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BIOLOGY 151: GENERAL BIOLOGY II: SECTION 2

COURSE SYLLABUS
DAYS/TIME:
LOCATION:
INSTRUCTORS:
ACTIVE DATES:
OFFICE:
PHONE:
E-MAIL:
OFFICE HOURS:

M/W/F 11-11:50 AM
100 Leonard Hall
Dr. Rebecca Simmons
Jan. 11-Mar. 2
315 Starcher Hall
777-3439

&

Dr. Brian Darby


Mar. 5-May 2
317 Starcher Hall
777-4678

rebecca.simmons@email.und.edu

brian.darby@email.und.edu

By appointment

10-11AM TWR & by appointment

Welcome to Biology 151! This course is designed for Biology and science majors. In this course, we will build
on knowledge acquired in Biology 150 by considering topics in genetics, molecular biology, evolution,
biodiversity, and ecology. By taking this course you will be better able to explain the biology behind current
events such as stem cell cloning, genetic counseling, disease resistance, human population growth, species
extinctions, and global climate change.
By the end of the semester, you should be able to:
1. Explain how genes code for variation among organisms.
2. Explain how genetic variation contributes to evolution of life on Earth.
3. Explain how adaptations to different environments explain broad patterns of species diversity.
4. Explain how organisms interact with one another and the environment.
5. Apply information from class in confronting contemporary issues in biology.
6. Draw accurate conclusions from scientific data presented in different formats.
The information presented here may be modified to fit the needs and time constraints of the course. This
syllabus is subject to change without notice; however, all attempts will be made to announce changes in class.
TEXTBOOK: Freeman, Scott. 2011. Biological Science. Fourth Edition. Pearson/Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle
River, NJ.
NOTE: The bookstore sells a custom edition designed specifically for Biol 150/151 that contains only the
chapters that we will cover. You may use the custom edition OR the complete textbook for this course.
CLICKERS: You will need a clicker for this course.
WEBSITE: http://www.masteringbio.com/site
BLACKBOARD: http://online.und.edu/
You will also need a laboratory manual if you are enrolled in Biology 151 Laboratory.
GRADING: Your final lecture grade will be determined from your total combined score on the following:
Lecture exams (3 exams/80 points each)
240 points
Final comprehensive exam
200 points
Homework/Quizzes/In-class participation 160 points
TOTAL
600 points
TENATIVE GRADING SCALE: The instructors reserve the right to alter the grading scale to compensate for
unforeseen discrepancies. The final grading scale may be curved based on class performance. Changes may
raise your grade, but IT WILL NOT LOWER IT.
A = 540-600 points
B = 480-539 points
C = 420-479 points
D = 360-419 points
F = 359 or less

EXAMINATIONS: Exams will be multiple choice, and will test your basic understanding of biological
concepts and critical thinking skills. The first three exams will contain 40 questions worth 2 points/question.
The final exam will consist of 100 multiple choice questions (200 points total). Forty questions will cover
material from after Exam III until the end of the semester; the remaining 60 questions will be from previous
material to test your mastery of topics from the entire semester.
If you have a conflict with a particular test date, it is your responsibility to inform the instructor to make
arrangements to take the exam at an EARLIER date, at the instructors convenience. Once an exam is missed, it
is the instructors choice if you will be allowed to take a make-up exam. This exam will consist of different
questions and have an alternate format (i.e. essay exam).
HOMEWORK/QUIZZES: Homework, quizzes, and in-class participation points (via Clickers) will be given
throughout the semester. Homework and quizzes will be available online through the Mastering Biology and
Blackboard websites. You will be notified in advance of when homework and quizzes will be due and what
topics will be covered.
LABORATORY: Lecture and laboratory are separate and independent classes. You may take Biology 151
lecture without taking the 151 lab, but the lecture is a co- or pre-requisite for the laboratory. The first lab
section begins the second week of classes. Please read lab exercise #1 in the manual beforehand.
DSS STATEMENT: If you have emergency medical information to share with the instructor, if you need
special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, or if you need accommodations in this course
because of a disability, please make an appointment with the instructor. The instructors locations and office
hours are given at the beginning of this syllabus. If you plan to request disability accommodations, you are
expected to register with the Disability Support Services office (DSS office, 190 McCannel Hall, 777-3425)
ACADEMIC HONESTY: We expect complete academic honesty as specified by the University of North
Dakota Code of Student Life. Failure to comply with this policy will result in a 0 for the assignment and
prosecution through the Dean of Students Office. There is zero tolerance for academic dishonesty.
As stated on the Dept. of the Registrars website:
Students are expected to maintain scholastic honesty. Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to
cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion.
A. Cheating on a test includes, but is not restricted to:
1. Copying from anothers test.
2. Processing or using material during a test not authorized by the person giving the test.
3. Collaborating with or seeking aid from another student during a test without authority.
4. Knowingly using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting, or soliciting in whole or in part the contents
of an unadministered test.
5. Substituting for another student or permitting another student to substitute for oneself to take a test.
6. Bribing another person to obtain an unadministered test or information about an unadministered test.
B. Plagiarism means the appropriation, buying, receiving as a gift, or obtaining by any means another persons
work and the unacknowledged submission or incorporation of it in ones own work. This includes appropriation
of another persons work by the use of computers or any electronic means.
C. Collusion means the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work offered for
credit.
For detailed policy statements and procedures dealing with scholastic dishonesty, see the Code of Student Life,
section 3.

TENTATIVE LECTURE & EXAM SCHEDULE


Note: This lecture schedule differs from the schedule followed in Section 1 and Section 3.
DATES
Wednesday

1/11

Friday
Monday
Wednesday

2/3
2/6
2/8

Wednesday
Friday
Monday

2/29
3/2
3/5

Monday
Wednesday
Wednesday

4/2
4/4
4/11

Wednesday

5/2

LECTURE TOPIC
Introduction to course /Mendel & the Gene
DNA & the Gene: Synthesis & Repair
How Genes Work
Transcription, RNA Processing &Translation
Control of Gene Expression in Bacteria
Review
EXAM 1
Control of Gene Expression in Eukaryotes
Analyzing and Engineering Genes
Evolution by Natural Selection
Evolutionary Processes
Speciation
Review
EXAM 2
Bacteria & Archaea
Protists
Green Algae & Land Plants
Fungi
Animals
Viruses
Review
EXAM 3
An Introduction to Ecology
Behavior
Population Ecology
Community Ecology
Ecosystems
Biodiversity & Conservation Biology

TEXT CHAPTER
Ch. 13
Ch. 14
Ch. 15
Ch. 16
Ch. 17
Ch. 18
Ch. 19
Ch. 24
Ch. 25
Ch. 26
Ch. 28
Ch. 29
Ch. 30
Ch. 31
Chs. 32-34 (selected portions only)
Ch. 35
Ch. 50
Ch. 51
Ch. 52
Ch. 53
Ch. 54
Ch. 55

Monday, May 7
FINAL EXAM
3:15 5:15
Location to be announced
Final Exam grid: http://und.edu/academics/registrar/final-exam-schedule-spring-2012.cfm
Monday
1/16
Monday
2/20
Monday 3/12- Friday 3/16
Thursday
4/5
Friday
4/6
Monday
4/9
Friday
5/4

OTHER IMPORTANT DATES


NO CLASS: MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY
NO CLASS: PRESIDENTS DAY
NO CLASS: SPRING BREAK
LAST DAY TO DROP A CLASS/SWITCH TO S/U GRADING
NO CLASS: EASTER HOLIDAY
NO CLASS: EASTER HOLIDAY
NO CLASS: READING AND REVIEW DAY