Village Venture

2016

35th annual
arts and
crafts faire

Spirited Scouts/page 10

Remembering Rosa/page 21

Courier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

3

Village Venture
Your guide to the Venture
See the map and booth listing to find your favorite vendor

............................4
A scary tour with the Scouts
Troop 1094 hosts its annual Ghost Walk

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Freaky and funky
Dig the top 13 Halloween hits for ‘weirdos’

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761• claremont-courier.com
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Adios, Rosa’s Tacos. Gracias!
After 34 years, a Venture favorite says goodbye

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

35th Annual

Village Venture
Arts & Crafts Faire
Saturday, October 22
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. • Rain or Shine

T

he Claremont Chamber
of Commerce is proud
to announce the 35th annual Village Venture Arts and
Crafts Faire. Get your holiday
shopping done early as you
walk the streets of the Claremont Village lined with over
450 booths selling unique art,
original crafts and apparel.

This is the place to kick-off your onestop holiday gift needs as you’ll find
something special for everyone on your
shopping list! You’ll also have an opportunity to explore our local businesses and
non-profits in the Business and Organizations block.
Enjoy tasty meals and treats at one of
our sidewalk café’s or stroll over to the
Food Court located on First Street to
choose from many international cuisine
options.
The Chamber anticipates more than
15,000 visitors to attend Village Venture
who often return to Claremont’s shops
and restaurants throughout the year. The

Photo courtesy of Jose Vera

day’s events are listed below:

Great Pumpkin Carving Contest
Sponsored by Claremont Sunrise Rotary
Contest Rules: Take your pre-carved
pumpkin to the Great Pumpkin Patch
VENTURE GUIDE/next page

4

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

5

Free Shuttle Service
From 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Buses run
every 10 to 15 minutes and are handicapped accessible. The free shuttle drops
off at the Metrolink at College Avenue
and First Street.

Food Court
Booths located on First Street between
Yale and Harvard Avenues.

VENTURE GUIDE/from the previous page

(corner of Bonita and Harvard Avenues)
between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.
• Complete the registration form when
you drop off your pre-carved pumpkin.
• Prizes will be awarded at the Great
Pumpkin Patch at 2 p.m. (participants
must be present to win).
• Pumpkins must be picked up between
2 and 4:30 p.m.
Unclaimed pumpkins will be discarded
at 4:45 p.m.)

Children’s Costume Parade
Begins at 9:30 a.m

Parking
Parking is available:
• City parking lots
• City streets
• Metrolink at College Avenue and First
Street
Photos courtesy of Jose Vera
• Parking Structure at West First Street
Sponsored by Casa Colina Hospital and Oberlin
and Centers for Healthcare
• Additional parking accompanied with
• All participants must assemble at the free shuttle service
Bonita and Harvard Avenues by 9:15 a.m.
(No motorized vehicles)
• Parade will be led by the El Roble
Marching Band. Participants will receive
goodie bags at the end of the parade with
thanks to Moultrie Academy of Music,
Voice and Dance.
Musical Entertainment
Sponsored by Inter Valley Health Plan
and College Escrow. From 1 to 4 p.m. at
the Claremont Depot: Hanks Cadillac

Shuttle parking/Pick up:
• CUC Facilities at First Street and
Mills Avenue.
• Taylor Hall parking lot at Scripps
Drive and Indian Hill Boulevard, north of
the high school.
• St. Ambrose Episcopal Church at
Bonita and Mountain Avenues

Handicapped Parking
• Located behind the Claremont Public
Library; enter on College and Bonita Avenues
• Bank of America parking lot; enter off
Indian Hill Boulevard.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

7

Village Venture Booth Listing
Apparel and Accessories
Space #
108
109
116
124
130
140
167
176
178
183
190
201
204
212
213
218
224
241
242
251
256
276
296
304
313
315
319
323
327
339
342
351
363
369

Company
Country Attic Boutique
The Dragon Flame Shop
Sinns Art
Ribbon Fairy Boutique
Designs by Ursula
No & Yo
Laurie Jo Designs
Just Buddha
Blue River
Shakeel’s Concepts
Dustin and Daisy
Bohemian Rags Handbags
Linda Stevens
Thai Dye
Sun Hwa and Co.
Yoney’s One Of A Kind
Jessie’s Girl Couture
Anantara
Cathy’s Collectibles
Scents 2 High Heaven
Nite Owl Ink
Graces Design
An Original to Remember
Dale Michele
Recyclicious
vitamin e
Ames Creations
Angel Girlz
Jackapotamus
Marcy’s Bendable Hair Clips
Love You Sew Bowtique
Declan
Bag Lady
JWT Gnome

371
379
385
397
408
411
414
433
434
454
457
465
470
484
495
554
556
559
605
609
611
613

Pure Intent
SorellaBella Designs, LLC
KBD Studio
Sewhotcreations
Pontigo
ini creations
Cheyr-D-Zigns
Trimitive
Rainbow Tie-Dyes
Not Made in China
My Dragonfly Girl
Margaret George
Floradora Hats
Leabrig
La Tee Da
GMH Designs
Jest for Fun Crafts
Old Bones
Elaine Cobb
Womanhood Collection
Silly Yeti
aCutee

Business/Organizations
Space #
142
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
506
507
508

Company
Claremont Sunrise Rotary
Claremont High School Water Polo
Maura’s Treasure Box
Amo Marketing
Pomona USD, Child Development
End Malaria Now
Olivia’s Heritage
BZ Upland-Bowlmor AMF
Citrus College
Retro Fitness
Bikram Yoga Claremont

509
510
511
512
513
532
533
534
535
536
701
702
703
704
705
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
722
723
724
725

Perry’s Collectibles
360 Remodeling
Dana Flynn’s Boutique
Next Door Solar
Assisted Living Locators
Metro Foothill Gold Line
Cynthia Gustafson
The Larimar Stone
Claremont Modern Dentistry
Sundappled
Dunn-Edwards Paints
Such-A-Deal
Hathaway Vacations
Candlelight Pavilion
Solar City
Mijac Alarm
Inland Valley Humane Society
& SPCA
Auxiliary of Pomona Valley
Hospital Medical Center
Kiwanis Club of Claremont
Sustainable Claremont
Eric Martinez State Farm Insurance
WSR Real Estate Sales
& Management
Scentsy
Sip Happens
Digital Satellite Zone
Boxer Prime Athletics
Inland Valley Death Penalty Focus
& Amnesty, Int.
Inter Valley Health Plan
Claremont Heritage
Claremont Chiropractic
Foothill Country Day School

726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
748
749
750
751
752
753
754
755
756
757
758
759
760
761

Our Lady of the Assumption
League of Women Voters Claremont
Claremont Bible Chapel
Saint Mark Episcopal School
Democratic Club of Claremont
Farm Fresh To you
Laga Handbags
Unleashed By Petco
LA Times
Funbiz
San Gabriel Valley Council of
Governments
Claremont Craft Ales
Sonnie Faires Nerium International
Claremont Community School
of Music
Pilgrim Place
Pomona College
American Museum of Ceramic Art
Arthur Murray Dance Studio
Uncommon Good
Origami Owl
RE/MAX Resources
Trinity Youth Services
Claremont HS Theatre
Village Network Africa
Justin A. Shuffer, DDS
Bungalow 360
Turf-n-California
U.S Bank
Daily Bulletin
Tupperware
Younique by Laura Hurtado
Planet Awesome
BOOTH LISTING/next page

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

486
490
561
607
610
606

BOOTH LISTING/from previous page

762
773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784
785

Far Arden Essentials
Pomona Valley Audubon Society
Southern CA Golden Retriever
Rescue
Real Connections
Pomona Valley Hospital Med. Ctr.
Priceless Pets
Golden State Water
It Works-Independent Distributor
Granite Creek Community Church
Sam & Alfreda Maloof Foundation
for Arts and Crafts
Friends of Upland Animal Shelter
Claremont Design Dentistry
Saint Johns Sponge Co
Smart Property Services, Inc.

Food

Ceramics
Space #
126
216
234
284
292
302
320
343
367
381
386
404
426
443
483
582

Company
Barbara Lamb Ceramics
Cactus Jack Ceramics
Creative Expressions
Of The Earth Ceramics
Mary Swann
Beyond Blue Ceramics
ShaJa Ceramics
Fired Up Tiles
The Clay Yard
Malgosia Nowakowski
Rica Aghasi
Lilia Venier Ceramics
Ellen Williams Ceramic Art
Squires Ceramic Studio
Fabrile Studios
Ramona Paloma Tile Studios

Crafts
Space #
114
138
163
165
175
187
191
217

Company
Gerda Mason
Curmudgeon Cards
Busy Brushes
Starfish Are People Too
Service Center for Independent Life
The SmokeStack Co.
One Crafty Mess
Dots Daughter Designs

Woodland Yard
The Sawdust Factory
Antiquity B.C
Tarnished Angels
Katherine Long
Timmy Stitches

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
This haunt hangs over the doorway to
the Law office of Herbert Hafif, part of
the decorations arranged by employee
Jayna Muse.

222
274
295
305
308
314
321
324
338
365
368
376
388
394
401
406
412
415
429
431
455
467

Phebies NeedleArt
Sun Kissed Herbal
Judy Morrison
Pattras Home
The Film Set Studio
Stillwater Co.
Chicken Lips
Daisies
Kathleen Miller
Baby Cadeaux
Cuddle Cups
Unearth Malee
Craft 4 U
Cristina Brockman
Body Scentsations
Blossom Soap Co
Essential Addictions
Larry & Connie Worsham
Friends 1st Crafters
Pelham’s Paperie
Dianna’s Gourds-n-Crafts
Heather’s Cards

Space #
203
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
721

Company
Tocaja
Charlas Tri Tip
Cjontes
Korean BBQ
Pams Sweet Shack
Crossroads, Inc.
Orange Clementine
Marco’s Produce
Gourmet Blends
Lolli Cakes
Planet Cookies
Bert & Rocky’s Cream Co.
Everyday Crafts Shop
Coldwater Canyon Provisions
Broney Distributing
Juju’s Famous Ceviche
The Green Falafel
La Paz House Tacos
Tasty Steak & Sausage
The Tamale Guy
Indonesian Satay
Justin Popping Good Corn
Bamboo Hut
Fresh Squeezed Lemonade
Now You’re Poppin
DoubleTree by Hilton Claremont

Garden & Floral
Space #
117
166
170
225
244
247
260
281
297
326

Company
Old Mexico Arts & Crafts
Frank’s Bonsai
JF Lin Creations
“Cheep” Housing
Lily’s Florist & Gifts
S.C. Ironworks
Janet Jobe
Second Tyme Chimes
Clay Do Flowers
Vintage Chimes

337
341
361
361
390
424
476
553
579

8

Dennis Shaw Artist
Barbara Larson
Sassy Succulents
Plant Kreations
Monalisa’s
Pacific Winds
Windancer
Rena Howe Design
Violet Perfection by Gini

Glass
Space #
128
134
186
311
318
373
377
391
402
444
468
491
555
558

Company
Michael Foster, Stained Glass
Follies
KS Creations
Glass Garden Diva’s
Beads Bottles and Bags by ME
Mad Art Studios
M Newmark
Griffin Glass & Jewelry
Luci & Son
Judy’s Fusion
Shadow Dance Glass
Hand Blown Glass by Ivan Adaniya
Creative Glassworks
Jeff Price Art Glass

Home decor
Space #
112
122
135
174
179
189
192
214
249
252
257
273
293
310
316
335
352
366

Company
Brenda Landon
Kathy Bell
Good Vibrations
HWL Tablecloth Sales
Leaf Motif
Simple Living
D’s Designs
Unique Bottle Candles
Martel Crafts
Handmade by Karen
Picnic Buddies
Pixie Village Cottages
Splashes
First Baptist Church
Quillos by Pat
3 Old Hens
Silva Saliba
Pillow Picasso
BOOTH LISTING/next page

Every Friday in print.
Every day online.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

235
248
375
Greenwood Goodies
253
380
Outrageous Embroidery
258
384
Blankety Blank Designs
272
387
Elva Rodriguez
275
409
Blue Violet Muffin
283
416
Lockjaw Garage
285
427
Christine Watte
294
430
Yu-neek
303
445
Keri Quilts
306
450
Stella Divina
309
462
Country Neighbor Crafts
312
464
Summerfield Candles
317
475
Three Home Vintage
322
488
The Om
325
493
Natural Body & Bath
333
494
Rusted Anchor
336
557
Cuzi’s Custom Crafts & Embroidery 340
578
Thalia Greeley TLG
362
602
California Furniture Restoration
370
604
Lots of Doings
372
615
Guitars and Smiles
378
389
Jewelry
393
Space # Company
395
111
Just For You
398
115
Personal Touch
403
123
Eel Projects Jewelry Design
405
127
Creations By Krys
407
129
Milestones
410
133
Allan Mason
428
136
Rone Prinz
432
139
Rocknstyle V Jewelry
446
162
Jewelry by Naomi
451
181
Sanderra
456
185
Taj Taj Jewelry
458
188
Wanda Gale Design
463
202
Renaissance Jewelry Design
471
211
Ancient Echoes
473
223
Beverly Jones Jewelry Designs
BOOTH LISTING/from previous page

Atelier Akion
hollymolecule
William Harrold Design
Mi Juleree
Jackie Cohen Jewelry Designs
Leather E
Cathy’s Earcuffs
Riokko Design
Studio of Bob Johnson
Maudi Jewelry
Cila
Jennifer Jones Collection
Tiffany’s House Inc
Bella Glass Jewelry
Little Muse Designs
Inner Earth Jewelry
Bovar Jewelry
Tommy Lane Jewelry
Joy’s
Helen Crisp
Arts Anvil
Meisha
Created By Stephanie
Panache Jewelry
Brandiwine Designs
Auragon
Darshan Sacred Jewelry
JX-Style
Rae Wolf Designs
Janet Bergner
Rica Jewels
Art and Soul Gallery
Jay Simmons Designs
Personal Touch Designs
Beth Kukuk Handcrafted Jewelry
Adornments
J. Dubson - Design Odyssey
Sparkles by Sarwat
Porcelain Designs
Hasri Collection

482
487
492
552
560
603
608
612
616

Slavic Gifts
Dazzling Lobes
Jewelry by Peter
Eco-Je’
Miss D’s Salon
lulu & the bear jewelry
Ashley Jean Boutique
Linda’s Jewelry Creations
La Meno

Music
Space # Company
172
Livingston Music

Village Businesses
Space #
113
131
137
141
141
164
169
173
177
205
221
232
240
243
255
259
261
262
271
286
331
364
374
447
452

Company
The Chama
On The Rawks
Norens Nursery
Petals n Wings
Vintage Odyssey
Solid Rock Church
Linda Lloyd Antiques
The Bath Workshop
Elizabeth Carr
Tattle Tails
Claremont Chamber of Commerce
Claremont Village Treasures
Kut Haus Claremont
Some Crust Bakery
Podges Claremont Juice
Sunny Days
Amelie
Buddha Mouse Emporium
Claremont COURIER
Hands Down Too
City of Claremont
A-Kline Chocolatier
Himalayan Collections
Hendricks Pharmacy
Tintura Salon

466
489
497
501
502
503
504
505
537
538
539
577
580
581
583
771
772

Jacqueline’s Home Décor
Friends of the Claremont Library
Rio de Ojas
Claremont Lock & Key
Vom Fass
Maple Boutique
Tapestry Church Claremont
The Grove
The Claremont Forum
Replay Vintage
Aromatique Skin & Body Care
First City Credit Union
Mint Leaf Thai Natural Products
& Bodyworks
Escape Salon & Day Spa
Middle Tree
Claremont Museum of Art
VNA Hospice & Palliative Care
of Southern California

Wood
Space #
110
161
171
180
184
207
215
231
277
291
307
329
396
461
469
474
485
562
614

Company
H2 Woodworks
Grandpas Off His Rocker
Imagination Depot
rayroundsdesigns
GW Wilson Co
Eddi Fern
Mr M’s Handmade
Left Angle
Lost Wood
Gomez Carvings LLC
Wayne’s WoodCrafts
Borusky Woodworks
Puesta del Soul
Hudson River Inlay
Wood Craft by David
Luz De Mano
Always Turning Woodworks
D and D Woodworking
Artisan by Day

9

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

10

Girl Scouts bring Claremont ghost stories to life

A

mid the old houses and buildings
dotting the Village and beyond,
Claremont has a ghostly history.

From a pesky poltergeist at Some Crust Bakery to a
sad specter roaming the basement of Sumner Hall, the
City of Trees has its fair share of spooky stories. These
tales came to light during the fifth annual Ghost Walk,
put on by Claremont Girl Scout troop 1094.
The home base of the ghost walk on October 1 and 2
was the Gypsy caravan, which took over a corridor next
to Hendrick’s Pharmacy. The caravan offered tarot card
readings, a projector screen showing old monster
movies and a four-piece string band playing creepy hits.
Before the tour began, guide and Girl Scout mom
Nicki Heskin cautioned the group of about 20 brave
souls that every story told on the walk was true.
“It’s not in the Girl Scout way to tell lies,” she said.
The first stop on the tour was the historic Some Crust
Bakery, which has stood at its Yale Avenue location
since the 19th century and is one of the oldest buildings
in Claremont.
According to legend, a “pesky poltergeist” causes
mischief at the bakery, throwing around cellophane
wrap and buttercream frosting.
As owner Scott Feemster was preparing his coffee in
the café one night, one of the massive slate menu boards
unhooked itself from the wall and crashed down on to
the floor. The heavy menu boards would have to have
been lifted up from the hinges to get loose, and how it
GHOST WALK/continues on the next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Girl Scout Jenna Heskin tells the tale of the haunting at Some Crust during the annual Ghost Walk of the
Claremont Village earlier this month. The popular event, which tours various haunted buildings in Claremont, is a fundraiser for the Girl Scouts and sells out every year.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

11

became dislodged remains a mystery to
this day.
The next stop on the tour was Barbara Cheatley’s antique shop, the story
centered on Ms. Cheatley buying an
antique pine box that had a morbid
past.
Soon after the pine box was brought
into her house, two ghostly men—one
wearing a blue coat and the other wearing a gray coat—began appearing to
guests at her home. In one incident, a
worker remodeling the house felt a sinister push from behind him while he
was on a ladder.
Ms. Cheatley later found out that the
pine box had a macabre history—it was
used as a holding coffin for Civil War
soldiers who had died in battle. It
seemed as if some of the soldiers never
left their temporary resting place.
GHOST WALK/next page
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Michelle Reinhardt tells the story of a hairdresser from the 1970s whose spirit
haunts a building on Fourth Street, the site of local business, Claremont Headstones Caskets Urns.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

12

COURIER photos/
Steven Felschundneff
Ghost Walk participants gather around
Nikki Heskin as she
tells of unearthly
events at the Candlelight Pavilion recently
in the Claremont Village. It was the fourth
season for the event
but the first time Ms.
Heskin had been a
host. Nonetheless, she
did a fine job telling
the ghost stories.

GHOST WALK/continued from the previous page

T

he third stop was one of the Village’s more unique shops, Olga’s
Underground Furniture, which specializes in selling materials for the dearly
departed. According to legend, the building used to be owned by a mysterious figure known only as “Timmy,” who
disappeared soon after opening a salon.
He was later found dead in the desert of a
drug overdose.

Since Timmy’s death, strange things have happened
in the building. A hand-mirror flew across the room—
as if thrown by an unseen force—and a ghostly figure, purportedly Timmy himself, would be seen
running upstairs to the attic.
The hauntings reached a chilly conclusion when a
subsequent owner of the space burned sage throughout the house to purge any lingering spirits of the
dead. As the story goes, when the owners returned
from the home following the cleansing ritual, every
flower arrangement in the house was frozen solid.

A new addition for this year’s ghost walk is the famous Candlelight Pavilion, a dinner theater on the
grounds of the former Claremont High School. According to Ms. Heskin, employees have heard knocking inside the building after hours, and unearthly
chatter has been heard in an otherwise empty hallway.
Once, a linen delivery man saw someone playing a
piano through a door window. The delivery man repeatedly called out to for the pianist to let him in, but
the musician ignored him. When a Candlelight employee arrived, the delivery man chastised the rude
piano player for not answering his knock at the door.
There was only one catch—there was no piano in the
Pavilion, let alone anyone in the building. The mysterious musician was never found.

Bridges Auditorium was the next stop, which featured the story of a handyman who loved his job so
much that he never left. The worker, known only as
Walter, was known for always being the first to arrive
and the last to leave. One day, during construction of
the theater, Walter fell to his death from the rafters.
As the sun set and darkness fell, the crowd huddled
around a nearby streetlamp as they heard tales of a
ghostly light that follows people as they walk across
the stage, and an ethereal outline of a man in old
clothing appearing in actors’ dressing rooms.
After a number of ghostly encounters, a group of
investigators used an EVP device—a tool that purportedly communicates with the dead—and asked,
GHOST WALK/continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

13

GHOST WALK/from the previous page

“Walter, where are you?”
A ghostly voice whispered, “I’m
right here.”

T

he oldest building in Claremont,
Pomona College’s Sumner Hall,
is said to be the eternal home of
a woman who arrived in the city during
its early days. Gwendolyn Rose arrived
with her husband Paul, and stayed in
the building when it was known as the
Claremont Hotel.
Paul, Ms. Heskin said, was a serial
philanderer. Gwendolyn eventually
found out about his cheating ways, and
she was later found dead in the building’s basement, the victim of a broken
heart.
Some people say Gwendolyn has
never left. College administrators and
workers have reported seeing a woman
in a long, white Victorian gown gliding
through the basement of the building. A
housekeeper reportedly saw Gwendolyn face-to-face, and refused to work
in the building again.
The final stop on the tour was in
front of the Renwick House, where the
crowd heard the tale of a portal in a
closet of a local home that opened into
a ghostly dimension. The homeowner,
Beth Bunte, had been hearing strange
tales from her son about a little girl who
was communicating with him. After a
series of unexplained events, Ms. Bunte
hired a medium to get to the bottom of

the situation. The medium, using an
EVP device, decided that a portal to the
spirit world had opened up in her son’s
closet.
The ghost walk was completely sold
out, with 240 guests spread out over 12
tours throughout the weekend, according to Holly Pugno, who helped put on
the event.
The tour has been such a part of the
Claremont Girl Scout tradition, Ms.
Pugno says, that some girls who started
in the Gypsy caravan have graduated to
becoming tour guides.
As the ghost walk continues to be a
success, the scouts are looking to add
even more haunted houses to the
ghastly repertoire for next year.
“There’s always room for more stories,” Ms. Pugno said.
—Matthew Bramlett
news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Rose Olivas, her husband Robert and her daughter Xol delight in the tales of ancient haunts.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

14

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

18

The top 13 Halloween songs for weirdos
‘Black Sabbath’ by Black Sabbath
Metal at its most sinister and sludgy, this is 6:16 of
straight-up evil, with the guitars tuned down a whole
step to accentuate the darkness. Considered by most
the first heavy metal band, Black Sabbath released
“Black Sabbath” in 1970 and it sounds every bit as
odd and terrifying today as it did then.

C

ompiling a list of the top Halloween songs is a service with
which many a writer has been
tasked, probably since music fans were listening to the latest hits on a gramophone. 

But this list isn’t that list. 
This list is for those unconcerned with what pleases
the masses. It’s for the outsiders. Think of this menu
as a primer for those who may not be aware of Halloween music past “Thriller” or “Ghostbusters,” both
of which are good songs, but not the kind we’re talking about here. This one’s for the weirdos. 
‘Bela Lugosi’s Dead’ by Bauhaus
This is perhaps the “Stairway to Heaven” of creepy
songs. Bauhaus’ 1979 debut single has it all going on,
so to speak: dark subject matter, spare, malevolent, reverb-laden production and, best of all, a Peter Murphy
vocal take that begins with a croak, careens into a
spooky wail before winding back down, seemingly
into a cold, dark grave. “The bats have left the bell
tower, the victims have been bled. Red velvet lines
the black box, Bela Lugosi’s dead.” Yikes!
‘I Put a Spell on You by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins
The unique theatricality of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’
signature tune was quite a shock upon its 1956 release. Up until then a straight-ahead blues singer, Mr.
Hawkins happened upon the crazy vocal of “I Put a
Spell on You” after over-imbibing in the studio and
just letting it rip. After DJ Alan Freed suggested he

‘Release the Bats’ by The Birthday Party
The Australian goth-rock pioneers fronted by the
great Nick Cave released this gem in 1981 on London’s 4AD label. The reverb-drenched rockabilly
Down Under by way of hell sound of “Release the
Bats” was an immediate hit in the underground,
reaching number 3 on the UK Indie Chart. But perhaps more importantly, “Bats” provided a jumpingoff point for innumerable black-clad kids into the
abyss of what would become goth. 

Bela Lugosi by Mark Hammermeister

come up with a visual gimmick to go with the unhinged vocal, Mr. Hawkins began to wear a long cape
and appear onstage by rising out of a coffin amidst
smoke and fog. He later added tusks in his nose, live
snakes, fireworks and a cigarette-smoking skull
named “Henry.” 

‘Goo Goo Muck’ by Ronnie Cook
This greasy, ghoulish prize emerged from the unlikely locale of Bakersfield, California in 1962. Ed
James’ lyric “When the sun goes down and the moon
comes up, I turn into a teenage goo-goo muck. I
cruise through the city and I roam the streets, looking
for something that is nice to eat” is creepy enough to
jump to the top of any Halloween playlist, and this
one has a soulful baritone saxophone hook in it that
makes it deliciously sinister. It’s hard to decide if this
or the Cramps’ rendition is the definitive version, but
this one gets the nod for being there first.
HALLOWEEN FOR WIERDOS/next page

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

HALLOWEEN FOR WEIRDOS/from the previous page

‘I Was a Teenage Werewolf’ by The Cramps
The Cramps have in their canon maybe a dozen songs
that could make this list. But “I Was A Teenage Werewolf,” off the group’s 1980 debut LP Songs the Lord
Taught Us, is perhaps the most fitting. Poison Ivy’s minimalist tremolo guitar, Bryan Gregory’s over-the-top
fuzz aggression and Nick Knox’s rocksteady tribal beat
provide the music and the late, great Lux Interior provides the deranged hillbilly rock ’n’ roll vocal. “Teenage
Werewolf” may be the most perfect Halloween song
ever recorded. Check out this one and also YouTube
clips of the band’s euphorically chaotic live shows, including the legendary “Live at Napa State Mental Hospital” from 1978. Lux and Ivy were married as well as
being bandmates. They were the Johnny and June for us
punk kids. Sniff.
‘Down By the Water’ by PJ Harvey
This monumentally creepy offering from the UK’s
queen of darkness is off her towering 1998 breakthrough
record, To Bring You My Love. It tells the tale of what
sounds at first like a bereaved mother pining for a lost
child, but one realizes as the song unfolds that mom is a
murderer. Chilling whispered choruses of “Little fish,
big fish, swimming in the water. Come back here man
and give me my daughter” are gloriously nightmare-inducing. “Down By the Water” will scare the bejeezus
out of the kids. It did mine!
‘Strychnine’ by The Sonics
A garage rock stomper with an impossibly catchy
hook, “Strychnine” is a 1965 blast of proto-punk that
scores of bands emulate to this day (The Hives owe the
Sonics just about everything.)  Middle America wasn’t
quite ready for the lyric “Some folks like water, some

folks like wine, but I like the taste of straight strychnine”
in ’65, but the band is still playing club and festival dates
today to audiences around the world that revere them as
the true pioneers they are.
‘Welcome to My Nightmare’ by Alice Cooper
My sentimental favorite on this list, the Phoenix rocker turned golfing
grandfather was at the
top of his theatrical
game when he released this in 1975. To
the world back then,
Mr. Cooper was
known primarily as a
horror shock-rocker,
but the truth is he had
a great deal of Broadway showbiz in him.
His stage-show antics with guillotines, dismembered dolls and snakes were
all part of the SHOW. This song holds up despite its overthe-top arrangement and ensuing TV special and extravagant live show it inspired. Mr. Cooper’s vocal is delivered with an ominous, biting confidence that makes
it a perfect wild-card Halloween party selection.
‘Frankie Teardrop’ by Suicide
Suicide is a New York City band usually associated
with the first wave of punk, but they actually pre-date
that movement by a few years, having gotten their start
in 1968. The band’s influence on what would become
electronic music is immeasurable. The 10-minute
“Frankie Teardrop” is a macabre, tension-filled epic
about a father pushed to the edge, off the group’s 1977
eponymous debut record. The band’s hypnotic frontman
and lyricist, Alan Vega, died last year at the age of 78. 

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‘Evil’ by 45 Grave
This song certainly lives up to its name! Formed in
1979, 45 Grave was made up of four members of established punk LA punk bands The Germs, the Consumers, Castration Squad, the Bags and others. The
band’s lyrical horror imagery, dark melodies and singer
Dinah Cancer’s aggressively sinister vocal style would
influence scores of like-minded gore hounds for years to
come. “Evil” was most prominently released on the
1981 compilation album “Hell Comes to Your House.” 
‘Ghost Town’ by The Specials
Not all songs on this list need feature macabre subject
matter or, in fact, about be about Halloween, and not all
need be obscure. The Specials’ classic 1981 number-one
hit  “Ghost Town” is none of these things. Released at a
time when riots were raging in the UK, this prescient
slice of 2 Tone groove was named single of the year by
all three British music magazines (NME, Melody Maker
and Sounds) in 1981. The song’s spare instrumentation
and spooky vibe give it a decidedly All Hallows Eve
feel, and besides that, it is guaranteed to pack your Halloween party dance floor. 
‘Dead Skin Mask’ by Slayer
Slayer, one of the “big four” of thrash metal—with
Metallica, Megadeth and Anthrax—have perhaps the
largest selection of Halloween-worthy tunes out of the
artists on this list. But over its 16 studio records, live
albums and EPs, “Dead Skin Mask” is my hands-down
winner by virtue of its subject matter being the infamous serial killer Ed Gein. “Dance with the dead in my
dreams, listen to their hallowed scream. The dead have
taken my soul, temptation’s lost all control.” It ain’t
Shakespeare, but it’s indisputably horrific, and that’s
what Halloween’s all about, right? 
—Mick Rhodes
mickrhodes@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

The end of an era: Village Venture favorite

Rosa’s Tacos says goodbye, thank you

W

hile the Village Venture Arts and Crafts
Faire continues to thrive, one flavorful
part of the annual event will be missing
this time around.
For the first time in 34 years, guests won’t be able to line up at
the corner of First Street and Harvard Avenue for Rosa’s Tacos.
The 2015 Village Venture was the last hurrah for the familyrun enterprise. Angie Pipins—a lifelong Claremont resident and
retired nurse—has helmed the booth since her mother, Rosa’s
Tacos founder Rosa Garcia Torrez, died in 1997.
She’d worked side-by-side with her mom for years, but Ms.
Pipins didn’t think twice about whether to keep the booth going
after Ms. Torrez’ death. “We just wanted to carry the tradition on
from my mom,” she said. “We always followed her recipe.”
Rosa’s Tacos dealt exclusively in tacos. Beef, cooked with
Ms. Torrez’ secret recipe, was ladled into crisp shells and topped
with lettuce, cheese and homemade salsa. The salsa recipe came
courtesy of Ms. Pipins’ brother-in-law Gilbert Navarro, who
until his death two years ago served as one of the booth’s primary cooks.
As far as quantity, Ms. Torrez began a tradition the family
continued after she was gone. “She would make a thousand
tacos and then she walked out and went home,” Ms. Pipins said.
The family held fast to that quota. They always made sure
there were plenty of tacos for friends and family, though, and
that required an ever-increasing effort.
“The Village Venture was getting bigger and we were selling
more and more,” Ms. Pipins said. “It got to the point where we
ROSA’S TACOS/continues on the next page

21

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

ROSA’S TACOS/from the previous page

would get there at 5 o’clock in the
morning and stay all day. People would
say, ‘Rosa’s Tacos is the only reason I
come back here.’ Customers would
order 15 to 20 tacos at a time.”

T

he crew had little time
to walk around the Venture, given the brisk
business. Still, Ms. Pipins always managed to get a taste of
the affair. “We would barter
with the other food vendors.
We’d say, ‘Give us your samples and we’ll give you tacos,”
she said. “It was fun, and we
got to know a lot of the other
vendors.”

Despite the stand’s popularity, no one
considered making the business a fulltime affair.
Rosa’s Tacos started as a twiceyearly event, with the tacos flowing
every July 4 as well as at Village Venture. When city rules for Claremont’s
Independence Day Celebration became
restrictive and Rosa’s Tacos was relegated to an out-of-the way spot at Memorial Park, the family decided to save
the big push for the Venture.
Ms. Torrez saw providing tasty and
affordable food, a culinary celebration
of Mexican culture, as a way to give
back to the city she loved.

She had moved to Claremont in 1917
at age 5 when her father got a job working for Pomona College. Young Rosa
and her siblings attended Sycamore,
then called Claremont Grammar
School. The Mexican students were
taught separately in the auditorium until
they learned English, and punished if
they spoke Spanish at school.
Ms. Torrez related the prejudice she
and her peers encountered to late Claremont historian Judy Wright, who devoted an entire chapter to Rosa in her
2007 book Claremont Women: 18971950.

Rosa Garcia Torrez, as seen in Judy
Wright’s “Claremont Women: 18871950” book, launched what would be a
nearly 35-year tradition at the Village
Venture—her Claremont-famous Rosa’s
Tacos stand. Ms. Torrez, who also provided food services for church and
school fundraisers, has a park named
after her on First Street.

22

The white kids dominated the playground and made fun of the Mexican
children’s clothes, braids and food. To
avoid being teased about the potato and
bean tacos her mother made for her,
Ms. Torrez would join her classmates in
running across the street to the grounds
of the Odd Fellows Hall. Hidden in the
bushes, they could eat their lunch in
peace.
“They used to make fun of my tacos.
Now they want to buy them,” Ms. Torrez would later joke.
Rosa attended Claremont High
School until she was 16 and then took a
job as a waitress at Padua Hills Theater.
In 1930, she married Jose “Joe” Torrez,
who worked as field foreman for Claremont’s College Heights Orange and
Lemon Association.
The couple raised nine children in
one of a dozen bungalows built by the
citrus company to house its workers, in
a neighborhood west of Indian Hill
Boulevard and north of the railroad.
Ms. Pipins and her friends, known as
the West Side Kids, had a rivalry with
the East Barrio Kids, the MexicanAmerican children living in the El Barrio Park area. Years later, her mother
ROSA’S TACOS/next page

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

ROSA’S TACOS/continued from previous page

would receive the posthumous honor of having a
Claremont park, Rosa Torrez Park, named after her.
The neighborhood competition was all in fun. Most
kids had relatives in the “rival” neighborhood and
they all convened at The Church of the Sacred Heart,
a chapel residents built in 1939.
Next to the church was a bar called La Curva. Across
the street was a little shop, The Chisme—located on the
northeast corner of First Street and Bonita Avenue—
where you could buy sodas and snacks. Ms. Pipins said
the shop’s name, which means “gossip” in Spanish, fit
the talkative proprietor and her daughters “to a T.”
Behind the former city yard was an old dirt field.
Rosa Garcia Torrez at Claremont’s Memorial Park celNow the site of the Claremont Police Station, it
ebration on July 4, 1988, waiting on customers of the
served as the sandlot where the Mexican-American
Rosa’s Tacos booth.
kids played baseball.

23

The Torrez boys played baseball in school and Mr.
Torrez coached a summer youth league. He also
served as manager/coach for The Juveniles, a Mexican-American League baseball team. Many of the
players worked at the packing house.
Ms. Torrez had three great passions: cooking, community activism and baseball, not necessarily in that
order. Retired Claremont realtor Frank Hungerford
played with the Torrez boys in the summer league.
“Rosa Torrez came to, if not all, almost all of the
games in the leagues of Claremont because she had a
number of boys that would have been playing,” Mr.
Hungerford told Judy Wright, adding that she’d often
be the only parent there. “She would scream and yell
and have more fun at those games. And let me tell
you, if she didn’t like the call that an umpire made,
she let that umpire know.”

R

esidents have warm memories of
the sense of community among
Claremont’s Mexican-American
residents, but not everything was rosy. By
the time Ms. Pipins got to Sycamore, it
was further segregated. Ms. Pipins and her
friends attended the Mexican School, featuring a separate classroom and a separate
playground.
Ms. Torrez noticed the injustice but was
at first too busy with her growing family
to intervene. In 1941, however, she
teamed up with Eleanor Condit—who
taught fifth and sixth grade at the time—to
get rid of the Mexican School.

Later, Ms. Pipins attended non-segregated Claremont High School, but there was still a lot of prejudice. “People would call us spics and beaners,” she
said.
Ms. Pipins mused on recent events at the Claremont Colleges, including a request by Pitzer students
for nonwhite roommates. “I think it’s interesting,” she
said. “I want to tell them, ‘You guys don’t know anything about prejudice and segregation.’”
In the free time she always somehow found, Ms.
Torrez cooked her Mexican food for PFA fundraisers.
She also joined other members of the Club de Damas
or Ladies Club—an organization that was part of the
Claremont Coordinating Council and for which she
ROSA’S TACOS/next page

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

24

ROSA’S TACOS/continued from previous page

served as president for many years—in preparing savory Mexican dinners for the church’s jamaicas or
festivals.
She would also cook dinners at the Claremont
Church for the Intercultural Council. Those gatherings were wonderful occasions, Ms. Torrez told Ms.
Wright. “We learned about our habits and cultures.
We got together,” she said.
Ms. Torrez also used her culinary skills to raise
money for the City of Hope, Claremont Red Cross
and the Our Lady of the Assumption scholarship
fund. With all that work under her belt, it wasn’t a far
leap when Ms. Torrez decided to take Rosa’s Tacos to
city events.
“She wanted to pay back the community so we
started doing Rosa’s Tacos at the Village Venture,” Ms.
Pipins said. “Of course, we got bigger and bigger.”

D

ecades later, the family-run enterprise is being shuttered partly because of a loss of helping hands.
It’s been “just the oldies and goodies”
serving up tacos in recent years. Members
of the younger generation, busy with college and other pursuits, don’t want to run
the booth, Ms. Pipins said.

Another contributing factor is it’s grown more
complicated to keep “the little taco stand that could”
going.
“Originally, we had a table, a stove and none of this
regulation stuff,” Ms. Pipins said. Now, food vendors

Ms. Torrez prepares food for customers of Rosa’s Tacos on July 4, 1988 in Claremont.

face higher booth fees, more stringent health department regulations and pricey liability insurance.
Still, she said it’s been a wonderful run.
“We want to thank everyone in Claremont, and

everyone in the community, who has come to see us
for years and years,” Ms. Pipins said.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

25

CHAP receives the Colleges’ annual community partner of the year award

T

he Claremont Homeless
Advocacy Program
(CHAP), a local organization that works to eradicate
homelessness in Claremont, has
been named the 2016 recipient
of the Claremont Colleges’
Community Partner of the Year.

The Claremont Colleges have presented the Community Partner of the Year
Award for more than a decade to a local
person, agency, organization or business
that has positively impacted the community or significantly enhanced town and
gown relationships with an emphasis on
serving and/or involving students.
This annual award underscores the
Claremont Colleges’ growing efforts to
strengthen ties with the community, especially in the city of Claremont.
CHAP is a Claremont-based all-volunteer grassroots organization that is
dedicated to assisting the homeless—or
participants, as they are refered to by
CHAP organizers—by helping them to se-

cure sustainable housing and jobs, mental health services and other resources and
skills to get them back on their feet.
The CHAP program has a threepronged approach to helping those in need.
• Participants are paired with volunteer
advocates, who have agreed to meet with
the participant at least once a week and to
be available to provide assistance 24/7 if
needed.
• The CHAP overnight stay program
provides participants with safe and secure
overnight accommodations. The shelter is
staffed by CHAP community volunteers,
some of whom have been the beneficiaries of the program and now want to pay
it forward.
• CHAP Community Cafés are held at
various places in the city. Volunteers
prepare food and then sit down with the
participants to share a meal.
CHAP has reached out to the Claremont
Colleges, encouraging students, staff and
faculty to volunteer. Jake Dittes, a recent
Harvey Mudd graduate, volunteered for
the overnight stay program and was instrumental in bringing a Community
Café to the HMC campus.

Karl Hilgert, left, receives the Community Partner of the Year Award on behalf
of the Claremont Homeless Advocacy
Program from CGU president Bob
Schult at last week’s Town and Gown reception.

Mr. Dittes, just one of many volunteers
from The Claremont Colleges, says he got
involved with CHAP to help others. He
said he got as much out of it as the people he was there to help.
“As I got to know the participants better and better, we became good friends. After I graduated and moved to New York,
one of them called me to tell me he had
gotten his first apartment,” he said. “It was

very rewarding and helped to show me that
there is more to the world than what is going on at the Claremont campuses.”
More information about CHAP is
available at chapclaremont.org.
The Community Partner of the Year
Award is given annually by the Claremont
Colleges at the fall Town and Gown reception to recognize a business, community agency, business and/or community
person who has contributed significantly
during the past academic year to enhance
town/gown relations with a special focus
on students.
Nominations are invited from the presidents and other key leaders at the Colleges. The final selection is made by the
Council of the Claremont Colleges.
Past winners include Brent Hunter,
owner of Bert & Rocky’s Cream Company; Dr. Wayne (Wally) Cox, longtime
coach of the men’s Claremont Rugby
Team; Community Friends of International
Students; Rotary Club of Claremont;
The Claremont Club; Arman Ariane,
owner of Xerxes; Claremont Kiwanis
Club; Chris Ulrich of Claremont Avenue for Life Long Learning (CALL
program); Claremont Village Marketing
Group; the Claremont Unified School District; Pilgrim Place and Project Sister Family Services.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

reserve a spot or for more information, call (909) 3995488 or visit claremontrec.com.

Oak Park Community
Church hosts fall festival Halloween spooktacular
The Oak Park Community Church is hosting a fall
festival on Saturday, October 29 from 5 to 7 p.m. The in the Village on
church is located at 616 S. Sycamore Ave. in Claremont. The community is invited to enjoy games,
Monday, October 31
treats, a bounce house, face painting and more! Call
(909) 670-0130 for more information.

Get your costume ready
for a Halloween dinner
and dance at the Joslyn
The Claremont Senior Program will offer a spooky
evening of dinner, dancing and a costume contest on
Wednesday, October 26 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Joslyn
Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont.
The event is sponsored by Inter Valley Health Plan.
Tickets are $5 and must be purchased in advance. To

Everyone is invited to Claremont’s annual Halloween Spooktacular in the Claremont Village on
Monday, October 31. There will be trick-or-treating as
well as free games and entertainment. More than 40
Village businesses, marked with balloons and a special poster, will be handing out free goodies to trickor-treaters from 3 to 5 p.m. Maps listing all
participating locations will be available at the Claremont Depot and the Chamber of Commerce on the
day of the event.
The Claremont Depot will offer free games and entertainment from 3 to 6 p.m. Festivities at the Depot
will include a dog costume contest sponsored by the
Priceless Pets Rescue at 4 p.m., a wildlife presentation
at 4:30 p.m. and a children’s costume contest spon-

26

sored by Bert & Rocky’s at 5:30 p.m. This event is
presented by the city of Claremont, Claremont Lincoln University, Claremont Village Marketing Group
and local businesses.
For more information about the city of Claremont’s
Halloween Spooktacular, visit the city’s website at
claremontca.org or call (909) 399-5490.

Fall information fair,
flu shot clinic
The Claremont Senior Program invites the community to a fall information fair and flu shot clinic on
Wednesday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to noon at Taylor Hall, 1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
The event will feature a variety of information
booths, service providers and health screenings. Free
flu shots will be offered in partnership with the Los
Angeles County Department of Public Health for people ages nine months and older. This event is open to
the public and there is no charge for admission. For
more information, contact the Joslyn Center at (909)
399-5488.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

27

Gala concert to celebrate renewal of Jewish life in Poland

Cantor David Wisnia, at right, will perform alongside
his grandson Avi Wisnia, an award-winning composer
and singer at Temple Beth Israel this Sunday.

A gala concert celebrating the renewal of Jewish life
in Poland, featuring Cantor David Wisnia, a 90-yearold Warsaw native and survivor of the Nazi horrors,
will take place on Sunday, October 23 at 4 p.m. at Temple Beth Israel in Pomona.
Cantor Wisnia, who spent three years in an
Auschwitz concentration camp, is one of the last living
cantors to be trained by the great Jewish liturgical
singers of prewar Poland, Gershon Sirota and Moshe
Kousevitsky. As reported by Philly.com, what saved
Mr. Wisnia, then 16 in Nazi-occupied Poland, was a
strong singing voice. He used it to entertain the SS
guards.
Cantor Wisnia will be joined by his grandson, Avi
Wisnia, an award-winning composer, singer and performer. The program will also include contributions
from two musical representatives of the Jewish renewal

taking place today in Poland—Cantorial soloists Rivka
Iza Foremniak and Menachem Piotr Mirski of the Progressive Jewish community Beit Polska.
Cantor Paul Buch of Temple Beth Israel will participate, along with a special musical ensemble created for
the occasion by musical director Neal Brostoff. A reception will follow the concert.
Proceeds from the program will benefit Friends of
Jewish Renewal in Poland, an organization that Temple
Beth Israel has supported since its inception, and that
recently made possible the publication of the first Hebrew-Polish prayer book since before World War I. FJR
also sponsors children’s programs, summer camps,
Sabbath celebrations, study programs for adults and the
presence of two progressive rabbis in Poland, the first
since World War II.
Tickets can be purchased via Eventbrite.com at jewishpolandconcerttibi.eventbrite.com. Prices range from
$7.50 for students to $18, $36 or $90 depending on the
level of contribution. For information, contact TBI at

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

28

Padua Hills Art Fiesta to feature
Claremont area artists,
architecture film and exhibition

C

laremont Museum of Art will host
the 13th annual Padua Hills Art Fiesta on Sunday, November 6 with
an outdoor art show, art and craft demonstrations and music under the shady olive
trees of the beautiful Padua Hills Theater.
A preview of the recently-produced film Claremont
Modern: The Convergence of Art + Architecture at
Midcentury will be shown throughout the day, accompanied by an exhibition produced by Claremont
Heritage.
Art Fiesta will be held Sunday, November 6 from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Padua Hills Theatre, 4467
Padua Ave., Claremont. Admission is $8 for adults, $6
for Claremont Museum of Art and Claremont Heritage
members. Children under 18 are free.
ARTstART students will lead children in creative art
activities. A music stage will feature local performers.
Festive foods will be served with traditional jamaica
punch and fresh lemonade.
The Padua Hills Art Fiesta originated in 1953 for
local artists to bring art into the community. The studio
art movement that flourished here in the 1950s centered on the use of natural materials and traditional
sensibilities—watercolor, pottery, woodworking, mosaic and textiles as well as painting. Visitors came to
meet the artists and watch “art in action” at the popular
festival. In 2011, the Claremont Museum of Art revived this tradition with a new generation of artists
sharing their talents.
THE ARTISTS
The outdoor art show will feature 25 area artists
showing their work under a grove of shady olive trees.
New artwork this year will include woodworking by
Hal Metlizky; ceramics by Kristen Erickson and T.
and Jon Pacini; weaving by Patricia Hinds, and paintings by Jackie Knell, Roz McMillan and Dee Small.
And visitors will find many favorite returning
artists: Paul Brayton, Sumi Foley, Sandy Garcia, Rebecca Hamm, Kathryn Herrman, Mike Hill, David
Holzberger, Aleta Jacobson, Sherry Marger, Kathleen,
Jerry Owens, Kazumi Kobayashi Svenson, Gaby Tepper, Barry Vantiger, Ahlene Welsh, Jan Wheatcroft,
Maureen Wheeler and Larry White.
“Art in Action” can be found on the hillside terrace
provided by Chaffey Community Museum of Art,
Alba Cisneros, The Clay Yard, dA Center for the Arts
and Maloof Woodworkers. Art-making activities will
be led by Project ARTstART students.
MUSIC, FOOD and SPONSORS
Music performances will be provided by Gloria
Cangahuala and Anne Sherrill of Claremont Symphony Orchestra, Stefan Pajaro-van de Stadt and
Aviva Mann, Silver Tree with Jessie Lyn and Kyle
Thompson and David Hostetler.
Tacos will be served by El Merendero along with
Bert & Rocky’s ice cream and traditional jamaica
punch and fresh lemonade.
Special thanks to Art Fiesta sponsors Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty and Ryan Zimmerman, broker associate at Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s
International Realty. And thanks to Scout Troop 407
for their invaluable helping hands.
THE EXHIBITION and the FILM
With the development of substantial art programs at
the Claremont Colleges, spearheaded by the artist and

educator Millard Sheets, Claremont attracted a large
number of artists in the years following World War II.
Painters, sculptors, ceramists, muralists, mosaic
artists, architects and designers shared ideas and
forged close friendships. With a cultural climate that
was conducive to the integration of art, craft and arPADUA HILLS ART FIESTA/next page

Artist Sumi Foley shows her work with silk collage
at the Padua Hills Art Fiesta in 2015.

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

29

ART FIESTA/from previous page

chitecture, Claremont became an important center of Midcentury Modern
design.
People associated with the Claremont Colleges and art community were
highly receptive to modern trends in architecture, and many of them engaged
the services of local architects to create
houses and other structures suited to the
informal, nature-oriented lifestyle of
southern California.
The Exhibition
To record and interpret this important
chapter in the cultural history of Claremont and southern California, Claremont Heritage Executive Director
David Shearer has curated an exhibition entitled “Claremont Modern: The
Convergence of Art + Architecture at
Midcentury.”
The exhibition will chronicle the efforts of forward-looking architects,
artists and designers to create living environments suited to the physical and
cultural landscape of Claremont and
southern California.
It will capture the full sweep of the
area’s rich architectural heritage, from
early expressions of modern thinking,
as seen in the 1903 Mary Darling
House by Greene & Greene, through
the residential housing boom of the
postwar period, to institutional and
commercial projects that advanced
modern ideas in architecture and design, including Millard Sheets’ historic

Woodwork by David Holzberger will be for sale at the Padua Hills Art Fiesta.

local projects such as Garrison Theater,
Pomona First Federal Bank and Sheets
Studio.
The exhibition will feature archival
imagery including photographs and
drawings of architectural projects that
integrated art into the design. Architects
featured include Millard Sheets, S.
David Underwood, Rufus Turner, Foster Rhodes Jackson, Criley & McDowell, Edward Durell Stone and more.
Work by Claremont artists will show
the influence of the architecture and

their perspectives on modern design.
They include Millard Sheets Studio,
Harrison McIntosh, Paul Darrow and
Betty Davenport Ford, among others.
The Film
The 90-minute documentary film,
Claremont Modern: The Convergence of Art + Architecture at Midcentury, is a companion piece to Design
for Modern Living: Millard Sheets
and the Claremont Art Community
1935-1975, a film produced in 2014 by

filmmaker Paul Bockhorst in partnership
with the Claremont Museum of Art.
Claremont Modern expands the
scholarship and examines the regional
influences that helped to establish a
unique chapter in the annals of Modernism. A 20-minute preview of the
film will be shown throughout the day
of the Art Fiesta.
A veteran writer, producer, and director, Mr. Bockhorst has produced dozens
of programs that have appeared on
PBS, NBC, ABC, Turner Broadcasting
and the Disney Channel. He recently
received an honorary American Institute of Architects Award for his many
documentaries on art and architecture.
Principal funding for Claremont
Modern was generously provided by
The Ahmanson Foundation, Andy and
Blenda Wright, the Windgate Charitable Foundation and Brent Harris.
For information on the Padua Hills
Art Fiesta, call (909) 621-3200 or visit
claremontmuseum.org

Claremont COURIER/Village Venture 2016

30

CEF announces community partnership, innovation grant winners

T

he Claremont Educational Foundation recently announced winners
for both community partnership
and innovation grants. After an application
and approval process, more than $20,000
was awarded by CEF to community
groups and teachers for the following projects. Community partnership grant winners
are:

CLASP: After School Enrichment ($1,600)—Claremont After Schools Program (CLASP) will further advance its strategic plan to enrich after school programming by planning and hosting Family Math and Literacy Nights at CLASP sites.
Claremont Heritage ($2,000)—Claremont Heritage
plans to expand its third grade local history program.
The three-part program supplements Claremont history
units and begins with classroom visits to every third
grade in the district to learn history with the help of an
Education Trunk full of interactive visuals. Part two
takes students on a bus tour of Claremont landmarks.
Claremont Museum of Art ($2,000)—Claremont
Museum of Art’s AfterARTS program will serve a
broad range of students in after-school care across the
district. This award will fund the training of Claremont
High School students to develop and execute monthly
art-making workshops at each of the seven elementary
school sites.
Inland Valley Repertory Theatre ($2,000)—Partnering with El Roble, Inland Valley Repertory Theatre
will engage seventh and eighth graders in reader’s theatre strategies. This language arts enrichment program
develops a range of academic competencies through
interactive engagement with literary texts. Novice students will connect meaningfully with more experienced student mentors and build relationships with performing artists, first as participants in the IVRT program, and then as audience members at the Candlelight
Pavilion’s spring production of Little Women, the
Musical.
First Street Art Gallery Center ($750)—First Street
Art Gallery Center (FSAGC) will implement an internship program with a local artist to develop and produce
instructional materials for quality elementary school art
lessons. The intern will be guided by FSGAC’s fulltime art content experts to research and write concepts,
learning objectives, age group focused art lesson plans
and training guidelines for instructors. First Street
Gallery Teaching Teams will then conduct weekly art
sessions for students in Claremont After School Programs (CLASP).
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden ($2,000)—In
partnership with the Workability program at CHS,
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s Grow Our Future
program provides worksite training for high school students with disabilities, addressing the need to help
youth transition from secondary school to the workforce. This structured, 10-week program directly benefits an often underserved population as students learn
horticulture skills in a functioning nursery. In 2016-17,
the program will emphasize outreach to potential employers to increase opportunities for program participants beyond high school.
Chaparral Elementary ($1,000)—In this project,
Jean Merrill, third grade teacher at Chaparral, will extend collaborative work completed in 2015 with CHS
students to create a play focusing on Claremont’s rich
history. The play will align with the third grade unit on
Claremont heritage, narrating the growth of our city
through the lens of letters sent home by college students. The play will be presented to all third graders in
the district.
Claremont High School ($1,000)—Jenna Mittman,
science teacher and Green Team leader at CHS, is collaborating with colleagues Ruth Ojeda, special educa-

tion department head, and Marizka Rivette, water wise
collaborator, to implement a student-designed renovation plan of the 600 quad on the CHS campus. The
project will embed curricular standards from math, language arts and science in the renovation to make the
quad more environmentally friendly, to increase access
and functionality for special education students and to
improve aesthetics of the space.
Mountain View Elementary ($500)—In this innovative program, Michelle Wishner’s fifth graders will participate in independent research and will develop inquiry, organization and presentation skills through selfidentified (teacher approved) projects that ignite the
students’ passion and meet the criteria for level-3 inquiry questions (AVID WICOR strategies).
Condit Elementary ($2,000)—The third grade
teachers at Condit authored this proposal to fund mobile Makerspace carts to support students in grades K-6
in hands-on projects that impact learning in science,
technology, engineering, art and math.
Sycamore Elementary ($1,797)—Utilizing the Makerspace concept for innovative STEM education lead
teacher Ann O-Connor and collaborators Jodi ElringerIrwin, Dawn Derleth, Michelle Texeira, Jacqui Canfield and Kelly Quesada-Diaz will leverage
Sycamore’s classroom exchange model to support
teacher-guided, but largely self-directed projects by
students in grades 1 through 3.

Mountain View Elementary ($275)—Ramon Villela
looks forward to integrating STEMscopes in his fifth
and sixth grade combination class to support hands-on
inquiry-based investigations based on the Next Generation of Science Standards (NGSS). Students will enhance competencies through integrated lessons that
embed those standards with an interactive, online
STEMscopes curriculum. Completed projects will be
presented to the Mountain View community.
El Roble Intermediate ($1,500)—Spearheaded by
Lindsay Lazenby and Jenny McGourty-Riggs, students
will demonstrate their understanding of the American
Revolution by developing a puppet show that will
bring eight of the most important events to life. Students will independently research and develop a script.
In collaborative groups, the students will craft puppets
of the historic figures and will bring the scripts to production using Green Screen and iMovie.
Mountain View Elementary ($2,000)—Project lead
Jacqueline McElvy and collaborator Valri Jacobs will
work with multidisciplinary artist and writer Gustavo
Alberto Garcia Vava to conduct filmmaking workshops
for sixth graders to explore media arts as related to social, historic and cultural elements of their curriculum.
Utilizing research-based, visual thinking strategies, students will write and produce their own films that will
be featured in a special Mountain View Film Festival at
the end of the year.