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OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

Not just Halloween:
Exploring the magic
of El Día de Los Muertos
Local Mexican-American Leticia Fraga shares
stories about one of her favorite holidays
before its Princeton celebration Nov. 5
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
“The Day of the Dead, or El Día
de Los Muertos, is one of my favorite holidays that reminds me
of home. This is a holiday when
we remember our loved ones that
have passed on, and also celebrate
their lives,” said Leticia Fraga, a
Princeton local who remains
committed to exploring, celebrating and sharing Mexican folklore
as a proud Mexican-American.
El Día de Los Muertos is a Mexican holiday dating back thousands of years to an Aztec festival. Its purpose remains true to
Mexicans throughout the world
as a day not to mourn but to celebrate and speak to the souls of
the departed. From this, which is
celebrated Nov. 2, came the North
American tradition of dressing
up like the dead.
“When I was little and lived in
Mexico, I remember looking forward to that day of the year when
we would go to the cemetery to
clean up and decorate the graves
of our dearly departed. Instead of
sadness, it was a festive event.”

Fraga said. “For most Mexicans,
we consider the Day of the Dead a
good day for communicating with
our loved ones that are no longer
with us, and reminding them that
they still live in our hearts.”
Fraga enjoys seeing family and
friends gather to build special altars, which remains a way to continue the tradition whether you
live close enough to relatives’
graves. Altars often include flowers, food, drinks, music and other
special items the deceased used to
love – perhaps a stuffed bear, a
certain trinket or their favorite
piece of jewelry. These items are
called “ofrendas,” which means
offerings. The altar also has a
photo of the deceased.
“Family
members
gather
around the altar to pray and
share stories about our loved
ones, which is particularly special for children who may never
have known their ancestor and in
this way learn a little bit about
their family history,” Fraga said.
“Some government offices and
schools will also build altars.
please see MEXICAN, page 17

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

From left, Martha Arable (Chiara Goldenstern), Fern (Lucy McCulloch), John Arable (Elias Gitterman)
and a young Wilbur discuss the value of saving of a life as a lamb (Pippi White, in back) looks on.

‘Charlotte’s Web’ on stage
JWMS students explore depth of characters in classic story
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
“Charlotte’s Web,” the story of
Wilbur, a young, naïve pig who
evades death with the help of a
wise spider named Charlotte, is
known as a childhood classic.

But the sixth, seventh and
eighth graders in John Witherspoon Middle School’s drama
program are diving into their
characters and proving not all
children’s books are simple.
“It’s a great show. It’s a show
that deals with friendship and

INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Halloween favorites
Princetonians share top
holiday picks. PAGE 2

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

the sacrifices that one friend
makes for another,” said Ryan
Spector, JW drama teacher of
four years and co-director of
this year’s fall play. “I tell the
kids, they may think this is a
please see PLAY, page 19

MEET THE
CANDIDATES
Mayoral and BOE candidates
give final pitches. PAGE 13-15

2 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

Time for spreading the spook around Princeton
Residents talk Halloween traditions,
from parades and haunted hayrides
to decorating pumpkins
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
It’s nearly Halloween, and
Princeton is crawling with characters, kids, cobwebs and cabinets full of candy. While trick or
treating is a holiday staple, there
are all sorts of ways to celebrate –
from parades and haunted
hayrides to decorating pumpkins.
Some are well acquainted with
a typical Halloween celebration,
with memories cemented in
childhood, while others are new
to the myriad of All Hallows Eve
traditions. Whatever your favorite, whomever your costume,
The Sun is set on spreading the
spook!
Princeton resident Lindsay
Ofrias grew up in Long Island,
N.Y., and recalls the fun – and
fears – her family had together.
“Every year, we’d do those
scary walks through the forest –
Spooky Walks I think they’re
called. We lived near the woods,
but there’s something about
going into them at night,” Ofrias
said. “The scariest one I remember was when you walked into a
room and the floor was made of
mesh, so it was hard to walk;
there were strobe lights so you
couldn’t see well to get out, and
there were people with weapons
everywhere. It was terrifying!”
Besides Spooky Walks, Ofrias’
parents once threw her a party
with the all the classic traditions
such as bobbing for apples.
This year, Ofrias is dressing up
as her grandmother, Georgina
Ofrias Terranova, who turned 91
Oct. 16. To capture the look of her
grandma in her earlier years,
Ofrias borrowed the dress she
wore to a wedding some time ago.
She also will wear her grand-

mother’s fur stole.
To complete the festivities,
Ofrias will probably travel into
Manhattan for the Halloween parade – a tradition that has become
her own.
Melissa Leiva moved to Princeton from Chile six years ago and
has grown fond of the local festivities.
“We went to the pumpkin patch
last week and are looking forward
to the Halloween parade in town.
We now celebrate the same as you
here,” Leiva said – brushing her
15-month-old son’s hair away
from his face. “Benjamin is going
to be a dragon, and my daughter
is going to be a witch. The kids
have a lot of fun, and I start to see
I have fun, too! I like it. There are
a lot of good traditions.”
Leiva’s mother-in-law, Sara
Engel, explained how in Chile
there is no Halloween. Within the
last couple years, though, companies have begun to market costumes and pumpkins in attempts
to adapt some of the U.S. decoration market.
“This will be my first Halloween in the states,” said Cristina Laze, who was visiting Leiva
from Chile. “All the kids are have
been decorating all week. I see the
big customs. I will dress too and
go and have fun with the kids.”
Laze smiled.
Lisa Dreiseitl will also be celebrating her first Halloween in the
U.S. – having moved recently from
Germany to be an au pair.
“I came home yesterday with
my friend who has never seen
Halloween in the U.S., and the
family was decorating the whole
house. It was so funny to see,”
said Dreiseitl, who is looking forward to celebrating with the children with whom she works.

Special to The Sun

Above, Christina Lazo, Sara
Engel and Melissa Leiva are
adopting some U.S. Halloween
traditions with 1-year-old Benjamin Engel. At right, Dave and
Sarah Rechner are debating
their costumes, but their sons
Ethan, 3, (left) and Micah are
going to be superheroes.

Sarah and Dave Rechner have
not immersed themselves in Halloween activities quite yet but
have gotten accustomed to handing out candy and taking their
sons trick or treating.
“I’m going to be Captain America,” 3-year-old Ethan said. “My
favorite is the candy.”
“And he loves seeing everybody
in their costumes,” his mother
added.
Ethan’s little brother will also
be dressing up – most likely as a
superhero – but the specifics are
yet to be determined.

Share your Halloween photos with The Sun at www.facebook.com/princetonsun

OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 3

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Princeton University provides
service to town fire department
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
With a solely volunteer-based
fire
department,
Princeton
launched an initiative to open its
companies to local institutions.
According to Director of Emergency Management Bob Gregory,
anyone who works for a private
school, college or municipality in
Princeton, whether or not they
live in town, is technically permitted to volunteer to fight fires.
“Princeton University really
stepped up to create their own
program,” Gregory said… “The
university and town work well together. There is support from the
administration and from the
town council. They’re really committed to this program – continually
recruiting
volunteers
from within their employee
base.”
The key part of the university
program, which was launched in
2009, is the volunteers are legally
permitted by their employer to
leave work during normal hours
should they need to respond to a
fire in the town. On campus, there
is a fire truck and a vehicle for
volunteers to take off campus

whenever they are called to a
scene.
For most members of Princeton’s three companies, Engine 61,
Mercer Engine 63, Princeton
Hook and Ladder, the availability
to respond to emergencies during
the workday presents a problem,
and many volunteer only at night.
The university firefighters, which
have been deemed associate members by Princeton fire departments, are tracked by the program to ensure that about six to
seven volunteers are on campus
to respond if necessary. They typically remain on call Monday
through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3
p.m., and occasionally on weekends or to be on standby with the
regular members during special
events.
In addition to availability, the
associate members match the
numbers of volunteer firefighters
from all three companies combined and play a significant role
in helping the community. Between the three fire departments,
there are approximately 25 to 30
active members – meaning the
volunteers physically able to respond to fires, not including those
who drive the trucks, volunteer

for events or act as fire police to
manage traffic during emergencies.
The university has about 30 associate members, with four to six
more looking to join.
“Their program is a real benefit to the taxpayer, not only in
keeping the community safe and
not only because of their numbers, but because they can legally
leave work during the day, which
means we are not forced to hire
paid firefighters during daytime
hours,” Gregory said. “It has
helped to remove a lot of the financial burden.”
According the university’s office of communications, PU also
recently contributed $500,000 to
offset the cost of the fire department’s two new trucks, which totaled $1.4 million.
“There’s not much like this
program,” Gregory said. “When I
speak to colleagues, especially out
of state, they say, ‘Hey, are you the
Princeton that fights fires with a
university?’
“And, hey, it’s a resource. It’s
been successful. Our goal now is
to try to reach out to other institutions and see if they’re interested.”

Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

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OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 5

Dr. Mary V. DeCicco

Princeton Police Department
gives Halloween safety tips
The following safety tips are
provided by the Princeton police,
who suggest all children and parents follow them for a fun-filled,
safe Halloween.
On Oct. 31, there will be no
hour restrictions or curfews for
being out and trick or treating.
However, patrol levels will be significantly increased on both mischief night, Oct. 30, and Halloween night.
During the days leading up to
Halloween,
Princeton’s
Safe
Neighborhood Bureau will give
presentations to area elementary
school students on Halloween
safety tips.
The safety precautions your police department suggests are:
• Wear a costume that fits
properly, allowing for ample
movement, breath, sight and
hearing.

• Wear reflective material on
your costume or carry a flashlight or glow stick.
• Stay in familiar neighborhoods and trick or treat with a
group.
• Never go into a house of
someone you don’t know.
• All candy
must be properly inspected by an
adult
before eating.
• Use
designated
sidewalks and
crosswalks while
trick or treating.
• Watch for
cars that are
turning or backing up. Parents,
teach your children to

never dart out into the street or
cross between parked cars.
• Stay in well-lit areas.
• Never venture into dark,
unfamiliar areas.
Check out the Princeton Police
Department’s safety tips video at
www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ToT1kj
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6 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

in our opinion

Safety first this Halloween

145 Witherspoon Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245

Parents, kids, homeowners and motorists should follow these tips
Richard Donnelly

hosts, goblins, ghouls and a lot
of superheroes, princesses,
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
and characters from “Frozen” will be
parading up and down streets in town
in less than one week. Halloween is an
exciting time for kids, parents and
neighbors alike.
It’s a time for fun, a time for laughter, a time for adorable pictures, a time
for candy, a time for celebration and a
time when we all need to pay attention
to safety.
First and foremost, motorists need
to be extra cautious when driving
through the streets that day, not just in
your own neighborhood, but surrounding ones, as well. Make sure to
be aware of trick-or-treating hours,
and be especially careful when darkness settles in. Be especially alert in

G

Halloween photos
While you’re out trick-or-treating this
Halloween, or attending a local
Halloween parade, don’t forget about
The Sun! We’d love to print photos of
you enjoying the holiday. Send them to
us via e-mail, to the address at the right.

residential neighborhoods, as kids
tend to run excitedly from house to
house.
Parents should be on high alert that
day as well, reminding their kids to
look both ways before crossing the
street and cross only at intersections
and crosswalks, when possible.
If kids are trick-or-treating without
adult supervision, make sure they
know the route so they don’t get lost
and confused. Other safety tips, courtesy of the website, www.safekids.org:
• Decorate costumes and bags with

reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors.
• Choose face paint and makeup
whenever possible instead of masks,
which can obstruct a child’s vision.
• Have kids carry glow sticks or
flashlights to help them see and be
seen by drivers.
• When selecting a costume, make
sure it is the right size to prevent trips
and falls.
If you need more tips or tricks of
the trade for trick-or-treating, visit
www.safekids.org.
The local police department will
have safety recommendations, and the
municipality will also have more information about specific rules and regulations for the day.
Be safe this Halloween. And most
importantly, have a scary good time!

letters to the editor

The Friends of Princeton Public Library held their Annual Book Sale on Oct.
14-16 and enjoyed a beautiful fall weekend
with booklovers from near and far. The
book sale is the culmination of months of
work by dedicated volunteers, and depends
on the generous donations of library supporters throughout the year.
We would like to thank the wonderful
staff at Princeton Public Library, whose

knowledge and commitment were crucial
to the success of this event. We are especially thankful to the Development Department and Buildings Department for their
guidance and wholehearted assistance,
and to the Teen Advisory Board for their
enthusiastic involvement. We would also
like to acknowledge the generous support
of our friends at Princeton Public Schools,
the Arts Council of Princeton, Corner
House, Princeton University, McCaffrey’s
and Witherspoon Grill.
The large team of book-loving volunteers who worked so hard and with such

PSA

PSA

Thanks for support
of library book sale

spirit made this event an absolute pleasure
for all involved, from the youngest child
picking out a book for the first time, to the
knowledgeable collector searching for a
special find. Thanks to our generous
Princeton community whose support once
again increased the amount raised for the
library. Even more heartwarming was the
sight of the many Princeton residents
heading home with bags full of treasures,
and smiles.
Seva Kramer and Claire Bertrand
Co-Chairs of the Friends of the Princeton
Public Library Annual Book Sale

ELECTION LETTERS

Safe Haven for Infants
in New Jersey

Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey

(877) 839-2339

(856) 486-4444

Letters to the editor regarding
the Nov. 8 election will not be printed
in the Nov. 2 edition. This is the last
edition to print these letters.

ceo oF NeWspAper MediA Group

Tim Ronaldson

Joe Eisele

executive editor

publisher

MANAGiNG editor

Kristen Dowd
Erica Chayes Wida
AdvertisiNG director Arlene Reyes

seNior priNcetoN editor

The Sun is published weekly by
Newspaper Media Group, 145
Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ
08542. It is mailed weekly to select
addresses in the 08542 and 08540 ZIP
codes. If you are not on the mailing list,
six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99.
PDFs of the publication are online, free
of charge. For information, please call
609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@theprincetonsun.com.
For advertising information, call
(609) 751-0245 or email advertising@theprincetonsun.com.
The Sun welcomes comments from
readers – including any information
about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look
for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Include your name, address and phone
number. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters to news@theprincetonsun.com, via fax at 609-7510245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too.
The Princeton Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium –
including electronically.

OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 7

‘Loving Limits in a Digital Age’
Exploring the realm of screen time limits? Check out
Kim John Payne speak at Waldorf School of Princeton Nov. 28
By ERICA CHAYES WIDA
The Sun
“I’ve been in contact with a
number of families at different
schools throughout Princeton,
and I think this media saturation
issue is becoming a big one,” said
Jamie Quirk, director of admissions and marketing at the Waldorf School of Princeton.
For most adults with children –
and for those without – the idea of
screen time is one that arises
often. Whether you set your own
limits as to how much TV to
watch, how much scrolling or
reading to do on your phone, your
Kindle, your iPad; whether you
set a time limit on electronics for
your family or indulge often but
wonder what life would be like if
that off button was just a little
easier to push, Kim John Payne
has established his career in providing remedies to too much.
The premise of Payne’s “Loving Limits in a Digital Age: Not
Anti-Screen but Pro-Connection
to Nature and People,” which
presents to both private and public schools nationwide, is to offer
parents resources for navigating
the types of challenges that come
from living in a technology,
screen-based society.
In his lecture, Payne works

with parents on how to build
focus, grit and good judgment so
kids don’t become overwhelmed
with media-driven images and
can shape their own self-esteem,
how to encourage respect when
negative images of adults pervade pop culture and how to help
kids still fit in if their screen time
is limited. Payne also explores
aloneness vs. loneliness and how
to help kids know the difference
and the alluring world of no
boundaries developed through
screen use.
“Aside from him being a great
speaker, the greatest value to this
talk to me is to not walk away
from choices or mistakes you
think you’ve already made, not to
walk away with a to do list of
things that will overhaul your life
to protect your children from the
evils of media. It’s really to maintain loving limits, calm discipline
and strengthen those family connections,” Quirk said.
Payne, who authored “Simplicity Parenting” and “The Soul of
Discipline,” is a consultant and
trainer to more than 110 U.S. independent and private schools. He
has been a school counselor, an
adult educator, a researcher, education and private family counselor for more than 30 years.
He will visit Princeton Nov. 28

for a lecture at
the
Waldorf
School from 7
to 9 p.m. Tickets are $10 online and $15 at
the
door.
Payne’s
lectures
are
geared toward
a general audiPAYNE
ence and the
program
is
open to all community members
interested.
“How do you find that balance?
How do you choose the rules right
for your family and feel confident
in your parenting choices for
your individual child?” Quirk
said. “I think that’s what Kim
John Payne is really helpful with.
There’s no set prescription.”

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CALENDAR

PAGE 8

WEDNESDAY OCT. 26
Building a More Sustainable
Princeton: Learn what other
communities are doing to build
more sustainably. A complimentary light breakfast will be provided. Princeton Public Library, 8:30
a.m.
Storytime: Stories, songs, rhymes,
fingerplays and movement for
children 18 months and up. All
children must be accompanied by
an adult. Princeton Public
Library, 10 a.m.
Ask the Mac Pros: Drop by these
sessions where members of the
Princeton Macintosh User Groups
will answer your questions about
Apple devices and software.
Princeton Public Library, 10 a.m. noon.
Film and Discussion: “All the Difference.” The struggles of young
African-American men are examined through the story of two
high school students from Chicago’s South Side. The film documents five years of hard work,
sacrifice, setbacks and uncertain-

ty as the two young men pursue
their goals of graduating high
school and college. Princeton
Public Library, 6:30 p.m.
Citizen Preparation Class: This
series of six classes is offered by
the Latin American Task Force to
assist those who are preparing
for the U.S. Citizenship Test.
Classes include history, civics and
a review of basic English necessary for the citizenship interview.
Continues Nov. 2, 9 and 16. Nassau Presbyterian Church, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY OCT. 27
Princeton Farmers Market: Seasonal produce from local farmers,
flowers, crafts and a variety of
edibles are available through 4
p.m. at this weekly event. Live
music from 12:30-2:30 p.m. Hinds
Plaza, 11 a.m.
Homework Help: Princeton University students provide after-school
homework help in all subjects to
students in elementary through
high school. Registration is not
required.
Princeton
Public
Library, 3 – 6 p.m.

WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 145 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Or by email: news@theprinceton
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.theprincetonsun.com).
Writing Workshop: Writers who are
working on book-length work are
invited to the Writing Workshop
to receive helpful, constructive
critique aimed from peers. The
group is designed so that writers
can help other writers of fiction
and book-length non-fiction to
strengthen characters and story
structure. Princeton Public
Library, 7 – 9 p.m.
Board of Education Candidate
Forum: Board candidate forum
with focus on special education in
Princeton Schools. John Witherspoon Middle School, ACC Room,
7 p.m.

FRIDAY OCT. 28
Meet the Mayor: Princeton residents are invited to discuss concerns with Mayor Liz Lempert.
Hinds Plaza or public library café,
8:30 – 9 a.m.
PSG Job Seekers: What to do, when
you can’t do, what you used to
do? David Schuchman will give a
presentation. If there is a gap
between the skills you expect to
bring to your next employer and
the skills your next employer and
the market place may really
need, it may be time to closely
evaluate your job search strategy.

OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016
Princeton Public Library, 9:45
a.m.
Annual Hometown Halloween
Parade: All are invited to dress in
their best costumes to join the
Arts Council of Princeton for the
Annual Hometown Halloween
Parade. The parade will start on
Palmer Square Green at 5 p.m.
and make its way through downtown Princeton, ending at the
Princeton Family YMCA. Fall festivities will continue at the YMCA
with “Trunk or Treat,” bounce
houses and family-friendly crafts.
This event is free and open to the
public.

SATURDAY OCT. 29
Fall Festival Weekends: Last weekend of Fall Family Weekends. $8,
ages 3 and older. Terhune
Orchards, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Meditation, Kirtan, Bhakti yoga,
Bhagavad-gita - Hidden Treasure of the Sweet Absolute: Enjoy
a discussion, meditation and Indiplease see CALENDAR, page 12

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Princeton Sun
10 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

Princeton Senior Resource Center ping pong
group takes medals in state Senior Olympics

NATASHA PAREMSKI, piano

Classical Series

IMPASSIONED RUSSIA
Sunday November 6
Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University
3pm Pre-Concert Talk / 4pm Concert
JAYCE OGREN, conductor
NATASHA PAREMSKI, piano

ROSSEN MILANOV
Music Director

PROKOFIEV / Piano Concerto No 3 in C Major, Op. 26
TCHAIKOVSKY / Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74 “Pathétique”

princetonsymphony.org or 609 / 497-0020
Dates, times, artists, and programs subject to change.
This program is funded in part by the NJ State Council on the Arts/Department
of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Princeton Senior Resource
Center players excelled again at
the 2016 NJ Senior Olympics table
tennis event, held Sept. 10 in
Woodside. Thrice weekly, for the
better part of the day, PSRC is
home turf for a multicultural
score of serious “pongers,” who
enliven the gym in the Suzanne
Patterson Building with enthusiastic, energetic play. Many of
those took home medals at the
event in Woodside.
In women's singles, Susan Bu
and Cally Hanawalt won gold
medals in their respective age
groups. In men's singles, George
Sheng, Takeshi Kitagawa and
Huasheng Jiang won gold in their
respective age groups. Ray Woodfield won silver and Henry Acselrod bronze in their respective
groups.
In doubles, PSRC teams swept
all categories! In the women's doubles category, Bu and Tak Yue won

Special to The Sun

From left are medalists Johnny Ho, George Sheng, Cally Hanawalt,
Ray Woodfield, Susan Bu, Henry Acselrod, Tak Yue, Takeshi Kitagawa, Caesar Primus and Huasheng Jiang.
gold medals in their age group,
and Hanawalt teamed with Joann
Spring of Tom's River, to win gold
in hers. In men's doubles, Johnny
Ho and Kitagawa, Sheng and
Woodfield, and Acselrod and Caesar Primus all won gold medals in
their respective age groups.
In mixed doubles, Bu and Ho,

Hanawalt and Sheng, and Yue and
Primus all took home the gold.
Other PSRC regulars Elena
Greene, Laura Hawkins, Sam Voleti, and Ali Zomorodi, along with
Caesar's wife Marci and former
PSRC player Ajay Sardar and his
family, were there to cheer from
the stands.

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OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 11

PSO to present
‘Rumor and Misnomer’
On Nov. 2 at 7 p.m., in partnership with the Princeton Public Library, the Princeton Symphony
Orchestra presents a discussion
of Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony with PSO guest conductor
Jayce Ogren in the library’s Community Room. Ogren offers insights into conducting the symphony and touches upon the controversial interpretations surrounding its nickname – “Pathétique.”
Ogren received a master’s degree in conducting from the New
England Conservatory. With a
Fulbright Grant, he completed a
postgraduate diploma at the
Royal College of Music in Stockholm where he studied with the
legendary Jorma Panula. He was
assistant conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra under Franz
Welser-Möst and music director
of New York City Opera where he

led Britten's “Turn of the Screw,”
Rossini's “Mosé in Egitto,” and
the much-acclaimed production
of Leonard Bernstein's “A Quiet
Place.” He is currently artistic director of Orchestra 2001 in
Philadelphia.
Soundtracks is free and open to
the public; refreshments will be
served.
Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony will be performed at the orchestra’s Nov. 6 “Impassioned
Russia” concert at Richardson
Auditorium under the direction
of Jayce Ogren; tickets available
at princetonsymphony.org.
Find the PSO online at
www.princetonsymphony.org; on
facebook
at
www.facebook.com/princetonsymphony;
on
Twitter
at
www.twitter.com/psomusic and
on flickr at www.flickr.com/photos/princetonsymphony.

Tommy Hilfiger to speak Nov. 2
The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce is proud to host
internationally known fashion
designer Tommy Hilfiger on Nov.
2 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the
Hyatt Regency Princeton. The
event will feature a VIP reception, networking, book signing
and presentation by Hilfiger.
Hilfiger is known for classic,
all-American style that melds pop
culture and the preppy, East
Coast lifestyle. Raised in Elmira,
NY, the second of nine children,
he opened a clothing store with
$150 in 1969 while still in high
school. Hilfiger launched his
namesake fashion label in 1985,
and the brand quickly expanded
to include womenswear, Hilfiger
Denim, kidswear, accessories, fragrance, and home, among other
categories. In the 1990s, he was
one of the first designers to blend
fashion and celebrity, sponsoring
tours for rock legends such as
The Rolling Stones and featuring
musicians such as Lenny Kravitz,
David Bowie and Beyoncé in his
iconic advertising campaigns.
Included in the evening event
ticket is a copy of Hilfiger’s new

book, “American Dreamer: My
Life in Fashion & Business.” In
this tale of grit and glamor, setbacks and comebacks, business
and pop culture icon Hilfiger
shares his life story for the first
time. Few designers have stayed
on top of changing trends the way
Hilfiger has and fewer still have
left such an indelible mark on
global culture.
To this day, Hilfiger’s approach
to commerce is rooted in his positive view of the world. His novel
is the story of a true American
original, told for the first time in
his own words and style that
proves sometimes you have to
dream big to make it big.
Tickets for “An Evening with
Tommy Hilfiger” include Hilfiger’s book, “American Dreamer:
My Life in Fashion & Business”
and a book signing directly following the presentation.
Tickets are $45. Sponsorship
packages are also available for
this event. For more information,
contact Alice Barfield at (609) 9241776, alice@princetonchamber.
org or visit www.princetonchamber.org.

12 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
an vegetarian luncheon at the
institute of spiritual culture and
science. Every Saturday. Register
by email: Princeton@bviscs.org.
Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau St. #116, 2 p.m.

SUNDAY OCT. 30
“Lord Nelson Mass:” Princeton Pro

Your Dog

In A Loving Home…
NOT A KENNEL!

Musica opens its season with
Director Ryan Brandau’s production of Haydn’s “Lord Nelson
Mass.” The concert begins at 4
p.m., and ticketholders are welcome at a pre-concert lecture at
3 p.m. Tickets are $25-$60 and
may be ordered by calling (609)
683-5122, or at www.princetonpromusica.org.

MONDAY OCT. 31
Letra Pequeña: Through engagement with books, activities and
crafts, these sessions are
designed to help children and
adults improve Spanish language
skills. Sessions are conducted in
Spanish and are intended for parents/caregivers to attend with
babies and toddlers. Princeton

Call Steven:
856-356-2775

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Free Computer Equipment Recycling (CRT Monitors Excluded)

TUESDAY NOV. 1
Chess: Children can learn to play
and practice chess at these weekly drop-in sessions led by Princeton High School Chess Club members. Princeton Public Library, 4
p.m.
"Reading Reality: Developing
Racial Literacy for the 21st
Century:" Ruha Benjamin, assistant professor in the Department
of African American Studies at
Princeton University, leads this
workshop that concludes the
library’s five-part series on racial
literacy. PPL Community Room,
6:30 p.m.

BOE candidate
forum Oct. 27

www.
OUR HOME
DOG BOARDING.com

Email us at news@theprincetonsun.com

Public Library, 11 a.m.
Mic Monday: Enjoy a cup of coffee
and some tunes for Small World’s
open mic night. Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon St., 7-9 p.m.

609.681.1120 

5W‡6NLOOPDQ

A Board of Education candidate forum, with a focus on special education in the Princeton
Public Schools, will be held from
7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27,
at John Witherspoon Middle
School, ACC room.
The Special Education PTO is a
district-wide organization serving all classified students from
preschool through high school.
Our goals are to build community,
enhance communication and bolster collaboration among families
of children with special educational needs, other district parent
organizations,
teachers,
the
Princeton School Board, Princeton school leadership, and the
Princeton Special Services team.
We focus on the needs of parents,
students and community members who have an interest in advocating for and supporting differently abled, creative student
learners. All families of students
receiving special education services are automatically members
of the Special Education PTO, as
well as the General Education
PTO of their student’s school.
For more information, email
specialedpto@gmail.com or visit
www.princetonk12.org/PTO/Special_ed.

OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 13

MEET THE

CANDIDATES
Every week, The Sun will ask the candidates in the Nov. 8 election
for mayor to respond to questions pertinent to local issues.
You can find responses online at www.theprincetonsun.com.
This week’s question: Make your final pitch.
Why should you be elected as Mayor of Princeton?
I ran for mayor four
ing the historic imporyears ago, and am runtance of our older
ning for re-election
neighborhoods,
and
now because I believe
creating a welcoming
that municipal governcommunity for all.
ment has an important
We must also work
role to play in shaping
toward sustainability –
our community, and in
by being good stewards
planning for the kind
of our open space; creof future we want to
ating a safe transportabuild together.
tion network for those
LIZ LEMPERT
I believe as a govwho either can’t or
ernment we are oblidon’t drive; and protectgated to do more with less. With ing the character and scale of
consolidation, we operate more our neighborhoods and the viefficiently and cost-effectively brancy of our downtown.
than before. We need to continI approach all of these chalue to look for efficiencies so we lenges with an attitude of optican keep costs down while pro- mism that we as a community
viding the excellent services can pull together the smartest,
our residents expect.
most creative minds to preI also believe government serve what is exemplary about
has a responsibility to lift all our town, while forging a fuboats, and to think not just for ture for Princeton that is more
ourselves, but also for future sustainable, inclusive and hugenerations. That means doing mane.
our fair share when it comes to
Princeton is a unique comaffordable housing, recogniz- munity but many of the chal-

lenges we face are not particularly unique to Princeton and
are things that other communities are grappling with as well.
Princeton has the advantage of
having incredible talent and a
tradition of volunteerism and
engagement.
I believe working together
we can be strategic, thoughtful,
and even transformative in approaching these challenges together.
If you have concerns or suggestions, you can reach me
through my website, lizlempert.com, or come to my Meet
the Mayor office hours at the
public library. I’ll be holding
my next session Oct. 28 from
8:30 to 10 a.m.
Thank you for electing me
four years ago. I hope to continue the work we started. This is
an important election from the
presidential race on down, and
I ask for your vote on Tuesday,
Nov. 8.

One-party rule has
left us in thrall to an
ideology. We have serious problems, problems that we can no
longer afford to ignore.
But ignore them we do,
usually because the solutions are unfashionable.
My particular aptitude is problem solving. I have no interest

PETER MARKS

in higher office. I am
not wedded to an ideology. Two objectives
will receive my focus:
protecting our existing residents and preventing the transformation of our distinctive little town into another of the edgeless,
urban blobs that blight
so much of our lovely
country.

Don’t forget to vote
on Tuesday, Nov. 8!

We Tweet!
See all candidate responses online
at www.theprincetonsun.com.

14 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016

CANDIDATES

MEET
THE
BOE

Every week, The Sun will ask the candidates in the Nov. 8 election for the
Princeton Board of Education to respond to questions pertinent to local issues.
You can find responses online at www.theprincetonsun.com.
This week’s question: Make your final pitch. Why should you be elected
to the Princeton Board of Education?
As a member of the Board of Education, I will ensure we continue our excellent educational system here in Princeton. My personal and professional experiences qualify me to help move Princeton
Public Schools into the future, but still
staying true to our community and ourselves. My personal experience is as a parent of two sons who attended the Princeton Public Schools starting in LB, JW and
then to PHS. One son graduated in 2015,
and the other is currently a junior. My
children have received an excellent education, and I want this to continue to be
available for all families and children in
Princeton.
I have been involved in the schools
since they entered LB, volunteering on
the LB PTO, as room parent, library aid,
book fair at JW, Super Saturday, home-

coming and with the Band Parent
sionally and non-professionally. I
PTO. These experiences have
will bring these skills with me to
given me the opportunity to meet
the Board of Education. I look
many parents and share in what
forward to working with the curit means to be part of a communirent board members and to conty.
tinue the work they are doing, but
Professionally, I bring to the
I will also be asking the hard
table 20 years working in corpoquestions to ensure we are transrate America and for the last 10
parent to the community and
years in the non-profit sector.
working within the district’s reBoth have prepared me to work
sources, including the budget,
with all types of individuals. I DEBBIE BRONFELD staff and facilities.
have a degree in accounting and
I have been on a listening tour
an MBA with a concentration in
meeting with members of our
operations and logistics.
community and hearing what their
One of the most important skills I have thoughts are about Princeton Public
developed from my experiences is the abil- Schools. I look forward to being a repreity to listen to others and appreciate sentative of my community members. I
points of view that differ from mine. I want to continue to communicate with
have worked on many teams both profes- the community and to make sure they

I have been in
mary reason for runPrinceton for nearly
ning for the Prince10 years, and by 2021
ton Board of EducaI will have had four
tion is because I
children go through
think we have an opthe school system
portunity to do betand graduate from
ter. I have a track
Princeton
High
record of driving
School. Our dinner
positive change in
conversations
various institutions
(when not confor nearly 30 years.
ALEX MARTIN
sumed by politics)
Change is never easy,
are often about
but persistence and
what we see as working well resilience matter. I have no
with
Princeton
Public other agenda than to work to
Schools, and what we think make the school system the
could be improved. My pri- best it can be.

have a place to voice their opinions about
the BOE and our schools.
I also want our students to be able to
voice their opinions too. We need to accommodate the needs of our students and
hear what is troubling them. This might
be easier at PHS, where we could set up
online questionnaires that the students
could anonymously answer with their
phones. We could install feedback boxes
throughout the schools where students
can give feedback on issues they like or
that bother them. At JW, I’d like to hear if
the students are looking for more clubs, or
sport opportunities, or music and drama
opportunities. We need to focus on the students, and find out what makes them tick
and what they want to be part of, so they
can feel connected to their schools and
peers and teachers and communities.

OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 15

I am asking for your vote on Nov. 8. I
do so in the belief that I offer a combination of management experience, academic skills and passionate support for public
education that will enable me to serve as
a strong representative for you on the
Princeton Board of Education.
I have master’s and doctorate degrees
in public policy, and have worked in the
largest school district in our country, as
well as for a national educational foundation focused on at-risk and minority
youth. I have served the state of New Jersey, focusing on fiscal and budgetary issues, and, as COO, have helped manage a
nonprofit institution with $400 million in
assets, financing affordable housing and
community facilities in low-income
neighborhoods throughout our state. I
want to use my background and experience on behalf of the community that my

family and I have called home for
current superintendent and
these past 12 years.
board’s efforts to nurture all the
I feel privileged to be able to
qualities that make each of our
send our child to the Princeton
children unique.
Public Schools. I am proud of
We also need to identify how
the fact that our schools are so
best to expand the capacity of
inclusive, with a team of teachour school system, so that we can
ers and administrators who
continue to serve the larger numwork hard each and every day to
ber of students who are now encontinue to close opportunity
tering our school doors. We can
gaps. These professionals strive
welcome them as we have welto make sure that each of our GREG STANKIEWICZ comed previous generations of
children are given the attention
students, by rationally planning
and services necessary to help
how best to use existing space
them best fulfill their potential and and identifying the most effective and
achieve their dreams.
fair ways to finance any additional capacWe as a community face important de- ity that we may need to add. At the same
cisions. I believe we must work to protect time, we must ensure that any long-term
our children from being judged merely by financing is structured so as to minimize
how high they may have scored on stan- the impact on current residents, and that
dardized tests, and instead build on the any financial impact is fairly shared

among current and future generations. I
believe that my background can help the
board and superintendent identify the
best way to proceed, and then help gain
your assent – as residents and taxpayers –
so that we as a community can move forward.
Most fundamentally, I passionately believe in the concept of public schools: I
pledge to protect the schools that we have
here in Princeton, but also help highlight
the strength of our schools as a model for
other districts in New Jersey and nationally. To do so, I promise to uphold the
democratic tradition of local control and
to be transparent in my decisions, as I
strive to best serve as your representative
on the Princeton Board of Education. If
you agree, please honor me with one of
your three votes when you go to the polls
on Nov. 8.

My motivation to join the Princeton
Board of Education is driven by two big
issues: academic integrity and fiscal balance. Over the years, I have heard too
many parents complain about two problems related to our schools. They complain about cheating in the high school
and needing to move out of town once
the last child has graduated from high
school because of the property taxes. I
believe these are both part of larger
problems.
On academic integrity, our kids are in
an overly competitive environment to get
into a small subset of good colleges. Failure to get into one of these few colleges
equates to failure. Even parents can fall
into this way of thinking, or, as I like to
term it, “drink the Princeton Kool-Aid.”
While I’ve found myself too often raising
that cup of Kool-Aid for a swig, I believe
our kids can do better. This level of competition and the fear of failure leads kids
to take academic short cuts. An April article in the Tower reports the result of a

survey of 340 PHS students on
tegrity.
their perception of cheating.
Perhaps more necessary is
Some notable numbers: 59.7 perchanging the culture. After
cent of students answered PHS
much consideration, I believe
students cheat “often” or “alSuperintendent
Steve
ways,” 36.6 percent answered
Cochrane’s efforts to promote
PHS students cheat “sometimes”
wellness of the students are necand 3.7% PHS students “never”
essary and should have a posicheat.
tive impact the culture at PHS.
I don’t bring up this article to
If we move away from the AP
judge the students but to ask why
arms race and focus instead on
BILL HARE
we have these numbers.
I
permitting our kids to learn,
haven’t met a PHS student who
and enjoy learning, in a less
didn’t impress me in one way or
stressful environment, they will
another, so why do we have these num- still achieve the same, great futures, but
bers? Some easy answers are that not all they might actually get their happily
students know what may or may not be with their integrity intact.
considered cheating, some teachers may
On the subject of fiscal balance, about
not take enough efforts to stop cheating, half of our property taxes go to the
and some parents may not support the schools. I don’t propose to join the school
teacher if it is their child who gets board and drop property taxes – unfortucaught. These can be addressed by mak- nately that isn’t realistic. Instead, I
ing clear to students what is and isn’t would like to control how property taxes
permitted and asking that parents sup- grow by controlling enrollment growth.
port teachers’ demand for academic in- Superintendent Cochrane reported in

September that about 160 more students
had enrolled in the schools than last year
with more than 100 students coming
from AvalonBay, Merwick-Stanworth
and Copperwood – and AvalonBay and
Merwick-Stanworth are still being built.
A few weeks later, that number had increased to 200 students more than last
year. A reasonable assumption is that in
this school year we will hit 300 students
more than last year.
If on the board, I would ensure Princeton’s elected officials clearly recognize
the fiscal impact of new developments
on schools and property taxes. Assuming
each new housing unit will have at least
one child enrolling in the schools, and
the average cost for each student will be
the current $23,000, I would seek to convince our elected officials to approve developments thoughtfully and infrequently. I also would work with our elected officials on shared services as a means to
reduce costs for both the town and
schools.

Name: ___________________________________________
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COLORING CONTEST

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HALLOWEEN
COLORING CONTEST RULES:
Must be original form. Only one
entry per person. Coloring must
be done by using colored pencils,
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must be received by 5 p.m. on
November 4, 2016, and cannot be
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OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 17

LETICIA FRAGA/Speical to The Sun

Leticia Fraga’s children, Benjamin and Sofia Nadler, dress up as Calacas on Halloween last year.

Mexican holiday
to be celebrated Nov. 5
MEXICAN
Continued from page 1
They usually honor famous public figures. I would like to one day
coordinate something similar
here in Princeton. We could have
displays throughout the community hosted by various organizations, and could both honor historical and local public figures,
plus also be a teaching moment.”
In light of El Día de los Muertos, the Arts Council of Princeton, Princeton Shopping Center,
Edens and Mi Pueblo Lindo will
again be hosting an event for
Princetonians of all ages to enjoy
the Mexican holiday and learn

about something besides Halloween. The fiesta will provide
many traditional activities, such
as strolling mariachis, sugar
skull decorating, face painting,
live dance performances, as well
as food and drink available for
purchase by Aurelio’s Cocina
Latina.
The festivities will take place at
the Princeton Shopping Center
from 3-5 p.m. on Nov. 5. The event
is free and welcomes all who wish
to attend.
“Because Dia de Los Muertos
and Halloween are so close together, our celebrations tend to
blend together now,” Fraga said.
“We Mexicans believe that every
soul should be remembered as a
happy one.”

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OCT. 26-NOV. 1, 2016 – THE PRINCETON SUN 19

ERICA CHAYES WIDA/The Sun

Annie Dykstra, left, and Hanako Moulton narrate the play.

Play is Nov. 4 and 5
PLAY
Continued from page 1

child’s piece, but this has themes
that carry weight with adults. It
deals with death and rebirth. It’s
not fluffy material.”
At first call of auditions, Spector noticed many of the young actors were reluctant about engaging in a show they felt was for
young children, especially after
last year’s fall drama, “I Never
Saw Another Butterfly,” about the
Holocaust.
“It was after the first reading
that many of the kids noticed this
is really an allegory for real issues and that it’s cool to bring
these issues to life,” said Amy
Troxel, choir director and “Charlotte’s Web” co-director.
“When I first started at JW, the
school didn’t have a fall play, only
a spring musical. The first one we
did was two years ago and was really low budget. All the costumes
were homemade. We started from
nothing,” eighth-grader Hanako
Moulton said. “Last year, when
we did the show about the Holocaust, I saw the drama club grow
up. Now, we have a beautiful set,
rented costumes. We transformed
something small to something
massive. It’s great to see.”
Thomas Gatzke, eighth grade,

plays Wilbur, and is enjoying taking on the role.
“For one thing, I get to be on
stage a lot. I love getting to see
everything come together,” he
said. “It’s a fun role to paly – an
innocent little pig who then transitions into someone who is mature and understands more about
the world.”
Eabha Ni Lionaird, an eighth
grader who moved from Ireland
at the start of the school year, was
cast in her first big role on stage
as Charlotte.
“I’ve always liked the theater,”
Ni Lionaird said. “I used to be in a
drama club back in Ireland but I
was the only girl. This is really
exciting for me.”
Emma McMahon, also in
eighth grade, began her theater
involvement during summer
camp at McCarter Theatre and
has since then been in love. She
plays Edith Zuckerman and,
while her time on stage is limited,
the comedy and “sass” she gets to
create with her lines makes it a
wonderful role.
“There is a lot of great chemistry on stage,” said Julio Troilo,
who plays the farmhand, Lurvy,
who first discovers the words in
the web, “Some Pig.”
The production of JW’s “Charlotte’s Web” will be on stage Nov.
4 and 5 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10
for adults and $5 for students and
will be sold at the door.

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