You are on page 1of 24

TS ONSLOW NAVY CADETS

SHORELINE MANAGEMENT
Stage 1 Report
August 2016

Report by Susie Chapman


Coastal Catchments Northern Area Manager
SEQ Catchments Ltd.

Table of Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Acknowledgments & Partnerships..2


Overview.3
Introduction.3
Project Plan & Approvals..4
Stage 1 works 5.1
Survey..... 5
5.2
Site stabilisation..6
5.3
Planting....7
5.4
Monitoring & Adaptive Management...8
6. Results and recommendations...9
7. Appendices
7.1 App 1 - T.S. Onslow Mangrove rehabilitation Stage 1 Project Plan..10
7.2 App 2 - letter of permit from DAFF to BBCAC..18
7.3 App 3 - email from DAFF re extension of time frame to complete works.20
7.4 App 4 - Species list for planting bank 21
7.5 App 5 Project budget 21

TS Onslow Shoreline Management


Stage 1 Report
1. Acknowledgments and Partnerships
This collaborative project at Golden Beach Caloundra has brought together many partners to build
resilience in the shoreline through a soft engineering approach.
Initially, the organisations partnering in this on-going project were T.S. Onslow Australian Navy
Cadets, Take Action for Pumicestone (TAPP), Bunya Bunya Country Aboriginal Corporation
(BBCAC), Sunshine Coast Council and SEQ Catchments. The Caloundra Power Boat Club agreed
to sponsor Stage 1 of the project.
A number of subsequent meetings held at the Navy Cadets HQ brought other organisations on
board to assist, including MangroveWatch who helped with the planning and design, Night Eyes
Water & Landcarers who provided advice and lunch for dune planting, and Geofabrics Australasia
Pty Ltd who donated materials.
It is particularly heartening to have the members of Bunya Bunya Country Aboriginal Corporation
who are of Kabi Kabi and South Sea Islander descent involved, with their deep connection to Sea
Country and their knowledge and expertise in propagating and planting mangroves on the banks of
the Maroochy River built over the last eight years.
The level of in-kind support generously provided has been extraordinary, matching the funds
invested by Caloundra Power Boat Club at a ratio of almost 2:1.

2. Overview
A staged long-term shoreline erosion management plan that will endeavour to restore ecological
integrity to the state-owned foreshore reserve in front of the T.S. Onslow Australian Navy Cadets
headquarters on the Esplanade at Golden Beach is currently being undertaken by a number of
collaborating organisations with skills and interest in this work. This report details the works
undertaken in Stage 1 between June 2014 and June 2015.
The objective of the project is to maximise the ability of the natural processes to re-establish a
natural shoreline ecosystem, assisted by the positive sand budget in the northern Pumicestone
Passage.
The project will also strengthen the links between local organisations and with the Traditional
Custodians of the area, and build the community understanding of the value of natural ecosystems.
To date the project has achieved success in effective shoreline management, partnership
development and raising awareness of the soft options with multiple benefits.

3. Introduction
In July 2013, a notice was issued by the Department of Environment & Heritage Protection for the
TS Onslow Australian Navy Cadets to remove the cement blocks illegally laid down on the
foreshore over the past twenty years to prevent erosion.
As the immediate removal would have been beyond the financial capability of the organisation and
would increase the risk of shoreline erosion, a more affordable and natural solution to be
established over time was sought to reduce the vulnerability whilst satisfying regulatory
requirements.
An interested community member and member of Take Action for Pumicestone Passage (TAPP),
Michael McNamara, heard of the situation and invited a number of organisations to meet with the
Navy Cadets to seek an alternative solution.
Following an initial meeting held on site on 4th February 2014, agreement was reached to work
together to sequentially build the foreshore ecosystem with endemic vegetation including
mangroves, and in doing so support the cadets to fulfil the requirements laid down by the
Department of Environment & Heritage.
First meeting on site with TS Onslow
Navy Cadets, TAPP and Bunya Bunya
Country Aboriginal Corporation members
Feb 2014

4. Project Management Plan and approvals


The Project Plan was submitted to the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries in August 2014 - see
Appendix 1.
Approval for Stage 1 was granted by Sunshine Coast Council, Department of Environment and
Heritage Protection and Department of Agriculture and Fisheries to proceed in November 2014.
Stage 1 was to achieve mangrove plantings in Management Area1 in the north and management
Area 2 in the south supported by coir logs.
As required by DAF for the approval for disturbance of marine plants, fencing was erected and a
sign was printed and erected during works, with the following wording:
Operational works conducted under Fisheries Queensland self-assessable code. Call 13 25 23.
An extension of time was sought from and granted by EHP in January 2015.

Management Area 1

Management Area 3

Management Area 4

Management Area 2

Signage and fencing around Management Area 1

Map of Management Area at TS Onslow Navy


Cadets lease

5. Stage 1 works
5.1 Survey
In December 2014, Sunshine Coast Council surveyors took levels of nearby red mangrove
populations, then related them to Management Area 1 of the project site so that the growing area
was constructed accurately and the red mangroves were planted at their preferred intertidal level.

Sunshine Coast Council Surveyor Peter Hayes establishing accurate tidal zone from
nearby red mangrove population

5.2 Bank stabilization


The restoration of Management Area 1 involved the use of coir logs to provide stability for the
mangroves to grow. The original design for their installation was modified by Professor Norm Duke
who assessed the situation with his expertise in shoreline erosion and mangrove growing behaviour.
The final design was a fish scale shape with four rows of 3-metre coir logs secured with wooden
stakes and rope. These have proved successful in protecting the young mangroves from wave
action and longitudinal current, and will break down in four to five years.
The bank behind was battered to a 45 degree angle and a perforated cellular confinement product
donated by Geofabrics Australasia was installed. All was then covered with sand and a combination
of gravel and rubble to further anchor the installation.
It was decided that Management Area 2 did not require coir log stabilisation as the sand was
accreting at the southern end of the site and erosion pressure was reduced significantly.

Photomonitoring point 1 above looking north


photomonitoring point 2 below looking south
Dec 2014

coir logs being installed Dec 2014


fish scale design for coir log installation in tidal zone below
6

5.3 Planting
After stabilisation works were completed, the mangroves propagated by BBCAC were planted into
the tidal zone on the same day (19th December 2014). These were mostly red, a few orange and
yellow and no grey mangroves. (see Appendix 1).
On 12th March 2015, the bank behind was planted with ground covers and low growing native
coastal shrubs. A species list (see Appendix 4) was developed and provided to Council who
orderedand paid for the plants. On the day there were almost forty people actively planting,
including the Bells Creek Green Army team, TAPP members, TS Onslow members and Night Eyes
Water and Landcare who generously provided a barbecue lunch and drinks.
All community members were invited to attend
the planting day and free barbecue through a
comprehensive story in the local Caloundra
Weekly, and two attended.

Community planting day March 2015

5.4

Monitoring and adaptive management

In late January 2015 the stabilisation works were


tested with high rainfall and strong wave action
combined with a king tide. The coir logs
withstood the event well, however as Prof Norm
Duke had predicted, the main erosive action
came from overland flow. Rainfall ponded behind
the works and eroded the gravel and Geoweb,
flowing down the northern side of the project area
and eroding the bank. Coir logs were installed in
the northern section in early February 2015,
however the water overtopped these and
continued to erode the bank.
The overland flow was successfully diverted by
the donation and installation of a silt fence along
the western side of the project area in March
2015. This has continued to be effective in
diverting overland flow.

erosion control on north end of Management 1


Feb 2015

Photo monitoring continues every six months.

Photopoint 1 from north July 2016

Photopoint 2 from south July 2016

In 2015, the Bells Creek Green Army maintained the couch from outcompeting the groundcovers by
hand pulling. In 2016 this has not yet been done and needs attention.
The coir logs in the front row of the fish scale design have been restaked once.
Soon after planting, twenty red mangroves seedlings on the southern end of the area were neatly
snipped off and died, presumably by someone keen to maintain their view. Enrichment planting has
taken place twice since the initial planting by direct planting and seedlings.

Results and recommendations


In August 2016, members of the project team met with new President of TS Onslow Navy Cadets ,
Geoffrey McNamara to review the stage 1 works and discuss the future plan in light of shoreline
changes and learnings.
Management Area 1

Mangroves: The estimated survival rate of original mangroves at July 2016 is 70%. The
growth rate of existing mangroves has been steady, and the new mangroves planted
through direct seeding or seedling transplant are all doing well.

Stabilisation: The configuration of the coir logs was effective in withstanding the erosive
action of high tides, waves and longitudinal current and protected the mangrove seedlings
well. The gravel used was too small and washed over mangrove seedlings, and the larger
rubble was stable. Some parts of the GeoWeb lost their gravel and rubble fill and require
some replacement rubble.
The eroding bank on the north end of this zone requires a concerted and novel approach. It
was suggested we trial an artificial seagrass product called SeaPlug recommended by
Council Engineer Denis Shaw. This can also be trialled just to the south of this zone in the
northern end of Management Area 3.

Fence: The temporary bunting fence has been effective in deterring traffic and requires
replacement with a more permanent fence. It is clear that no fence would be a mistake and
allow too much foot traffic as well as enticing the Council staff to mow the area as the couch
is long.

Dune plants: The couch needs to be managed as it is outcompeting the native dunal plants.
The native groundcover and shrubs need enrichment planting to thicken and deter traffic
further.
Community awareness: Except for the twenty mangroves snipped on the southern end,
there has been very little vandalism reported to the project site. Many conversations with the
public have elicited positive responses from community. The informative signage and
newspaper article have helped raise awareness of the project objectives and broad
collaboration.
Recommendation summary
1. Continue to enrich mangrove
plantings with direct seeding in
season and seedlings.
2. Import more rubble to fill eroded
areas in Geoweb
3. Trial Seaplug on the northern
end to accrete
4. Follow up offer of Council to
install permanent fence around
Management Area 1
5. Manage couch by hand,
avoiding whippersnapper and
poison) and enrich
groundcovers and shrub
plantings.

active erosion on north end of Management Area 1

Management Area 2
With the positive sand budget in the Passage and the current circulation pattern, the beach at the
southern end of the project area is accreting and not in need of remedial action other than planting
of mangroves. In this case the species do not have to be restricted to red mangroves but can be the
taller grey mangroves as their height will not jeopardise any view of the passage with mature
casuarinas already growing and being behind the TS Onslow buildings.
Management Area 3 & 4
Two issues in particular need addressing in this area:
1. With the sand accreting to the southern end of the area and a shallowing of the Passage at
this point, the TS Onslow Navy cadets are experiencing difficulty launching their boats from
the existing boat ramp.
2. The area on the northern end of Management Area 3 is actively eroding with a deep channel
adjacent.
It was decided that relocation of the boat ramp to the northern end of Management Area 3 would
solve both these challenges by launching the boats into deeper water and diverting the erosive
forces from the bank. The artificial seagrass Seaplug could be installed around the boat ramp to
help protect the bank.
Mangroves and groundcovers are to be planted at any gaps along the length of this section but no
cement blocks removed in the short term.
As suggested in the initial plan, every second block could be cleaned with a Gerni to improve the
possibility of recruitment of oysters.

Active erosion on north end of Management Area 3


10

alternate blocks to be blasted for oyster recruitment

Appendices
Appendix 1 T.S. Onslow Mangrove rehabilitation Stage 1 Project Plan
The following project plan is prepared for the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry by Susie
Chapman of SEQ Catchments on behalf of T.S. Onslow Navy Cadets and the collective of organisation listed
below.
We understand that works proposed for Stage 1 fall into the work type category of 2.11 in the Code for selfassessable development: Minor impact works in a declared Fish Habitat Area or involving the removal,
destruction or damage of marine plants, Code number: MPO6 January 2013.
Work type
(public purposes)

Maximum allowable
disturbance and method
of disturbance

2.11 Fish habitat


rehabilitation or
restoration
works (including
not-for-profit
marine plant
nursery
establishment)

Marine plant removal, destruction


or damage or

Permitted in a
declared FHA
under this code

Yes

FHA works in accordance with the


details of a
project plan endorsed by
Fisheries Queensland
(see Appendix 4 for details
required).
Structures may be included as
part of the
endorsed rehabilitation or
restoration work
project plan
No removal of soil or sediment
from restricted
areas, e.g. declared fire ant
areas.

Details required for inclusion in a project plan (from Appendix 4):


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

11

Introduction
Scope of project
Alternative options
Rationale
Timing
Management measures
Drawings/plans/maps showing locality of project.

Notification and signage

Yes
Signage to
state name of
project plan
Notification to
be as
specified in
agreed pro

1. Overview
A staged long-term plan that will endeavour to restore ecological integrity to the state-owned foreshore
reserve in front of the T.S. Onslow Australian Navy Cadets headquarters on the Esplanade at Golden Beach
is currently being developed by a number of collaborating organisations with skills and interest in this work.
The objective of the project will be to maximise the ability of the natural processes to re-establish a natural
shoreline ecosystem, assisted by the positive sand budget in the northern Pumicestone Passage. The project
will also strengthen the links between local organisations and with the Traditional Custodians of the area, and
build the community understanding of the value of natural ecosystems.
1. Introduction
Lot 547 SP163949 : TL232247 : Par Bribie
Following an initial meeting held on site on 4th February 2014, agreement was reached to work together to
sequentially build the foreshore ecosystem with endemic vegetation including mangroves, and in doing so
support the cadets to fulfil the requirements laid down by the Department of Environment & Heritage.
As the planning has progressed, the organisations partnering in this on-going project are now T.S. Onslow
Australian Navy Cadets, Take Action for Pumicestone (TAPP), Bunya Bunya Country Aboriginal Corporation
(BBCAC), Sunshine Coast Council, SEQ Catchments, MangroveWatch, Geofabrics Australasia and Night
Eyes. Staff members from the Department of Environment & Heritage Protection including coastal engineer
Paul Prenzler have attended three meetings and are supportive of the approach planned.
2. Background
In July 2013, a notice was issued by the Department of Environment & Heritage Protection for the Australian
Navy Cadets to remove the cement blocks illegally laid down on the foreshore over the past twenty years.
As the immediate removal would be beyond the financial capability of the organisation and would increase the
risk of shoreline erosion, a more affordable and natural solution to be established over time is being sought to
reduce the vulnerability whilst satisfying regulatory requirements. An interested community member, Michael
McNamara, heard of the situation and invited a number of organisations to meet with the Navy Cadets to seek
an alternative solution.
Mangrove rehabilitation trials in the Maroochy and Noosa Rivers over the last five years have developed local
knowledge and skills among the partnering organisations which can be applied to this situation. In particular,
Bunya Bunya Country Aboriginal Corporation whose members are of Kabi Kabi and South Sea Islander
descent, has built knowledge and expertise in propagating and planting mangroves on the banks of the
Maroochy River.
3. Land tenure
On July the 8th of 1977 the Navy Cadets at Caloundra gained a lease of 0.661 ha of reclaimed land, situated
on the foreshore of Golden Beach near the end of Onslow Street. The lease on the land had a 30 year term
and expired on the 7th July 2007. The lease over the land was renewed in April 2008 and the land was resurveyed and reduced to a size of 0.624 ha (approximately). The parcel is State land and owned by the
Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM).
The property owner is registered as Unit Committee TS Onslow c/- Defence Department Supp, PO Box 800,
Salisbury South SA 5106.
4. Site analysis
The land is situated on the North Pumicestone Passage away from the designated Fish Management Area.
There are currently no marine plants in the area and no marine plants will be disturbed by these works. This
land is reclaimed foreshore at Golden Beach that used fill from nearby development over thirty years with no
clear knowledge of the consistency. It may be comprised of sand and building rubble and potentially has
differential absorbency resulting in varying rates of sub-surface moisture flow. Any attempt at erosion control
must therefore allow for the subsurface flow from the reclaimed area.
The reclaimed area has effectively changed the original shoreline profile and subsequently the flow
characteristics of the Passage adjacent to the shoreline. The introduced curvature of the shore would increase
flow rate in the immediate vicinity, creating a venturi effect on the apex of the curve. In principal, this region
would respond similarly to a broad groyne and deposit sand south of the groyne, erode it from the north. The
12

same situation is evident at each groyne installed over drains north of this area in the Passage. The subtle
difference with the installed groynes is that the groyne itself does not erode, in this instance, the shoreline is
continually varying and is the reason that the concrete blocks were installed. The groyne influence is evident
when considering the sand deposits south of the area protected by concrete blocks and the erosion
immediately north.
A study of Google Earth (current 2008) clearly displays the saw tooth effect created by groynes north of the
area. If left to nature, the region would potentially regress to the natural shoreline, cutting through the T.S.
Onslow building site and eliminating most, if not all, of the reclaimed area.
The reduced permeability provided by the concrete blocks has reduced the erosion slightly on the apex of the
curve and increased it on the northern side. The major
reason for continued erosion is the result of the blocks
sinking and therefore being overtopped by tidal
action. An attempt to rectify this was the use of small
rocks and a concrete capping layer between the soil
and the concrete blocks. This has cracked and allowed
water to erode under the concrete layer resulting in
increasing separation of the blocks from the shoreline.
This situation is further exacerbated as a result of the
concrete blocks continuing to sink into the sandy floor
of the Passage. Fig 1 demonstrates an example of this
problem.

Fig 1. Slumping from tidal action

The total defined area, 131 metres in length, commences north of the T.S. Onslow building at a stormwater
drain. This drain needs to be addressed in keeping with other drains of similar size in the Passage and
extended into the water and covered with Geofabric or similar bags to create a groyne. This groyne would
assist in restoring sand to the erosion area approximately 40 metres south.
Approximately 20 metres south of this drain, a smaller diameter stormwater drain exits onto the shore. This
should be connected into the main drain, above, or alternatively extended to enter water below low tide region
and covered to create an additional smaller groyne. The restoration area commences approximately 20
metres south from that point.
The first restoration area Management Area 1 is 36 metres long and at its maximum, 11 metres wide. It has a
total area of 290 square metres. An area of shoreline would also need to be revegetated to provide a riparian
region and protect from further deterioration of the shoreline. It is reasonable to expect that during the process
of establishing vegetation, further shoreline erosion could result. Installation of matting will assist in reducing
this impact.

13

Fig 2. Eroding northern end of the site


The concrete blocks in this region are the most recently installed. The photo indicates they are sinking and
can therefore be breached by wave and tidal influx.
Aerial photographs demonstrate that the shoreline erosion since 2010 has been restricted to the north end of
the site with sand accretion occurring on the southern half of the site.

Fig 3 Nearmap image 25 Jan 2010

Fig 4 Nearmap image 3 July 2012

Fig 5 Nearmap image 22 April 2014


14

5. Alternative options
A report by Australian Wetlands Consulting was commissioned by a TS Onslow sponsor in 2011 to provide
and compare options for restoration. Although the report recommends the removal of concrete and installation
of sandfilled geobag groynes as the best option as it goes closest to satisfying all above requirements, this
was not a viable option for the organisation as the members could not raise the capital to achieve this.
The next best option recommended using vegetation to stabilise the area has become the preferred course of
action from all project partners that have come forward to collectively assist TS Onslow to address the
problem. Removal of all cement blocks was not advised as this would be too expensive and open the area up
for more erosion. Over time it was decided some blocks will be removed where necessary and soft options of
coir logs and vegetation used for stabilisation in these areas. Remaining rocks will be populated with oysters.

Foreshore
rehabilitation options report .PDF

6. Project Plan
The overall objective is to provide a soft and more natural option for control of erosion and restoration of
currently eroded areas of the foreshore.
The long-term plan involves a staged approach, commencing in the area of worst impact on the northern end
of the site, involving use of combination of coir logs, cellular confinement, rubble, mangrove planting and
vegetated riparian zone onshore. The southern end will also be vegetated as part of stage 1. Stage 2 will
progress to the middle section. It will be undertaken over three years applying an adaptive management
framework. As this site is unique in its characteristics and processes, the success of each operation will be
collectively reviewed and improvements implemented.
At all stages of the project, proper regulatory requirements will be observed. Initially the approval to work on
state-owned land must be granted. It is understood by the project partners that appropriate permission will
need to be sought for the seed collection, propagation and planting of mangroves and for the installation of
coir logs.
When the project is underway, the community will be informed through media stories and signage erected on
site about the process in place and the people involved. Where appropriate community members will be
invited to be involved in the revegetation works.
This application only relates to Stage 1, though the other stages are outlined here.
Stage 1
June 2014 - June 2015.
Starting with Management Zones 1 and 2 on either end of the site (see Fig 1), appropriate mangrove species
preferably propagated from local species will be established on the toe of the bank with protection afforded by
coir logs and rubble, with coir logs used to batter the bank in a series of steps carefully levelled to keep the
mangroves within the tidal range between low tide and HAT. A diversity of endemic vegetation chosen for
strong root structure will be established on the bank behind, along with endemic coastal groundcovers.
Stage 2
June 2015 June 2017
Based on observations of the stage 1 sites and with further advice from a fluvial geomorphologist, a plan for
Management Zones 3 and 4 will be refined to gradually remove some of the cement blocks and replace with
vegetation in the area between the first two trial zones.
Stage 1 will require on-going enrichment planting.
Stage 3:
When the design has evolved, it is anticipated that any remaining hard surfaces will be populated with oysters
sourced from the oyster lease owned by BBCAC.

15

Fig 6. T.S. Onslow Australian Navy Cadets shoreline rehabilitation - Management Zones
Nearmap 22 April 2013

16

7. Stage 1 - Site works


The restoration of Management Area 1 will involve the use of coir logs to provide stability for the mangroves to
grow. They will be installed in a fish scale design to provide maximum protection from the wave action. The
logs will break down over 5 years to form excellent growing medium for the plants. Coir logs come in 3 metre
lengths and can be easily secured with wooden stakes and rope.
The bank behind will be battered to a 45degree angle and a perforated cellular confinement product will be
installed. All will then be covered with sand and a combination of gravel and rubble to further anchor the
installation. The propagated mangroves will then be planted into the tidal zone, and the bank behind planted
with ground covers and native coastal shrubs.

Fig 7. Coir logs placement in fish scale design covered with rubble, stepping up and within tidal zone.
The proposal would involve installation of the coir logs prior to adding fill to site to batter the profile. The entire
site would need to be enclosed, landside by a barrier fence for protection and safety prior to the
commencement of the above. Additionally to the above work, community consultation would be required to
determine and resolve any community concerns.
8. Mangrove propagation and planting

17

Mangroves will be propagated and planted by BBCAC through their existing permit in the Maroochy River to
collect seeds and at their nursery at Bli Bli. Appendix 2 is a letter from DAFF granting the permit, though it
does not site a Permit No. These would be primarily of the species Rhizophora, known as red or stilt
mangroves. This species is highly salt water tolerant and suitable for this location. They are small stature
plants, reaching height of about 5 metres over about 20 year period and would not restrict Passage view
currently enjoyed by residents on Landsborough Parade. Mangrove seedlings propagated by BBCAC will be
planted randomly at a density of approximately 6 plants/m2 (if the number propagated allows) between the
high and low water tide levels. As the marine sediment accumulates behind the groynes, mangrove seeds will
be collected and planted in situ to enrich the planting. It is understood that this process is not guaranteed to
succeed with the high erosion rates, however every possible opportunity to collectively monitor, review and
adapt as the project proceeds will adaptively manage for the best outcome.
To complement the mangrove planting, suitable low growing locally endemic coastal vegetation sourced from
local nurseries will be planted to stabilise the banks.
9. Schedule of works

Obtain provisional approval from DEHP and SCC


This has been achieved after numerous meetings with EHP staff, Paul Prenzler, Julie Murdoch,
Deena Rigby and Bryce Herslet. see Appendix 2 for email referring to this. No official notification
of approval has been received.
Commence community consultation in the vicinity of the restoration area.
Obtain approval for mangrove propagation and planting from Fisheries Queensland.

After Approval and appropriate funding is assured:

Arrange for propagation of Mangroves number to be decided by BBCAC, possibly 110 plus.
This may need to happen earlier to fit in with the seeding season.
Install safety fencing on landside to safely enclose works area.
Install silt fence and boom on Passage side of concrete blocks.
Purchase and install coir logs at locations shown in sketch plan, including groynes.
Shoot levels of tidal zone so that mangroves are planted between high and low tide levels.
Obtain fill from the area adjacent to the Power Boat Club
Install matting, entire area if required or only at the boundary of erosion and riparian area
landside.
Mount security camera, if available, to overview the site.
Plant mangroves and suitable riparian area vegetation.
Monitor changes to shoreline erosion in vicinity and assess impacts.
Monitor growth and health of Mangroves and other vegetation. Replace and enrich as and if
required.

10. Monitoring
Monitoring will be undertaken by BBCAC and the community members of TAPP, in conjunction with TS
Onslow and SEQ Catchments.
Photomonitoring points for shoreline changes and vegetation growth will be established before the project
and will be monitored subsequently every month. Planting success for mangroves will be gauged by
monitoring survival rates, trunk height and number of leaf branches and for other vegetation survival rates
only.
Results will be reported to the project partners including Mangrove Watch Prof Norm Duke and Jock
Mackenzie.

18

Appendix 2 letter of permit from DAFF to BBCAC

19

20

Appendix 3 email from DAFF re extension of time frame to complete works


From: MURDOCH Julie [mailto:Julie.Murdoch@ehp.qld.gov.au]
Sent: Friday, 9 January 2015 3:48 PM
To: kevinstroud@stockdaleleggo.com.au
Subject: Extension to timeframe of tidal works notice

Dear Kevin,

The Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (the department) issued a tidal works notice to Unit
Committee T.S. Onslow Incorporated in respect to the works along the foreshore adjacent to Lot 547
SP163494 at Golden Beach. The tidal works notice stated requirements to be performed by 10 January
2015.

The department acknowledges the recent commencement of works associated with stage 1 of your shoreline
rehabilitation plan. As the works are not yet completed the department has decided to extend the timeframe
of the tidal works notice for a further two years.
A replacement tidal works notice has been sent reflecting these changes.

Please contact me if you have any queries.

Kind regards,

Julie Murdoch I Senior Environmental Officer


South Queensland Compliance I Sunshine Coast
Environmental Services & Regulation
Department of Environment and Heritage Protection

Tel: 07 5459 6141

PO Box 362, Maroochydore Q 4558


www.ehp.qld.gov.au
sunshinecoast.esr@ehp.qld.gov.au

21

Appendix 4 - Species list for planting bank


TS Onslow foreshore rehabilitation
Stage 1 bank planting species list

Botanical name

Common name

# tubes

Groundcovers and grasses

Hibbertia scandens

Twining guinea flower

30

Carpobrotus glaucescens

Pigface

30

Ipomoea pes-caprae

Goats foot convolvulus

60

Scaevola calendulacea

Blue fan flower

30

Spinifex sericeus

beach spinifex

100

Saltmarsh

50

Trees and shrubs

Hibiscus tiliaceus

Cotton wood

Casuarinea equisetifolia

horsetail sheoak

15

Alectryon coriaceus

beach birds eye

15

Banksia integrifolia

Coastal banksia

15

Leucopogon parviflorus

Leucopogon

20

22

Appendix 5 - Budget
Stage 1 - TS Onslow Shoreline Erosion Management
Plan
Activity
seed collection & propagation & prep
seedling planting
expert advice
coir logs 74 @ $60.50ea + $245 freight
ropes, stakes, Geo-Web & MegaFlo
coir logs installation
security bunting & erection
project management (SEQC)10%
project admin (BBCAC) 10%
surveying expertise
signage
community support & Green Army
including monitoring a& maintenance

Cost $
1,769
$600
4,722
$278

$800
$800

8,969

23

in-kind $

comments

2,000
3,000

SCC
MangroveWatch

1,000
3,000
500
3,000
2,000
1,000
500

GeoFabrics Australasia P/L


TAPP, TS Onslow,
SCC

9,000
25,000

TAPP, Green Army

SCC
SCC