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Government Responsibility Chart

Federal

National Defence
Foreign Diplomacy
International Trade
Aboriginal Affairs
Postal Service
Banking System
Marriage and
Divorce
Criminal law
Agriculture and
agri-food
Canadian heritage
Citizenship and
immigration
Finance
Foreign affairs and
international trade
Industry
Health
Labour
Public safety
National resources
National Revenue
Veteran affairs

Provincial
Education
Health Services,
hospitals, Some
natural resources,
Environmental
issues
Charities
Licences
Highways
Provincial Court
System
Provincial
Police/Prisons
Agriculture and rural
development
Health wellness and
seniors
International and
intergovernmental
relationships
Human services
Infrastructure
Culture and
community services
Energy
Parks and
recreation

Municipal
Public transit
Garbage collection
and disposal
services
Water and sewage
Snow removal
Fire protection
services
Zoning land
Local Police
services
Collection of
property taxes and
fees for many
licenses
Airports
Agricultural services
Animal control
Ambulance services
Cemeteries
Community or
convention centres
or halls
Public lighting
Family and
community support
services
Business licences
Emergency and
disaster services
Tourism

Federal Government
The federal government is the national government of Canada, centred in Ottawa . The
term can refer narrowly to the Canadian Cabinet, or more broadly to the Cabinet and
the public service. The federal government plays a huge role in Canadians' lives from
the collection of taxes to the delivery of social services, and from the supervision of
international trade to the safeguarding of national security.
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/federal-government/

Provincial Government
Under Canada's federal system, the powers of government are shared between the
federal government and 10 provincial governments. The provinces are responsible for
public schooling, health and social services, highways, the administration of justice, and
local government. However, overlapping and conflicting interests have stretched
provincial concerns across virtually every area of Canadian life. Provinces are free to
determine their own levels of public services, and each province has been true to its
economic and cultural interests in its own fashion.
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/provincial-government/

Municipal Government
Municipal governments are local authorities created by the provinces and territories to
provide services that are best managed under local control. They raise revenue (largely
from property taxes and provincial grants) and impact peoples daily lives in numerous
ways, from garbage pick-up and public transit to fire services, policing and programs at
community centres, libraries and pools. Municipal governments include cities, towns,
villages and rural (county) or metropolitan municipalities.
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/municipal-government/