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Friday | October 28, 2016

Online fund-raising booms in Golden Triangle
GoFundMe campaigns in area have produced
$614,000 in area donations
BY SLIM SMITH
ssmith@cdispatch.com

The phone rang at Ellen Gregory’s home at
10:30 on the night of July
13, 2015. It was a call from
a friend in Alabama, who
urgently needed her help.
Gregory owns New

Prospect Farm, a hunter/
jumper training facility
in New Hope. In addition
to her work as a trainer,
Gregory also has a history of rescuing maltreated
horses.
That was the reason
her friend was calling.
“She said the police in

INSIDE

GoFundMe Stats Since 2010

n OUR VIEW:
Mississippians’ generoson display
Livingston, ity
yet again
A labama,
PAGE 6A

had
just
seized two
horses in an animal cruelty case and they were
desperate to find someone
to take them in” Gregory
said. “So I said, ‘OK, bring
them over.’”

Campaigns

Donations

Funds Raised

17,000

195,000

$12.3 million

Mississippi

Golden Triangle 670 9,500 $614,000
Source: GoFundMe

They arrived at 1:30
a.m., but it wasn’t until
daybreak that Gregory realized just how grave the

situation was for the two
horses, which she named
Thetis and Achilles.
“They were virtually

starving and in real bad
shape,” she said.
She summoned her
See GOFUNDME, 8A

Bomb threat
cleared at
Columbus High

HANGIN’ AROUND

Students were evacuated
to football stadium
BY ALEX HOLLOWAY
aholloway@cdispatch.com

Deanna Robinson/Dispatch Staff

Christian Latham, 6, of Columbus, hangs on the monkey bars at Propst Park Thursday afternoon. Christian’s parents are
Elishawan Young and Shanequa Latham. He visits the park every week.

Supreme Court candidates talk to Exchange Club
BY ALEX HOLLOWAY
aholloway@cidpatch.com

Four candidates vying to represent Mississippi’s northern district
on the state Supreme Court made
their pitches to the Columbus Exchange Club on Thursday.
John Brady, Bobby Chamberlin,
Steve Crampton and Jim Kitchens
are competing for Ann Lamar’s seat
on the court. Lamar announced
early this year that she will not seek
another term on the court.
The northern district covers 33
See SUPREME COURT, 3A

Deanna Robinson/Dispatch Staff

Ann Marie Langford leads a question-and-answer session with Mississippi Supreme
Court candidates Bobby Chamberlin, Jim Kitchens, Steve Crampton and John Brady
during Exchange Club at Lion Hills in Columbus Thursday afternoon.

A bomb threat Thursday caused Columbus
High School students
and staff to evacuate.
City Assistant Police
Chief Fred Shelton said
a thorough inspection of
the campus yielded no
Hickman
explosives, and authorities issued an all-clear at
about 3 p.m.
Columbus Municipal
School District Superintendent Philip Hickman
said a stranger called
the threat into the school
office at about noon. CoShelton
lumbus police and firefighters responded moments later.
Four police dogs — two from Lowndes County Sheriff’s Department and
two from Columbus Air Force Base —
also responded to the scene, Shelton
said, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation assisted.
“We evacuated the students to the
football stadium, which is a secure location,” Hickman told The Dispatch. “We
were able to feed them there because
this happened during our lunch hour.
The students were well-behaved. Our
evacuation plan panned out very well.”
Hickman said the district alerted
parents of the situation via phone and
email, and requested that no students
See BOMB, 8A

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Miss MSU turns personal battle
into opportunity for advocacy
Itawamba Community College. She’d
been active in the Miss America
program all through her teen years
and was drum major for the college’s
marching band.
She also had to get tested for the
mutated gene BRCA1, which greatly
increased the chances of getting
breast cancer and which runs in her
family.
See MAY, 8A

BY ISABELLE ALTMAN
ialtman@cdispatch.com

Editor’s note: This article concludes
our Breast Cancer Awareness Month series.
When Molly May was 19 years
old, she learned she was almost
guaranteed to develop breast cancer
in the next two to five years.
At the time, May was a freshman at

WEATHER

Erin Bolen
Third grade, West Lowndes

High

87 Low 54

FIVE QUESTIONS

CALENDAR

1 Who was the first Czar of Russia?
2 What was the name of the orangutan in “Every Which Way but Loose?”
3 What book tells the story of the five
factions, Abnegation, Amity, Candor,
Dauntless and Erudite?
4 Which U.S. Constitutional Amendment granted women the right to
vote?
5 Which country is known as the
“Land of White Elephant?”

Through Monday

Answers, 9B

Sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.

INSIDE
137th Year, No. 195

Classifieds 8B
Comics 7B
Crossword 9B
Dear Abby 7B

Miss MSU Molly
May, a 22-yearold Mississippi
State University
senior, is the
youngest person
in the state to
have received a
double mastectomy. Post-surgery, her chances of developing
breast cancer
have dropped
dramatically.

Obituaries 4A
Opinions 6A
Religion 7A

Russ Houston/MSU
Public Affairs

LOCAL FOLKS

■ CPD Haunted House: This fundraiser
is hosted by the Columbus Police Department. Enjoy barbecue, face painting and
music at Trotter Convention Center, 6
p.m.; wristbands for the haunted house
may be purchased at event. Kids can
trunk-or-treat outside Trotter. $10 adults;
$5 children. For more information, rsanders@columbusms.org or 662-251-7355.

Today

■ Andrew Duhon Trio: The Columbus
Arts Council presents the Andrew Duhon
Trio of New Orleans at 7:30 p.m. in the
Rosenzweig Arts Center Omnova Theatre,
501 Main St. Tickets $10 advance;
$12 at the door. Call 662-328-2787 or
visit columbus-arts.org for tickets or
information.

Star Walton is an MUW
nursing major.

DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471

PUBLIC MEETINGS
Oct. 31: Lowndes County
Board of Supervisors, Lowndes County Courthouse, 9
a.m.
Nov. 1: Columbus City
Council, Municipal Complex,
5 p.m.
Nov. 7: Lowndes County
Board of Supervisors, Lowndes County Courthouse, 9
a.m.
Nov. 14: Columbus Municipal School District Board of
Trustees, Brandon Central
Services Center, 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 14: Lowndes County
School District Board of
Trustees, West Lowndes
High School, 5:30 p.m.

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

2A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

Friday

DID YOU HEAR?

Real-life angry
birds: Town tries
to rein in rowdy
turkeys

A Thousand Words

Turkeys have harassed residents
It also called for an ordinance prohibiting people
from feeding the turkeys.
Davis residents are fond
of urban wildlife. They
built a tunnel for toads and
protected jackrabbits from
construction, but the wellknown turkeys wandering
the streets are too much.
Police Chief Darren
Pytel says his department
has fielded calls from people accosted by turkeys,
including a man who was
pinned against the wall of
a bank by a bird.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAVIS, Calif. — Leaders of a California college
town are working to relocate turkeys that have
been harassing people on
the streets.
The Sacramento Bee
reports that the Davis City
Council voted this week to
approve a wild turkey management plan that includes
trapping and relocating
many of the birds and
possibly killing some of
the more aggressive ones.

Cheap thrills.
Go for a walk.

Deanna Robinson/Dispatch Staff

Sherrece Lacy, of Columbus, participates in the fashion gala during the 43rd Annual Celebration and Scholarship Banquet at the R.E. Hunt Center Thursday night.

Office hours:
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Robert E. Lee’s Gettysburg
headquarters gets $6M facelift

Report a sports score?
n 662-241-5000

BY MICHAEL RUBINKAM
The Associated Press

Submit a calendar item?
n Go to www.cdispatch.com/
community

Over the decades,
the stone house and
grounds that ser ved
as Confederate Gen.
Robert E. Lee’s headquarters
at
Gettysburg sprouted a motel,
restaurant and other
modern structures that
dismayed preser vationists and Civil War buffs
keen on historic authenticity.
Now, after a $6 million restoration that
erased decades of development at the 4-acre
site, the property looks
much as it did in July
1863, when Lee suffered
defeat in a bloody threeday battle that turned
the tide of the war.
“If Robert E. Lee
would ride up tomorrow, he would recognize his headquarters.
And for over 100 years
that wasn’t the case,”
said James Lighthizer,
president of Civil War
Trust, the nonprofit that
bought the house and
grounds from private
owners and completed
the restoration.
On Friday, more than
600 people are expect-

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Physical address: 516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39701
Mailing address: P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703-0511
Starkville Office: 101 S. Lafayette St. #16, Starkville, MS 39759

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The Commercial Dispatch (USPS 142-320)
Published daily except Saturday. Entered at the post office at Columbus, Mississippi.
Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, MS
POSTMASTER, Send address changes to:
The Commercial Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703
Published by Commercial Dispatch Publishing Company Inc.,
516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39703

FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

A star-studded sky

SUNDAY

Sunny

54°

88°

53°

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Plenty of sunshine

Plenty of sunshine

Plenty of sunshine

88°

88°

87°

53°

54°

55°

ALMANAC DATA
Columbus Thursday

TEMPERATURE
Thursday
Normal
Record

HIGH

LOW

85°
56°
73°
47°
88° (1963) 29° (1962)

PRECIPITATION (in inches)
Thursday
Month to date
Normal month to date
Year to date
Normal year to date

0.00
0.99
3.47
47.38
45.19

TOMBIGBEE RIVER STAGES
In feet as of
7 a.m. Thu.

Flood
Stage

Amory
Bigbee
Columbus
Fulton
Tupelo

20
14
15
20
21

24-hr.
Stage Chng.

11.64
3.57
4.28
7.56
1.01

+0.01
+0.01
-0.02
-0.02
-0.06

LAKE LEVELS
In feet as of
7 a.m. Thu.

Aberdeen Dam
Stennis Dam
Bevill Dam

24-hr.
Capacity Level Chng.

188
166
136

163.89 +0.08
136.29 +0.08
136.15 -0.01

SOLUNAR TABLE
The solunar period indicates peak feeding times for
fish and game.

Major Minor Major Minor

Fri.
Sat.

11:31a 5:21a 11:53p 5:42p
12:13p 6:02a
---- 6:24p

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016

Shown are tomorrow’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Showers

-10s

T-Storms

-0s

City
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Honolulu
Jacksonville
Memphis

Rain

0s

Flurries

10s

20s

SAT
Hi/Lo/W
86/61/s
57/51/c
73/49/pc
87/67/s
84/74/sh
82/60/s
86/62/s

Snow

30s

Ice

40s

SUN
Hi/Lo/W
86/59/s
61/42/c
58/45/c
88/65/s
85/74/pc
83/56/s
85/62/s

Cold

50s

60s

Warm

70s

City
Nashville
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
Seattle

Jetstream

Stationary

80s

90s

SAT
Hi/Lo/W
86/60/s
86/66/pc
72/57/pc
94/68/s
77/56/s
70/57/pc
57/45/sh

100s

110s

SUN
Hi/Lo/W
86/58/s
86/64/pc
76/46/sh
93/66/pc
84/58/s
70/46/t
55/45/pc

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

SUN AND MOON
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset

FRI

SAT

7:10 a.m.
6:05 p.m.
5:11 a.m.
5:17 p.m.

7:10 a.m.
6:04 p.m.
6:05 a.m.
5:49 p.m.

MOON PHASES
NEW

FIRST

FULL

LAST

Oct 30

Nov 7

Nov 14

Nov 21

Wikimedia Commons
This postcard pictures Gen. Robert E. Lee’s headquarters in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The historic site is undergoing a $6 million renovation.

ed at a ribbon-cutting
ceremony at the site,
which now includes a
walking trail and interpretive signage. Plans
call for the property to
be turned over to the
National Park Ser vice.
The area around the
circa-1830s house was
the scene of heavy fighting on the battle’s first
day, and its strategic
location atop Seminar y
Ridge made it an ideal
spot for Lee’s battlefield
headquarters.

“He’s dictating and
writing a lot of orders,
he’s using that as a base
from which to obser ve
the enemy, and he is responding to crises and
events as they occur,”
said Garr y Adelman,
Civil War Trust’s director of histor y and education.
The longtime occupant, a widow named
Mar y Thompson, is believed to have remained
in the home during the
battle, and lived there

until her death in 1873.
The home was left out
of Gettysburg National Militar y Park, then
gutted by fire in the late
1890s. By 1921, it had
become General Lee’s
Headquarters Museum,
a commercial venture
that transformed the
surrounding property.
“Without
question,
this was one of the most
important
unprotected historic buildings in
America,”
Lighthizer
said.

MSU SPORTS BLOG

Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports

@

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

3A

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Burn ban to impact Mississippi State tailgating
Charcoal grills prohibited
Saturday; gas grills allowed
BY JOSHUA STARR
jstarr@cdispatch.com

Mississippi State University
announced Wednesday it will
strictly enforce active Oktibbeha County burn bans on campus
during tailgating for the homecoming football game against
Samford.
Oktibbeha County is included in the 52-county partial state
burn ban issued by Gov. Phil
Bryant and the Mississippi Forestry Commission. Additionally, a county-level ban the board
of supervisors issued is in effect
until Nov. 2. Dry weather conditions have compelled a total of
67 counties to issue burn bans
currently active in the state.
MSU Chief Communications

Officer Sid Salter
said the university is heeding
direction by state Salter
and local fire
marshals with its enforcement
efforts. He said MSU police
will ensure prohibited cooking
and heating methods that produce coals and embers, such as
charcoal grills and fire pits, will
remain unlit during game day
activities.
“[Fans] are aware there’s a
drought, and they’re aware of
the ban. They will be voluntarily cooperative. Obviously, our
MSU [police] will endeavor to
make sure that those who may
not be aware of the ban are advised of that, and they’ll ask

them to comply,” Salter said.
“We’re working hard for this
game in particular to avoid open
flame or situations where there
are coals or embers that could
be dumped out.”
Salter said the ban on grilling
is not without exception, however. Gas grills will be permitted
due to the manageable and contained nature of their flames.
Starkville Fire Marshal Stein
McMullen agrees heightened
safety measures are appropriate
on campus Saturday.
“The issue we have with
charcoal grills is the way that
people dispose of charcoal,” McMullen said. “They either dump
it in flower beds, dump it in
dumpsters or stuff like that, and
we always end up having a [few]
fires every year related to them.
“With football and baseball
combined, it probably happens
four, five or six times a year,” he

added.
McMullen said due to
drought conditions, a fire resulting from improperly disposed
embers could cause significant
damage or injury because dry
conditions could help it spread
more quickly. He said though an
SFD fire truck will be on-site as
always in case of such an emergency, game day congestion
affects emergency response
times.
“If a fire were to start, by the
time we could actually get there
with a truck, there’s no telling
how big it would be or how much
it had spread,” McMullen said.
Delta State, Ole Miss and
Jackson State, the other Mississippi public universities under
burn bans with home games
Saturday, have not similarly
been advised by fire officials to
enforce the bans on game day,
according to representatives

from the universities.
“There’s two things that
makes the burn ban particularly relevant [to Mississippi State]
– the fact that we still do allow
open flame cooking and that we
have such a large campus,” Salter said. “There’s so many places that people tailgate over a
widespread area. Plus, because
of the size of the campus there
are more expanses of grass that
if we had a fire to get away from
us on campus, it would be pretty
significant.”
To inform the public, the
university published a release
announcing the enforcement
effort on its website, and further promoted the release on its
Facebook and Twitter pages.
Knowingly and willfully violating the ban is a misdemeanor
and carries a fine of up to $500.

Supreme Court
Continued from Page 1A

counties in Mississippi,
including Lowndes, Oktibbeha and Clay.
Exchange Club President-elect
Ann
Marie Langford said she
thought it was good to
have the candidates in —
especially all four at one
time to allow club members to ask questions and
hear responses from each
candidate.
“I work in the circuit
clerk’s office and we’re
doing absentee voting,”
Langford said. “When
people come in, they
know there’s the presidential election, but they’re
shocked to see there’s a
supreme court election,
an appellate court election and local election
commissioners.
“...So it is good to publicize that and make the
public aware that there’s
more candidates on the
ballot than just for President,” she added.

John Brady

Brady, of Columbus,
said he strongly believes
that the role of the court

is to interpret, not make,
laws.
“I want to see our state
progress, and I want to
see our citizens prosper,”
he said. “I think we need
conservative, Christian
leaders on the court who
will fairly apply the law of
the case to the facts of the
case and not try to legislate from the bench.”
Brady began practicing law in 1994 at a law
firm in Jackson. He’s
worked with Mitchell,
McNutt and Sams in Columbus since 2003.
He said in his 22 years
of law practice, he’s primarily worked on litigation defense. Brady has
defended law enforcement, government entities, large and small businesses and individuals.
He said he also has extensive appellate experience and has gone before
the Mississippi Supreme
Court and other appellate
courts many times.
Brady also touted his
endorsements by former
Mississippi Gov. Haley
Barbour and the Business
and Industry Political Ed-

ucation Committee (BIPEC).

Bobby Chamberlin

Chamberlin said he
has three beliefs about
what judges should stand
for.
He said he believes
judges should follow and
apply the law, rather than
make it. He said the the
Constitution says what it
says and it should be followed as such.
“It’s [the Constitution]
not, as they say, a living
document that can be
changed just to suit what’s
going on today,” Chamberlin said. “It’s served us
very well for many, many
years. I believe the people
who wrote that document
had divine guidance,
and if the people think
it needs to be changed,
there’s a process to do
that contained in our Constitution.”
Chamberlin
added
that, as a Christian, he
believes he should bring
his Christian values to the
court.
All of those, he said,

fall under what he called
an “overriding rule” for
courtrooms.
“Everyone is entitled
to a fair and level playing
field, and each and every
person who comes into
a courtroom should be
treated with the respect
and dignity they deserve,”
Chamberlin said. “It’s as
simple as that.”
Chamberlin is form
Hernando. He’s a judge in
Mississippi’s 17th Circuit
Court District, where he’s
served for 18 years. He’s
also served as a board
attorney for Coldwater, a
municipal prosecutor and
a senator in the Mississippi Legislature.

Steve Crampton

Crampton said he’s
running because he believes an expanded government threatens the
rights of ordinary civilians.
“The cold, hard truth
is the more there is of government, the less there
is of freedom,” Crampton
said. “It’s just the natural,
inevitable consequence

NEW ORLEANS — A
judge has ruled a group of
attorneys will divide $555.2
million for their work on behalf of people and businesses who suffered economic
damages because of BP’s
2010 Gulf oil spill.
U.S. District Judge Carl
Barbier (BAHR’-bee-aye)
of New Orleans issued a
42-page ruling spelling out
reasons for the award, the
result of work on a 2012
settlement that is expected
to account for at least $13
billion of the energy company’s spill-related costs.
Barbier’s Oct. 25 ruling
didn’t specify the number
of attorneys involved and
said the way in which the
money will be allocated will
be determined later.
He said the award,
which was requested by
the attorneys, amounts to
about 4.3 percent of the
settlement. He said that
is modest compared to
awards in similar cases.

More than a dozen apply
for Bay St Louis police
chief’s post

BAY ST. LOUIS, Miss.
— The deadline to apply for
the vacant Bay St. Louis police chief position is Friday.
Mayor Les Fillingame
says he’s already received
more than 20 applications
from people interested in
running the city’s police
force.
WLOX-TV reports once
the deadline closes, Fillingame will work with local
and state professionals to

Jim Kitchens

Kitchens, of Caledonia,
told the Exchange Club
he believes it’s vitally important to have judges on
the Supreme Court who
have trial court experience.

Kitchens worked as a
clerk for a former Chief
Justice Dan Lee on the
court from 1994-96. He
currently serves as a
judge in Mississippi’s 16th
Circuit Court District — a
position he’s held for 14
years. His past work also
includes experience as an
assistant district attorney
for former district attorney Forrest Allgood.
While Kitchens noted his belief that all four
candidates are good men,
he said that, unless he or
Chamberlin wins the seat,
the court will be without a
circuit judge.
“When I left the court
to come back home in ’96,
six of the nine judges on
the court had been trial
judges,” he said. “Now
there are two. Soon there
may only be one trial
judge on that court. Ann
Lamar is the only circuit
judge left on that court
and she’s retiring.
“I think you need a circuit judge on that court
who has tried a jury trial,
who’s tried a death penalty case,” he said.

Tell your child a bedtime story.

AROUND THE STATE

Attys in BP settlement
will divide $555.2MM

as our government continues to grow.”
Crampton is from Tupelo. He has more than 30
years of legal experience,
including corporate, civil
and criminal law on the
trial and appellate levels.
He noted he’s been
particularly involved in
defending the constitutional rights of Christians
across the country in
state and federal courts.
“We’re not really winning the war on religious
freedom,” he said. “In
fact, as we stand here today, our nation faces the
greatest threat to our religious beliefs that we’ve
ever faced. As our religious freedom goes, so go
the rest of our freedoms.
Even the freedom to vote,
I think, is ultimately at
risk.”

evaluate the resumes and
develop a list of finalists.
He hopes to interview
the top candidates by the
end of next week. Fillingame hopes he can recommend a candidate to the
Bay St. Louis City Council
by mid-November.
Recently, the council
began questioning whether the city’s police force
should be taken over by the
Hancock County Sheriff’s
Department. Last week,
council members heard a
presentation from the sheriff about what he could offer

and what it might cost.

Mother: Student ‘forced’
to stand for Pledge

GULFPORT, Miss. — A
mother says her son’s principal forced him to stand for
the Pledge of Allegiance,
threatening him with punishment if he didn’t comply.
The Sun Herald reports
the ninth-grader’s mother
says West Harrison High
School Principal Dana
Trochessett
threatened
her son with demerits and
suspension if he didn’t

stand for the pledge. She
says Trochessett also questioned the boy about being
a Jehovah’s Witness.
The mother says her son
hasn’t stood for the Pledge
since fourth grade. She met
Monday with the Harrison
County School Board.
Superintendent Roy Gill
says the district doesn’t
have any policy that forces
a student to stand during
the Pledge. He says the
matter was resolved, and
school officials could have
done a better job handling
the situation.

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

4A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

Early voting: More good signs for Clinton in key states
BY HOPE YEN
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The millions of votes that have been cast
already in the U.S. presidential
election point to an advantage

COMMERCIAL DISPATCH
OBITUARY POLICY
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service times, are provided
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obituaries with a photograph,
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may wish to include, are available for a fee. Obituaries must
be submitted through funeral
homes unless the deceased’s
body has been donated to
science. If the deceased’s
body was donated to science,
the family must provide official
proof of death. Please submit
all obituaries on the form
provided by The Commercial
Dispatch. Free notices must be
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no later than 3 p.m. the day
prior for publication Tuesday
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the next day Monday through
Thursday; and on Friday by 3
p.m. for Sunday and Monday
publication. For more information, call 662-328-2471.

Christine Forbes

WEST POINT —
Christine Shelton
Forbes, 65, died Oct.
24, 2016, at Jackson
Memorial Hospital in
Florida.
Services will be
at 11 a.m. Tuesday at
Mhoon Valley Baptist
Church with the Rev.
Ronnie Smith officiating. Burial will follow in
Siloam-Mhoon Valley
Cemetery. Visitation
will be from 2-5:30
p.m. Monday at Carter’s Mortuary Service
Chapel.
Mrs. Forbes was
born Sept. 25, 1951, to
the late Andrew Shelton
Sr. and Beatrice Quinn
Shelton. She was employed in food services.
She is survived by
her step-children,
Geronimo Forbes and
Jeremy Forbes; brother,
Andrew Shelton Jr.; and
sisters, Flossie Shelton,
Margaret Brooks, Barbara Walker, Bernice
Davidson and Doris
Smith.

Donald Bishop

COLUMBUS — Donald Bishop, 83, died
Oct. 27, 2016, at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lowndes
Funeral Home.

Wanda Cardullo

RIVER BEND, N.C.
— Wanda Matthews
Cardullo, 85, died
Sept. 30, 2016, at Pruitt
Health Center in New
Bern, North Carolina.
Memorial services
will be at 1 p.m. Sunday
at First United Methodist Church in Macon
with the Rev. Andy
Pearson officiating.
Mrs. Cardullo was
born Aug. 13, 1931, to
the late Carl W. Craig
and Vallie Jo Holstein
in Scooba. She was
previously employed as
a John Robert Powers
model and as the city
clerk in Macon. She was
a member of Centenary
Methodist Church, New
Bern Women’s Club,
Questers of Craven
County and the Daughters of the American
Revolution.
She is survived by
her son, Ryland Jr. of
River Bend; and two
grandsons.
Memorials may be
made to the Alzhei-

for Hillary Clinton in critical
battleground states, as well as
signs of strength in traditionally
Republican territory.
The strong early-voting turnout by those likely to support
Clinton — registered Demo-

crats, minorities, and young
people among others — could
leave Donald Trump with virtually no path to the 270 electoral
votes needed for victory.
Clinton is showing strength
in Florida and North Carolina,

both must-win states for Trump,
as well as the battleground
states of Nevada, Colorado and
Arizona. There are even favorable signs for Clinton in Republican-leaning Utah and Texas.
“It’s going to be a very tall or-

der for Trump to win,” said Michael McDonald, a University of
Florida professor who specializes in election turnout. Other
analysts also point to a strong
finish for Clinton based on the
early vote.

AREA OBITUARIES
mer’s Association, 225
N. Michigan Ave., FL
17, Chicago, IL 60601.

Ella Hill

COLUMBUS — Ella
Harris Hill, 49, died
Oct. 26, 2016.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Carter’s
Funeral Services of
Columbus.

Constance Smart

COLUMBUS — Services for Constance
Pitts Smart will be at
11 a.m. Saturday at
Hopewell MB Church.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery. Visitation is from noon-6
p.m. today at Lee-Sykes
Funeral Chapel.
Mrs. Smart was
born Sept. 14, 1950, to
Minnie Bell Pitts Pernell and the late Willie
Frison. She was a member of Hopewell MB
Church. She graduated
from Mississippi State
University and was
previously employed
in the Columbus and
Moorhead public school
system.
In addition to her father, she was preceded
in death by one brother.
In addition to her
mother, she is survived
by her husband, John
Smart Jr.; sons, John
Smart III and Nekendric Smart; step-daughter, Termekia Buchanan; step-son, Malcolm
Lomax; 12 sisters; and
10 brothers.

Laura Richardson

COLUMBUS — Services for Laura Jean
Richardson will be at
11 a.m. Saturday at
15th Street Church of
God in Christ. Burial
will follow in Union
Cemetery. Visitation is
from noon-6 p.m. today
at Lee-Sykes Funeral
Chapel.
Mrs. Richardson was
born Oct. 18, 1945, to
the late Rubbie Lee and
James Cunningham.
She was a member of
Dunamis Ministry and
owned Simple Tax.
In addition to her
parents, she was preceded in death by her
son, Eric Richardson.
She is survived by
her husband, Jerome
Richardson; sister,
Barbara Cunningham
Brown of Ft. Lauderdale, Alabama; and
brother, Woody White
of Los Angeles.

Ashley Jackson

ARTESIA — Ashley
Simone Jackson, 22,
died Oct. 14, 2016, in
Starkville.
Services will be at
noon Saturday at Liberty Missionary Baptist
Church in Canton with
the Rev. Isiac Jackson
Jr. officiating. Burial
will follow in Jackson
Family Cemetery. Visitation will be one hour
prior to services.
She is survived by
her daughter, Morgan
Lipkin; father, Eric
Jackson; mother, Lanetta Jackson; step-mother,

Tieisha Jackson; brothers, Damian Windham,
Adrean Wash and Eric
Jackson II; and sister,
Madison Jackson.

Ramona Taggart

VERNON, Ala. —
Ramona Ann Taggart,
81, died Oct. 26, 2016,
at her residence.
Services are at 2 p.m.
today at Chandler Funeral Home chapel with
Roger Redus officiating.
Burial will follow in Furnace Hill. Visitation was
from 6-8 p.m. Thursday.
Mrs. Taggart was
born July 1, 1935, to the
late Alvin Andrew Sims
and Mary Hankins
Sims.
In addition to her
parents, she was preceded in death by her
brother, Daniel A. Sims.
She is survived by
her husband, John
Taggart of Vernon;
daughter, Donna Gail
Perkins of Byhalia; son,
James Daniel Taggart of
Vernon; one grandson;
and two great-granddaughters.

Loise Conaway

WEST POINT —Loise Christine Conaway,
85, died Oct. 23, 2016,
at Heavenly Angels
Personal Care Home.
Services will be at
3 p.m. Saturday at Mt.
Zion Missionary Baptist
Church with the Rev.
Erusia Culpepper officiating. Burial will follow
in the church cemetery.
Visitation is from 3-5:30
p.m. today at Carter’s
Mortuary Service
Chapel.
Mrs. Conaway was
born Feb. 13, 1931, to
the late Wardell Doss
and Arzenia Doss. She
was employed with
the West Point School
System.
She is survived by
her son, James Daniels
of West Point; daughter, Christanna Lofton
of Chicago; brothers,
Gene Doss and Ivory
Doss, both of Chicago;
sisters, Betty Doss
Williams and Josephine
Moore, both of West
Point; and numerous
grandchildren.

Mattie Stevens

WEST POINT —
Mattie Ree Fair Stevens, 84, died Oct. 23,
2016, at her residence.
Services will be at 11
a.m. Saturday at Carter’s Mortuary Service
Chapel with Charles A.
Johnson III officiating.
Burial will follow in
Greenwood Cemetery.
Visitation is from 3-5:30
p.m. today at the funeral home.
Mrs. Stevens was
born Jan. 20, 1932, to
the late Willie James
Williams and Thelma
Williams. She was employed as a cook.
She is survived by
her son, Albert Stevens
Jr.; daughters, Edith
Stevens, Artimissi Johnson and Thelma Barton;
seven grandchildren;
and 15 great-grandchildren.

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Make your funeral/cremations plans in advance.
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FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY

1131 N. Lehmberg Rd.
Columbus, MS 39702
(662) 328-1808
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net

Peggy Moore

COLUMBUS — Peggy B. Moore, 81, died
Oct. 27, 2016, at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lowndes
Funeral Home.

Charlie Sanders

COLUMBUS
— Charlie
Sanders,
77, died
Oct. 21,
2016, at
Baptist
Memorial Sanders
Hospital-Golden Triangle.
Services will be at
11 a.m. Saturday at The
Word Church International with John Sanders officiating. Burial
will follow in Zion Hill
MB Church Cemetery.
Visitation is from noon6 p.m. today at Carter’s
Funeral Services of
Columbus.
Mr. Sanders was
born Jan. 30, 1939, to
the late Sallie Mae Williams and Sam Sanders.
He was previously
employed as a police
officer with the City of
Columbus and in the
City of Columbus Sanitation Department.
He is survived by his
children, Glenda Terry
of Jacksonville, North
Carolina, Clara Mae
Sherrod, Vanessa Mixon and Donald Sanders,
all of Columbus, and
Jeanette S. Cannon of
Flint, Michigan; siblings, Mattie Brown
and Johnnie Sanders,
both of Columbus;
11 grandchildren; 15
great-grandchildren;
and one great-greatgrandchild.

Norah Hairston

COLUMBUS
— Norah
Hairston,
87, died
Oct. 25,
2016, at his
residence.
Hairston
Memorial services will be at 11
a.m. Saturday at Carter’s Funeral Service
Chapel with William
Lenoir officiating.
Mr. Hairston was
born Sept. 7, 1929, to
the late N.H. Hairston

Frances Rector
Visitation:

Friday, Oct. 28 • 10 AM
Gunter & Peel Funeral Home

Services:

Friday, Oct. 28 • 11 AM
Gunter & Peel Funeral Home

Burial

Piney Grove Cemetery
Steens, MS
gunterandpeel.com

Brock Richardson
Visitation:

Saturday, Oct. 29 • 10 AM
Memorial Funeral Home

Services:

Saturday, Oct. 29 • 11 AM
Memorial Funeral Home

Burial

Murrah’s Chapel Cemetery
memorialfuneral.net

and Bessie Mae Hairston. He was previously
employed as a supervisor at Johnston Tombigbee.
In addition to his parents, he was preceded
in death by his siblings,
Bessie Henry, Donna
Hairston and Sylvester
Hairston; sons Bernard
and Donald Hairston.
He is survived by his
wife, Earnestine Hairston of Columbus; children, Norah Hairston
Jr., Daisy Inge Douglas
Hairston, Lisa Ramsey,
Norma Saddler and Patricia Richardson, all of
Columbus, Debra Fleming of Atlanta, Georgia,
Mary Anderson of
Tuscaloosa, Alabama,
Gloria Kidd-Hairston of
Florida, and Beverly Dillon-Bussey of St. Louis,
Misourri; step-children,
Karlos Lowery, Adrian
Lowery, Marqus Lowery and Lavoris Lowery,
all of Columbus; and
siblings, Frances Williams, Clyde Hairston,
Ben Hairston, Willie
Hairston and Sam Hairston, all of Columbus,
Annie Mabins of Halls,
Tennessee, Mary Gandy
of Augusta, Georgia,
and Annete Chambry of
Steens.

Lora Coats

STARKVILLE —
Lora D. Coats, 84, died
Oct. 21, 2016.
Services will be at 1
p.m. Saturday at New
Zion Methodist Church
with Eddie Hinton
officiating. Burial will
follow in the church
cemetery. Visitation
is from 1-6 p.m. today
at Hairston Funeral
Home.
Mrs. Coats was born
Feb. 15, 1932, to the
late William Henry
Spruell and Golenda
Rieves Spruell. She was
previously employed
as a laundry worker at
Mississippi State Uni-

versity.
She is survived by
her sons, Arvid Coats,
Kirk Coats and Jerry
Coats, all of Starkville;
four grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.

Avis Woodson

WEST POINT —
Avis Wylie Woodson,
82, died Oct. 26, 2016,
at Hospice of West Alabama-Tuscaloosa.
Services will be at 3
p.m. Saturday at Calvert
Funeral Home Chapel
with Wayne Mathis
officiating. Burial will
follow in Greenwood
Cemetery. Visitation
will be two hours prior
to services at the funeral home.
Mrs. Avis was born
April 20, 1934, to the
late James Theodore
and Lena Weeks Wyle.
She was a graduate of
Louisville High School.
She was previously
employed as a utility
worker with Knickerbocker and Big Yank
Manufacturing and a
secretary and dispatcher with Pennebaker
Concrete. She was a
member of First Baptist
Church.
She is survived
by her sons, Michael
Woodson of Birmingham, Alabama, and
Stanley Woods of
Vicksburg; sisters, Sarah Jackson of Sturgis,
Dorothy Partridge of
Louisville and Jeanette
Ryan of West Point; four
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers will
be Tanner Woodson,
Bowen Woodson, Brian
Samuels, Joey Partridge, Tom Jackson
and Stanley Spradling.

Brock Richardson

Brock Richardson, age 24,
formerly of Columbus, died
Monday, October 24, 2016 at
Vanderbilt University Medical
Center in Nashville, TN. Funeral arrangements have been
entrusted to Memorial Funeral
Home. Services will be Saturday, October 29, 2016 in the
Chapel of Memorial Funeral
Home at 11:00 AM with Rev.
Josh Daffern officiating. Visitation will begin at
10:00 AM at Memorial Funeral Home. Interment
will immediately follow in Murrah’s Chapel Cemetery.
The son of Robert Glenn and Gail Rickard
Richardson, Brock was born November 9, 1991
in Columbus. He was employed by Charger Commercial Flooring and was living in Unionville,
TN. He attended New Hope High School and
loved his family, especially his niece and nephew. He also loved to hunt and fish. He always had
a smile and liked to laugh and joke around. He
was also a BIG “Roll Tide” Alabama football fan.
He was preceded in death by his paternal grandfather Chesley Richardson.
He is survived by his parents Robert and Gail
Richardson, his brother Brett Richardson, all of
Columbus, his sister and brother –in-law Alisha
and Aaron Boyd of West Point, MS, his paternal
grandmother Sarah Richardson of Columbus, his
maternal grandparents Barbara and Tom McNutt
of Stevensville, MD and his maternal grandfather
Bobby Rickard and maternal great-grandmother
Lucille Carter, both of Columbus. He is also survived by his niece and nephew Rileigh and Asher
Boyd and several aunts and uncles.
Pallbearers will be Troy Richardson, David
Richardson, Zach Richardson, Billy Williams,
Greg Bailey, Michael Carter, Chesley Brownlee
and Nathan Richardson. Honorary pallbearers
will be Hunter Lackey, Glen Rickard, Robby
Rickard, Brett Richardson, Aaron Boyd, Paul
McGovern, Albert Richardson, Mike Carter,
Bobby Jones, Jeremy Brownlee and Peyton Ford.

Expressions of Sympathy May
Be Left At
www.memorialfuneral.net

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

5A

AROUND THE NATION

Police evict oil pipeline protesters
from private land in North Dakota
BY JAMES MACPHERSON
AND BLAKE NICHOLSON
The Associated Press

CANNON BALL, N.D.
— A months-long protest
over the Dakota Access
oil pipeline reached its
most chaotic pitch yet
when hundreds of law enforcement officers moved
in to force activists off private property.
Thursday’s
nearly
six-hour operation dramatically escalated the
dispute over Native American rights and the project’s environmental impact, with officers in riot
gear firing bean bags and
pepper spray.
Donnell Hushka, a
spokeswoman for the

Morton County Sheriff’s
Department, said 141
people were arrested. No
serious injuries were reported, though one man
was hurt in the leg and
received treatment from
a medic.
Among those arrested
was a woman who pulled
out a .38-caliber pistol and
fired three times at officers, narrowly missing a
sheriff’s deputy, according to State Emergency
Services spokeswoman
Cecily Fong. Officers did
not return fire, she said.
Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said
that the camp had been
cleared
by
nightfall.
Though officials earlier
said they planned to turn

the site over to private
security, Kirchmeier said
police would stay.
“We’re not leaving the
area,” he said. “We are
just going to make sure
that we maintain a presence in the area so the
roadway stays open, and
to keep individuals from
camping on private land.”
Texas-based
Energy Transfer Partners is
working to complete the
1,200-mile pipeline to carry oil from western North
Dakota to Illinois. But the
route skirts near reservation land of the Standing Rock Sioux, who say
it could endanger water
supplies and disturb cultural sites, though state
officials say no sensitive

sites have been found on
the route.
The tribe has gone to
court to challenge the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ decision granting permits. A federal
judge in September denied its request to block
construction, but three
federal agencies stepped
in to order construction
to halt on Corps-owned
land around Lake Oahe, a
wide spot of the Missouri
River, while the Corps reviewed its decision-making.
Meanwhile, construction has been allowed to
continue on private land
owned by the developer,
with a goal of completion
by the end of the year.

No injuries after Pence plane slides off runway
NEW YORK — Republican vice presidential
candidate Mike Pence’s
campaign plane slid off
a runway during a rainstorm at New York’s
LaGuardia Airport late
Thursday, tearing up concrete before coming to
rest on a patch of grass.

When the plane came
to a stop, U.S. Secret Service agents rushed from
the back of the plane to
the front, where Pence
was seated, to check on
the candidate. He said he
was fine, though, and no
one had been injured.
“We can see mud on
the front windows,” a
calm Pence said in the
press cabin about a min-

ute after the plane came
to rest.
Later, the Indiana governor tweeted: “So thankful everyone on our plane
is safe. Grateful for our
first responders & the
concern & prayers of so
many. Back on the trail
tomorrow!”
In Geneva, Ohio, GOP
presidential
candidate
Donald Trump told his

supporters that Pence
had come “pretty close to
grave, grave danger.” But,
he added: “I just spoke to
Mike Pence and he’s fine.
Everybody’s fine.”
Democrat Hillary Clinton tweeted: “Glad to hear
@mike_pence, his staff,
Secret Service, and the
crew are all safe.”

Manson follower ‘Tex’ Watson denied parole
BY DON THOMPSON
The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California parole
officials
recommended
Thursday that Charles
“Tex” Watson, the self-described right-hand man
of murderous cult leader
Charles Manson, should
remain in prison 47 years
after he helped plan and
carry out the slayings of
pregnant actress Sharon
Tate and six other people.
Watson’s 17th parole
hearing was held at Mule
Creek State Prison, near
Sacramento. He can seek
parole again in five years.
Watson, 70, is serving a
life sentence for the murders of Tate and four others at her Beverly Hills,
California, home on Aug.
9, 1969. The next night, he
helped kill grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife, Rosemary.
“These were some of
the most horrific crimes in
California history, and we
believe he continues to exhibit a lack of remorse and
remains a public safety
risk,” Los Angeles County
District Attorney Jackie
Lacey said in a statement
after the decision.
Watson was initially
sentenced to death in the
stabbing and shooting
rampage, but the sentence
was later commuted to life
when the California Supreme Court ruled in 1972
that the death penalty was
unconstitutional. He currently is in Mule Creek
State Prison, near Sacramento.
Sharon Tate’s sister,
Debra Tate — the last
surviving member of her
immediate family — urged
the panel of parole commissioners to reject freedom for the man she called
“the most active, the most
prolific killer in the Manson family.”
“He’s a sociopath, and
sociopaths are incapable
having insight or empathy for anything. It’s all
about him. He didn’t have
it then, and he doesn’t have
it now,” she said after the
hearing. She said Watson
still blames the murders
on his drug use and lack
of a clear goal in life rather
than accepting full responsibility.
In July, Gov. Jerry
Brown reversed a Board
of Parole Hearings recommendation that the state
release Manson follower

Leslie Van Houten, 67, who
is serving a life sentence
for the La Bianca killings.
In January, he blocked
the release of Bruce Davis, 74, another Manson
devotee who was convicted in the killings of
musician Gary Hinman
and stuntman Donald

“Shorty” Shea.
In prison, Watson
wrote a book, “Manson’s
Right-Hand Man Speaks
Out,” saying the charismatic Manson offered
utopia, then persuaded
his followers to act out his
“destructive worldview.”
Watson has apologized for

the killings.
Watson says he converted to Christianity in
1975, founded Abounding
Love Ministries in 1980,
and ministers to other inmates. He also obtained
his college degree behind
bars.

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© The Dispatch

BY WILL WEISSERT
The Associated Press

662-328-1855

2203 Hwy. 45 N. - Columbus, MS

Opinion
6A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher

Dispatch
The

PETER IMES General Manager
ZACK PLAIR, Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
MARY ANN HARDY Controller

OUR VIEW

Mississippians’ generosity on display yet again
There are many things
that Mississippi is known for,
both good and bad. Of those
distinctions, we find what
might appear, at first blush, to
be paradoxical: Mississippi is
known as one of the poorest
states and yet it is also known
as one of the most generous.
Upon reflection, this odd
coupling is understandable.
The people of our state, more
than others, understand what
it’s like to face a financial crisis. There is nothing abstract
about it. Many of us have been
there, understand the fear
and uncertainty it induces and

respond with empathy and
generosity.
This week, the crowd-funding website GoFundMe
celebrated a milestone: The
six-year-old fundraising website based in northern California reached the $3-billon mark
in donations. The company
also released figures for the
state and the Golden Triangle.
Mississippians raised $12.3
million for 670 GoFundMe
campaigns collecting 9,500
donations
In the Golden Triangle
alone, 607 GoFundMe campaigns generated 9,500 do-

nations raising $614,000. On
average, that’s almost $65 per
donation, but a search of the
website finds that donations
run from as little as $5 to the
thousands of dollars.
Most likely, Mississippians donated to GoFundMe
accounts outside the state as
well and, of course, we are
well aware that the GoFundMe donations represents only
a fraction of our charitable
giving. There are also other crowd-funding sites that
attract our attention – IndieGoGo and KickStarter being
among the better known.

Although people can
launch GoFundMe campaigns
for any number of causes —
from frivolous to serious —
Kate Cichy, a spokesperson
for the company, says most of
the campaigns are started to
help people who have found
themselves facing emergencies — illness, accident,
death, loss of home — events
that come without warning
and leave those affected in
dire straits.
GoFundMe accounts
can be set up in a matter of
minutes and begin generating
funds almost immediately,

which can be especially important in emergency situations.
It is yet another tool by
which we can express the
wonderful generosity of our
people and we are pleased to
note that so many Mississippians are taking advantage of it.
We certainly have reason
to lament many of the ills our
state is known for. But in this
respect, we can all draw a
measure of pride. When the
chips are down and things
seem hopeless, Mississippians
have proven they will respond
with generosity.

LOCAL VOICES

Community hospital?
Oktibbeha County Hospital’s
future is yet again the subject of
community discourse. This is a
seminal aspect of our identity and
the surrounding discussion and
ultimate decision is one of the
most critical we will have from
the Board of Supervisors in the
foreseeable future.
We have a new board and new
possibilities but this needs to be
the final time in the near term
Lynn Spruill
this issue again becomes a public
football.
The best way for closure is for the supervisors to throw it
to the residents for a vote. Unlike a bond election requiring
60% approval to pass, this is a straight up democratic, majority vote decision.
As the supervisors contemplate options for the hospital
they carry with them Starkville and MSU. It is no small
decision. It is no simple decision.
Complex issues go well beyond the 48 pages in the consultant’s report. I don’t know there to be enough information
at this point to move beyond just getting more information.
I have always believed initiating a status report was
the proper and prudent thing to do. In fact, it ought to be
something that is done every 10 years or so by the county
in conjunction with the hospital board and the hospital
administration. In fact, it ought to be an even more frequent
internal review by the appointed hospital board and hospital
administration.
It is a strategic planning tool. Perhaps had we been doing
that all along we might have been on the front end of the
healthcare curve instead of the back end.
This report seems slanted in the direction of a sale or
lease but still provides data that deserves consideration.
The consultants identified strengths and challenges for
OCH as it currently operates.
What is the rest of the story?
The consultants are estimating the hospital is worth
between $20 million and $60 million. There is about $38
million in debt pending. Depending on the sale price that
could mean the hospital is worth about the amount of debt it
carries.
What about the bonds that are outstanding? Can we just
pay them off with the proceeds? Nope. Investors have been
promised interest on those bonds for a guaranteed time.
We can’t “call” those bonds until a set date out in the future.
What is that date and what does that mean to a sale price?
Who knew there were such things as doctor incentive
commitments? Think of them as a signing bonus for an NFL
football player. The hospital has those commitments. Maybe
they can be modified, maybe not. Something else we don’t
know. Somebody should have that answer.
In the meantime we are obligated to pay the interest.
There is also a possible premium to be paid when you pay
them off early. The report doesn’t address that.
What about the suggestion of reducing operating costs?
About 60% of that is people. What is that trickle-down effect?
I am guessing that some of the supervisors have cash
sugar plum fairies dancing around in their heads. They envision the same kind of deal Lowndes County got and it just
isn’t going to happen. That was a deal for the ages.
They see newly blacktopped roads and a new embankment for the county lake without a tax increase. They see
the Oktoc Road mess fixed.
Having the land along Hospital Road back on the tax rolls
would be a definite boon to city coffers. A reasonable guess
is about $130,000 a year. It isn’t chump change, but it isn’t
large enough to make it the tipping point for such a major
community shift. It also isn’t a guarantee because that only
happens if they sell to a for-profit hospital group.
What do we do with this information? What information
is missing? Where is the response of the hospital administration to these findings? All of this data needs to be put out
there through public meetings with knowledgeable officials
on hand to educate the community as to what it means.
The county’s auditors and bond experts and hospital
administrators and consultants should be in attendance to
provide the rest of the story.
We have to determine if we want the hospital to be more
of a community hospital or a place to make you well? Are
the doctors part of our community fabric or are they more
an interchangeable service provider? Do we believe we can
be relevant to our needs as an independent or do we risk the
market forces in a network health care industry?
This should be more than a financial decision. This is a
community decision and should be part of a longer and more
detailed public discussion. Educate yourselves and us and
then step back and let the county vote.
Lynn Spruill, a former commercial airline pilot, elected
official and city administrator owns and manages Spruill
Property Management in Starkville. Her email address is
dlspruill@bellsouth.net.

MISSISSIPPI VOICES

Kemper operating costs are
the final blow
In a state like
Mississippi, which
limits and regulates
power companies, your
electric bill is effectively a tax over which you
have little control. As a
result, it is incumbent
upon the Mississippi
Public Service Commission (PSC) to act
responsibly to protect
consumers. We call on
Wyatt Emmerich
the PSC commissioners to do their jobs and
shoot down any more rate increases relating to
the ill-fated Kemper power plant.
Kemper was touted as a first-of-its-kind clean
coal plant that would turn low-grade lignite into
cleaner synthetic gas, which is no “greener” than
natural gas but far greener than a traditional
coal plant. It was proposed as a $1.5 billion plant
by Atlanta-based Southern Company, which
owns 100 percent of Mississippi Power Company
(MPC.)
Unfortunately, the $1.5 billion plant has turned
into a $7 billion plant and it’s still not finished.
This week we learned that annual operating
costs are now estimated to be four times higher
than original projections. That means it will cost
far more to burn lignite than to burn natural gas,
which is plentiful and cheap partly because of the
new fracking technologies in the oil fields.
The significance of this cannot be overstated.
A natural gas plant would have cost a tenth the
cost of Kemper. Southern and MPC justified
Kemper because, once built, it would operate on
inexpensive lignite, which on an on-going basis
would be cheaper than having to buy natural gas.
The new operating projections blow this argument out of the water. Not only is Kemper now
10 times more expensive to build but it will also
be far more expensive to operate than a common
natural gas plant.
This can only mean one thing: It’s time to pull
the plug on Kemper and its plan to convert lignite

coal into synthetic gas. Fortunately, Kemper can
run on natural gas and is currently operating that
way. Ratepayers have already paid for this with a
rate increase to fund the one billion dollars spent
for Kemper’s natural gas turbines. Ratepayers
should not pay one dime more.
The Kemper fiasco is a lesson to Mississippians about the frailties of the regulated monopoly
system. In Texas, lawmakers have deregulated
electricity, allowing customers to purchase the
cheapest electricity from the lowest-cost providers on the grid. Mississippians should have such
options.
Southern and MPC executives argued that
Kemper would diversify Mississippi’s energy
base. That was a fraudulent argument. If that’s
what they really wanted, they could have expanded their grid, connected with buying cooperatives, and purchased inexpensive energy from
hundreds of diversified power plants all over the
country. Instead, they wanted to build their own
captive plant for a huge amount of money and
then be mandatorily reimbursed for both interest
and equity returns. In Mississippi’s perverted
monopoly system, the more the power company
spends, the more money they make. The Mississippi PSC simply cannot let this go down.
Just this month the PSC approved a new $3.7
million solar farm that will provide enough power
for 250 homes. Using that math, 750 solar farms
could have been constructed for a third the cost
of Kemper and supplied all 188,000 MPC customers with green solar power requiring zero fuel
costs and minimal operating costs.
Kemper was Southern Company’s mistake.
They failed grossly on their capital projections
and now on their operating projections. Southern’s natural gas projections where off by a factor
of five. Kemper is the ultimate definition of a
boondoggle. It is time for the PSC to state clearly
and publicly that Mississippi consumers will not
be forced to bear this economic burden.
Wyatt Emmerich is the editor and publisher
of The Northside Sun, a weekly newspaper in
Jackson. He can be reached by e-mail at wyatt@
northsidesun.com.

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The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

7A

RELIGION

Experts uncover hidden layers of Jesus’ tomb site
Work part of renovation of cave where Jesus
said to have been entombed
BY DANIEL EST0RIN
The Associated Press

JERUSALEM — In the innermost chamber of the site
said to be the tomb of Jesus, a
restoration team has peeled
away a marble layer for the first
time in centuries in an effort
to reach what it believes is the
original rock surface where Jesus’ body was laid.
Many historians have long
believed that the original cave,
identified a few centuries after
Jesus’ death as his tomb, was
obliterated ages ago.
But an archaeologist accompanying the restoration team
said ground penetrating radar

tests determined that cave walls
are in fact standing — at a height
of six feet and connected to bedrock — behind the marbled panels of the chamber at the center
of Jerusalem’s Church of the
Holy Sepulchre.
“What was found,” said National Geographic archaeologist
Fredrik Hiebert, “is astonishing.”
The work is part of a historic renovation project to reinforce and preserve the Edicule,
the chamber housing the cave
where Jesus is said to have been
entombed and resurrected. It is
the centerpiece of one of Christianity’s oldest churches and one

of its most important shrines.
“I usually spend my time
in Tut’s tomb,” said Hiebert
about the Egyptian pharaoh
Tutankhamun’s burial site, “but
this is more important.”
National Geographic is partnering with Greek restoration
experts to document the work.
A 12th-century building sitting on 4th-century remains, the
Church of the Holy Sepluchre is
the only place where six Christian denominations practice
their faith at the same site.
The Edicule was last restored
in 1810 following a fire, and is
in need of reinforcement after
years of exposure to humidity
and candle smoke. A hulking
iron cage built around the Edicule by British authorities in
1947 for support still stands, but
is not enough.

Renovations at this holiest of
spots require mutual agreement
by the church’s various custodians, and that is notoriously hard
to secure. The denominations
jealously guard different parts
of the site and often object to
even the slightest of changes.
Last year, Israeli police briefly shut down the building after
Israel’s Antiquities Authority
deemed it unsafe. It prompted
the Christian denominations to
green light the repairs, which
began in June.
Pilgrims line up throughout
the day for the chance to crouch
in the Edicule’s tiny room. They
kneel before a white marble encasing, said to cover a surface
hewn from the side of the limestone cave where Jesus’ body
was laid before his resurrection.
Church officials closed the

Edicule to pilgrims beginning
Wednesday evening, and workers used a pulley to slide open
the marble slab, in hopes of
reaching the burial surface.
Hiebert said the slab hadn’t
been removed since the year
1550.
Underneath the marble was
a layer of debris. By Thursday
afternoon, workers had finished
removing the debris, revealing
something unexpected: another
marble slab.
Hiebert said he thinks the
second slab, which is grey and
features a small etching of a
cross, dates to the 12th century.
It is cracked down the middle,
and underneath it is a whitish
layer.
“I don’t believe ... that is the
original rock,” Hiebert said.
“We still have more to go.”

Mormons preach love for LGBT members, but no doctrinal shift
BY BRADY MCCOMBS
The Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY
— Mormon leaders told
gay and lesbian members
Tuesday that attraction to
people of the same sex is
not a sin or a measure of
their faithfulness and may
never go away, but reminded them that having sex
violates fundamental doctrinal beliefs that will not
change.
The newly unveiled
“Mormon and Gay” church
website includes articles,
teachings, videos and stories from church members
who identify themselves

Fifth Sunday Program

The Mt. Olivet District
One Missionary Ministry will
have it’s fifth sunday program
at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 30 at St.
Matthew MB Church.

Community Prayer
Rally

A community prayer rally
will be held at 6:30 p.m. Nov.
3 at the YMCA in downtown
Columbus.

Communion Service

Beginning Nov. 6, Good
Shepherd Episcopal Church
will host Sunday evening communion services at 6:30 p.m.
at Faith Lutheran Church.

Gospel Singing Celebration

Fourth Street MB Church,
610 4th St. N. in Columbus,
will host a joyful gospel singing celebration with special
guests Annie & the Caldwells,
The Decided Seven, Family
Affair and Penesha McDowell
at 6 p.m. Nov. 5

School of Ministry
Enrollment

Mississippi State School
of Ministry will take applications for fall semester
enrollment beginning Nov. 10
For information call 662-4258443.

Love Benefit Program

Bigbee Valley CME Church
will hold a love benefit program for Christopher White Jr.
at 6 p.m. Nov. 12.

Retirement Banquet

16th Section MB Church
will host a retirement banquet
for William A. Richardson at
4 p.m. Nov. 12. A $25.00 donation is required. For more
information contact Gwen
Ware or Charolette Ware.

Pastoral Anniversary

Union Baptist Church, 101
Weaver Road in Columbus,
will celebrate the first anniversary of Christopher McSwain and Pamela McSwain
at 2:30 p.m. Nov. 13 with
guest Rev. Theodis McSwain
of Gifield MB Church.

Pastoral Anniversary

16th Section MB Church
will host a pastoral anniversary program for William A.
Richardson at 3 p.m. Nov.
13.

as gay and lesbian. It is a
remake of a site first created nearly four years ago
that marked the religion’s
most significant outreach
to gays and lesbians.
The website is designed
to encourage compassion
and acceptance for LGBT
people and strike a softer
tone on an issue that has
led to criticism of the conservative Utah-based The
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints recently.
The Mormon church is
one of many conservative
faith groups staunchly
upholding theological opposition to same-sex relationships amid widespread

social acceptance and the
U.S. Supreme Court’s decision legalizing gay marriage, while attempting
to foster an empathetic
stance toward LGBT people.
“There is no change
in the church’s position
of what is morally right,”
church leader Dallin H.
Oaks said on the website.
“But what is changing and
what needs to change is
helping church members
respond sensitively and
thoughtfully when they encounter same-sex attraction in their own families,
among other church members, or elsewhere.”

The website may seem
“pitiful” to non-Mormons
supportive of gay rights
victories, but is a positive
step for LGBT Latter-day
Saints, said Kendall Wilcox, a gay Mormon man
involved in church focus
groups during the creation
of the website.
The acknowledgment
of the pain and conflict
that gay and lesbian Mormons endure, is comforting and should help heterosexual Mormons better
understand gay and lesbian experiences, Wilcox
said. Mormons who are in
same-sex relationships are
considered apostates, and

RELIGIOUS BRIEFS
Church Anniversary

Pleasant Grove Pools MB
Church, 3000 Waverly Road
in West Point, will celebrate
their 127th church anniversary at 3 p.m. Nov. 13 with
guest speaker Rev. James
Morgan of New Mt. Zion MB
Church.

Harvest Fest
Program

Bible Way Progressive
will host a Harvest Fest
Program at 3 p.m. Nov. 20
at 426 Military Road with
sponsor Freddie Mosely.

Free Coffee and
Prayer

Mount Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, 2221 14th
Ave. N., holds free coffee
and prayer community outreach service from 8-9 a.m.
every fifth Saturday. For
more information contact
Jesse Slater at 328-4979.

New Book Convention
Singing

Tuscaloosa County New
Book Convention Singing
will be hosted by Bethel
Presbyterian Church, 7100
Watermelon Road, in Northport. Contact 256-673-0177
for more information.

Bible Study

Faith Harvest Church
Bible class will be every second and fourth Tuesday of
each month at 6 p.m. Pastor
is Hugh L. Dent. For information, call 662-243-7076.

Radio program

Apostles Patrick Perkins
invites the public to tune in
to WTWG, radio 1050 AM for
Perfecting the Saints Broadcast, Wednesdays 8:30 a.m.

Radio program

Pat Douglas invites the
public to tune in to WTWG
radio, 1050 AM for Yes Lord
Ministries, Sundays 9:159:45 a.m.

Women Prayer and
Worship Service

Church of the Eternal
Word , 120-21 Street St. in
Columbus holds a prayer and
worship service every Thursday from 5-6 p.m. Contact
Marie Nabors at 549-4322
or 329-1234 for prayer
requests.

Prayer ministry

New Beginning Everlasting
Outreach Ministry invites the
public to call in with their
prayer requests at 662-3279843.

Praise and worship
service

Sulfur Springs MB Church
will have a praise and worship service the last Friday
of each month at 7 p.m. For
information, call Pastor Henry
Mosley at 662-328-1035.

Fitness Transformations

The Transformational
Church, 2301 Jess Lyons
Road, Columbus, MS, 39705,

hosts Boxing Lessons
Mondays and Wednesday
from 5-7 p.m. weight-loss
boot-camp Tuesdays and
Thursdays 5-7 p.m. and both
on Saturday 9-11 a.m.

can be excommunicated.
But the church fell
short by focusing exclusively on gay and lesbian
LGBT Mormons who are
not in same-sex relationships so they can maintain

full-fledged church membership, avoiding mention
of gay Mormons who try to
maintain a connection to
the religion while relationships, he said.

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

8A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

Family sues Amazon over hoverboard that burned $1M house
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
— A family is suing Amazon for selling a hoverboard blamed for starting a fire that burned
their $1 million home in
Nashville.
The Tennessean re-

ports that the Fox family’s lawsuit says Amazon
had information about
the dangers of the product before the Jan. 9 fire.
The lawsuit was filed
in Davidson County Circuit Court late Wednesday. It targets 10 defendants, including Amazon

and retailers on its website.
The lawsuit says the
listed seller of the hoverboard, “W-Deals,” is
a sham business registered to a New York City
apartment and hasn’t responded to lawyers.
It claims the family

was sold a counterfeit
product from China.
The family is seeking
$30 million in damages,
plus possible additional
financial penalties.
An Amazon representative said the company doesn’t comment on
pending cases.

“We let them know every
child is safe and accounted for. We asked that no

one be checked out so everyone can be accounted
for, and everyone coop-

erated with us. It takes a
team effort, in times like
this.”

have those particular
surgeries in the state of
Mississippi.
In September, she also
earned the Miss MSU
crown and is using her
experiences -- both from
watching her mom fight
breast cancer and also
surviving it herself -- to
generate awareness and
support for others.

bors mowed the lawn,
her preacher visited and
church friends brought
food and found other
ways to help.
As for May, she got
through the summer
by reading everything
anyone put in front of her,
doing countless puzzles
and watching every ‘80s
movie on Netflix. When
she began physical therapy, her goal was to have
enough range of motion
in her arms to where she
could direct the marching band at Itawamba.
“I pushed myself so
hard in physical therapy,”
she said. “I would get
in trouble sometimes
because my mom said I
would do too much. I ended up getting to conduct
the next season, so I don’t
regret a thing.”
But May’s battles at
hospitals weren’t over
yet. Her reconstructive
surgery was planned for
December 2014. Until
then, May had plastic
spacers put in. Once a
month she went to her
plastic surgeon for him to
inject saline.
Two years and nine
scars later, May’s battle is
mostly over. She still has
some breast tissue, but
her chances of developing breast cancer are now
down 2 to 5 percent. She
attends yearly checkups
with her breast surgeon

and plastic surgeon.

family a few days after
the accident. In its first
10 days, it raised about
$115,000.
Stories of tragic loss,
and the support that
quickly envelopes the victims, has been a point of
pride for GoFundMe.
“You can start campaigns for just about
anything,” said company
spokesman Kate Cichy.
“But we really created this
platform for people who
need help quickly. You can
put together a campaign
in a matter of minutes,
which is important in an
emergency situation.”
Not all campaigns generate the kind of donations
as Hope for the Gentrys,
though.
On average, the GoFundMe campaign in the
Golden Triangle average a
little more than $900 with
an average single donation of $64.
Some are more successful than others –
reaching or exceeding
their goals or falling well
short.
Cichy said the success
of any campaign relies on
a number of factors. Because the campaign relies
heavily on social media to
get the word out, the bigger the network of social
media friends a campaign
organizer has, the greater
the exposure to the cause.
But there are other
ways campaign organizers can improve their
chances, Cichy said.
“I think it’s important
for people who are starting their campaigns to really think about what they
want to say on their campaign page,” she said. “We
encourage everyone to be
as transparent as possible.
What are the funds for?

How will they be spent?
“We also have found
that it’s really important
to provide updates as frequently as possible,” she
added. “Using photos
helps, too. The idea is to
keep the campaign active
and circulating through
social media. When you
make a donation, you can
share it to your Facebook
page, which also keeps
the message circulating.”

Bomb

Continued from Page 1A
be checked out.
“We thank parents for
their support,” he said.

May

Continued from Page 1A
She can remember
being in the doctor’s office in Jackson when she
received the news.
“[The doctor] leaned
up against the door and
said, ‘There’s no easy
way to say this, so I’m
just going to tell you. You
have this gene. Let’s talk
about what comes next,’”
May said.
May had known since
she was 8 there was a
risk of developing breast
cancer because that’s
when her mother was
diagnosed. As a single
parent, she kept working
and taking care of May
while undergoing two
separate mastectomies
and three years of both
radiation and chemotherapy. Watching her mother
go through that, May
understood it could be
her one day.
So when her doctor
told her she had the gene,
she had already decided
she wanted a mastectomy
herself.
“I was like, ‘Just taken
them, dude,’” she said.
Now 22 and a senior at
Mississippi State University, May has already had
a double mastectomy and
implants put in at an age
when most people haven’t
had their first mammogram and many haven’t
even started their monthly breast exams. She is
the youngest person to

Molly’s fight

May was in the hospital for three days after
surgery, but her recovery
took about six months. At
first, she couldn’t move
her arms. She had two
drains coming from each
arm and required other
people feed and take care
of her.
Every two days, her
mother bathed her and
then left her to sit on a
stool in the shower to cry
and pray in private, May
said.
“And then we would
change my bandages and
do another puzzle on the
kitchen table and watch
another Netflix,” she
added.
Friends in the community jumped to help
the family, May said.
Her mother’s three
older brothers all visited
during and after May’s
surgery. Her best friend
made her lunch and
dinner every day. Neigh-

Advocacy

Since her surgery,
May has talked to countless people, including
some near her own age,
who have been diagnosed
with breast cancer and
are facing mastectomies
and other forms of treatment.
“It is the most rewarding and humbling thing
in the world when people
walk up to me and ask for
my advice because of the
struggles that I’ve faced,”
May said.
She promotes breast
Starkville Staff
Columbus Staff
cancer awareness and
is involved in nonprofits
Summer fun is closer than you think.
that support breast cancer patients and survivors. She also promotes
an app called IBreastPersonal
Loans
We’ve got
the cash• Starter
you need Loans
Check, which sets monthto
make
memories.
Consolidation Loans and more
ly alarms for people to do
their monthly self-exams
and has set up booths on
706-C Hwy 12 W
3189 Hwy 45, Ste. E
campus where people can
STARKVILLE
COLUMBUS
write encouraging letters
662-323-5746
662-328-2200
to patients for an organiwww.1ffc.com
zation called Girls Love
Mail.
*All loans subject to our liberal credit policy
Through her camand limitations, if any. 1st Franklin Financial
paign, “Bald is BeautiCorporation, NMLSR #141654, Georgia Residential Mortgage Licensee #5656, licensed
ful,” she aims to provide
by the Mississippi Department of Banking
handmade head scarves
and Consumer Finance.
and hats to every breast
cancer treatment facility
Starkville MS_summerAD3.236x5bw_final.indd 1
5/12/2016 12:03:
in the state.
“You can just find little
ways … to get involved,”
she said.

We have loans
for all reasons
and seasons.

GoFundMe
Continued from Page 1A

A $3 billion milestone

California-based GoFundMe recently reached
a significant milestone –
$3 billion in donations. It
keeps 7.9 percent of the
donation total for processing and operations fees.
The site generated
more than $7.5 million
for victims’ families of the
Pulse nightclub shooting
in Orlando, Florida, and
more than $11 million for
Louisiana flood victims.
But most campaigns
are smaller, more personal, efforts.

To note the milestone,
the company compiled
data on how its campaigns
have generated money in
each state.
According to its data,
Mississippians
have
started more than 17,000
GoFundMe campaigns,
raising $12.3 million from
nearly 195,000 total donations.
“Whether it’s a small
business owner standing
for equal rights, raising
money to support your
neighbors affected by
the floods, or feeding
the homeless population,
folks in Mississippi routinely step up. There have
been millions of dollars
donated to thousands of
GoFundMe
campaigns
to generously help their
friends, family, and local communities during
times of need,” GoFundMe CEO Rob Solomon
said in a statement.
Here in the Golden Triangle, the 670 GoFundMe
campaigns have generated $614,000 donations
from 9,500 contributors
since 2010.
Of those campaigns,
none have been more
successful than “Hope
for the Gentrys,” which
has raised more than
$135,000.
That campaign started
the day after a tragic automobile accident on Highway 82 on Nov. 6, 2015.
John Gentry and his
three sons were victims in
the crash. The father died
at the scene while 11-yearold J.D. died two days later. Josh, 6, spent months
in the hospital while Jack,
9, sustained only minor
injuries.
A GoFundMe campaign was started on
behalf of the Starkville

Happy endings

Soon after her vet examined the two rescue
horses, Gregory got on
her computer and started
a GoFundMe campaign,
“Saving Achilles and Thetis!”
She really didn’t know
what would come of it.
“I was so surprised,”
she said. “By the next
morning, we already had
$75 and the donations
kept coming in.”
The campaign ultimately raised $1,200.
“The GoFundMe money was a huge help, a
blessing,” Gregory said.
Today, Achilles is fully
recovered.
He’s fat and happy and
living on a farm north of
Birmingham, Alabama,
Gregory said.
“You know, that was
the first time I had used
GoFundMe, but after receiving the support that
I received, I’ve donated
to other campaigns,” she
said. “You have to use
good judgment. There
are some campaigns that
have no business being on
there. But when you look
through their website,
you can see people in your
own community that really need help. I think it’s a
great idea.”

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veterinarian to inspect the
horses. Thetis, the older
of the two, was in such
bad shape he had to be euthanized. Achilles wasn’t
much better.
In addition to his emaciated condition, a rope
halter had been left on him
for so long – years, most
likely – that it had been
embedded in the horse’s
muzzle down to the bone.
When the harness was cut
away, the wound was filled
with maggots. There was
also a deep, untreated
gash on one of Achilles’
forelegs.
The treatment would
be long. It would also be
costly.
“I hadn’t been expecting to do a rescue at that
point, but this was a dire
emergency,”
Gregory
said.
To raise the funds
needed, Gregory became
one of 670 people in the
Golden Triangle to turn
to the crowd-funding website GoFundMe since the
site was founded six years
ago.
“I had never tried it before,” Gregory said. “But I
decided to give it a shot.”

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The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

Deep South drought kills crops,
threatens herds, dries lakes
BY JEFF MARTIN AND
JANET MCCONNAUGHEY
The Associated Press

ATLANTA — Six
months into a deepening
drought, the weather is
killing crops, threatening
cattle and sinking lakes
to their lowest levels in
years across much of the
South.
The very worst conditions — what forecasters
call “exceptional drought”
— are in the mountains of
northeast Alabama and
northwest Georgia, a region known for its thick
green forests, waterfalls
and red clay soil.
“Here at my farm, April
15 was when the rain cut
off,” said David Bailey,
who had to sell half his
cattle, more than 100 animals, for lack of hay in Alabama’s scorched northeast corner.
“We’ve come through
some dry years in the
‘80s, but I never seen it
this dry, this long,” Bailey
added. “There’s a bunch
of people in a lot of bad
shape here.”
The
drought
has
spread from these mountains onto the Piedmont
plateau, down to the plains
and across 13 southern
states, from Oklahoma
and Texas to Florida and
Virginia, putting about 33
million people in drought
conditions, according to
Thursday’s U.S. Drought
Monitor.
Wildfires raged Thursday near Birmingham,
Alabama. Statewide, the
blazes have charred more
than 12,000 acres in the
past 30 days.
“There are places getting ready to set records
for most number of days
in a row without rain. It’s
a once-in-100-year kind
of thing for this time of

“This is the worst
drought that I’ve
ever experienced
and I’ve been
farming for 45
years.”

Phillip Thompson,
farmer

year,” said John Christy,
Alabama’s state climatologist.
The South has historically enjoyed abundant
water, which has been fortunate, because much of
its soil is poor at holding
onto it. But the region’s
booming growth has
strained this resource.
A legal battle between
Georgia and Florida over
water from rivers and
their watersheds goes
before a federal court official Monday, and the U.S.
Supreme Court is expected to review his recommendations.
The dry weather is only
making things worse.
“We’re 10 days away
from a drought at any
given time,” Christy explained. “Unlike the Midwest and other places in
the country, we are closer
to a drought than almost
any place else.”
Parts
of
northern
Georgia and Alabama
have now seen their driest
60 days on record, Thursday’s national drought report showed.
If the drought persists,
authorities said it could
lead to the kinds of water
use restrictions that are
common out West, but haven’t been seen in parts of
the South in nearly a decade.
In 2007, police in Atlanta’s suburb of Alpharetta

were given the power to
criminally cite anyone
watering their lawns. In
Alabama that year, people
were fined for watering on
the wrong day and many
homes became infested
by thirsty ants and cockroaches.
In west Georgia this
month, the Tallapoosa
River dropped below
the intake the Haralson
County Water Authority
uses to provide water to
at least four small towns.
Some major cities are
spending big to prevent
future water shortages:
Atlanta has begun a $300
million project to store 2.4
billion gallons of water —
a month’s water supply —
and pipe it under the city.
This summer was particularly hot as well as
dry, with 90-degree temperatures day after day
that evaporated what little
moisture the soil had left,
said Bill Murphey, Georgia’s state climatologist.
This summer was the
second-hottest on record
in Atlanta, where seasonal rains still haven’t arrived: During the past 30
days, just over two-tenths
of an inch of rain has fallen in Atlanta, 94 percent
below normal, and in Cartersville, about 45 miles
northwest of Atlanta, the
weather service has recorded no rain at all.
The South’s usually
temperate forests have
turned into tinderboxes,
worries Denise Croker,
a chief ranger with the
Georgia Forestry Commission in northwest
Georgia.
In the arid western
U.S., cigarettes tossed
from cars have been
known to start forest
fires. In the South, higher
humidity generally keeps
that from happening, but

not this year. Even a spark
from a chain dragged
from a truck could set the
northwest Georgia woods
on fire, she said.
“Our dirt is like talcum
powder,” she said.
Outdoor burning has
been banned due to fire
risk across parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and
Alabama, and burn permits aren’t being issued
in parts of Georgia.
“This is the worst
drought that I’ve ever experienced and I’ve been
farming for 45 years,” said
Phillip Thompson, 60,
who spent Tuesday night
trying to snuff out a smoldering, 150-acre brush
fire near Scottsboro, Alabama, where he farms
corn and soybeans. “It’s
just a bleak situation.”
Some of the South’s
best known crops — cotton, peanuts and sweet
potatoes — have largely
escaped damage, because
they’re mostly produced
outside the drought area,
and in some cases got rain
from Hurricane Matthew
and other tropical weather, trade groups said.
Peanut yields will be
down due to heat, drought
or hurricanes, but that
won’t likely affect consumer prices, said Dan
Koehler, who directs the
Georgia Peanut Commission.
As for sweet potatoes,
the drought has been
both good and bad: Hard
ground can damage skin
and lead to rot in stored
tubers, but they also start
curing in the ground
when it’s really dry, which
means “they’re really
sweet,” said Sylvia Clark,
secretary of the Mississippi Sweet Potato Association.

© The Dispatch

Columbus:
Leigh Mall
1404 Old Aberdeen Rd

662-328-4450
Starkville:
911 Highway 12 W

662-323-4919

9A

10A FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

Sports

SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000

THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

PREP FOOTBALL

Nicholson confident
Vols will be prepared
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com

STARKVILLE

Chase Nicholson hopes
for a better performance
this week.
Given everything the
Starkville Academy football coach has seen from
his team this week, he
feels confident that the
Volunteers are building to
a good performance.
Seventh-seeded

Starkville Academy (7-3)
will need one of its best
efforts of the season at 7
tonight when it plays host
to 10th-seeded Hartfield
Academy (6-4) in the first
round of the Mississippi
Association of Independent Schools Class AAA
playoffs.
The winner of tonight’s game will take on
the winner of the game
See VOLUNTEERS, 3B

Starkville faces two
must-win games
BY BEN WAIT
bwait@cdispatch.com

Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

Starkville High School defensive back Jaquez Akins
fights for additional yards against Callaway.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

BY BEN WAIT
bwait@cdispatch.com

STARKVILLE — After back-to-back road
games, the Mississippi State football team will
play host to Samford at 2:30 p.m. Saturday (SEC
Network) at Davis Wade Stadium.
MSU (2-5) opened the 2016 schedule with
home games against South Alabama and South
Carolina. It also has played host to Auburn. MSU
lost to BYU 28-21 in double overtime on Oct. 14
in Provo, Utah. Last week, Austin MacGinnis’ 51yard field goal as time expired gave Kentucky a
40-38 victory.
On Saturday MSU will look to improve its
bowl chances and snap Samford’s four-game
winning streak as part of Homecoming.
This will be the 19th meeting between the
teams, and the first since MSU won 43-0 in
Starkville in 1963. MSU leads the series 16-1-1.
See MSU, 6B

GAME 8
n Samford, 2:30 p.m. Saturday
(SEC Network; WKBB-FM 100.9)
Stan Beall/Special to The Dispatch

LIONS ROLLING INTO PLAYOFFS
No. 3 EMCC wins eighth-straight game to set up first-round game at home next Saturday
BY SCOT T WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com

No. 3 EMCC 42, Hinds C.C. 0

SCOOBA — Freshman Duke
Upshaw wanted more after he had
his first taste of action for the East
Mississippi Community College
football team.
However, he knew patience and
his belief in God would help make
that possible.
As the former Baldwyn High
School standout has blossomed, so
has the EMCC defense.
Upshaw had an interception and
fumble recovery Thursday night in
No. 3 EMCC’s 42-0 victory against
Hinds C.C. 42-0 in the Mississippi Association of Community and
Junior Colleges (MACJC) regular-season finale for each team at

INSIDE
n MORE HINDS-EMCC: Former
Starkville High School standout
Jacquez Horsley had a career night to
help the No. 3 East Mississippi
football team conclude the regular
season with an eighth-straight victory.
Page 4B

Sullivan-Windham Field.
“If you saw me make those plays
that was because God was in me,”
Upshaw said. “He was playing
through me. This has just been an
unbelievable opportunity. I am eternally grateful for it. God has put me
here for a reason. The ability to play

this game and make those plays is
possible through Him.”
EMCC won its eighth-straight
game with a second-straight shutout. The victory helped the Lions
remain in the national championship race with three more regular-season rankings scheduled to
be released.
EMCC won the MACJC North
Division championship a week ago
and will play host to the South Division runner-up in the MACJC semifinals Nov. 5.
“It was really important we send
a message the defense was ready
to play,” EMCC sophomore defensive lineman Chauncey Rivers said.
“We really know what our unit is
See EMCC, 4B

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL: World Series

Schwarber draws strength
from ailing Arizona boy
CHICAGO — Kyle Schwarber signed a baseball for Campbell Faulkner. Faulkner gave
Schwarber a green wristband.
Twin acts of kindness, and a
friendship was born.
The slugger with the big
Ohio heart, and
the sunny boy
with a life-threatening illness. A
bond that made
each of them better.
Some
1,700
Schwarber
miles away from
Wrigley
Field,
no one is enjoying Schwarber’s
comeback from a major knee

STARKVILLE — The playoffs have started
for Starkville High School football coach Ricky
Woods.
Even though the postseason doesn’t officially
begin until Nov. 11, Woods’ Yellow Jackets are in
must-win territory with two games remaining.
Starkville (6-3, 3-2 Class 6A, Region 2) will try
to take the first step at 7 tonight when it plays
host to No. 2 Warren Central (8-1, 4-1) at Yellow
Jacket Stadium.
Starkville will travel to No. 4 Clinton next
See STARKVILLE, 3B

MSU out to get back
on winning track

East Mississippi Community College quarterback De’Andre Johnson threw for 179 yards and two touchdowns
Thursday night to lead the No. 3 EMCC football team to a 42-0 victory against Hinds C.C.

BY JAY COHEN
The Associated Press

B
SECTION

injury more than Faulkner and
his family. The 10-year-old
Faulkner — “If you ask him,
he’s two hands,” his mother
Carrie says — stays up to watch
his buddy in the World Series,
and Schwarber proudly wears
his Campbell’s Crew wristband
while he tries to help the Chicago Cubs to their first championship since 1908.
“He’s a kid who can always
put a smile on my face,” Schwarber said.
Faulkner has a rare mitochondrial disease. His body
doesn’t know how to use food
and Oxygen properly.
Doctors knew something
was wrong with Faulkner just
See SCHWARBER, 7B

SCHEDULE

CLEVELAND INDIANS 1,
CHICAGO CUBS 1
(Best-of-seven;
x-if necessary)
All games on WLOV
Tuesday, Oct. 25
n Cleveland 6, Chicago 0
Wednesday, Oct. 26
n Chicago 5, Cleveland 1
Today’s Game
n Cleveland (Tomlin 13-9) at
Chicago (Hendricks 16-8),
7:08 p.m.
Saturday’s Game
n Cleveland (Kluber 18-9) at
Chicago (Lackey 11-8),
7:08 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
n Cleveland at Chicago,
7:15 p.m.
x-Tuesday’s Game
n Chicago at Cleveland,
7:08 p.m.
x-Wednesday’s Game
n Chicago at Cleveland,
7:08 p.m.

Pettway, Auburn
running wild again
BY JOHN ZENOR
The Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. — The Auburn football team
is running wild again, this time
with a mostly dropback passer
at quarterback and two tailbacks
who were virtual unknowns
outside the state coming into the
season.
The 15th-ranked Tigers, with
no Cam Newton or Nick Marshall
Pettway
to bulldoze or dart past defenders,
have resurrected their ground
game and, in the process, their season with a
four-game winning streak .
Even without tailback Kerryon Johnson,
See AUBURN, 6B

GAME 8
n No. 15 Auburn,
6:15 p.m. Saturday
(SEC Network; WNMQ-FM 103.1)

Fall Classic back at Wrigley
for first time in 71 years
BY JAY COHEN
The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Chicago Cubs
slugger Kyle Schwarber was
followed by cameras and cellphones. A couple of pitchers
from the Cleveland Indians
played hacky sack in the outfield. The giant videoboard in
left field flashed “World Series.”
So, no, nothing like the last
Fall Classic at Wrigley Field.
The World Series returns
to one of baseball’s iconic ballparks tonight when the Cubs
and Indians face off in Game
3 after splitting the first two
nights in chilly Cleveland. It’s
the first World Series game at

Wrigley since Hall of Famer
Hank Greenberg helped the
Detroit Tigers to a 9-3 victory
in Game 7 on October 10, 1945 .
The expectation is, well,
even more bedlam than usual.
The Cubs, seeking their first
championship in 108 years,
played in front of packed, frenzied crowds for much of the season, and even the Indians are
looking forward to the scene.
“(Tonight’s) going to be unbelievable,” Cleveland slugger
Mike Napoli said. “I watched
when they clinched to go to the
World Series and how crazy it
was and seeing the fans in the
See WRIGLEY, 3B

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

2B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

OLYMPICS: Rio Games

FOOTBALL: NFL

WADA cites near collapse of anti-doping program

Tennessee defeats Jacksonville to end home woes

By The Associated Press

MONTREAL — The World Anti-Doping Agency has detailed serious
failings of doping control management
at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, saying
the system was only saved from collapsing by the “enormous resourcefulness and goodwill” of some key staff.
In a 55-page report from its independent observer team led by British
lawyer Jonathan Taylor, WADA said
the logistical issues which put a strain
on the testing process were “foreseeable and entirely avoidable” during the
games in August.
The report blamed a lack of coordination, budget cutbacks, tension between the local organizing committee
and Brazil’s anti-doping agency, and
inadequate training for the problems
that included days when only half of
the out-of-competition samples could
be collected in the athletes village.
“Many athletes targeted for testing
in the athletes village simply could not
be found and the mission had to be
aborted,” the report said. “On some
days, up to 50 per cent of planned target tests were aborted in this way.”

The report, which was released by
the Montreal-based agency on Thursday, said the sample collection process
in the village was so strained that it
came “close to breaking point.”
“It was only due to the enormous resourcefulness and goodwill of some key
doping control personnel working at the
games that the process did not break
down entirely,” the report said. “Due to
their initiative, tenacity and professionalism in the face of great difficulties, the
many problems identified above were
patched over and sample collection was
conducted in a manner that ensured the
identity and integrity of the samples.”
In another key failure, the report said
no out-of-competition testing was conducted in soccer and “little or no in-competition blood testing” in some high risksports, including weightlifting.
Doping was in the spotlight in the
months before the Rio Games, with allegations of state-sponsored doping in
Russia leading to sanctions against some
Russian athletes and the retesting of 840
samples from the 2008 and 2012 Olympics barring dozens of other athletes
from competing in Brazil.

BY STEVE MEGARGEE
The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — There’s nothing like a visit from the Jacksonville Jaguars to make the Tennessee Titans remember how to protect their home field.
Marcus Mariota threw for 270 yards
and two touchdowns to end his home
struggles and the Titans had their highest point total of the season in a 36-22 victory Thursday night.
Since the start of the 2014 season,
the Titans are 3-0 at home against the
Jaguars and 1-17 against everybody else.
The Titans are 3-8 in home games started by Mariota.
“It was important,” Mariota said.
“Hopefully this will build a foundation for
the rest of the year and give the fans what
they really want.”
Mariota was 18 of 22 and had a 148.1
passer rating, the second-highest of
his career. DeMarco Murray ran for
123 yards and a touchdown to help
Tennessee rebound four days after
losing a lead in a 34-26 home loss to
Indianapolis.
“I thought it was good to have a short
turnaround,” Titans coach Mike Mu-

Jacksonville
Tennessee

Titans 36, Jaguars 22

0 0 8 14—22
3 24
6 3—36
First Quarter
Ten—FG Succop 32, 3:31.
Second Quarter
Ten—Wright 36 pass from Mariota (Succop kick), 14:53.
Ten—Henry 6 run (Succop kick), 10:36.
Ten—Murray 14 run (Succop kick), 7:09.
Ten—FG Succop 22, :00.
Third Quarter
Jac—Thomas 10 pass from Bortles (Bortles run), 11:05.
Ten—Matthews 4 pass from Mariota (kick failed), 6:53.
Fourth Quarter
Ten—FG Succop 33, 12:32.
Jac—Hurns 5 pass from Bortles (Myers kick), 3:11.
Jac—Walters 7 pass from Bortles (Myers kick), :01.
A—61,619.

Jac Ten
First downs
27
25
Total Net Yards
370
494
Rushes-yards
11-48 43-214
Passing
322 280
Punt Returns
2-0
1-9
Kickoff Returns
2-45
1-4
Interceptions Ret.
0-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int
33-54-0 19-23-0
Sacked-Yards Lost
2-15
0-0
Punts
6-45.8 4-38.8
Fumbles-Lost
2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards
7-75 7-54
Time of Possession
25:35
34:25
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Jacksonville, Bortles 4-22, Yeldon 3-20, Ivory 4-6. Tennessee,
Murray 21-123, Henry 16-60, Wright 1-15, Mariota 3-11, Walker 1-3, Cassel 1-2.
PASSING—Jacksonville, Bortles 33-54-0-337. Tennessee, Mariota 18-22-0270, Cassel 1-1-0-10.
RECEIVING—Jacksonville, Hurns 7-98, A.Robinson 6-70, Koyack 5-41, Yeldon
4-36, Lewis 4-23, Thomas 3-28, Walters 2-14, Lee 1-21, Ivory 1-6. Tennessee,
Wright 4-84, Walker 4-75, Matthews 4-38, Henry 4-37, Supernaw 1-30, Sharpe
1-11, Murray 1-5.

larkey said. “It was a difficult loss we had
against Indy. We had to get focused right
on these guys immediately, especially
with a prime-time game. We wanted to
show what we’re capable of doing, show
the country what we’re trying to do here.”

COLLEGES

NCAA to give millions for academic performance
BY RALPH D. RUSSO
The Associated Press

The NCAA will distribute millions of dollars in March Madness
money to member schools as a reward for academic performance by
athletes, starting in 2019-20.
The NCAA announced Thursday
that the Division I Board of Directors and NCAA Board of Governors
approved the change to the revenue
distribution model. The money will
come from the NCAA’s multimedia
rights deal for the men’s basketball
tournament.
The NCAA agreed to an eightyear extension of that contract
with CBS and Turner this year. The
agreement now runs through 2032
and ups payment to the NCAA to
about $1.1 billion per year, an increase of about $330 million annually. For the first six years of the new
distribution, 75 percent of the increase in rights fees will be used to
create academic distribution units
similar to the units that are earned

by conferences based on team performance in the NCAA Division I
men’s basketball tournament.
After the first six years, the
NCAA said, the percentage of
growth allocated to the academic
unit will equal the percentage applied to all other distributions.
“The creation of an academic
distribution unit underscores the
NCAA’s commitment to putting its
money where its mission is — with
students,” NCAA President Mark
Emmert said in a statement.
Academic units will be awarded
to schools that earn:
n An overall, single-year, allsport Academic Progress Rate of
985 or higher. The APR is used to
hold schools accountable for the
academic progress of their student-athletes by measuring eligibility and retention of each player for
each academic term.
n An overall all-sport graduation
rate of 90 percent or higher.
n A federal graduation rate that
is at least 13 percentage points high-

er than the federal graduation rate
of the student body at that school.
The academic unit revenue, like
athletic performance units revenue,
will be paid to a conference and distributed in a manner agreed upon
by its members.
University of Colorado Chancellor Philip DiStefano, who cochaired the working group that conceived the academic unit, said the
formula should allow for all schools,
no matter the resources or admissions standards, to have a realistic
chance of earning an academic distribution.
DiStefano said any concern that
incentivizing academic performance with payments could lead to
misconduct or schools steering athletes toward less strenuous course
work is outweighed by the benefits.
“When you do things that are
bold, you certainly take a risk,”
DiStefano told the AP. “I would look
at it as we’re incentivizing institutions to do better and to make sure
that more students are graduating.”

GYMNASTICS

Sex abuse lawsuit names ex-USA doctor, Karolyis
BY WILL GRAVES AND
AMANDA LEE MYERS
The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The
latest lawsuit accusing a
former USA Gymnastics
doctor of sexually abusing a longtime member of
the U.S. women’s national
team is the first to name
renowned husband-andwife coaches Bela and
Martha Karolyi, alleging
they turned a blind eye to
molestations.
The
lawsuit,
filed
Thursday in Los Angeles,
does not provide specifics
about what the Karolyis
were allegedly told about
the abuse, just that they
knew about it and did
nothing to stop it.
The Karolyis didn’t return messages seeking
comment.
The civil lawsuit, filed
by the now 24-year-old

former gymnast, claims
Dr. Larry Nassar repeatedly sexually abused her
when she was on the national team from 2006 to
2011.
Nassar’s
attorney
didn’t respond to messages Thursday but his
lawyer has previously vehemently denied abuse
allegations by two other
gymnasts. Nassar hasn’t
been criminally charged.
The lawsuit accuses the
Karolyis of creating a toxic
environment that allowed
the alleged abuse to thrive
at their ranch north of
Houston, where gymnasts
would stay in bungalows
while receiving individual
instruction from the national staff and medical attention from Nassar.
“Everyone left and
went back to the house
and left Larry Nassar

alone with a bunch of little girls,” said John Manly, the attorney representing the gymnast who filed
Thursday’s lawsuit.
“There are a lot of former national team members who are gutted emotionally,” he said.
The Karolyis and the
current and former presidents of USA Gymnastics
“had knowledge of inappropriate conduct and
molestations committed
by (Nassar) before and
during his employment,
yet chose to allow him
to remain unsupervised
where he sexually abused
plaintiff,” according to the
lawsuit.
Manly declined to discuss specifics about the
allegation that the Karolyis knew of the abuse,
saying it would only help
their case.

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BRIEFLY
Brightwell gets hole-in-one at Elm Lake

Mississippi State student Ryan Brightwell made a hole-in-one at
Thursday at Elm Lake.
Brightwell aced No. 17 with a pitching wedge. Daniel Brown was
the witness.

Mississippi State
Women’s soccer team loses to Texas A&M

STARKVILLE — The Mississippi State soccer team lost to
Texas A&M 2-1 on Thursday night at the MSU Soccer Field.
The loss capped the season for MSU (6-12-0, 1-10 Southeastern Conference).
MSU tied the match in the 47th minute after a long kick
from Ari Holmes found its way into the box for a sliding Mallory
Eubanks. The goal for the Bulldogs was the soccer program’s
first against the Aggies in the five-game series.
One minute later, Stephanie Malherbe found Grace Wright
for the game-winner.
MSU outshot Texas A&M 13-4 in the second half.
“I’m very proud of the effort our team gave tonight,” MSU
coach Aaron Gordon said. “They’ve played this way all season
and we fought Texas A&M for the full 90 minutes. Looking
forward I think the future is bright because we have a very young
team who learned a lot of lessons this season. We’ve had a lot
of one-goal losses (eight) and that’s due partly to luck and being
as young as we are. We’re only losing one starter from this team,
so I’m excited for how this team will grow and develop over the
offseason.”
n Today’s Maroon Madness will feature Ace Hood: At
Starkville, Homecoming weekend tips off with basketball, a stroll
off, a pep rally and special guest Ace Hood as Maroon Madness
returns to Humphrey Coliseum today.
Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., with the National Pan-Hellenic
Council’s Stroll Off beginning at 7 p.m. Admission to the evening
at the Hump is free.
All bags will be searched at the main entrances.
Concession stands selling pizza and other goods will be
available on the concourse by the entrance.
All parking lots will be open to fans with the exception of lots
34 and 38.
The event continues at 8:30 p.m. with performances by the
popular rapper Ace Hood, the first look at Ben Howland’s men’s
team and Vic Schaefer’s preseason top-10 women’s squad,
the introduction of the 2016 homecoming court, and a pep rally
featuring the MSU spirit squads, Bully and Jak.
n In related news, the women’s basketball team was ranked
No. 11 in the USA Today Coaches preseason poll.
Thursday’s rating was a seven-spot jump for MSU after it
ended 2015-16 18th.
The Bulldogs return nine letterwinners, including all five
starters, from last year’s squad that set the school wins record for
the second-straight year with 28 and matched the program SEC
wins best with 11 en route to advancing to the NCAA Sweet 16.
n No. 29 cross country team prepares for SEC
Championships​: At Fayetteville, Arkansas, Championship
season has arrived for the No. 29 cross country team.
Last season, the Bulldogs exited a rain-soaked Texas A&M
course with 95 points and a program-best 2nd place finish. Five
of the eight members of that squad return this season, and bring
with them even higher aspirations.
Five of the eight athletes that helped guide MSU to their
highest finish in school history will take the course Saturday.
Senior Rhianwedd Price has paced MSU in three of four meets
so far in 2016, and was the team’s third-highest finisher at SEC
Championships last season. Mia Meydrich, Ffion Price, Shannon
Fair and Antonia Hehr also competed in the SEC Championships
last season, while Stephanie Peterson, Carly Terp, Emma Tucker,
Kristy Terp and Alex Wallace will get their first taste of the Arkansas cross country course.
n Four Bulldogs will compete this weekend at Roberta
Alison Fall Classic: At Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Four members
of the women’s tennis team will compete this weekend in the
Roberta Alison Fall Classic.
MSU’s sophomores, 75th-ranked Anastasia Rentouli and
Caroline Kelly, along with newcomers Lisa Marie Rioux and Sara
Lizariturry, will be in action for State in the tournament. The first
round of doubles is set to start this morning, followed by the first
round of singles. The second round of singles will take place this
afternoon.
In the Nancy Harris Doubles Draw, the Bulldog pair of
Lizariturry and Rioux will face Alabama-Birmingham’s Marlene
Herrmann and Pardis Kianoush to open things today. In the Lori
Smith Doubles Draw, State’s duo of Kelly and Rentouli match up
with Mercer’s Katie Sidor and Anna Sovic.
To start singles play, MSU’s Kelly will play Troy’s Hannah
Seizer in the Patricia Morgan Draw. In the Patti Farmer Draw, the
State newcomer Lizariturry will face Kansas’ Summer Collins.
Representing the Bulldogs in the Myke Loomis Draw, the 75thranked Rentouli matches up with Clemson’s Constanza Gorches.
And in the Selia Matthew Draw, MSU’s Rioux will play Kansas’
Tanya Nikolaeva.
The second round of doubles will begin on Saturday at 9
a.m., followed by the third round of doubles. The event will conclude in the afternoon with the third round of singles. If weather
interferes on Friday or Saturday to the point of cancellation, the
schedule will be pushed back a day and matches will be played
on Sunday.
n Volleyball team loses to Arkansas: At Fayetteville, Arkansas, Jelena Vujcin had a career-high 19 kills, but the olleyball
lost to Arkansas 3-1 on Wednesday at Barnhill Arena in a SEC
match. Set scores were 26-24, 22-25, 23-25, 25-27.
Evie Grace Singleton had 17 kills for her best showing in
a SEC match this season for MSU (12-12, 4-6 SEC). Emily Hill
added 12 kills.
“That was a tough one tonight,” MSU coach David McFatrich
said. “We struggled in a number of areas and weren’t able to
capitalize in crunch time. Now we have to turn around and get
ready for one of the top teams in the nation in Missouri.”
Blossom Sato led MSU with 38 assists. Payton Harris had 17
digs to move into sole possession of third place on MSU’s career
digs list. Jazmyne Johnson had a team-high four blocks.
n Softball team announces dates for winter camps: At
Starkville, MSU softball coach Vann Stuedeman and her staff are
accepting applications for this winter’s softball camps on Jan.
28-29, 2017. The winter camp will feature multiple sessions on
hitting, defense, and pitching.
The camp is designed to provide intensive instruction on
all aspects of the game of softball, focusing on hitting skills,
defensive skills, base running, and game strategy. All defensive
positions including pitching and catching will be covered, along
with extensive instruction on hitting. Athletes will have the opportunity to get live-game experience as well.
For more information, go to www.hailstatecamps.com/
softball.
— From Special Reports

Volunteers

Starkville

CALENDAR

Local

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

Basketball

NBA

Continued from Page 1B

Prep Basketball
Saturday’s Games
West Point Jamboree
Tupelo (girls) at West Point, 9 a.m.
Tupelo (boys) at West Point, 9:45 a.m.
Tupelo (girls) vs. New Hope, 10:30 a.m.
Tupelo (boys) vs. Starkville, 11:15 a.m.
Starkville (girls) vs. New Hope, Noon
Starkville (boys) vs. Noxubee County, 12:45 p.m.
Starkville (girls) vs. Durant, 1:30 p.m.
New Hope (boys) vs. Noxubee County, 2:15 p.m.
New Hope (boys) vs. Durant, 3 p.m.
Durant (girls) vs. Kosciusko, 3:45 p.m.
Durant (boys) vs. Kosciusko, 4:30 p.m.
West Point (girls) vs. Kosciusko, 5:15 p.m.
West Point (boys) vs. Kosciusko, 6 p.m.

Prep Football

Today’s Games
South Panola at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Hope at West Point, 7 p.m.
Caledonia at Leake Central, 7 p.m.
West Lowndes at Coffeeville, 7 p.m.
Warren Central at Starkville High, 7 p.m.
Houston at Noxubee County, 7 p.m.
Aberdeen at Nettleton, 7 p.m.
Smithville at Hamilton, 7 p.m.
Kosciusko at Louisville, 7 p.m.
Corinth at Amory, 7 p.m.
East Webster at Eupora, 7 p.m.
Strider Academy at Central Academy, 7 p.m.
Kemper Academy at Hebron Christian, 7 p.m.
Hillcrest at Aliceville, 7 p.m.
South Lamar at Sulligent, 7 p.m.
Kingwood Christian at Pickens Academy, 7 p.m.
Mississippi Association of Independent Schools
Class AAA Playoffs — First Round
St. Aloysius at Heritage Academy, 7 p.m.
Hartfield Academy at Starkville Academy, 7 p.m.

College Cross Country

Today’s Meet
SEC Championships (Fayetteville, Arkansas)

College Football

Saturday’s Games
Samford at Mississippi State, 2:30 p.m.
Marshall at Southern Mississippi, 6 p.m.
Auburn at Ole Miss, 6:15 p.m.

College Soccer

Today’s Match
Southern Mississippi at UTEP, 7 p.m.

College Volleyball

Today’s Matches
Tennessee at Alabama, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Southern Mississippi, 6 p.m.
Ole Miss at Florida, 6 p.m.
Sunday’s Matches
North Texas at Southern Mississippi, Noon
Kentucky at Alabama, 1:30 p.m.
Mississippi State at Missouri, 2 p.m.

Junior College Football

Saturday’s Game
Itawamba at Holmes, 3 p.m.
n On the Air Page 5B

Wrigley

3B

week in its regular-season finale.
“It’s like you’re in the first round. You’ve just
got to keep winning or you don’t play,” Woods said.
Starkville is tied for fourth with Northwest
Rankin in the region, but Northwest Rankin holds
the tiebreaker because of a 28-7 victory on Sept.
30. Northwest Rankin will play tonight at Madison
Central and play host to Murrah (2-8).
Starkville has defeated Callaway (30-6), Greenville (70-0), and Murrah (56-8) in region play. It also
has lost to Madison Central (29-14) in the region.
With all the pressure on this week’s game, the
reigning Mississippi High School Activities Association Class 6A State champions are in good spirits.
“We’ve been on it,” junior running back Andreus Swanigan said. “Everybody has been doing
their part and coming together as a team. We’ve
been 100 percent and everybody has been focused. Even if they’re not playing, they’re focused.
They’re focused on the game. They’ll be yelling
stuff out to help different positions.”
After missing the game against West Point on
Sept. 2 and the game against Meridian on Sept.
16, Swanigan had a breakout game with 107 yards
on nine carries and three touchdowns last week
against Murrah. He has 382 yards on 56 carries
for the season.
Swanigan said practices have been intense and
everybody has been on high alert to execute at a
high level.
Woods has liked his team’s attitude.
“We’ve had three great days of practice,”
Woods said. “They know. We talked about it Monday and they know. We’ve really worked hard and
I think we’ve got a good plan. Now we’ve just got
to go execute and everybody’s got to play hard.”
Warren Central beat then-No. 1 Clinton 50-32
last Friday. Woods praised the job Warren Central
coach Josh Morgan has done and likes what he
has seen from senior quarterback Jesse Wilson
(67 of 129 for 996 yards, 10 touchdowns) and senior running back Joe’vonte Shorter (892 yards,
13 touchdowns).
Starkville senior linebacker Willie Gay said focus in practice wasn’t where it needed to be after
a 20-10 loss at Meridian. Senior defensive lineman
Nelson Jordan said the focus has been on point this
week.
“You’ve got to get your mind right,” Jordan
said. “Football is more of a mental game than it
is physical, so you’ve got to get your mind right
before you go out and play. As a team, as a whole,
we’re focusing.
“It’s lead by example. Once you do right as a
senior, everybody looks up to you as a leader on
the team. You have to lead by example.”
Jordan has 52 tackles (13 for loss) and seven
sacks and one fumble recovery.
Woods called this the “biggest game by far,”
and is excited about how his players will respond
to a playoff-like atmosphere.
“I feel good about it,” Woods said. “I think
we’re going to play really, really hard. If we just
don’t make mistakes, we have a good chance at
winning.”
Follow Dispatch sports writer Ben Wait on Twitter @bcwait

Wednesday’s Games
Indiana 130, Dallas 121, OT
Miami 108, Orlando 96
Boston 122, Brooklyn 117
Toronto 109, Detroit 91
Charlotte 107, Milwaukee 96
Denver 107, New Orleans 102
Memphis 102, Minnesota 98
Oklahoma City 103, Philadelphia 97
Sacramento 113, Phoenix 94
L.A. Lakers 120, Houston 114
Thursday’s Games
Atlanta 114, Washington 99
Chicago 105, Boston 99
L.A. Clippers 114, Portland 106
San Antonio 102, Sacramento 94
Today’s Games
Cleveland at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 8 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 11:30 a.m.
Boston at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Memphis at New York, 6:30 p.m.
Orlando at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Portland at Denver, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m.

Football

College Schedule

Today’s Games
EAST
Yale (1-5) at Columbia (2-4), 6 p.m.
SOUTH
Navy (5-1) at South Florida (6-2), 6 p.m.
FAR WEST
San Diego St. (6-1) at Utah St. (3-4), 7 p.m.
Air Force (4-3) at Fresno St. (1-7), 9:30 p.m.

Thursday’s Mississippi
Prep Scores

Charleston 33, Independence 0
Franklin Co. 38, Jefferson County 6
Southaven 21, DeSoto Central 14
West Lauderdale 34, Northeast Lauderdale 20

Thursday’s Alabama Prep
Scores

Local
Gordo 62, Pickens County 12
Sulligent 28, South Lamar 20
State
Athens 35, Huntsville 7
Beauregard 63, Benjamin Russell 35
Brewer 55, Grissom 12
Brookwood 50, Holt 12
Buckhorn 42, North Jackson 23
Bullock County 36, Barbour County 12
Carver-Birmingham 25, Greensboro 18
Catholic-Montgomery 60, Marbury 33
Chambers Academy 41, Springwood School 6
Charles Henderson 39, Northview 20
Citronelle 37, Washington County 33
Cleveland 42, Susan Moore 20
Collinsville 28, Valley Head 20
Daleville 48, Cottonwood 21
Dallas County 48, Billingsley 12
Fullington, Ga. 35, Edgewood Academy 26
Hackleburg 35, Phil Campbell 19
Hillcrest 34, Thompson 23
Hueytown 59, Oak Grove 29
Huffman 16, Bessemer City 3
J.B. Pennington 48, Douglas 14
Jackson Olin 20, Fairfield 9
James Clemens 35, Austin 14
LaFayette 54, Notasulga 20
Linden 68, Choctaw County 0
Lowndes Academy 34, Southern Academy 26
McAdory 35, Greenville 20
Monroe County 26, Excel 12
Montevallo 16, Fultondale 12
Mortimer Jordan 14, Fayette County 0
Mountain Brook 19, Ramsay 13
Murphy 28, Vigor 14
Muscle Shoals 35, Deshler 7
Northridge 48, Central-Tuscaloosa 13
Northside 41, Holy Spirit 0
Ohatchee 42, Pisgah 22
Opp 43, Elba 24
Parker 14, Woodlawn 8
Red Bay 40, Cherokee 14
Reeltown 33, Loachapoka 27
Rogers 42, Hamilton 28
Samson 42, Kinston 20
Saraland 62, B.C. Rain 26
Satsuma 34, Chickasaw 30
Sheffield 57, Hubbard 8
South Montgomery County Academy 51,
Macon-East 13
Southside-Selma 60, Ellwood Christian
Academy 0
Spain Park 52, Minor 42
Spanish Fort 25, LeFlore 6
St. Clair County 28, Springville 22
Stanhope Elmore 42, Selma 36
Sylvania 49, Ider 21
Tanner 35, East Limestone 14
Tarrant 26, Talladega County Central 12
Wadley 26, Horseshoe Bend 0
Walker 55, Dora 7
Walter Wellborn 62, White Plains 13

Continued from Page 1B
streets where they had to have police
escorts. You could just see the crowd
just part ways.
“So it’s going to be fun. It’s something
that I wanted to be a part of, and thought
that it would be an unbelievable World
Series,” he said.
It’s been pretty great so far, and it’s
only getting started.
Corey Kluber pitched the Indians to a
6-0 win on Tuesday, striking out nine in a
dazzling performance. After Josh Tomlin
makes his third playoff start in the Wrigley opener, Kluber looms over Game 4 on
Saturday night on short rest.
The Cubs returned to Chicago on
a high after working over Cleveland’s
pitching staff in a 5-1 victory Wednesday
night. Trevor Bauer lasted just 3 2/3 innings, beginning a parade to the mound
that included six relievers and a total of
196 pitches.
“That was the plan, to get at least one
over there and bring it back home,” second
baseman Javier Baez said. “Everybody is
excited to be here in Chicago. Everybody
has been waiting for this moment.”
Schwarber will be relegated to
pinch-hitting moments for the next three
games after doctors said it was too soon
after major left knee surgery to risk putting him in the outfield. The move takes

one of Chicago’s best bats out of the lineup after a surprising return by the slugger for the Series.
“We’re going to respect the doctors,”
president of baseball operations Theo
Epstein said. “They’re the professionals here and move forward. Kyle understands that. He wants to play, he’s the
ultimate gamer, but he understands that
the doctor’s judgment has to rule the day
in this case.”
Schwarber was ruled out for the year
after he tore two knee ligaments in an
outfield collision with Dexter Fowler in
Chicago’s third game of the season. But
he had an encouraging checkup with Dr.
Daniel Cooper on Oct. 17 in Dallas, clearing the way for a short stay in the Arizona
Fall League before serving as the designated hitter in Cleveland.
Facing major league pitching for the
first time in six months, Schwarber doubled and walked in Game 1. He added a
pair of RBI singles Wednesday night ,
leading to lengthy phone conversations
with Cooper and Dr. Stephen Gryzlo, one
of the Cubs’ physicians, that ultimately
led to the safe route for the 23-year-old
catcher/outfielder.
“Facts are facts,” Schwarber said. “I
just can’t physically do it. So I’m going to
be ready at any time during the game to

go out there and pinch-hit.”
The lack of a designated hitter for the
NL park also affects the Indians, likely
sending Carlos Santana to left field for
only the second time in his career. He
also played left for four innings on Aug.
12, 2012, against Boston.
“We’re thinking about it,” manager
Terry Francona said. “I think, I mean,
there’s no reason not to — it’s no big
secret, we’re trying to balance scoring
more runs than them. OK, he’s a big part
of our offense.”
Santana set career highs with 34 homers and 87 RBIs this season. The switch
hitter also walked 99 times and had a
.259 batting average for his best number
since he hit .268 in 2013.
The Indians managed just four hits
against Jake Arrieta and two relievers
in Game 2, and they are looking at another challenging matchup with Kyle
Hendricks going for the Cubs at Wrigley. The major league ERA leader had
a 1.32 ERA in 15 home games this year,
and is coming off 7 1/3 shutout innings
against Los Angeles in the clinching
Game 6 of the NL Championship Series.
“It just feels like I’m right at home,
honestly,” Hendricks said. “I think
that’s part of why I’ve had the success
here.”

Continued from Page 1B

between second-seeded
Adams County Christian
Academy and 15th-seeded North Delta Academy
next week. If ACCS wins,
that game would be in
Natchez. If North Delta
Academy wins, the winner of the Starkville Academy-Hartfield Academy
game would play host to
a second-round playoff
game.
Nicholson isn’t thinking that far ahead. Instead, he is focused on
carrying over a strong
week of practice that
helped erase the feeling
of a 14-12 victory against
Winston Academy last
week. Nicholson wasn’t
pleased with how the Volunteers performed, so he
called captains Dalton
Dempsey, Torin Hamilton, Drew Jackson, and

Carter Roach on Saturday
morning and asked them
for their help. He said the
four seniors agreed the
players needed to talk,
so they gathered in a
closed-door, players-only
meeting Monday for 10
minutes.
“They are a really good
group of seniors,” Nicholson said. “They want to
be great leaders, and they
have it in them. They had
a moment, so we will see
how it goes.”
Nicholson said the
meeting was the first of
its kind this season. He
said he didn’t listen outside the door like a little
brother, but he acknowledged he heard laughter
and quiet before the meeting ended. He said he has
a sense of what was said
in the room after hearing

some of his players say
things like, “Today, all the
joking ends. It gets real
today.”
Nicholson said he has
heard comments like that
all week as the Volunteers
have gotten better each
day of the week. He said
that has been the pattern
the Volunteers have followed almost every week
this season. The exception was last week, when
he said Starkville Academy had “the greatest
practice of the season”
Monday practice to begin
preparations for Winston
Academy. He said the
next two practices were
“average” before the team
regrouped Thursday, but
he said the efforts earlier
in the week translated to
the field.
Judging from the way

the players responded
that day in practice and
in the next three days,
Nicholson is confident
everyone is going to be
motivated and ready to go
for what should be a challenge in the first round.
“(The close loss to
Winston Academy) could
have been the best thing
in the world for us because we really have
played good football all
year,” Nicholson said.
“We really have not just
played bad, and I thought
Friday night we did not
play well as a team.”
Nicholson said the proverbial light bulb clicked
for his players and they
understood they needed
to look back on their history to realize steady improvement every day in
practice leads to a strong

effort on Friday nights.
He is looking forward to
seeing if the Volunteers
can improve on their
practice last Monday and
deliver the best week of
practices this season. He
believes the Volunteers
will produce that kind of
effort because his players
don’t want the season to
end.
Hartfield
Academy,
which is coming off a 2410 victory against Central
Hinds last week, defeated
Winston Academy 34-14
on Sept. 30.
“You don’t win a game
on Friday,” Nicholson
said. “We watch a lot of
film. The guys watch a lot
of film and do a lot of stuff
on their own. They can
see Hartfield Academy
is a good team, but what
they have done in the

past doesn’t matter. What
we have done in the past
doesn’t matter. What matters is what we do Monday through Thursday to
get us ready for Friday.
“(Assistant coach and
defensive
coordinator
Brad) Butler has said it
a bunch. When you go
in Friday night and you
know what you’re doing
and you feel confident in
what you’re doing, playing is a lot more fun. Monday through Thursday is
where you gain your confidence to go in and play.
They know what to do and
how to play the game. It is
all about mentally preparing and getting ready for
the opponent this week. If
we don’t, we’re done.”
Follow Dispatch sports
editor Adam Minichino on
Twitter @ctsportseditor

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

4B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: No. 3 East Mississippi C.C. 42, Hinds C.C. 0

Horsley’s career night helps EMCC extend winning streak to eight

po game plan on offense always has been pass heavy,
the Lions always manage
to have a marquee back.
This year is slightly different.
Quarterback De’Andre
Johnson, along with sophomores Isaiah Wright and
Horsley have been the

leaders. Freshmen Tyrell
Price and Brieton Sykes
have combined for 96 of
the team’s 360 rushes.
Wright didn’t play last
week in a 42-0 victory
against Coahoma C.C.
so he could rest for the
team’s stretch run. Against
Hinds, Wright only had

two carries.
Overall, EMCC (8-1)
ran 41 times for 342 yards,
which is its second-best
rushing game of the season.
“We have some options
back there,” EMCC coach
Buddy Stephens said. “We
have four players who
would be the No. 1 running
back for most of the teams
around the state. It has
been a challenge making
sure everybody stays involved.”
With a desire to re-tool
the program’s image and
to keep the margin of victory down, the running game
has come into a clearer
focus. The Lions also are
thriving on a staple of Stephens’ system — 5-yard
passes in the flats.
“I think the thing we can
be most proud of is the balance,” Johnson said. “We
have really worked hard at
that. When you have a guy
going the way (Horsley)
was going, he needs to get
touches. He needs to keep
making things happen.”
Johnson threw for 179
yards and two touchdowns.
Reserve quarterback Vijay
Miller played some series
early after the Lions had
built a 14-0 advantage.

East Miss. Comm. College 42,
Hinds C.C. 0

season.
“Now, we are back
there, all of the time. That
kind of helps set the tone.
When you get a few sacks
and you have (sophomore
defensive end Chauncey Rivers) batting down
passes, it can get frustrating. Being chased by
(linebacker Dakota Allen) is not fun, either.”
Allen, a transfer from
Texas Tech, leads the
MACJC in tackles. His
strip led to a fumble recovery by Pounds. EMCC’s other two takeaways
belonged to Upshaw, who
intercepted a pass thrown

by quarterback JP Elkins
under duress by Allen
and Rivers and recovered
a fumbled fair-catch attempt on a kickoff.
“We kind of have that
spark,” Allen said. “Everybody is doing the right
thing at the same time.
I don’t think you would
recognize the defense if
you saw it earlier in the
season. The whole season
you point toward the playoffs. We wanted to be at
our best at this time.”
EMCC cranked out
342 rushing yards and led
28-0 at halftime. Former
Starkville standout Jac-

BY SCOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com

SCOOBA — East Mississippi Community College sophomore running
back Jacquez Horsley
felt a little giddy when he
watched from Hinds C.C.’s
rushing defense on tape
this past week.
Horsley had high hopes.
However, his performance
Thursday night was even
better than his dreams.
Horsley’s career-high
150 rushing yards and two
touchdowns helped lead
No. 3 EMCC to a 42-0 victory against Hinds C.C.
in the Mississippi Association of Community and
Junior Colleges (MACJC) regular-season finale
for both teams at Sullivan-Windham Field.
“My goal is always
to help the team win,”
said Horsley, a former
Starkville High School
standout. “However, I am
pretty excited about how
this game went. We like to
pass a lot here. Everybody
knows that, so when you
know going in the game
plan is going to be a lot of
run, you have to get excited.”
While EMCC’s up-tem-

EMCC

Stan Beall/Special to The Dispatch

Former Starkville High School standout and East
Mississippi Community College sophomore running
back Jacquez Horsley rushed for a career-high 150
yards and had two touchdowns Thursday night in a
42-0 victory against Hinds C.C.

ting us the ball.”
EMCC will play host to
a MACJC state semifinal
Nov. 5. The Lions hope the
good offensive vibes can
carry the team to two more
wins and a return to the national championship game.
Horsley will continue
to watch film so he will be
able to do his part. It was
his third 100-yard game at
EMCC but first since Sept.
10, 2015, against Coahoma
C.C. The two touchdowns
scored happened for the
second time in his career.
“That was fun,” Horsley
said. “Hopefully, we can do
it again.”

EMCC finished with
342 rushing yards and
246 passing yards. Nine
players caught a pass,
while eight had rushing
attempts.
“The confidence level
on the offense is real high,”
Horsley said. “When you
have a player like (Johnson) leading the way, then
really anything is possible. We go into the huddle
thinking we are invincible.”
EMCC has scored 42
or more points in every
game in its current-eight
game winning streak. The
42 points scored in each of
the last two games are the
low-water marks. The last
two wins included a condensed fourth quarter due
to the MACJC mercy rule.
EMCC has eight or
more wins in eight of Stephens’ nine seasons as
head coach.
“We are having a lot of
fun,” said EMCC sophomore wide receiver Mario
Lanier, who played at Aliceville High School. “The
ball is just flying all over
the field. We had some
opportunities we didn’t
cash in, but we know the
way the defense is playing.
They are going to keep get-

n Elsewhere in the MACJC on Thursday night, No. 5 Northwest Mississippi C.C.
locked up the MACJC North Division No.
2 seed with a 48-6 victory against No. 10
Northeast Mississippi C.C. in Senatobia.
Northwest Mississippi, the reigning
MACJC state champion, will travel for its
first-round playoff game Nov. 5.
In the South Division, Jones Junior
College upset No. 10 Mississippi Gulf
Coast C.C. 28-14 in Ellisville.
If East Central C.C. beats Southwest
Mississippi C.C. on Saturday in Summit,
East Central will be the South No. 1 and
play host to Northwest Mississippi, while
Mississippi Gulf Coast will be the South
No. 2 and travel to EMCC.
If Southwest Mississippi defeats East
Central, a three-way tie for first place in the
South Division will need to be broken to
determine playoff pairings.
Follow Dispatch sports writer Scott
Walters on Twitter @dispatchscott

quez Horsley ran for 150
yards and two scores.
EMCC has scored
42 or more points in every game in the winning
steak. The ability to win
by a larger margin in each
of the last two games was
hampered by the mercy
rule.
“We are at a good
place,” Stephens said.
“We are there at the right
time, too.”
The offense and defense will need to remain hot together to
help EMCC complete the
climb to the top of the
junior college world for

the third time in four seasons. Johnson threw for
179 yards and two touchdowns and figures to continue to do his part.
“(Johnson) is an incredible player,” Upshaw
said. “God has blessed
me. To be able to play
with these guys and to
get turnovers and to help
my team get a shutout is
great. Then when we aren’t on the field, we get to
watch that man play quarterback. It’s special.”
Follow Dispatch sports
writer Scott Walters on
Twitter @dispatchscott

Continued from Page 1B
capable of doing. They
have been some tough
games, but we never quit
believing in what we were
doing. Going into the playoffs, we have a lot of confidence. It’s like a different
team and mind-set.”
EMCC has recorded
19 shutouts in Buddy Stephens’ nine seasons as
head coach. The last four
squads prior to this one
had a minimum of two
shutouts in the campaign.
This season, the challenge has been greater.
The streak has included
a 44-42 victory against
Itawamba C.C. and a 6349 victory against Holmes
C.C.
Despite the elation of
winning, many defensive
players walked off the
field on those nights with
long faces. On Thursday, there were plenty of
smiles, high-fives, and
hugs.
“You can only ride the
kids so long,” Stephens
said. “We just needed
that buy-in. We needed
the defense to want to
create its identity. If there
is anything this team is
missing, it is swag. We really need some swag. The
teams in the past had it. It
really helps you get over
the top. The defense is
taking the right steps.”
EMCC took that kickoff and drove 71 yards on
eight plays for a De’Andre
Johnson to Mario Lanier
25-yard touchdown pass.
Hinds C.C. (2-7) didn’t
move the football into the
red zone in the game.
“We were simply giving up too many big plays
earlier in the season,”
EMCC sophomore line-

Hinds
EMCC

0 0 00—0
14 14 14 0 — 42
First Quarter
EM — De’Andre Johnson 25 pass to Mario Lanier
(Taylor Crabtree kick).
EM — Jacquez Horsley 1 run (Crabtree kick).
Second Quarter
EM — Vijay Miller 5 pass to Brooks Shannon
(Crabtree kick).
EM — Johnson 24 pass to Devin Ducksworth
(Crabtree kick).
Third Quarter
EM — Tyrell Price 48 run (Crabtree kick).
EM — Horsley 4 run (Crabtree kick).

First Downs
Rushes-Yards
Passing Yards
Comp.-Att.-Int.
Return Yards
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties

Team Statistics
H
17

33-62
145
17-31-1
60

2-2
2-10

EM
26
41-342
246
20-33-0
85
1-1
5-27

Individual Statistics
RUSHING: Hinds C.C. — DeVante Scott 12-51,
JP Elkins 16-9, DeMichael Harris 1-8, Freddy Jordan
2-7, Micah Zanders 2-(-13); East Mississippi C.C.
— Jacquez Horsley 14-150, De’Andre Johnson 8-75,
Tyrell Price 5-64, Vijay Miller 3-35, Ja’Mori Mark
3-15, Brieton Sykes 5-2, Ja’Moz Mark 1-1, Isaiah
Wright 2-0.
PASSING: Hinds C.C. — JP Elkins 12-25-1-116,
Micah Zanders 5-6-0-29; East Mississippi C.C.
— De’Andre Johnson 14-23-0-179, Vijay Miller 6-100-67.
RECEIVING: Hinds C.C. — Stephen Guidry 4-49,
DeMarcus Frazier 3-30, DeMichael Harris 2-15, John
Hightower 2-14, Ra’Meik Wallace 2-13, John McInnis
1-16, Freddy Jordan 1-5, Chris Blair 1-4, DeVante
Scott 1-(-1); East Mississippi C.C. — Calvin Keys
4-29, Devin Ducksworth 3-48, Ja’Moz Mark 3-27,
Mario Lanier 2-28, Tyrell Price 2-26, Brooks Shannon
2-20, Raphael Leonard 2-11, Damion Willis 1-53, Brieton Sykes 1-4.

backer Diamante Pounds
said. “We just had to turn
that around. Once we got
a couple of big three-andouts (against Northwest
Mississippi C.C.), it really
changed our season.”
While
Northwest
scored 32 points in a 5132 defeat, the EMCC defense was dominant in the
first half and set the tone.
The two shutouts have followed.
“I am really proud of
how far we have come,”
Upshaw said. “It took a
little while, and I think everybody will admit that.
The biggest thing has
been getting pressure
on the quarterback. Our
front is exceptional. We
were having a lot of trouble getting back to the
quarterback earlier in the

Through the course of
football season these
hometown fans will be
selecting their winning
teams, both in High School
and College. Look in each
Friday’s edition of The
Dispatch to keep up with
their predictions.

TOP PICKER

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ON THE AIR
Today

AUTO RACING
11:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Camping World Trucks
Series, Texas Roadhouse 200, practice, at
Ridgeway, Virginia, FS1
1:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Camping World Trucks
Series, Texas Roadhouse 200, final practice, at
Ridgeway, Virginia, FS1
2 p.m. — Formula One, Mexican Grand Prix,
practice, at Mexico City, NBC Sports Network
3:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup Series,
Goody’s Fast Relief 500, qualifying, at Ridgeway,
Virginia, NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 p.m. — Navy at South Florida, ESPN2
6 p.m. — Yale at Columbia, NBC Sports Network
7 p.m. — San Diego State at Utah State, CBS
Sports Network
9:30 p.m. — Air Force at Fresno State, ESPN2
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
6 p.m. — Tennessee at Alabama, SEC Network
DRAG RACING
5 p.m. — NHRA, Toyota Nationals, qualifying, at
Las Vegas, FS1
GOLF
1:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Sanderson Farms
Championship, second round, at Jackson, TGC
4:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, PowerShares QQQ
Championship, first round, at Thousand Oaks,
California, TGC
10 p.m. — PGA Tour-WGC-HSBC Champions,
third round, at Shanghai, TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. — World Series, Game 3, Cleveland at
Chicago Cubs, WLOV
NBA
6 p.m. — Cleveland at Toronto, ESPN
8:30 p.m. — Golden State at New Orleans, ESPN
SOCCER
1:20 p.m. — Bundesliga, Borussia
Mönchengladbach vs. Eintracht Frankfurt, FS2

Saturday

5B

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Alabama will face new
tests vs. Fournette, LSU
BY JOHN ZENOR
The Associated Press

MONTGOMERY, Ala. —
The No. 1 Alabama football
team’s defense has changed
with the times.
The top-ranked Crimson
Tide still has 300-pounders
clogging the line of scrimmage, but nowadays the biggest stars are the hard-to-block
pass rushers like Jonathan Allen, mobile linebacker Reuben
Foster and cornerback Minkah
Fitzpatrick.
It’s a group tailor made for
stopping all those hurry-up,
spread-you-out offenses pervading college football while
still defending the run as well
as any team in the nation. Alabama has an open date to prepare for a different kind of test:
Leonard Fournette and No.
19 LSU’s formidable running
game next weekend in Baton
Rouge.
“That’s one of the things
that we’re going to have to do
a good job of because we probably don’t have as many big
guys as we’ve had in the past,
because we were built in the
past for teams like LSU who
were I-formation, run downhill, very physical offensive
line,” Tide coach Nick Saban
said. “We’re going to have to do
a really good job with our guys
up front. I think we’ve got some
guys that can hang in there
and play that type of game.”
They certainly did last season when Alabama held Fournette to 31 yards.
The Tide has hardly gone
soft — or small — since the
days when hulking Terrence
Cody was monopolizing multiple blockers. But Saban & Co.
have loaded up with speedy
edge rushers like Allen and
Tim Williams along with the
beef.
Alabama still leads the nation in run defense, giving up
70 yards a game and only three
touchdowns all season. Opposing runners are averaging a

paltry 2.2 yards per carry.
The difference: The Tide
is also tops with 32 sacks and
nine defensive touchdowns
in eight games. If Alabama
lacks last season’s abundance
of 300-pounders, that’s mostly because defensive tackles
Jarran Reed and A’Shawn Robinson moved on to the NFL as
second-round draft picks.
Da’Ron Payne and Dalvin
Tomlinson supply plenty of
muscle on the line while the
291-pound Allen has made a
succession of big plays, including six sacks, two fumble
returns for touchdowns and an
airborne sack of Texas A&M’s
Trevor Knight.
“Losing J. Reed and
A’Shawn, you didn’t really
know how we were going to
be on the D-line,” Tide cornerback Marlon Humphrey said.
“Those guys just haven’t really lost any slack. If anything
they’ve gotten better. That’s
what’s been the big surprise to
me.”
Allen has been even more
productive since returning for
his senior season instead of
entering the draft. Pro Football Focus gives him the highest rush grade of any interior
defensive lineman while Foster gets the top grade overall
among linebackers. PFF says
Foster has missed only two
tackles.
Allen has even been drawing some buzz as a potential
Heisman Trophy candidate.
Not even his coach likes the
chances of any defensive lineman to claim that trophy.
“I hope he does get considered and I think he would be a
great candidate for it,” Saban
said.
Allen is just one of several productive quarterback
chasers on the Tide defense.
Linebackers Williams (sixand-a-half sacks) and Ryan Anderson (four-and-a-half sacks,
11 1/2 tackles for loss) have
also wreaked havoc in opposing backfields.

Proposed reforms
reflect changing
reality of recruiting
BY RALPH D. RUSSO
The Associated Press

The NCAA committee that proposed football recruiting reforms,
which include the addition of early signing periods, wants to create
more transparency and access for
coaches and players in a process that
has been accelerated in recent years,
said a key member of the group.
Nebraska
Athletic
Director
Shawn Eichorst told The Associated
Press the football oversight committee created an interconnected and
comprehensive package of reforms
while acknowledging the new realities of recruiting.
“I think you need to think about
it in that more broad context,”
Eichorst said in a phone interview
Monday. “I know people want to pull
pieces and talk about the pieces,
but really I think to understand and
explain the rationale appropriately,
you’ve got to understand the whole
process.”
The proposal would change when
and where summer camps and clinics can be held and limit so-called
satellite camps. High school players
would be allowed to take official recruiting visits in the summer before
their senior years, conceivably creating opportunities for visits to be
paired with attending a camp. The
proposed changes, which could go
into effect next year, would also allow
a 10th assistant football coach and
set a hard cap of 25 signees per year.
The piece of the proposal that
has drawn the most debate is the
creation of two early signing periods in June and December. The
June period would allow prospects
to sign binding national letters of intent before their senior years of high
school. The Collegiate Commissioners Association, which administers
the NLI, must approve and implement the new signing periods.
“I hear the reasoning is because
there’s so many decommitments,”
Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said in
September about early signing periods
before the Division I Council passed
the oversight committee’s proposal
in early October. “So because 17-yearolds are decommiting, let’s give them
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AUTO RACING
9 a.m. — NASCAR, Camping World Trucks
Series, Texas Roadhouse 200, qualifying, at
Ridgeway, Virginia, FS1
11 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup Series, Goody’s
Fast Relief 500, final practice, at Ridgeway,
Virginia, NBC Sports Network
12:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Camping World Trucks
Series, Texas Roadhouse 200, at Ridgeway,
Virginia, FS1
1 p.m. — Formula One, Mexican Grand Prix,
qualifying, at Mexico City, NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
11 a.m. — Duke at Georgia Tech, FSN
11 a.m. — Elon at Albany, American Sports
Network
11 a.m. — Kansas State at Iowa State, FSN
South
11 a.m. — Kent State at Central Michigan, CBS
Sports Network
11 a.m. — Kentucky at Missouri, SEC Network
11 a.m. — Louisville at Virginia, WTVA-ABC
11 a.m. — Michigan at Michigan State, ESPN
11 a.m. — Minnesota at Illinois, Big Ten Network
11 a.m. — Penn State at Purdue, ESPN2
11 a.m. — Central Florida at Houston, ESPNU
11 a.m. — Connecticut at East Carolina, ESPN
News
11 a.m. — West Virginia at Oklahoma State,
WLOV
11:30 a.m. — Boston College at North Carolina
State, ACC Network
2:30 p.m. — Army at Wake Forest, ACC Regional
Network
2:30 p.m. — Baylor at Texas, WTVA-ABC
2:30 p.m. — Florida vs. Georgia, at Jacksonville,
Florida, WCBI
2:30 p.m. — Cincinnati at Temple, CBS Sports
Network
2:30 p.m. — Maryland at Indiana, ESPNU
2:30 p.m. — Miami (Florida) at Notre Dame,
WTVA
2:30 p.m. — Northwestern at Ohio State, ESPN
2:30 p.m. — Samford at Mississippi State, SEC
Network
2:30 p.m. — Texas Tech at TCU, ESPN2
2:30 p.m. — Washington at Utah, FS1
2:30 p.m. — Western Kentucky at Florida
Atlantic, American Sports Network
3 p.m. — Southern Methodist at Tulane, CBS
Sports Network
4 p.m. — Arizona State at Oregon, Pac-12
Network
6 p.m. — Abilene Christian at McNeese State,
American Sports Network Regional
6 p.m. — Boise State at Wyoming, CBS Sports
Network
6 p.m. — Kansas at Oklahoma, FS1
6 p.m. — Marshall at Southern Mississippi,
American Sports Network
6 p.m. — Nebraska at Wisconsin, ESPN
6:15 p.m. — Auburn at Ole Miss, SEC Network
6:15 p.m. — Tennessee at South Carolina,
ESPN2
6:30 p.m. — New Mexico State at Texas A&M,
ESPNU
7 p.m. — Clemson at Florida State, WTVA-ABC
7 p.m. — Tulsa at Memphis, ESPN News
9:30 p.m. — UNLV at San Jose State, CBS
Sports Network
9:45 p.m. — Washington State at Oregon State,
ESPN2
10 p.m. — Stanford at Arizona, FS1
GOLF
5 a.m. — LPGA Tour, Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia,
third round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
(same-day tape), TGC
1:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Sanderson Farms
Championship, third round, at Jackson, TGC
4:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, PowerShares QQQ
Championship, second round, at Thousand Oaks,
California, TGC
10 p.m. — PGA Tour-WGC-HSBC Champions,
final round, at Shanghai, TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. — World Series, Game 4, Cleveland at
Chicago Cubs, WLOV
NBA
11:30 a.m. — Atlanta at Philadelphia, Fox
Sports Southeast
6:30 p.m. — Memphis at New York Knicks, Fox
Sports Southeast
7 p.m. — New Orleans at San Antonio, NBA TV
9:30 p.m. — Minnesota at Sacramento, NBA TV
NHL
9:30 p.m. — Nashville at San Jose, Fox Sports
Tennessee
RUGBY
2:30 p.m. — English Premiership, Saracens vs.
Leicester (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network
SOCCER
6:30 a.m. — Premier League, Arsenal at
Sunderland, NBC Sports Network
8:20 a.m. — Bundesliga, Augsburg vs. Bayern
Munich, FS2
9 a.m. — Premier League, Leicester City at
Tottenham, CNBC
9 a.m. — Premier League, Manchester United at
Burnley, NBC Sports Network
11:20 a.m. — Bundesliga, Borussia Dortmund
vs. Schalke 04, FS2
11:30 a.m. — Premier League, Liverpool at
Crystal Palace, WTVA

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

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The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

6B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

No. 25 Virginia Tech holds off Pittsburgh
By The Associated Press

Thursday’s Scores

PITTSBURGH — One of the nation’s worst secondaries kept daring
Virginia Tech quarterback Jerod Evans to throw. So he did. Over. And
over. And over.
The junior shook off a right ankle
injury to throw for a career-high 406
yards and two touchdowns to lead
the 25th-ranked Hokies to a 39-36
victory against Pittsburgh on Thursday night.
Joey Slye tied the school and Atlantic Coach Conference records by
making six field goals to help the
Hokies (6-2, 4-1) beat the Panthers
(5-3, 2-2) on the road for the first
time in 17 years.
Pitt came in with the nation’s
120th-ranked pass defense yet
played bump-and-run for most of the
game, hoping its defensive backs
could win more than they lost.
Didn’t happen. Instead, three
Tech wide receivers topped 100
yards in the same game for the first
time in school history. Isaiah Ford’s
10 receptions included his school-record 23rd receiving touchdown.
Bucky Hodges caught six passes for
145 yards and a score and Cam Phillips added 109 yards on a night the
Hokies piled up 556 total yards.

Auburn

Continued from Page 1B
Auburn piled up 543 rushing yards in a 56-3 win
over Arkansas, a record
for a Southeastern Conference game. Now, Auburn ranks third nationally in rushing offense
with numbers rivaling the
2013 offense led by the
mobile quarterback Marshall and Heisman Trophy finalist Tre Mason.
That group made the
national
championship
game by becoming the
first SEC team to lead the
nation in rushing, averaging 328.3 yards and having four players with 600plus yards. This Auburn
team is averaging 302.9
yards on the ground.
Johnson is expected to
return from an ankle injury Saturday night against
Ole Miss.
Quarterback
Sean
White and backup John
Franklin III have both
made some plays on the
ground but nothing like
Marshall or Newton, who
won the Heisman in leading the 2010 team to a national title.
“Whoever our quarterback is, we try to design

MSU

Continued from Page 1B
The only loss was a 6-0
defeat in 1909, when Samford was known as Howard University.
MSU is 53-21-3 in
Homecoming games. Its
last loss was a 31-24 decision to Houston in 2009,
MSU coach Dan Mullen’s
first year with the program.
Here are five things to
watch:

1. Will MSU overlook Samford?
MSU is 7-0 against Football Championship Subdivision competition in Mullen’s eight-year tenure.
Samford is ranked 19th in the FCS
Coaches poll. Its lone loss came to thenNo. 3 Chattanooga (41-21) on the road.
“They are probably one of the best
FCS teams in the nation,” Mullen said.
“Probably the best one we have played
in my time here. They are the best team
I’ve seen in quite a while.”
Sophomore quarterback Devin
Hodges is 212 of 298 for 2,445 yards
and 24 touchdowns (five interceptions).
Senior wide receiver Karel Hamilton
has 53 catches for 752 yards and nine
touchdowns.
Mullen called Samford’s offense “explosive” and praised Hodges.
MSU senior wide receiver Fred
Ross, who leads the team with 39 catches for 436 yards and six touchdowns,
said Wednesday that preparation has
been good this week. He said the team
has focused on the little things like breaking a key tackle to score a touchdown or
making a tackle to stop a touchdown.
Ross said the team has come together and is focusing on being competitive.
“The only thing I want to do every
Saturday, no matter what our record is,
is to win and just go out there and compete,” Ross said. “I think that’s where
the guys are. We’re motivated just to win
games.”
2. How will MSU’s young players
respond?
Youth has been a theme of the season for Mullen.
He reiterated that fact Wednesday
on the Southeastern Conference teleconference, but he praised the steps the
players have taken, especially at leadership, in the last few weeks.
“I’m really encouraged by the young
leadership on our team and the attitude
of how they’re approaching things with all

EAST

Buffalo 41, Akron 20
Fairmont (WVa) 23, Notre Dame (Ohio) 19
Virginia Tech 39, Pittsburgh 36
SOUTH
Appalachian St. 34, Georgia Southern 10
MIDWEST
Ohio 31, Toledo 26
SOUTHWEST
Ouachita Baptist 41, Southern Nazarene 14
FAR WEST
Southern Cal 45, California 24

The Associated Press Top 25 Schedule

Today’s Game
No. 22 Navy at South Florida, 6 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
No. 2 Michigan at Michigan State, 11 a.m.
No. 3 Clemson at No. 12 Florida State, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Washington at No. 17 Utah, 2:30 p.m.
No. 5 Louisville at Virginia, 11 a.m.
No. 6 Ohio State vs. Northwestern, 2:30 p.m.
No. 7 Nebraska at No. 11 Wisconsin, 6 p.m.
No. 8 Baylor at Texas, 2:30 p.m.
No. 9 Texas A&M vs. New Mexico State, 6:30 p.m.
No. 10 West Virginia at Oklahoma State, 11 a.m.
No. 13 Boise State at Wyoming, 6 p.m.
No. 14 Florida vs. Georgia at Jacksonville, Florida,
2:30 p.m.
No. 15 Auburn at Ole Miss, 6:15 p.m.
No. 16 Oklahoma vs. Kansas, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Tennessee at South Carolina, 6:15 p.m.
No. 24 Penn State at Purdue, 11 a.m.

“It’s a great feeling when you can
do what you love doing and that’s
throw the ball up and down the field
against a pretty good defense,” Ev-

ans said. “One-on-one coverage. You
can’t ask for anything better than
one-on-one coverage.”

n USC 45, California 24: At Los Angeles, Ronald
Jones just needed an opportunity to show he was still the
running back that became Southern California’s most prolific freshman rusher a season ago.
With starter Justin Davis sidelined because of injury
and the Pac-12’s worst run defense trying to stop him,
coach Clay Helton knew the sophomore was “ready to
explode.”
Jones rushed for a career-high 223 yards, Sam Darnold threw five touchdowns passes and USC defeated
California on Thursday night.
Darnold threw for 231 yards, with Darreus Rogers
making six catches for a career-high 97 yards, as the
Trojans rolled up a season-high 629 yards of offense.
Aca’Cedric Ware had a career-high 130 yards rushing to
USC’s total of 398, the fourth time this season the Golden
Bears have allowed more than 300 yards on the ground.
“We looked like a tired, beat-up football team and we
were,” Cal coach Sonny Dykes said.
USC (5-3, 4-2 Pac-12) scored on three of its first four
possessions, with Darnold finding Rogers, Jones and Deontay Burnett for touchdowns. Rogers added a second
touchdown catch with 28 seconds left, but two fumbles by
Darnold allowed Cal (4-4, 2-3) to maintain a modicum of
hope despite allowing 451 yards on 46 plays in the first half.
Defensive tackle James Looney returned a fumble to
the USC 22, where Tre Watson took a screen pass into
the end zone. Webb, the Texas Tech transfer, found his
rhythm on Cal’s next drive, with throws of 23 and 32 yards
to set up Matt Anderson’s field goal.
Webb threw for 331 yards and two touchdowns,
throwing a ball up for grabs that was intercepted by safety Marvell Tell in the first quarter. Webb also rushed for
a touchdown in the third quarter that cut USC’s lead to
28-17 before Jones had a 37-yard touchdown run and
Daniel Imatorbhebhe caught a 17-yard touchdown pass
from Darnold.

the offense around their
strengths,” Malzahn said.
“There aren’t a whole lot
of Nick Marshalls running around out there. He
was a special player.”
The current ground attack has mostly been built
on tailbacks Johnson and
Kamryn Pettway. Pettway
was moved from H-back
in the spring and didn’t
log a carry last season or
in the opener.
With Johnson out
with an ankle injury, the
240-pounder has run 66
times for 361 yards and
five touchdowns against
Mississippi State and Arkansas. He’s ranked 12th
nationally and leads the
SEC in rushing yards per
game, gaining 697 yards
in six outings.
“I haven’t seen a running back like that since
like Jerome Bettis,” Auburn receiver Tony Stevens said. “That’s who he
reminds of, Jerome Bettis. The way he just cuts
and runs you over. So you
never know what you’re
going to get when you go
head up with him.”
Johnson, also a sopho-

more, is 42nd nationally
and sixth in the SEC in
rushing with 538 yards.
Tailback was one of the
team’s biggest question
marks entering the season. Last year’s top three
rushers — Peyton Barber
(early draft entry), Jovon
Robinson (dismissal) and
Roc Thomas (transfer)
— were no longer on the
team for various reasons.
That left Johnson,
often used in a Wildcat
role as a freshman, and
Pettway. Depth has come
from players like freshman Kam Martin, a former Baylor signee, and
converted wide receiver
Stanton Truitt. Truitt and
freshman receiver Eli
Stove both ran for long
touchdowns against the
Razorbacks, with Stove’s
a 78-yarder on the opening play.
“One of the big questions this year coming
into the season was our
running back depth,”
Malzahn said. “I think it
was a really good thing
moving forward that we
had the guys that we had
step up. They did a super

the young players and adversity,” Mullen
said. “When you lose three games on the
final play of the game in one season, it’s
tough sometimes.”
Along with the loss to Kentucky,
Westin Graves missed a 28-yard field
goal in the waning seconds against
South Alabama. Quarterback Nick Fitzgerald threw an incomplete pass to Justin Johnson on fourth-and-9 on the final
play in the second overtime against BYU.
With turnover and injury, Mullen has
had to give 18 players their first start.
Against Kentucky, Michael Story drew
his first start at left guard and Jeffery
Simmons drew his first start at defensive
tackle.
Mullen said players like sophomore
safety Brandon Bryant and redshirt
freshman Leo Lewis have embraced a
vocal leadership role at practice.
“They are guys that have really been
outspoken, vocal leaders and motivating
players, and making sure we’re playing
at the level we need to be at and continue to improve every day at practice,”
Mullen said.
3. How will the injuries affect MSU?
Injuries have plagued MSU.
Before the season began, MSU lost
starting cornerbacks Tolando Cleveland
(torn anterior cruciate ligament in left
knee) and Cedric Jiles (broken right
arm). Cleveland is out for the season,
while Jiles missed four games before
returning to play against Auburn.
Defensive lineman Will Coleman
(back) missed five games before returning at BYU.
Senior running back Brandon Holloway and senior safety Kivon Coman
haven’t played the last two weeks with
undisclosed injuries. Both are questionable this week.
Offensive lineman Deion Calhoun
(sprained ankle) didn’t play last week
and offensive lineman Darryl Williams
suffered a neck injury against Kentucky.
Mullen said Williams is fine, but he won’t
play this week. Calhoun is questionable.
As a result, MSU has had to shuffle its lineup. Calhoun plays right guard.
Starting left guard Devon Desper was
moved to right guard and Story, who is
the backup left guard, took Desper’s
spot.
“I thought Michael handled it fairly
well in that being his first start. I didn’t
see any glaring issues,” Mullen said.
Injuries probably won’t play a factor
in this game, but avoiding them will be a
key for the rest of the season.
4. Does MSU’s defense take a step in
right direction?
MSU first-year defensive coordina-

tor Peter Sirmon was pleased with how
his defense played in the first half last
week.
MSU led Kentucky 14-6 at halftime
and allowed 119 yards in the first two
quarters. Kentucky had 355 yards in the
second half and scored 34 points.
In the second half, MSU gave up
touchdowns of 44, 34, and 40 yards.
“When the ball goes up in the air,
we’ve got to be able to high point it.
We’ve got to be able to knock that ball
down,” Sirmon said. “That goes back to
some of those 50/50 balls. We’ve got to
execute, and I’ve got to coach better at
the end of the game.”
Sirmon has taken all of the blame
as MSU is ranked ninth in the SEC in
scoring defense (28.4) and sixth in total
defense (388.9).
Senior linebacker Richie Brown,
who has a team-high 55 tackles, said
Sirmon is taking more of the blame than
he should be.
“He’s done a great job coaching us,”
Brown said. “From all the defensive coordinators I’ve had success with, I would
rank him as one of the best. I think he’s
done a great job with these guys. Some
of that blame I would put on my shoulders, and some of my teammates would
say the same thing.”
After giving up 432 yards in a 38-14
loss to Auburn, MSU gave up 311 yards
to BYU.
5. What will be Samford’s mind-set?
Samford coach Chris Hatcher
doesn’t seem intimidated.
Even though his team lost 45-3 at
Louisville last season, he is ready for a
shot at another Division I school.
“We’re going over there to win,”
Hatcher said. “I wouldn’t get on the bus
if I didn’t think we had a chance to win
the ballgame.”
Hatcher also sees the benefit in
playing a Southeastern Conference
school on television. He said the game
will raise the profile of his program and
could help it in recruiting.
Hatcher believes he has seven or
eight players who could play at MSU and
be a valuable asset to Mullen and his
coaching staff. He knows his team will
be outmanned at some positions. Still,
junior defensive lineman Xavier Forrest
is ready for the challenge.
“We’ve had this opportunity many
times before,” he said. “It’s just another
opportunity to come out and showcase
our talents against a bigger opponent.”
Follow Dispatch sports writer Ben
Wait on Twitter @bcwait

job running the football
and protecting the football, so we definitely have
some depth to that position.”
Seven Auburn players
have rushed for 100-plus
yards, including White
and Franklin. The Tigers
are averaging 106.5 more
rushing yards than last
season even minus that
team’s top three runners.
Now, the Tigers are
at least running White
enough to make defenses
wary, and Franklin has
been almost exclusively
used as a runner.
“If you keep it every
now and then, it really
changes things,” Malzahn said. “Last year, we
didn’t do that.”

Recruiting

Continued from Page 5B
give them a legal document so they can’t decommit. That’s not very smart.
Young people have a right
to choose where they want
to go to school. Period. Let
them decommit 100 times.”
Alabama coach Nick
Saban said he was against
early signing because
it could put players who
take big steps forward in
their development as seniors at a disadvantage
after early signees scoop
up scholarships.
But there is no consensus among coaches. Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh is in
favor of an early signing
period. Clemson’s Dabo
Swinney liked the idea,
but prefers the period be
in August. Arizona coach
Rich Rodriguez has endorsed eliminating signing periods altogether,
instead allowing schools
and prospects to sign
whenever both agree.
Ole Miss coach Hugh
Freeze said the proposals
make the recruiting process seem rushed.
Eichorst, who was
chairman of the subcommittee that worked on the
satellite camps issue, said
the NCAA’s research indicates the process already
is moving faster than ever.
A recent survey showed
30 percent of more than
1,400 football players who
signed a national letter of
intent gave verbal commitments during their
junior years or during the
summer before their senior years.
“We wanted to get
more transparency there,”
Eichorst said. “In order to
do that you had to reorder
things a little bit because
what we know is there are
a number of kids who are
being identified, evaluated, offered and commit
before they start their senior year. And they’re doing that without the benefit of official visits. And
they’re doing that without
the benefit of permissible
off-campus contact.”

De-commitments and
flip-flopping by highly
touted recruits gets a lot
of attention, but it is still
relatively uncommon. The
survey showed 82 percent
of football signees verbally committed prior to
signing. Of those, 90 percent signed where they
committed.
The NCAA also wants
to better regulate socalled third parties, such
as seven-on-seven coaches who are often not affiliated with high schools,
in the recruiting process
and keep the emphasis on
high school coaches.
The reforms are also
supposed to alleviate what
can seem like nonstop recruiting for coaches.
“What we wanted to
see was greater balance
with our coaches and
our current students,”
Eichorst said. “And what
we constantly hear from
our coaches and others is
often times I spend more
time recruiting my next
class than coaching my
current.”
Of 55 NCAA sports,
football is one of four that
does not have an early
signing period.
According
to
the
NCAA, 25,316 Division I
student-athletes signed a
national letter of intent in
2015-16. Of those, 18,103
had the opportunity to
sign early and about 66
percent did.
“Why are we treating
football players different
from all the other students that come to us?”
Eichorst said. “There’s no
good answer for that.”

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com

Schwarber

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

7B

Continued from Page 1B

days after he was born. The
youngest of Carrie and Shane
Faulkner’s four children never
cried and was never hungry.
On Day 4, he was labeled “failure to thrive,” Carrie Faulkner
said. He got his first feeding tube
in his stomach when he was 4,
and a second tube at age 7.
“On the outside he looks perfect,” Carrie Faulkner told The
Associated Press in a phone interview. “On the inside, it’s just
a trainwreck, it’s a disaster in
there.”
So when Carrie Faulkner
heard about what Schwarber did
after one of the biggest games of
his life, she just lost it. Moments
after Schwarber hit two RBI singles in Chicago’s 5-1 victory over
Cleveland in Game 2 on Wednesday night, he was asked about his
green wristband, and the son of a
retired Ohio police chief jumped

on the question like a belt-high
fastball.
“Yeah, Campbell Faulkner,
he’s a kid that I met down in Arizona. He’s got a rare genetic
disease, and I met him my first
spring training,” Schwarber said.
“Really young, smart kid, and
he’s just always got a big smile on
his face.”
Schwarber kept right on going.
“We stay in contact through
email. He’s a smart kid, man,” he
said. “The kid’s, I think, got an IQ
of like a college kid for being so
young. That tells you how smart
he is. And that’s a person you
want to look up to right there.”
A day later, Carrie Faulkner
was still floored.
“I don’t even have words,” she
said Thursday. “I have tears. ...
Oh my heavens what an amazing man to think of my son at

that moment.”
For Campbell, it was no big
deal. After all, they’re friends. “It
made me feel good and I knew
that he was thinking of me,” he
said.
Faulkner and Schwarber met
last year during spring training.
Faulkner was a guest of an organization called “Steve’s Dream,”
which provides tickets to Cubs’
spring training games to families.
They were tailgating when
Schwarber stopped and signed a
ball for Faulkner, who returned
the favor with the wristband
making Schwarber a member
of Campbell’s Crew — a support
group for Faulkner that has its
own Facebook page and Twitter
feed .
Schwarber promised to wear
the green band, and the connection only grew from there.

Schwarber got Faulkner his own
Dinger Bat. They exchanged autographed pictures and started
emailing each other.
“He’ll just give me like support
and he’ll say he’s praying for me,”
Faulkner said.
Faulkner was at Chase Field in
April when Schwarber got hurt in
an outfield collision with Dexter
Fowler, spraining his ankle and
tearing two ligaments in his left
knee. He was ruled out for the
year, just three games into the
season.
A crestfallen Faulkner was
quiet when he got home. He took
his hat off, put it in his lap and
prayed. Then he sent an email to
Schwarber pointing out he had
“a lot of doctors” and offering to
help the slugger get in touch with
them.
“Campbell literally went into
protective mode to take care of

Kyle,” Carrie Faulkner said.
And that’s when that one fleeting moment in the heat of spring
training returned to Schwarber
in a major way. As Schwarber
embarked on the long, difficult
process of rehabbing a major injury, he found inspiration in the
example of his precocious friend
in Arizona.
“It means a lot,” Schwarber told the AP. “I wasn’t going
through near as much time as
what that kid’s going through
his whole life right now. That just
gives me that extra motivation
going through this rehab that I
still have to go through after the
season.”
Schwarber made it back
quicker than anyone expected, surprising everyone with
the Cubs. Following an encouraging checkup on Oct. 17 in
Dallas, he was cleared to hit.

Comics & Puzzles
DILBERT

Dear Abby

D

are now in school
EAR ABBY:
while her five are
I have been
running wild in
with my wife
the house. Am I
for 16 years.
wrong for leaving?
She has a grown
— NEEDS MY
daughter who’s
OWN SPACE
the mother of
DEAR NEEDS:
eight kids, but
Not in my book.
she only has five
Your mistake was
with her at this
in letting your
time.
wife’s daughter’s
My problem
eviction become
is, the daughter
your problem. I
got evicted, and
don’t know whose
all of a sudden
name is on the
she brought her
lease or title
belongings to the
to your place,
house. She didn’t
Dear Abby
but it’s time to
ask or anything,
discuss this with
she just showed
an attorney. If you don’t, you
up with the five kids and they
may have more trouble getting
are driving me up the wall. I
the woman and her brood out of
already have two adolescent
there in the future.
kids, so seven ain’t heaven.
DEAR ABBY: My friend
I have tried to talk with my
whom I have known since we
wife, but she doesn’t listen. I’m
fed up, Abby, and I’m looking for were 8-year-olds (we’re now in
our 50s) is driving me bonkers.
other accommodations. They
She has started drinking a lot
have been here for two weeks
and hanging out with younger
and — by the way — my sons

ZITS

GARFIELD

people and dating younger
guys. I have loaned her quite a
bit of money because she can
barely get by. I don’t drink, and
I hate seeing what she’s doing
to herself. I think she is having
trouble with the aging process.
She has now started to
embarrass me when she drinks
in public. She doesn’t handle
it well and relies on me to get
her out of sticky situations. I’m
really tired of all this. I have told
her how I feel, but she knows
I’ll come to her rescue. —
TIRED GUARDIAN ANGEL
DEAR TIRED: Draw the line.
Tell her you are her friend, but
not her chaperone, and you will
socialize with her only if she
limits her intake to nonalcoholic
beverages. One of the signs of
alcoholism is when the drinking
interferes with the drinker’s relationships — and clearly, this
is what’s happening. Do not allow her to continue making her
drinking your problem because
you cannot control it. Only she
can do that.

Horoscopes
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Oct.
28). The thing you wanted to
make your own will finally be
yours. Happiness! But wait
-- working out the maintenance
plan is key through the next
10 weeks. There’s a don’tmiss investment opportunity
in November. A family victory
will happen because of you in
January. Lifestyle upgrades
happen in August. Sagittarius
and Aquarius adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 7, 20, 3, 14
and 9.
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
When to speak and when the
unspoken says more; when to
open and when to close the
door; when rhyming’s good and
when to make the words not
sound alike at all: You’ll sense
these things and more today.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
It’s the same with the peacocks and the toads and the
pufferfish, this instinct to make
yourself bigger to discourage
those who threaten you and

CANDORVILLE

BABY BLUES

BEETLE BAILEY

encourage those you desire.
It doesn’t work every day, but
today it will.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You’ve told this story before,
and you didn’t like how it
played. Don’t blame yourself.
It’s not the story. It’s yours, and
it’s good. It just needs some
tweaking. Answer this: What
do you want them to feel at the
end?
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
When you really give it thought,
you despise the idea that so
many are rallying behind. You
can’t take on every injustice,
but this accepted part of the
backdrop is now bothering you
too much for you to remain
passive.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
You’re optimistic. You don’t
want to hear sad stories -- i.e.,
any story you can’t do anything
about. However, avoid trying
to turn the story around. Don’t
twist it into taffy or spin it into
cotton candy. Leave it be.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Destruction is a positive force
for you today. You’ll tear down
the fixture that is causing you
stress and build in its place
something functional, lovely
and reflective of the real you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23). Everyone is promoting an
agenda. Most are doing so unconsciously. Here’s where you’ll
have an edge today. Promote
consciously, no apologies. You
can feel good about going for
what you want.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). There’s a clown in every
class. You’re it today -- the
one who makes people laugh
and smile with a much-needed
disruption. Of course, half the
grace of clowning is knowing
when to get off the joke.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). Love takes on many
forms. Sometimes love looks
like people debating, competing
or ignoring one another, as
offering comment, opposition
or space can be an extremely
loving act.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You’re still forming a habit
and it’s still hard, but don’t
worry. It will be hard tomorrow
and the next day, too. One day
you’ll wake up and it won’t be
hard anymore. It will just be
who you are.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Your enthusiasm for life
will attract different responses
from different people. Some
may go mild, or laugh, or walk
away. Others may finance your
dreams.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). You should be the one to
organize the gathering. Along
with your common-sense approach to socializing, you have
an added psychic sense that
makes your invite list a perfect
mix.
MALCO
COLUMUBS CINEMA
2320 Highway 45 N

MALLARD FILMORE

*INFERNO PG13
4:00 - 7:00 - 9:40 SAT MAT 1:05
*BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN PG13
4:30 - 6:50 - 7:35 - 9:15 - 10:00
SAT MAT 1:00 - 2:00 - 3:30
*JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK PG13
4:20 - 7:20 - 9:55 SAT MAT 1:20
*OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL PG13
4:25 - 7:25 - 9:45 SAT MAT 1:25

FAMILY CIRCUS

*KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES PG13
4:10 - 7:15 - 9:35 SAT MAT 1:10
THE ACCOUNTANT R
4:15 - 7:10 - 10:00 SAT MAT 1:15
KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW? R
4:40 - 7:40 - 9:55 SAT MAT 1:40

FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS

8B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

thence South 1 degree

22 minutes
East a disThe Dispatch
• www.cdispatch.com
tance of 210 feet to the

initial Point of Beginning of the property
herein described (being
the Southwest corner of
the Kenneth O. Canida
and wife lot as shown
by deed recorded in
Deed Book 382, at
Pages 535-536 in the
Chancery Clerk's Office
of Lowndes County, Mississippi); thence South
88 degrees 40 minutes
East parallel to the
North side of Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter of said Section 32 a distance of
197 feet; thence South
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTalong said fence a disEES NOTICE OF SALE
tance of 210 feet;
thence North 88 de(Deadlines subject to change.)
WHEREAS, on October
grees 40 minutes West
6 Days ...................................... $12.00
4 Lines/6
...................
$19.20
4 Lines/1 Day..................$9.20
26, 2007,
JonathanDays
B. parallel
to the North
12 Days.................................... $18.00
Thompson
and
wife
Ashside
of
Southeast
4
Lines/12
Days
.................
$31.20
4 Lines/3 Days..............$18.00
ley Thompson, exQuarter of Northwest
For Placing/Canceling Classified Line Ads:
Over 6 lines is $1 per additional line.
4 aLines/26
.................
$46.80
ecuted
deed of trustDays
Quarter
of said Section
Price includes 2 FREE Garage Sale
Sunday Paper Deadline is Thursday 3:00 P.M.
Six lines or less, consecutive days.
to J. Patrick
32 a distanceoperations
of 197
RateCaldwell,
applies to commercial
signs. RAIN GUARANTEE: If it
Monday Paper Deadline is Friday 12:00 P.M.
Trustee for the benefit
feet; thence North 1 deRate
applies
to
private
party
ads
of
non-commerand merchandise
over
$1,000.
of BancorpSouth
Bank, gree 22
minutes
West a
rains the day of your sale, we will recial nature for merchandise under $1,000. Must
Tuesday Paper Deadline is Monday 12:00 P.M.
which deed of trust is
distance of 210 feet to
run you ad the next week FREE!
include price in ad. 1 ITEM PER AD.
Callof328-2424
for rates
Wednesday Paper Deadline is Tuesday 12:00 P.M.
recorded in Deed
the initial
Point on
of BeginYou must call to request free re-run.
No
pets,
firewood,
etc.
additional
lines.
Trust
Book
2007
at
ning
of
the
property
Thursday Paper Deadline is Wednesday 12:00 P.M.
Page 31827 in the Ofherein described, lying
Friday Paper Deadline is Thursday 12:00 P.M.
fice of the Chancery
and being situated in
Clerk of the County of
the Northeast Quarter of
LEGAL NOTICES must be submitted 3 business days
Lowndes, State of Mis- the Southwest Quarter
prior to first publication date
sissippi; and
of Section 32, Township 18 South, Range
WHEREAS, the afore17 West, Lowndes
• Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept
said, BancorpSouth
County, Mississippi.
1780 Sitting with Elderly/Sick
0 Legals
4000 Merchandise
5000 Pets & Livestock
8000 Real Estate
responsibility only for the first incorrect insertion.
Bank, the holder of said
1790 Stump Removal
4030 Air Conditioners
5100 Free Pets
8050 Commercial Property
• The Publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors nor fordeed of trust
and the
Together with a non-ex1000 Service
1800 Swimming Pools
4060 Antiques
5150 Pets
8100 Farms & Timberland
omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion note
of secured
clusive easement for in1030 Air thereby,
Conditioning & Heating
1830 Tax over
Service
4090 Appliances
5200 Horses/Cattle/Livestock
8150 Houses - Northside
substituted
Underwood
space occupied by such error.
1060 Appliance
Repair gress and egress
1860 Tree
Service
PLLC, as
and across that
certain
4120 Auctions
5250 Pet Boarding/Grooming
8200 Houses - East
• All questions regarding classified ads currently running should be Law Firm1070
Asphaltas
& Paving
Trustee therein,
aunow
road as same
1890isUpholstery
4150 Baby Articles
5300 Supplies/Accessories
8250 Houses - New Hope
directed to the Classified Department.
Automotive
Services located, which
thorized 1090
by the
terms
1910road
Weldingex4180 Bargain Column
5350 Veterinarians
8300 Houses - South
• All ads are subject to the approval of this paper. The Commercial thereof, 1120
by instrument
Building & Remodelingtends Southerly from
4210 Bicycles
5400 Wanted To Buy
8350 Houses - West
Dispatch reserves the right to reject, revise, classify or cancel any dated September
26,
the Yorkville2000
public
road
Announcements
1150 Carpeting/Flooring
4240 Building Materials
8450 Houses - Caledonia
2016 and
to and along2050
theCard
West
advertising at any time.
of Thanks
6000
Financial
1180recorded
Childcare in
the Office of the aforeboundary line
ofFraternal
the & Lodge
4250 Burial Plots
8500 Houses - Other
2100
6050
Business
Opportunity
1210
Chimney
Cleaning
said Chancery Clerk in
tract of land herein deSUBSTITUTED TRUST4270 Business Furniture &
8520 Hunting Land
2150
Good
Things
To
Eat
6100
Business
Opportunity
Wanted
1240
Contractors
Book 2016 at Page
scribed and conveyed.
EES NOTICE OF SALE
Equipment
8550 Investment Property
2200 Inlocated
Memorial
21799; and
6120 Check Cashing
1250 Computer Services Said road being
4300 Camera Equipment
8600 Lots & Acreage
WHEREAS, on August
in
the
Southeast
2250
Instruction
&
School
6150 Insurance
1270 Electrical
4330 Clothing
8650 Mobile Homes
WHEREAS,
29, 2006, Benjamin
2300NorthwLost & Found
6200 Loans
1300default
Excavating hav- Quarter of the
4360 Coins & Jewelry
8700 Mobile Home Spaces
ing been made in the
a single person,
est Quarter of
North2350the
Personals
You may cancel atGable,
any
time
during
regular
business
hours
6250
Mortgages
1320
Fitness
Training
terms and conditions of east Quarter of the
and Alana Robison, a
4390 Computer Equipment
8750 Resort Property
2400 Specialand
Notices
6300 Stocks & Bonds
1330ofFurniture
and receivesingle
a refund
said deed
trust Repair
and & Refinishing
Southwest Quarter
person,for
ex-days not published.
4420 Farm Equipment & Supplies
8800 River Property
2600Quarter
Travel/Entertainment
6350 Business for Sale
1360debt
General
Services the Southeast
secured
NOTICE TO CREDITORS the entire
ecuted a deed of trust
4450 Firewood
8850 Wanted to Buy
been de- of the Southwest
thereby, 1380
having
to J. Patrick Caldwell,
Housecleaning
3000 and
Employment
7000 Rentals
4460 Flea Markets
8900 Waterfront Property
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI clared to1390
beInsulation
due and
Quarter, all lying
beTrustee for the benefit
305032,
Clerical
& Office
7050 Apartments
4480 Furniture
payable in accordance
ing in Section
Townof BancorpSouth Bank, COUNTY OF LOWNDES
9000 Transportation
1400
Insurance
3100 Range
Data Processing/ Computer
with the terms of said
ship 18 South,
which deed of trust is
7100 Commercial Property
4510 Garage Sales
9050 Auto Accessories/Parts
1410 Interior
Decorators
Letters Testamentary
deed of trust,
and
the
17 West, Lowndes
recorded in Deed of
3150 Domestic Help
7150 Houses
4540 General Merchandise
9100 Auto Rentals & Leasing
1440 Jewelry/Watch
been(approximately
granted and legal holder
of said in-Repair County, Mississippi.
Trust BookAd
2006
at fit inhave
must
4 lines
3170 Engineering
7180
Hunting
Land
4570
Household
Goods
issued to the underBancorpPage 24487 in the Of9150 Autos for Sale
1470 Lawn
Care/Landscaping
20 characters per line)
and will run for 3 days.
For items $100 or debtedness,
3200 General
Help Wanted
7190 Land for Rent/Lease
4630 Lawn & Garden
signed upon the Estate South Bank,
having
reSubject,
however,
to
fice of the Chancery
9200 Aviation
Locksmiths
3250 Management
7200 Mobile Homes
less ONLY. More than
oneof item
may of
be in of
same
ad,W.but
prices quested 1500
4660 Merchandise Rentals
James
Halbert,
the underthose restrictive
coven- Positions
Clerk
the County
9250 Boats & Marine
1530 Machinery Repair ants and conditions
3300
Medical/Dental
Jr.,
Deceased,
by
the
signed
Substituted
Lowndes,
State
of
Mis7250
Mobile
Home
Spaces
4690
Musical
Instruments
may not total over $100, no relists.
9300 Camper/R.V.’s
1560execute
Mobile Homethe
Servicescontained in3350
Chancery Court of
Trustee to
deed
datedInformation
sissippi; and
Opportunity
7300 Office Spaces
4700 Satellites
9350 Golf Carts
Moving
& Storage
Lowndes County, Mistrust and1590
sell
said
land June 7, 1968,
3400recorded
Part-Time
7350
Resort
Rentals
4720
Sporting
Goods
Up toWHEREAS,
4 lines, runs
for 6 days.
sissippi on the 25th day and property
in accord400,
Page
the afore9400 Motorcycles/ATVs
1620 Painting
& Papering in Land Book3450
Positions
Wanted
7400 River Property
4750 Stereos & TV’s
of October, 2016. This ance with
the
resaid, BancorpSouth
9450 Trailers/Heavy Equipment
1650
Pestterms
Control of 346, of the land
3500
Professional
7450 Rooms
4780 Wanted To Buy
is to
give
notice
to all
said deed
trust for
cords of Lowndes
Bank,
of said
Upthe
toholder
6 lines,
ad will
run
for
6 days.
9500 Trucks, Vans & Buses
1680ofPlumbing
3550 Restaurant/Hotel
persons having claims
the purpose of raising
County, Mississippi.
deed of trust and the
7500 Storage & Garages
9550 Wanted to Buy
Printing
the sums1710
due
thereunagainst said estate to
note secured thereby,
3600 Sales/Marketing
7520 Vacation Rentals
1740 Roofing
Guttering WE WILL CONVEY
der, together
with& attoronly
substituted Underwood probate and register
3650Trades
7550 Wanted to Rent
neys fees,
same with the Chanis vested
Law Firm PLLC, as
1770Substituted
Saws & Lawn Mowers such title as3700Truck
Driving
7600 Waterfront Property
Trustees fees and excery Clerk of Lowndes
in Underwood Law Firm
Trustee therein, as aupense of sale;
County, Mississippi,
PLLC as Substituted
thorized by the terms
within
90 (ninety)
thereof,
by 0010
instrument
Trustee.
Legal Notices 0010
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
0010 days
Legal Notices 0010
Legal Notices 0010
Painting & Papering 1620
General Help Wanted 3200
Bargain Column 4180
www.cdispatch.com
from this date. A failure NOW, THEREFORE, WE,
dated September 13,
Underwood Law Firm
to so probate and re2016 and recorded in
WITNESS OUR SIGNAGENERAL
Advertisement for Bid
QUALITY PAINTING. Ex4 USED P225/R60 R16
PLLC, Substituted Trust- TURE, this the 6th day
gister said claim will
the Office of the aforeMAINTENANCE
Mississippi University
terior/Interior Paint.
Michelin tires, 31,000
ee in said deed of trust, of October, 2016.
forever bar the same.
said Chancery Clerk in
for Women
Sheetrock Hanging and person needed for sev- miles, good condition.
Garage Sales: New Hope 4530
will
on
the
4th
day
of
This
the
26th
day
of
OcBook
2016
at
Page
eral rental properties. A $100.00 for set of 4.
Columbus, MS 39701
Finishing. Free EstimNovember, 2016, offer Underwood Law Firm
tober, 2016.
21610; and
142 RICHARDSON
ates. Larry Webber 662- handy man to repair or
662-327-1598 or view
for sale at public outcry PLLC
replace, whatever
ADIDAS ATHLETIC
242-6225.
at 711 Hemlock Street. Road. EACH ITEM $1!
for cash to the highest
WHEREAS, default hav- Elizabeth Kay Hollis ElSaturday AM only.
comes up. Seek overall
ITEMS
lis,
bidder,
and
sell
within
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE
ing been made in the
Skills, rather than a
BROWN LEATHER love
legal hours (being
terms and conditions of Executrix of the Estate
specialist
in
any
one
Mississippi University
seat. $100. Very good
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
33 Lakeover Dr-W. Sat
of
between the hours of
BY: Catherine W. Undersaid deed of trust and
field. Must have at least condition! 328-5091 or 7AM-Noon. Furniture,
for Women is requestSERVICE
11:00 A.M. and 4:00
wood
the entire debt secured James W. Halbert, Jr.,
A
HS
diploma/GED
,
a
ing bids from compan386-2814.
Certified in lead
clothes, dishes, and
P.M.) at the Main front
Majority Member
thereby, having been de- Deceased
ies that maintain or
removal. Offering spe- Valid driver’s license,
toys. Multifamilies.
door of the County
clared to be due and
have access to a catacial prices on interior & and be drug free. Salary LIKE NEW Werner 8' tall
Published: 10/28/16,
Courthouse at ColumControl# Thompson,
payable in accordance
DOE.
Email
resume
and
log of Adidas Athletic
fiberglass Type 1A
exterior painting, pres11/4/16, & 11/11/16 bus, County of
980 OSWALT RD. WoJonathan/BCS
with the terms of said
items.
300LB rated step ladsure washing & sheet pay information to:
Lowndes, State of Mismen's clothes, lawn
deed of trust, and the
hollandholdingsmiss
der. $100.
rock repairs.
sissippi, the following
mower, furn., bistro set,
IN THE CHANCERY
PUBLISH: 10/14/2016,
legal holder of said in@gmail.com.
Sealed bids will be reCall 574-7189.
Free Estimates
described
property
situbow,
Oct. 29th, 7A-2P.
OF
LOWNDES
COURT
10/21/2016,
debtedness,
Bancorpceived at the Office of
Call 435-6528
ated in the County of
COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI
10/28/2016
South Bank, having rePurchasing. The bid
Firewood / Fuel 4450
Part-Time 3400
Lowndes, State of Misquested the underopening will be held in
Garage Sales: Caledonia 4540
IN THE MATTER OF THE sissippi, to-wit:
signed Substituted
Sitting With The Sick / Elderly ANIMAL ATTENDANT
the Office of PurchasBuilding & Remodeling 1120
FIREWOOD FOR Sale.
ESTATE
OF
Trustee
to
execute
the
ing, Whitfield Hall,
Various lengths.
PT workers needed to
783 WILEY RD. HUGE
1780
Beginning at the Northtrust and sell said land MATTIE BALL,
Tom Hatcher, LLC
Columbus, MS 39701
662-295-2274
feed & medicate
YARD SALE! Saturday
east Corner of the
Custom Construction, CAREGIVER. ANGEL of
at 2:00 p.m. on Novem- and property in accord- DECEASED
dogs/cats & clean
Oct. 29, 10A-6P. Prices
Southeast Quarter of
Restoration, Remodel- Mercy. Changing lives,
ance with the terms of
ber 17, 2016 at which
HARDWOOD BLOCKS.
cages for 10-40
negotiable!
ing, Repair, Insurance one patient at a time.
Northwest Quarter of
ESTATE NO.
said deed of trust for
time they will be pubhrs/month. Need to be Can deliver or you haul.
claims. 662-364-1769. Over 20 years experiSection 32, Township
2016-0196D
the purpose of raising
licly opened and read.
Loading available. Call
available year round.
General Merchandise 4600
Licensed & Bonded
18 South, Range 17
the sums due thereunSpecifications may be
for appointment. 662Strenuous work inence. Letters of rec.
der, together with attor- NOTICE TO CREDITORS West, Lowndes County,
obtained from:
242-0259
volved.
Please
respond
available. 352-1041.
4
GOOD year dura trac
W S Construction. BuildMississippi; thence
neys fees, Substituted
only by mail. If questires. LT 275-70R18.
ing, remodeling & roofSTATE OF MISSISSIPPI North 88 degrees 40
Trustees fees and exOffice of Purchasing
OAK FIREWOOD - mostly Set of 4 for $500. Good
tions, email dew1ochs
ing. Backhoe & dumpminutes West a disCOUNTY OF LOWNDES
pense of sale;
Whitfield Hall
split - delivered and
condition w/ a lot of
EXP. CAREGIVER, 20+ @bellsouth.net. Send
truck service.
tance of 623 feet;
1100 College Street,
tread. 662-242-0259.
yrs. exp, seeking a posi- resume and letter of in- stacked. 662-436(662) 242-3471.
thence South 6 deNOW, THEREFORE, WE, By The Chancery Court
MUW 1628
5004.
terest
indicating
animal
tion in a private setting.
grees 53 minutes East
of Lowndes County:
Underwood Law Firm
Columbus, MS 39701
experience
&
skills
to:
RAY'S WOOD WORKS
Trustworthy & Reliable.
a distance of 423 feet;
PLLC, Substituted TrustTelephone (662) 329OCHS, City of Starkville
Garage Sales: Downtown 4500 LARGE SANDBLASTING
Own Transportation.
cabinet with dual entry.
thence South 17 deee in said deed of trust, Letters of Administra7223
Animal Shelter, PO BOX
References
avail.
Like new, lighted, 100
tion have been granted grees 37 minutes East
will on the 4th day of
1612 9TH St. S. Sat,
297, Starkville, MS,
Call
662-570-2208.
November, 2016, offer and issued to the under- a distance of 220 feet;
Mississippi University
7A-Noon. No early birds. LB portable hopper, Cyc39760.
lone Vacuum system,
for Women reserves the for sale at public outcry signed upon the Estate thence South 15 deFurniture, toys, kids
Multiple Home Repairs
regulator, Dryer and
grees 46 minutes East
of Mattie Ball, deright to reject any or all for cash to the highest
clothes, women's 12Sales / Marketing 3600
Stump Removal 1790
Sheetrock, Flooring,
1/2" hose with foot
a distance of 1200 feet;
ceased, by the Chanbidder, and sell within
bids.
24W, kitchen items.
Trim, Painting, Tile,
control. Worth over
thence South 1 degree
cery Court of Lowndes
legal hours (being
THE COMMERCIAL
Kitchen/Bath
$1600, will take $1200
County, Mississippi, on 17 minutes East a disPublished: 10/21/2016 between the hours of
Garage Sales: East 4510
DISPATCH is in search
DecksDock
Repair
OBO. 501-545-7750.
the 6th day of October, tance of 210 feet;
11:00 A.M. and 4:00
& 10/28/2016
of an excellent newspaPressure Washing
2016. This is to give no- thence South 1 degree
P.M.) at the Main front
222
MEADOW
Dr.
XXL
per
subscription
sales662-634-1114
22 minutes East a distice to all persons havdoor of the County
IN THE CHANCERY
person to work the Mon- North Face jacket-new,
LIKE-NEW pick-up truck
ing claims against said tance of 210 feet to the
Courthouse at ColumCOURT OF LOWNDES
Ole Miss hooded shirtroe County area. Must
ramps by Reese. $75.
initial Point of Beginestate to probate and
bus, County of
General Services 1360
COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI
red, all lg sizes, lots of Centurion Collection
be able to sell door-toLowndes, State of Mis- Register same with the ning of the property
other
items!
Fri.
2Pdoor,
KIOSK
&
work
inholly leaves/berries 66
ALLSTUMP GRINDING
herein described (being CASA CARE SERVICES:
Chancery Clerk of
IN RE: MATTER OF THE sissippi, the following
5:30P & Sat. 7A-11A.
dependently. Must be
pcs Christmas dishes.
SERVICE
the Southwest corner of Offers services such as:
described property situ- Lowndes County, MisLAST WILL AND
able to pass drug
$100. 329-1516.
GET 'ER DONE!
residential janitorial,
the Kenneth O. Canida
sissippi, within (90)
ated in the County of
TESTAMENT OF
3411
HWY
50
E.
Sat.
screen
if
hired.
For
We can grind all your
lighting & decorating,
and wife lot as shown
Lowndes, State of Mis- days from this date. A
WILLIAM ARTHUR
Tools,
antiques,
7A-2P.
more
information
apply
stumps. Hard to reach
Sporting Goods 4720
emergency repairs, preby deed recorded in
failure to so Probate
JONES, JR., DECEASED, sissippi, to-wit:
to The Commercial Dis- left over estate sale
places, blown over
ventative maintenance,
and Register said claim Deed Book 382, at
items, etc.
patch at 516 Main
roots,
hillsides,
backBAMBOO FLY Rod - New
moving & shipping asPages 535-536 in the
will forever bar the
Lot Number 93 of and
TRACY LYNN
yards, pastures. Free Street in Columbus,
- 3wt 6'6" w/2 tips and
Chancery Clerk's Office sistance, & pressure
in LaBelle Estates Sub- same.
JONES BLAIR,
MS. No phone calls acestimates.
You
find
it,
sock. Sell for $150
washing.
division, First Extension, THIS the 18th day of Oc- of Lowndes County, MisEXECUTRIX
cepted.
we'll grind it!
cash. 501-545-7750.
sissippi); thence South Call 662-549-1878.
tober, 2016.
CAUSE NO. 2016-0319 a subdivision of
662-361-8379
88 degrees 40 minutes
Lowndes County, MisTrades
3650
East parallel to the
/s/ Maurice Ball,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS sissippi as per map or
GUN SMITH. Over 45
422 MCCULLY Rd. U
North side of SouthAdministrator
plat recorded in Plat
yrs. exp. (As good as
AUTO TECHNICIAN
Tree
Services
1860
Price
It.
IN
THE
WOODS
east
Quarter
of
NorthwBook
4
at
Page
55
in
Letters Testamentary
the best, better than
needed. ASE certified
YARDSALE. Please folPublish: October 21, 28 est Quarter of said Secwere issued unto me as the Office of the Chanmost). New & used
preferred. Must have
A&T Tree Service
low signs. Sat. Oct.
and November 4, 2016 tion 32 a distance of
cery Clerk of Lowndes
Executrix of the Last
guns, new scopes, reBucket truck & stump tools and transporta29th, 7A-3P.
197 feet; thence South
County, Mississippi.
Will and Testament of
pairs, rebuilding, cleanremoval. Free est.
tion. Very busy shop.
NOW HANGING
along said fence a disSUBSTITUTED TRUSTWilliam Arthur Jones,
ing & scopes, mounted
Serving
Columbus
Pay based on experi429
E.
Gaywood
St.
HOLIDAY
tance
of
210
feet;
Subject,
however,
to
exEES NOTICE OF SALE
Jr., deceased, by the
& zeroed on range, ansince 1987. Senior
ence. Columbus area.
10/22. Sat 8A-Until.
DECORATIONS
thence North 88 deisting easements for the
Chancery Court of
tique guns restored, &
citizen disc. Call Alvin @ 662-570-4326.
Household items, furn.,
FREE ESTIMATES
grees 40 minutes West
installation and mainWHEREAS, on October
Lowndes County, Miswood refinished. Ed
242-0324/241-4447
lamps, home decor.
662-312-4588
sissippi on the 26th day tenance of public utility 26, 2007, Jonathan B. parallel to the North
Sanders, West Point. 3
"We'll go out on a limb
EXPERIENCED
facilities as reserved
Thompson and wife Ash- side of Southeast
of September, 2016.
PIANO LESSONS availmi. N. Barton Ferry on
for you!"
CERTIFIED
HVAC
Sat.,
Oct.
29,
6am.
Quarter of Northwest
and shown on the recor- ley Thompson, exNotice is hereby given
able for $45 per month.
SERVICE TECHNICIAN Burchfield's on Gardner. Darracott Rd. Open TueQuarter of said Section (Located in Starkville)
ded plat, and subject
ecuted a deed of trust
to all persons having
Sat. Call for appt. 494Evans Plumbing & A/C. 3 Families with lots of
32 a distance of 197
further to the Restrictto J. Patrick Caldwell,
claims against the EsCall Michele at
6218.
J&A TREE REMOVAL Minimum 5 years verifi- stuff!
feet; thence North 1 de- 662-312-1883.
ive Covenants duly reTrustee for the benefit
tate of William Arthur
able
experience
reWork
from
a
bucket
gree
22
minutes
West
a
corded
in
Deed
Book
of BancorpSouth Bank,
Jones, Jr. to have the
Wanted To Buy 4780
quired. DRUG TESTING Garage Sales: North 4520
truck. Insured/bonded.
distance of 210 feet to RETAINER WALL, drive786 at Page 145 in the which deed of trust is
same probated and reCall Jimmy for a free es- IS MANDATORY. Comthe initial Point of Begin- way, foundation, conOffice of the Chancery
recorded in Deed of
gistered by the Chantimate
662-386-6286.
petitive
benefits
packBIG YARD SALE! 2406
ning of the property
Clerk of Lowndes
crete/riff raft drainage
Trust Book 2007 at
cery Clerk of Lowndes
LOOKING TO BUY
age available (paid holi- 15th Ave N. Sat. 29th,
herein described, lying
County, Mississippi.
work, remodeling, basePage 31827 in the OfCounty, Mississippi
days,
vacation
days,
7A-1P. Clothes, shoes,
and
being
situated
in
ment
foundation,
refice
of
the
Chancery
within ninety (90) days
30” ELECTRIC
401K, etc.).
coats, & much more!
the Northeast Quarter of pairs, small dump truck
WE WILL CONVEY only
Clerk of the County of
of the date of the first
RUTHERFORD
662-343-5391
such title as is vested
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
Lowndes, State of Mis- the Southwest Quarter
publication of this NoCONTRACTING
DROP-IN RANGE
GOING OUT OF BUSIof Section 32, Townin Underwood Law Firm sissippi; and
demolition/lot cleaning. TREE REMOVAL, Trimtice, or they will be
NESS SALE! Salon
ship 18 South, Range
PLLC as Substituted
Burr Masonry 242forever barred.
ming, & Stump Grinding. Truck Driving 3700
CALL
equipment for sale. Per17 West, Lowndes
Trustee.
0259.
WHEREAS, the aforeWITNESS MY SIGNA662-251-9191
formance Hair Salon,
County, Mississippi.
OTR DRIVERS
said, BancorpSouth
TURE, this the 5th day
Serving Golden Triangle!
328-2749
1908 Military RD. Sat.
RYAND CARE GIVING
AMORY, MS
WITNESS OUR SIGNABank, the holder of said
of October, 2016.
Hub Miles Pay. Home Oct. 29, 8A-Until.
Together with a non-ex- SERVICE. We offer:
TURE, this the 6th day
deed of trust and the
During the Week &
clusive easement for in- companion sitters, perPersonals 2350
of October, 2016.
Pets 5150
note secured thereby,
/s/ Tracy Lynn Jones
Every Weekend. Class A HUGE INDOOR GARAGE
sonal care, meal prep,
substituted Underwood gress and egress over
Blair
License. Three Years SALE Sat 10/29, 7-2.
FOR SALE: CKC reand across that certain errands, cleaning, trans- ADOPTION: LOVING
Underwood Law Firm
Law Firm PLLC, as
TRACY LYNN JONES
Verifiable Experience
Inside old Nicholson
gistered Husky puppies.
portation, post-op care, couple hopes to adopt.
road as same is now
PLLC
Trustee therein, as auBLAIR,
Required.
warehouse
at
1084
A
happy
home
&
a
Call or text 662-305located, which road ex- laundry, & more!
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE thorized by the terms
EXECUTRIX
662-257-0605
Mike Parra Rd.
secure life awaits 1st
5584.
Call 662-295-0871 or
tends Southerly from
thereof, by instrument
the Yorkville public road email: rylandcaregiving- baby. Expenses pd.
Publish: October 14, 21 BY: Catherine W. Under- dated September 26,
Debra & Ike,
servicellc@gmail.com
to and along the West
wood
2016 and recorded in
and 28, 2016
1-888-449-0803.
boundary line of the
Majority Member
the Office of the aforeLawn
Care
/
Landscaping
tract
of
land
herein
desaid Chancery Clerk in
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTscribed and conveyed.
Control# Gable, BenBook 2016 at Page
EES NOTICE OF SALE
1470
Special Notices 2400
Said road being located
jamin/BCS
21799; and
in the Southeast
WHEREAS, on August
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
FOR
HEALTHS sake- the
PUBLISH: 10/14/2016, WHEREAS, default hav- Quarter of the Northw29, 2006, Benjamin
LAWN SERVICE.
one minute cure for
est Quarter of the North- Cleanup, mowing &
ing been made in the
Gable, a single person, 10/21/2016,
healing virtually all
10/28/2016
terms and conditions of east Quarter of the
and Alana Robison, a
weed eating, landscapSouthwest Quarter and ing, siding, tree cutting. diseases by Madison
said deed of trust and
single person, exCavaugh. Call:
NOTICE TO CREDITORS the entire debt secured the Southeast Quarter
ecuted a deed of trust
356-6525.
800-311-3285.
thereby, having been de- of the Southwest
to J. Patrick Caldwell,
Quarter, all lying and be- Leaf Removal/Pressure
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI clared to be due and
Trustee for the benefit
ing in Section 32, Town- Washing. Fall Clean Up.
payable in accordance
of BancorpSouth Bank, COUNTY OF LOWNDES
ship 18 South, Range
with the terms of said
which deed of trust is
Quality. Affordable. 66217 West, Lowndes
Letters Testamentary
deed of trust, and the
recorded in Deed of
769-5494.
County,
Mississippi.
have been granted and legal holder of said inTrust Book 2006 at
issued to the underdebtedness, BancorpPage 24487 in the OfTERRA CARE
Subject, however, to
signed upon the Estate South Bank, having refice of the Chancery
Landscaping L.L.C.
those restrictive covenof James W. Halbert,
quested the underClerk of the County of
Phone: 662-549-1878
ants and conditions
Landscaping, Property
signed Substituted
Lowndes, State of Mis- Jr., Deceased, by the
contained
in
deed
dated
Clean Up, Plant Care,
Chancery Court of
Trustee to execute the
sissippi; and
P.O. BOX 9570
Bush Hogging,
Lowndes County, Mistrust and sell said land June 7, 1968, recorded
Herbicide Spraying
sissippi on the 25th day and property in accord- in Land Book 400, Page
WHEREAS, the aforeCOLUMBUS,
MS
346, of the land reof October, 2016. This ance with the terms of
said, BancorpSouth
cords of Lowndes
said deed of trust for
Bank, the holder of said is to give notice to all
Painting & Papering 1620
39705
County, Mississippi.
persons having claims
the purpose of raising
deed of trust and the
CLIFF'S Painting. Cliff
the sums due thereunagainst said estate to
note secured thereby,
Baswell. Free estimder, together with attor- WE WILL CONVEY only
substituted Underwood probate and register
such title as is vested
ates. Interior/Exterior
neys fees, Substituted
same with the ChanLaw Firm PLLC, as
in
Underwood
Law
Firm
work. 30 years experiTrustees fees and excery Clerk of Lowndes
Trustee therein, as auPLLC as Substituted
ence. Many references.
pense of sale;
County, Mississippi,
thorized by the terms
Trustee.
662-327-9079.
within 90 (ninety) days
thereof, by instrument
662-386-0006.
from this date. A failure NOW, THEREFORE, WE,
dated September 13,
© The Dispatch
WITNESS OUR SIGNAUnderwood Law Firm
to so probate and re2016 and recorded in

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BOY SCOUTS

A REAL
COMMUNITY
ASSET

GARAGE SALE RATES

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com
Commercial Property For
Rent 7100

Office Spaces For Rent 7300

Super nice office space
for rent on high-visibility
Bluecutt Road. 1350
sq. ft. CH/A. Private offices and central area.
Call 662-327-6510

Houses For Rent: Northside
7110
1&2 BR house for rent.
$300 & $350 on 373.
Call 662-275-0666.

Apts For Rent: Northside 7010

Apts For Rent: Other 7080

2BR/2.5 bath condo townhouse. Dining & living room, gas log fireplace, W/D, 2 car garage. $850/mo, $500
deposit. 662-251-9947.

1, 2, 3 BEDROOM apartments & townhouses.
Call for more info. 662549-1953.

3BR/1.5BA house in
Columbus. 1801 MLK
Dr. $695/mo. $695 deposit. Call 770-3161714.

Apts For Rent: East 7020
2BR/1BA apartment.
Call 327-5000.
FURNISHED STUDIO
apartment. Ideal for
senior adult. Quiet, safe
area. Easy access. Utilities and satellite included. $650.00. Need
good references. Call
662-251-1829.
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-5491953

Apts For Rent: West 7050

Apts For Rent: Caledonia 7060
2BR/2BA duplex for
rent. Security deposit
$475. Rent $475/mo.
309 Jess Lyons Road
APT B. 662-435-4188.
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE and ready for
move in. 2BR/1BA.
Stove & refrigerator.
Washer/Dryer hookups
in utility room. Central
HVAC. Please contact
662-436-2255 for further details. Background & credit checks
required.

Apts For Rent: Other 7080
1 BEDROOM apartment
for rent in Downtown.
662-574-3970.

BEAUTIFUL 7BR/4.5ba
w/large granite kitchen
& 2 laundry rooms, all
appliances furnished.
Tall ceilings/crown
molding/fireplaces.
Many architectural features. Great location.
$1995/mo.
662-630-0118 or 769233-4515.

OFFICE SPACE

FOR RENT
Downtown
STARKVILLE
800 Sq. Ft.
$ 675.00/Mo.

7 ACRES restricted or 2
acre restricted lot.
Ready to build on. In
Caledonia. Most utilities included. 662-4352842.

662-418-6465

91 ACRES. Lamar
County Alabama.
Pasture & timber land.
Good Hunting. About 2
miles from state line.
205-609-0264. $1550
per acre.

Storage & Garages 7500
INEXPENSIVE
MINI-STORAGE. From
5'x10' to 20'x20'. Two
well-lit locations in
Columbus: Near Walmart on Hwy 45 & near
Taco Bell on Hwy 182.
Call 662-327-4236 for
more information.

FRIENDLY CITY
Mini-Warehouses

friendlycitymini.com

2 Conv
Locatienient
on
Best R s
In Towates
n!
662-3
27-42
36

Mobile Homes 8650

A MUST see with large
family room, huge master suite, 3 bd/3Houses For Rent: South 7140 1/2bths, swimming
pool and much more.
2997 Military Road. Call
RECENTLY PAINTED!
Barbara @ SFA Realty,
1st st S. Historic District. 2/3BR-2BA. CH&A. 327-9916 or 574-1821.
Fridge, stove, dishwasher, W/D, fenced backHouses For Sale: East 8200
yard. No smoking. No
133
MAPLE St. Gutted.
HUD. $950/mo.
3BR/1BA on corner lot.
662-726-9893.
Ready to be remodeled.
$25k. Call or text
Houses For Rent: Caledonia
662-436-0686.
7160
2 HOMES for rent:
-3BR/2BA Home. 1200
sf. $975/mo.
-Small Cottage.
$975/ mo.
Both: No smoking/pets.
CUTE 3/2 home, priCaledonia school.
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apart- Lease & dep. required. vacy fence, covered
ments & Townhouses.
patio, storage bldg.If
Call 435-1248.
1BR/1BA Apt. $335
you qualify, move in with
2BR/1BA Apt. $410no money down. 207
Houses
For
Rent:
Other
7180
$460. 2BR/2BA 3BR
Kermit St. Call Barbara
/2BA Townhouses
@ SFA Realty 327-9916
2BR/1BA, all appli$550-$800. No HUD al- ances, 2 car garage. No or 574-1821
lowed. Lease, deposit,
Pets. Near EMCC.
credit check required.
Houses For Sale: New Hope
Lease, Dep. & referColeman Realty. 329ences required.
8250
2323
$600/mo. $400/dep.
494-5419/242-2923
3BR/2BA move in ready
Commercial Property For
renovated home in New
Hope park. Fenced
Mobile Homes 7250
Rent 7100
backyard, wired shop,
corner lot, new appliRENT
A
fully
equipped
205 TUSCALOOSA Rd.
ances. 1600 sq ft.
camper w/utilities &
Office or retail space
$149k. 662-386-9794.
cable from $135/wk available. 450 - 3,650
sq. ft for rent. Call Rich- $495/month. 3 Columbus locations. Call 662- Houses For Sale: Southside
land Realty at
242-7653 or 601-940327-5000.
8300
1397.
HUD ACCEPTED. 2215
GREAT RATE!!
Office Spaces For Rent 7300
10th Ave. S. Serious in3,500 sq ft terminal
quiries only. $25,000
with office space. Easy OFFICE SPACES & retail OBO. 662-242-4467 for
access & lots of space space for lease. Startadditional info.
to park large freight
ing at $285/mo. Fairtrucks. Call Tom Sneed lane Center, 118 S. Mc- Houses For Sale: Caledonia
662-574-0147
Crary. 662-435-4188.

8450

Apts For Rent: Other 7080

Riverhill
Riverhill Property Management offers a
large selection of rental properties including
homes, apartments and commercial properties.

© The Dispatch

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

For current listings of available properies,
visit our website:
www.riverhillproperties.com

112 3rd Street South, Columbus, MS 39701

662.329.5050

Apts For Rent: Other 7080

PRICE REDUCED on this
3.2 acre lot with pond.
RENON LANE
MAYFIELD ROAD
Two ---3 acre lots
—Great Building sites.
Call Barbara @ SFA Realty 327-9916 or 5741821

28X70 3BD/2Ba huge
kitchen, lots of cabinets, Glamor Bath, vinyl
siding, shingle roof.
$16,900.00 Cash Only!
Must be moved Call
662-297-4532

COLONIAL TOWNHOUSES. 2 & 3 bedroom w/ 2-3 bath townhouses. $575/$700.
662-549-9555. Ask for
Glenn or lv. message.

BIG 28X80 4BR/2BA
Cavalier Power House
for sale! Vinyl/shingle,
central H&A, living
room/den, fireplace,
walk in closets, master
has separate tub &
shower, home has all
upgrades! SUPER NICE
home! ONLY $43,900
delivered & set on your
property! Call 662-7602120.

DEAL OF the Day!!!
14x70 3Bd/2Ba
$9500.00 Cash Only!!
Call 662-419-9762
I PAY top dollar for used
mobile homes!! Call
662-296-5923
LOOKING FOR a deal?
Everybody wants their
own bedroom! 1999
Gateway 4Br/2 full
bath,large kitchen,vinyl
siding,shingle roof,large
tub,seperate shower.
Home needs a good
cleaning, and a little
TLC! 1st $14,900.000
Cash gets it! Home has
to be moved! Call 662296-5923
SINGLE WIDE 3Bd/2Ba
Vinyl siding, shingle
roof,Must be moved
$10,800.00 Cash Only
Call 662-297-4532
WANT A new house, but
don't want to pay the
price? Save yourself
thousands!! Like New
16x76 (2014) 3Br/2Ba
vinyl siding, shingle
roof,large tub,seperate
shower,nice home! Delivered and setup for
only $29,900.00 Call
662-296-5923

2001 FORD Explorer
Sport Trac. 270K miles.
Good condition inside &
out. Runs good. $3200.
205-662-4267.

632 31st Avenue North

662-386-4446
© The Dispatch

4 19th
Amendment
5 Thailand

Sudoku

YESTERDAY’S ANSWER

Sudoku is a numberplacing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difficulty
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.

ACROSS
1 Targets for bulls
6 Colorado resort
Houses For Sale: Other 8500
11 Quiver item
3BR/1BA, Brick, 2 ac,
12 Chili con —
Palmetto Comm, Pick13 Act part
ens Co, Hwy 17. Well &
14 It’s worth ten
Motorcycles & ATVs 9400
county water. Will sell
2011 BUICK LaCrosse
OR trade for hunting
sawbucks
Loaded.
50,000
CXS.
2003
HONDA.
VFR
800
land. 205-614-2902.
miles. Excellent condiInterceptor. Metallic sil- 15 Holds
tion. $16,800. 386ver. New fuel pump and 16 Ironed
3BR/2BA Brick home,
8618.
battery. Exc condition.
Steens. 1630 sq ft.
18 Kin of Ltd.
Only 15,862 mi.
+/- an Acre. Kitchen apMotorcycles
&
ATVs
9400
19 Seth MacFarlane
$4200. 327-5751.
pl. incl. Fireplace.
Fenced backyard. $79k
film
HAWK
"NEW"
full
face
LEATHER
MOTORCYCLE
OBO. 662-889-8987.
jacket new "XL" by First 20 Bellow
helmet. Size "L". New
cost $140, selling for
Classics. New price is
21 Bully’s target
Investment Property 8550
$75 cash. 501-545$275, selling for $150
23 Precious ones
7750.
cash. 501-545-7750.
3 INVESTMENT
25 One-million link
opportunities:
Autos For Sale 9150
Northside 10 unit
27 Go downhill
apt complex: $185k
28 Extra
Eastside 8 unit apt
30 Phone downcomplex: $185k
Guaranteed
Credit
Approval!
12 spaces, 10 moloads
No Turn Downs!
bile homes for sale on
Blackcreek Rd.
We offer late model vehicles with warranty. 33 Dachshund doc
Call 352-4776.
Call us, we will take application by phone. 34 Appliance store
array
We help rebuild your credit!
Lots & Acreage 8600
36 Course need
1.5 acres located on
37 First
Ponderosa Dr. Great
662-329-4221 • 4782 Hwy. 45 N., Columbus 39 Radio’s Glass
spot to build a house!
by Spirit Mart at Hwy. 373 intersection
Call 662-328-2207 or
40 Chases off
www.tousleymotors.net
662-251-5679.
41 In the area
Houses For Sale: Other 8500
43 Pacific island
nation
44 Edgy
45 Burning crime
4170 N. Hwy. 45 Frontage Rd.
46 Moves slowly
2003 SONOMA truck: 4cyc, 5-sp, runs good,
nice interior, new lights
all around, and only
68,000 miles. Asking
$5500. Call 501-5457750.

NEED A CAR?
Tousley Motors

Columbus, MS

Washer And Dryer In Unit
1 And 2 Bedrooms Available
15% Military Discount
Move In Specials
Fitness Center On Site

3 “Divergent”

BIG DOUBLEWIDE
3Br/2Ba, stone fireplace, island in kitchen.
It's a steal at this price!
$18,900.00 Must be
moved!! Cash Only!! Call
662-419-9762

Autos For Sale 9150
WELL MAINTAINED 3bd,
2-1/2 baths,large family room, shop and
much more.180
Thomas Cr. Call Barbara @ SFA Reallty,
327-9916 or 574-1821

2 Clyde

FALL SPECIAL. 2½ acre
lots. Good/bad credit.
$995 down. $197/mo.
Eaton Land. 662-3617711

RIVERFRONT
PROPERTY
Camp Pratt
Call 574-3056
Ray McIntyre
Blythewood Realty

Houses For Sale: Northside
8150

1 Ivan the
Terrible

BUY, SELL, and DISCOVER in the CLASSIFIED AD SECTION!

Northwood Townhouses 2BR, 1.5BA,
CH/A, stove, fridge,
DW, WD hookups, &
private patios. Call
Robinson Real Estate
328-1123

3BR/2BA. All brick
house for rent. Big yard.
Carport. W/D hookup.
Nice neighborhood.
$750 per month. 155 W
Thomas Dr. 3 min from
CAFB. 504-813-1200.

Five Questions:

Lots & Acreage 8600
67 ACRES of land cut
over Lamar County AL.
Good hunting and creek
frontage. $650/acre.
205-609-0264.

© The Dispatch

Apts For Rent: Northside 7010

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016 9B

Southside
Feature Home

DOWN
1 Redeem
2 Mysterious
3 Pharmacist’s
concerns
4 Long time
5 Cleaned, in a way
6 Consents
7 Lacking
8 Bans
9 Keys in
10 High-maintenance
17 Roulette bet

423 7th Street South

This beautiful antebellum home, built
in 1835, has 3 bedrooms and three
full bathrooms in 3,260 sq. ft. It has 1
fireplace and a carport.
Shedule a showing today and see for
yourself how you can make this beautiful home your own!
MLS# 16-2203 $249,000

Call Today!

Caroline Bromley, Realtor
662-386-6656 Cell
662-328-1150 Office

cbromleyrealtor@gmail.com

WHATZIT ANSWER
© The Dispatch

Wishful thinking

22 Genetic stuff
24 Alias letters
26 Craftsman
28 Man of Brazil
29 Longoria of TV
31 Read
32 On the sofa
33 Mountaintop
feature
35 Roofing material
38 Fast food
request
42 Arthur of TV

10B FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2016

The Dispatch • www.cdispatch.com