell: clothing, household goods, shoes, Marks and Spencer also sells food.

High Street Chemists
e.g. Boots, Superdrug Usually open 9.00am to 6.00pm, but chemists take turns in staying open outside normal hours for emergency supplies. They sell: medicines, personal care products, contraceptives

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Markets
Wellington has a local market – open Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays (9am to 4pm).

Charity Shops
e.g. Oxfam, Cancer Research UK These sell good quality, second-hand items e.g. clothes, shoes, household goods.

Books and Stationery Shops
e.g. Waterstones – books and cards WH Smith – books, magazines, newspapers, stationery, cards Partners – stationery and cards Open from 9am to 6pm.

Local Shops
e.g. newsagents, local store Often open early morning until late at night They sell: magazines, cigarettes, sweets, some food and drink

Restaurants
There are restaurants serving many different kinds of food, e.g. Chinese,Thai, Indian, Greek as well as traditional English food. Lunch is usually served from 12 noon to 2pm and dinner between 6pm and 10pm. Some larger restaurants stay open for long hours and serve food all day and cater for families.

Post Offices
Open: 9am to 5.30pm Monday to Friday and 9am to 12.30pm on Saturday. You can send letters and parcels from Post Offices. You can also buy phonecards and it operates a bank.

Pubs and Bars
Pubs serve drinks and often food. The opening hours vary so check locally. Beer is a popular drink – this could be lager or bitter. Pubs also serve spirits and non-alcoholic drinks. The legal age for drinking alcohol in the UK is 18.

Internet Shopping
This can be useful for airline tickets. Make sure that the site is secure – there should be a solid gold padlock in the bottom left hand corner and the address should begin “http”. Check with your tutors before buying anything on-line.

Entertainment
The UK has many events – cultural and artistic. There are museums, theatres, cinemas, concerts, sports. Check the displays in Student Services and with your Student Council.

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Telephones
Public Telephones: Although most people now have mobile phones, there are public telephones available. To use these you need cash or a phonecard. You can buy phonecards from newsagents, post offices and supermarkets for £2, £5, £10 and £20. There is a display panel in the public telephone which tells you how to use it. Useful phone numbers: Emergency services (fire, police, ambulance) 999 Be ready to tell the operator where you are, and what kind of emergency it is.

Television and Radio
A television is often provided as part of the furnishings in your accommodation. You can also rent or buy television and DVD players. You will need a licence to watch UK television – this costs £139.50 per year. If you share accommodation you can split the cost of the licence. If you are in homestay you will not need to pay this. There are 5 main ‘terrestrial’ channels broadcast in the UK. A rough guide to what is broadcast is: BBC 1 broadcasts drama, light comedy, news, films, sports, consumer programmes and soap operas. broadcasts gardening, cookery, drama, documentary dramas and educational programmes broadcasts dramas, soap operas, game shows, quiz shows, news, films and documentaries broadcasts dramas and comedies, news, documentaries and alternative comedy aimed at a younger audience. Broadcasts sport Documentaries, American dramas, soap operas, game and chat shows

BBC 2 Operator 100 International dialling code 00 To call overseas, dial 00, then the country code, then the number. These are listed at the front of telephone directories. International operator 155 You can use this number to reverse the charges for an international call (so that the person you are calling pays.) International calls are cheapest between 8pm and 8am. Channel 4

ITV

Channel 5

Mobile Phones
There are contracts and pay-as-you-go plans available. Check the costs of the contracts carefully. There are mobile phone shops in Telford. The College may be able to help with SIM cards.

There are also satellite and cable channels that you can subscribe to for an extra fee. The European satellite “hotbird” is free and receives foreign language channels but you must still have a licence to receive digital signals.

Email
As soon as you are a student at the college you are given a free email account, which will help you to keep in touch with family and friends.

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Radio
The BBC broadcasts nationally as follows: Radio 1 contemporary music station, playing mainly pop music Radio 2 wide range of music, light comedy, conversation Radio 3 arts station – classical music, literary work Radio 4 conversation, news, interviews, health advice, quiz shows and drama Five Live news and sport BBC Radio Shropshire local radio station – local news and stories of local interest, music

There are many other independent radio channels.

COUNCIL TAX
The Council Tax is set by local authorities in England to pay for local services that they provide, such as rubbish collection, the Police and the Fire Brigade. It is based on the value of the house, flat or other accommodation (on this page these are all called ‘dwellings’) in which you live. The Council Tax bill for a dwelling depends on its value and the number of people aged 18 years or over living there. Some dwellings are ‘exempt’ which means no Council Tax is payable at all and there will be no bill for the dwelling. In other cases, certain people (including students) are ignored when counting the number of adults living in a dwelling and there may be a reduction in the bill.

Water
It is safe to drink water from the tap in the UK. Use the cold tap in the kitchen – avoid drinking from taps in bathrooms, and in public places only drink if it is labelled ‘drinking water’. Swimming – it is best to swim in the local swimming pool and avoid rivers and lakes as these can be dangerous.

You need to check with Student Services whether you will be liable for Council Tax.

Further reading
Council Tax and International Students – available from Student Services

Gas and Electricity
Gas is widely used for cooking and heating. Always: I Read the instructions carefully for gas appliances I Never block ventilation pipes or hatches I If you smell gas, do not use any sort of flame or electrical light or switch – call the gas emergency service immediately on 0800 111 999

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Education
In the UK, all children must be in full-time education from the age of five to the age of sixteen. If you bring your children to the UK with you and they are in this age range, they can study at a UK state school free of charge. If your children are older than sixteen and they want to continue their education, they may have to attend an independent school. Independent schools charge fees to all students. Ask at Student Services for advice. Your spouse or civil partner can study full time or part time.The rules regarding overseas and home fees (see sections 1 and 3) apply to your spouse/civil partner as well.

journey. London Transport will give details of accessible journeys. If you would like to get out and visit other parts of the UK while you are here, one helpful option is to travel on a specially arranged holiday. Some tour operators and organisations organise trips and holidays for disabled people, choosing destinations and transport that meet your access needs. Contact RADAR or SKILL for details.

Further information
RADAR (Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation) 12 City Forum, 250 City Road, London, EC1V 8AF, telephone +44 (0)20 7250 3222 www.radar.org.uk SKILL: National Bureau for Students with Disabilities, Chapter House, 18-20 Crucifix Lane, London, SE1 3JW, telephone +44 (0)20 7450 0620 (information and advice are available in the UK between 11.30am to 1.30pm Tuesdays and 1.30pm and 3.30pm Thursdays: 0800 328 5050), fax +44 (0) 20 7450 0650. Equality and Human Rights Commission, Equality and Human Rights Helpline, Freepost, RRLL-GHUX-CTRY, Arndale House, Arndale Centre, Manchester, M4 3EQ.

Services and access for disabled people
Telford College is fully accessible for disabled students. We have a Learning Support Manager, Mr Rob Lewis, who can advise. Institutions now have legal obligations towards students under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. For further advice, see “Further information” below. Many modern buildings in the UK have wheelchair ramps and lifts, and are fully accessible to disabled people. Older buildings are sometimes more difficult, so when you are planning a visit to a place you haven’t been before, telephone in advance and ask about the access arrangements. If you are disabled and you drive a car, you can apply for a badge entitling you to free parking. On public transport, some trains have facilities for wheelchair users, and some taxis are specially converted to take wheelchairs. Buses and the London Underground are more difficult for wheelchair users. Again, check what sort of transport is available before you begin a

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Buying and owning a car in the UK
If you own a car in the UK, you must do all of the following: I Make sure that it is registered in your name. When you buy a new or second-hand car you should be given the car’s registration document. You must immediately register or re-register the car in your name by completing the document and sending it to the address shown on the document I Keep it insured – it is an offence to drive a car in the UK without insurance I Make sure it has a valid MOT certificate if it is over three years old. All cars over three years old must pass a roadworthiness test that is run by the MOT (Ministry of Transport). The MOT test is available at most garages, but make sure you choose a garage that is an approved MOT centre – look for a sign which says this I Pay road tax: the UK government recently introduced a banding system of car tax. Cars with certain engine types and emission levels now qualify for reductions in, or even exemption from, road tax duty. You can pay the tax at most main post offices, by phone or online via the DVLA website. If paying at a post office you will need to take your registration document, insurance certificate and MOT certificate, if applicable, with an accepted form of payment (cash, cheque with guarantee card, credit or debit card). You will then receive a tax disc, which you must display at all times by attaching to the inside of your windscreen. Further information available from: Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), Customer Enquiries (Drivers) Unit, DVLC, Swansea, SA6 7JL. Telephone +44 (0)1792 786 369 Website www.dvla.gov.uk

Services for drivers
If you plan to buy your own car to use in the UK, consider joining one of the motoring organisations. For an annual fee, these organisations offer: I breakdown and recovery services (they’ll come and help you if your car breaks down) I advice on insurance and route-planning I information about motoring, motoring laws and regulations The two best known organisations are the Automobile Association (AA) and the RAC, but there are a number of others as well. Ask your students union, or the NUS, about special rates for students.

Further information
Automobile Association (AA) Lambert House, Stockport Road, Cheadle, SK8 2DY.Telephone +44 (0)161 495 8945, website www.theaa.com RAC Motoring Services 8 Surrey Street, Norwich, NR1 3NG. Telephone +44 (0)1922 727313, in the UK 0870 572 2722 Website www.rac.co.uk

Further reading
UKCISA notes: . driving in the UK – a guide for international students Available from Student Services

Bicycle basics
Bicycles can be a good low-cost choice. For information about the National Cycle Network Centre, contact Sustrans, 2 Cathedral Square, College Green, Bristol, BS1 5DD. Telephone +44 (0)845 113 0065. www.sustrans.org

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Bicycling tips
If you want to use a bicycle while you are in the UK, it is a good idea to take a ‘familiarisation’ course if there is one available. The local police or the local authority sometimes offer these courses, and they can teach you how to ride a bicycle safely while you are here. Top safety tips include: I wear a safety helmet on a bicycle, although it is not compulsory I make sure that your bicycle has proper lights, compulsory if you ride at night I you should also wear some reflective clothing if you ride at night I use a good locking device to reduce the chance of theft I if you want, you can have a special number engraved on your bicycle and register it with the Police. If your bicycle is ever stolen, this number can help the police to identify it

Further reading
The Student Book,Trotman & Co. Ltd, annual The Time Out Student Guide,Time Out Magazine Ltd, annual Watching the English,The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour by Kate Fox, Hodder & Stoughton, 2005 UKCISA Guidance Notes for students: www.ukcisa.org.uk/student/information

Libraries
The College has its own library, but the local public library can be a useful resource as well. You can: I use it as a place to read and study I borrow books, videos and CDs I access the internet using the library’s public computer terminal I find information on local history, services (including lists of local doctors) and social events You can walk into a public library and study or read any books without restriction, but if you want to borrow any of the materials or use the computer terminals, you will have to join. Joining is free – all you have to do is complete a form and provide proof of your address (e.g. a letter from your institution or a utility bill that displays your UK accommodation address).

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Health Matters

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Health Matters

Health Matters
It is important to look after yourself in a new country. You will have to cope with differences in the weather, food and the culture, and know how to obtain medical treatment. As an international student you may be entitled to health care through the UK’s National Health Service while you are here.

Reciprocal Health Care Agreements
The UK has reciprocal health agreements for the following: Nationals of: Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Bosnia and Herzogovina Bulgaria Croatia Georgia Kazakhstan Macedonia Moldovia New Zealand Romania Russia Serbia and Montenegro Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan Residents of: Anguilla Australia Barbados British Virgin Islands Channel Islands Falkland Islands Gibraltar Isle of Man Montserrat St Helena Turks and Caicos Islands

The National Health Service (NHS)
The National Health Service (NHS) provides free and subsidised treatment for people who live in the UK. As an international student, you may be entitled to NHS hospital treatment if you are: I enrolled on a course lasting for six months or more I To receive free hospital treatment in England and Wales, your family members must be in the UK as your dependants and not, for example, as visitors. ‘Family’ in this situation means your husband or wife, and your children aged up to the age of 16 or up to the age of 19 if they are in full-time education I studying in England and Wales and your course is substantially funded by the UK government; you will receive full NHS hospital treatment from the beginning of your stay even if your course is less than six months long. ‘Substantially’ means at least 35 per cent government funded. You will need to provide evidence of the funding in order to qualify for free treatment. You will not be eligible for free General Practitioner (family doctor) treatment however. Otherwise, if you have come to the UK for less than six months to study, you may still be eligible for hospital treatment under the NHS if you are: I a non-UK EEA (European Economic Area) national. You should obtain a European health insurance card (available from your national health authority) in your own country before coming to the UK. This will entitle the holder and their family to full NHS treatment on the same basis as the student categories described above.

Be careful: this list changes from time to time, so check with the British Embassy, High Commission or Consulate in your country to confirm the current list. If you are covered by a reciprocal care agreement, you will be eligible for some NHS treatment even if your course lasts for less than six months. Some treatment may not be covered so always check with the health authority in your own country. You may still need to take out limited medical insurance. Dependants (defined as spouse or civil partner and children under 16, or under 19 if in full-time education) enjoy the same access to NHS services provided they are resident in the UK with the family member who enjoys exemption from charges. This does not apply to dependants who are only visiting the UK for a short period. If you are not entitled to NHS treatment you will have to pay the full cost of any treatment you receive in the UK except for treatment that is free for everyone. Services that are always free are: I treatment for accident or emergency I diagnosis and treatment of certain specified communicable diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) and sexually transmitted diseases other than HIV. HIV tests and counselling are free I family planning services (contraception) I compulsory psychiatric treatment Treatment can be very expensive, so make sure you take out a medical insurance policy, either before you leave your home country or as soon as possible after you arrive in the UK (see section 1 – insurance).

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Emergency Services
In a medical emergency you should either: I telephone for an ambulance – dial 999 (the call is free), or I get someone to take you to the nearest hospital with a casualty (accident and emergency) department The accident and emergency services provided in the casualty department are free for everyone in the first instance. However, if you are admitted to hospital for treatment after an accident (because you need more treatment than the casualty department offers), and you are not covered by the NHS, you will have to pay for this treatment.

Prescription medicines
If the doctor decides you need medicine, he or she will give you a ‘prescription’, written instructions allowing a pharmacist to give you the medicine. Take the prescription to a chemist’s shop (a pharmacy) to get the medicine. You can expect to pay a fee for each prescription medication you need – currently £7-£10 per item. Some people may get free prescriptions. Look at the website www.dh.gov.uk for more information in different languages. Download the leaflet ‘Help with Health Costs’ HCH from www.dh.gov.uk .

Doctors services Registering with a GP and obtaining a NHS medical card
If you are in an eligible category you should register with a local doctor (also referred to as a general practitioner or GP) as soon as possible after you arrive at your destination and have a permanent address – do not wait until you are ill. The GP will be based in a surgery. Your college may be able to recommend a local GP. You can also get a list of local GPs from your public library. Alternatively, telephone NHS Direct (0845 4647) and ask for a list of GPs in the area where you live, this is also available on the NHS direct website www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk . Student Services keep a list of local doctors.

Dental treatment
You should try to have your teeth checked by a dentist at least once a year. You can find lists of dentists who give NHS treatment at local main post offices or at www.nhs.uk. You need to be registered with a doctor in order to qualify for NHS dental treatment. Otherwise you will have to pay the full cost. Check first whether the dentist accepts NHS patients, as some dentists will only accept private patients. Once accepted, you will need to give the dentist the NHS number on your medical card. There is a charge for all dental treatment. If you are eligible for free prescriptions (see above), you will also be eligible for free dental treatment.

NHS Direct
This 24 hour nurse-led telephone advice service is free and run by the NHS. It provides information on diagnosis and treatment of common conditions; www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk

Your NHS number
After you have registered, you will eventually receive a medical card stating your NHS number. Take this card with you whenever you go to see your doctor or any other NHS health-care provider (e.g. a dentist or an optician).

Consulting the doctor
When you go to your doctor for the first time, find out what times the surgery (the doctor’s office) is open, and whether you need to make an appointment.There should also be an emergency telephone number that you can call if you need to see a doctor outside the normal opening hours. Doctors will not normally visit you at your home, but they might if it is an emergency and you are too ill to leave your bed. If you are covered by the NHS, there is no charge for consulting a doctor.

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Optical treatment
Opticians usually have premises on the high streets. People under 16, or under 19 and in full-time study, do not have to pay for eye tests. People not in the above category will have to pay for: eye tests – currently about £20 lenses and frames for glasses, and contact lenses (various prices) Prices for lenses and frames vary from place to place, so look around before you buy anything. If you already wear glasses or contact lenses, it is a good idea to bring a spare pair with you – you may find that these items are more expensive in the UK than in your home country.
I I

Services for women
In the UK, there are a number of special health services available for women: I you have the right to register with a female doctor if you wish I whether your doctor is male or female, he or she can provide contraceptives, advice on birth control and pregnancy tests I Well Woman Clinics offer advice and check-ups. There are clinics in many areas; to find the nearest one, ask your doctor or college.The website www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk will give details of where to go I Family planning clinics – see above I If you become pregnant during your stay, student services at college can provide help and advice, and can refer you to appropriate professionals if necessary. Your doctor or the local Family Planning Clinic can also advise you of your rights and options. In addition, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service has branches in major cities throughout the UK – Contact the head office (see below) or ask student services I If you have been subjected to any form of physical harassment or sexual assault, seek help and advice immediately. Most large towns and cities have a Rape Crisis Centre – look in the local telephone directory

Keeping Healthy – Family Planning
Family Planning Clinics offer free, confidential advice and information on contraception (birth control) and sexual health. They provide free condoms and other contraceptives, pregnancy tests and cervical smear tests. Their services are completely confidential and they will not pass on information about you to anyone else. Clinics can be used by women, men and young people (including those under 16 years of age). You can refer yourself or be referred by your GP or other health workers. You may need to book an appointment to see the doctor but many centres also have walk-in clinics. Student Services can advise you where to go (in confidence). You can get details of your nearest Family Planning Clinic from your local telephone directory (or www.yell.com) , your GP surgery, hospital, local health authority or from the Family Planning Association (FPA) website at www.fpa.org.uk

Further reading
British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) 20 Timothy’s Bridge Road, Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 9BF, telephone action line in the UK: 08457 304030, www.bpas.org Citizens Advice Telephone 0845 146 1554,Waterloo House, Ketley Business Park, Ketley,Telford,TF1 5JD Family Planning Association www.fpa.org.uk

Sexual Health
In the UK, sexual relationships are entirely a matter of personal choice. If you come from a different culture, this approach may be very different from what you are used to. If you begin a sexual relationship, make sure you understand the risk of catching sexually transmitted diseases, and how to reduce that risk. This is important for both men and women. Some sexually transmitted diseases can be easily treated with antibiotics, but HIV/AIDS can be lifethreatening – so do make sure you get (and follow) good advice about reducing the risks. You can get confidential advice and information from your doctor or from College who can give details of specialist drop-in clinics on a confidential basis. If you think you have been in danger of catching a sexually transmitted disease, contact your doctor. He or she will treat your case in confidence (that is, protecting your privacy). There may also be a unit specialising in these illnesses at the local hospital – ask your doctor, contact the hospital or search for a Family Planning Association clinic on www.fpa.org.uk .

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Diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases is free for everyone, but for HIV/AIDS you may be entitled only to initial diagnosis and associated counselling or emergency care and treatment (that which is immediately necessary) AIDS advice: For free and confidential advice about HIV/AIDS, telephone the Terence Higgins Trust’s national helpline on 0845 122 1200 Monday to Friday, 10.00am to 10.00pm, Saturday and Sunday, 12.00 midday to 6.00pm.

Drugs and alcohol Drugs
In the UK, it is illegal to use controlled drugs, except under medical supervision (that is, following your doctor’s instructions). But, if you do use illegal drugs and you develop a problem with substance misuse here are two numbers you can telephone for confidential advice: I Turning Point 0207 481 7600 I FRANK 0800 776 600 (www.talktofrank.com)

Further information
Speak with your doctor, or contact one of the following: I Meningitis Research Foundation telephone 080 8800 3344 (free call) www.meningitis.org (information is available on the website in 17 languages) I National Meningitis Trust telephone 0845 6000 800 (lowcost call), www.immunisation.org.uk

Alcohol
Anyone over 18 years old can legally buy and consume alcoholic drinks in the UK. If you think you might be drinking too much, get help and advice from one of the following:
I I I

Student Services Your doctor Alcoholics Anonymous +44 (0)1904 644026

Keeping healthy
The best way to stay healthy while you are in the UK is the same way to stay healthy when you are at home: eat healthy foods, exercise regularly, and make sure you get enough sleep. Eating a balanced diet (selection of foods) can be a challenge when you first arrive – the food in the UK may be very different from what you are used to.Try to eat each of the following every day:
I I I I

Meningitis
When you have registered with a local doctor, you should make an appointment to be immunised against meningitis. This immunisation is usually free of charge and provides protection against a common strain of the disease for three to five years. Meningitis is an infection that causes inflammation (swelling) of the lining of the brain and spinal cord. Although the infection is quite rare, it is extremely dangerous and can result in deafness, blindness, loss of limbs or even death. Meningitis can develop very quickly, sometimes within a matter of hours. Early symptoms are similar to flu, such as feeling feverish or suffering from aching back or joints, headaches and vomiting. If you or anyone you know develops any of the following symptoms, get medical help urgently: I a severe aversion to light I a rash that does not fade when pressure is applied (you can test this by pressing the side of a glass against the rash; if the rash does not fade and change colour under the pressure, contact your doctor immediately) I disorientation I loss of consciousness (this can lead to coma)

lots of fresh fruit and vegetables bread, potatoes, rice, noodles or pasta some protein, such as beans, lentils, eggs, fish or meat some milk, cheese, yoghurt or fortified soy products (e.g. soya milk or tofu with calcium and other nutrients added)

Try to get some exercise several times a week.The College offers lots of opportunities to practise your favourite sport or learn a new one.The College offers sports facilities just for females as well as mixed sports. If you do not like sports, try an exercise class, go dancing, or go for a long walk. If you arrive in September you will find that the days are short and the mornings and evenings can be quite dark, which may be different from your normal environment. Getting out into the daylight for exercise as much as possible will be beneficial.

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Coping with minor problems
Travelling to a new country with a different climate and different foods can cause small health upsets. You may develop minor illnesses such as coughs and colds. If you have not had these symptoms before, they may seem worrying at first, but do not be alarmed - these problems are usually easy to treat. Make an appointment to see your doctor if you are concerned.

Health-care checklist
Checklist:
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I

I I I I

find out whether you are entitled to health care under the NHS arrange any necessary insurance, either before you leave home as soon as you get to the UK register with a doctor and a dentist as soon as you can ask your doctor to immunise you against meningitis eat a balanced diet and get regular exercise if you are worried about your health, talk to your doctor, your College Mentor, Personal Tutor or the Student Advisor at College

Further reading
UKCISA Guidance Note for students: Keeping healthy (available from your local British Council office or directly from UKCISA:The Council for International Student Affairs, 9-17 St Albans Place, London, N1 0NX, telephone advice service available 1.00pm to 4.00pm, Monday to Friday +44 (0)20 7107 9922, www.ukcisa.org.uk Insurance Endsleigh Insurance Services Ltd, www.endsleigh.co.uk

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UK Fact File

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UK Fact File

‘‘The perfect location in one of Britain’s most beautiful counties’’

where great futures begin

✈ ✈ ✈ ✈

Information on how to get to Telford
Telford is located in the Heart of England and is very easily accessible by road, rail and air. Birmingham International Airport is served by many airlines providing direct links to the UK and international destinations and is only 45 minutes by road from Telford. Telford connects to the main-line intercity network, with regular direct services to London from Telford's three train stations.These services also serve Birmingham International Airport.
v ● Birmingham - 1 hour v ● Manchester - 1.5 hours v ● Coventry - 1 hour v ● East Midlands - 2 hours v ● Liverpool - 1.5 hours

London - 3 hours

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UK Calendar 2008
January
1 January 9 January 19 January 23 January New Year’s Day Bank Holiday Islamic New Year Ashura (Islamic) Hindu Spring New Year

College Calendar 2009/10
DATE July 2009 August 2009 27 – 31 03 – 07 10 – 14 17 – 21 24 – 28 31 – 04 07 – 11 14 – 18 21 – 25 28 – 02 05 – 09 12 – 16 19 – 23 26 – 30 02 – 06 09 – 13 16 – 20 23 – 27 30 – 04 07 – 11 14 – 18 21 – 25 28 – 01 04 – 08 11 – 15 18 – 22 25 – 29 01 – 05 08 – 12 15 – 19 22 – 26 01 – 05 08 – 12 15 – 19 22 – 26 29 – 02 05 – 09 12 – 16 19 – 23 26 – 30 03 – 07 10 – 14 17 – 21 24 – 28 31 – 04 07 – 11 14 – 18 21 – 25 28 – 02 05 – 09 12 – 16 19 – 23 26 – 30 02 – 06 WEEK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 1 2

February
5 February 6 February 7 February Shrove Tuesday (Christian) Ash Wednesday (Christian) Chinese New Year

Aug/Sep Sept 2009

20 August – GCE A/AS results 27 August GCSE results 31/8 & 1/9 Bank/College Holidays Part-time enrolment Full-time students commence Part-time students commence

Sept/Oct Oct 2009

March
2 March 21 March 21 March 23 March 24 March 29 March Mother’s day (UK) Purim (Jewish) Good Friday (Christian) Bank Holiday Easter Sunday (Christian) Easter Monday (Christian) Bank Holiday British Summer Time begins Clocks go forward one hour
Nov 2009

Student Half-Term Holiday

Nov/Dec Dec 2009

April
13 April 14 April 20 April Sikh New Year Festival Rama Navami (Hindu) Pesach – Passover (Jewish)

Student last working day Friday 11 December Student Xmas Holiday Student Xmas Holiday Student Xmas Holiday

Jan 2010

Feb 2010

May
4 May 5 May 5 May Greenery Day (Japan) Children’s Day (Japan) May Day (UK Bank Holiday)
March 2010

Student Half-Term Holiday

September
1 September 30 September Ramadan (Islamic) Rosh Hashanah (Jewish)

Mar/Apr April 2010

Student Easter Holiday (Good Friday 2 April) Student Easter Holiday (Easter Monday 5 April)

October
9 October 25 October 28 October 28 October Yom Kippur (Jewish) British Summer Time Ends Clock go back one hour Diwali (Sikh) Divali – Row of Lights (Hindu)

May 2010

03 May – Bank Holiday

May/Jun June 2010

Student Half-Term Holiday (31/5 & 1/6 Bank/College Holidays)

November
3 November Culture Day (Japan)
Jun/Jul July 2010

Last day of Summer Term Friday 2 July

December
7 December 23 December 24 December 25 December 26 December Hajj Day (Islamic) The Emperor’s Birthday (Japan) Christmas Eve (Christian) Christmas Day (Christian) Boxing Day (Holiday)
August 2010

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Country

Distance from London in miles

Dialling Time difference code f rom the UK f rom the UK 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 39 81 254 961 60 52 212 31 64 234 47 92 63 351 7 966 65 27 82 34 94 46 886 66 90

Italy Japan Kenya Lebanon Malaysia Mexico Morocco Netherland New Zealand Nigeria Norway Pakistan Philippines Portugal Russia Contacting your home The following listing will help you keep in touch with home and with friends in other countries, or plan your travels from the UK. If you have problems with dialling an international number you can call the International Operator on telephone number 155. International Directory enquiries is 118 505 but note that you will be charged premium rates to use this service. Country Distance from London in miles Time Dialling difference code f rom the UK f rom the UK 00 54 00 374 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 61 994 973 880 32 55 359 1 86 57 420 45 20 358 33 49 233 30 852 91 62 Saudi Arabia Singapore South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Sweden Taiwan Thailand Turkey United Arab Emirates USA Venezuela Vietnam Zambia

897 (Rome) 5,956 (Tokyo) 4,228 (Nairobi) 2,160 (Beirut) 6,557 (Kuala Lumpar) 5,556 (Mexico City) 1,240 (Rabat) 221 (Amsterdam) 11,682 (Wellington) 2,960 (Abuja) 718 (Oslo) 3,763 (Islamabad) 6,690 (Manila) 985 (Lisbon) 1,559 (Moscow)

+ 1 hour + 9 hours + 3 hours + 2 hours + 8 hours - 6 to -8 hours no change + 1 hour + 12 hours + 1 hour + 1 hour + 5 hours + 8 hours no change +2.5 to + 10 hours 3,079(Riyadh) + 2 hours 6,739 + 8 hours 5,609 (Johannesburg) + 2 hours 5,519 (Seoul) + 9 hours 783 (Madrid) + 1 hour 5,410 (Colombo) + 6 hours 892 (Stockholm) + 1 hour 6,094 (Taipei) + 8 hours 5,924 (Bangkok) + 7 hours 1,557 (Istanbul) + 2 hours 3,407 (Dubai) 3,674 (Washington DC) 4,640 (Caracas) 5,747 (Hanoi) 4,930 (Lusaka) + 4 hours -5 to -11 hours + 4 hours +7 + 2 hours

6,900 (Buenos Aires) - 3 hours + 4 hours 2,250 (Yerevan) 10,553 (Canberra) + 8 to + 10 hours Azerbaijan 2,480 (Baku) + 4 hours Bahrain 3,160 + 3 hours Bangladesh 4,980 (Dhaka) + 6 hours Belgium 199 (Brussels) + 1 hour Brazil 5,750 (Rio de Janeiro) -2 to -5 hours Bulgaria 1,270 (Sofia) + 2 hours Canada 3,341 (Ottawa) -3.5 to -8 hours China 5,071 (Beijing) + 8 hours Colombia 5,260 (Bogota) - 5 hours Czech Republic 644 (Prague) + 1 hour Denmark 592 (Copenhagen) + 1 hour Egypt 2,191 (Cairo) + 2 hours Finland 1,133 (Helsinki) + 2 hours France 213 (Paris) + 1 hour Germany 577 (Berlin) + 1 hour Ghana 3,170 (Accra) no change Greece 1,486 (Athens) + 2 hours Hong Kong 6,052 + 8 hours India 4,164 (New Delhi) + 5.5 hours Indonesia 7,278 (Djakarta) + 7 to +8 hours

Argentina Armenia Australia

00 971 00 00 00 00 1 58 84 260

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