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Lesson Plan Template

Candidate Name: Kim Carter


Strategy (circle one): Task Rotation; NAL; Mystery; Decision Making;
C/C Thinking; Metaphorical; Windows Notes; Other
Unit Name
Unit 4: Geometry
Lesson Name
Exploring Quadrilaterals
Grade
3

Subject
Math

Time Needed (Hours/Days)


45 60 Minutes
Course

Standards/Elements: CCGPS, GPS/GSE (where applicable) and TAG Standards


MGSE3.G.1 Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses,
rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that
the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize
rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw
examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
Standards For Mathematical Practice
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Students
make sense of problems involving the attributes of shapes.
6. Attend to precision. Students use clear and precise language when discussing the attributes of
shapes.
7. Look for and make use of structure. Students look closely to discover a pattern or structure
when sorting shapes based on common attributes.
Tag Standard: Advanced Communications Skills
Element 8: The student responds to contributions of others, considering all available information.
Element 10: The student supports and defends his/her own opinions while respecting the opinions of
others.

Enduring Understanding
At the end of this lesson, students will be able to explain in their own words using correct math vocabulary
how a square is also a rectangle but a rectangle is not a square.

Essential Question(s)
What should students know when lesson is completed?

What are the attributes of a square?


What are the attributes of a rectangle?
How can I use attributes to compare and contrast shapes?

Teacher Lesson Preparation


Copies of the Six Thinking Hat Colors with corresponding questions
Six Thinking Hats for each group
Six Thinking Hats recording sheet
Copy of The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns
Copies of What Makes a Shape? (Shapes for sorting and Venn Diagram)
Padlet
iPad for each group

Activating Strategy (for example: Hook/Mini-Lesson/Warm-Up/Connection to Prior Learning)


The teacher will read aloud The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns. While reading, questions should
be posed to the students that lead to the discovery of shape attributes their similarities and
differences. A list of attributes may be generated on the board throughout the reading or each student
may be asked to keep a list of attributes.
The students will then pair with a partner and cut out their shapes for sorting. The students will sort
their shapes into 2 categories based on their attributes. The students will then complete the Venn
Diagram using the 2 attributes. The students will glue their shapes into the appropriate spot on the
Venn Diagram. With their partner, the students will write to explain their thinking and to describe
any observations that were made.
Explain to the students that they will use their information from their Venn Diagram to help them
think about the question How is a square a rectangle but a rectangle is not a square? by using the
Six Thinking Hats strategy.
Instructional Sequence and Activities including use of technology
1. Put students into groups of 5. (Blue hat will be done whole group)
2. Students can choose their hat or randomly select a hat out of a basket. A facilitator of the
group should also be chosen.
3. In small groups have students listen to the thoughts each one has on the topic, each taking
turns wearing the different hats. Each person should only wear their hat for approximately
one minute.
4. The facilitator of the group should take notes on a six thinking hats handout as members of
the groups are giving their thoughts while wearing a hat. The facilitator or another group
member can type the responses into Padlet as well for teacher monitoring.
5. When everyone has given input, the group can come up with further questions to challenge
and explore the ideas theyve presented to each other.
6. The students will then come together as a whole group to discuss How is a square a
rectangle but a rectangle is not a square? and their findings. The students can refer to what

they shared on Padlet or their recording sheet.

Six Thinking Hats - Colors


White hat-Facts
Red hat-Feelings

Yellow hat- Good


Green hat- Create

Black hat-Caution
Blue hat- Understanding (Whole Group)

Assessment Strategies
Formative: Students will put into their own words using specific attribute of the shapes, how a
square is a rectangle but a rectangle is not a square and why.

Differentiation
Scaffolds/ Interventions/Extensions/Enrichment

Intervention: Give students corresponding questions that go with each hat color to help guide the
students through the thinking process.
Enrichment: The students will wear a different hat and must say something unique that has not
been said by another person wearing that same hat color.
Materials/Links/Text References/Resources
Copies of the Six Thinking Hat Colors (with corresponding questions for intervention)
Six Thinking Hats for each group
Six Thinking Hats recording sheet
Copy of The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns
Copies of What Makes a Shape? (Shapes for sorting and Venn Diagram)
Padlet
iPad for each group