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PROJECT PHASE - I

(EC159)

ULTRA LOW ENERGY HARVESTING


EDR-BLE TRANSCEIVER DESIGN WITH
LOW DROPOUT ARCHITECTURE FOR
PAN/BAN
ABSTRACT
Submitted by
P. PREAM
15EC330
M.Tech IInd Year
Wireless Communication
Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering

Pondicherry Engineering College

Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering

PONDICHERRY ENGINEERING COLLEGE


(AUTONOMOUS)
2016

ABSTRACT
INTRODUCTION
Bluetooth wireless technology - An open specification for a wireless personal area
network (PAN), provides limited range wireless connectivity for voice and data transmissions
between information appliances; eliminating the need for interconnecting cables and enables ad
hoc networking among devices, without the need for infrastructure such as base stations or
access points. EDR is an enhancement to the Bluetooth 1.2 standard and is described in the
Bluetooth 2.0 specification. It is backward compatible with the earlier Bluetooth standards.
MOTIVATION
As large number of companies have shown interest in bluetooth, it is highly probable that
in the near future a lot of electronic devices such as cordless or mobile phones, modems,
headsets, PDAs, computers, printers, projectors, and so on to communicate via short-range ad
hoc radio connections will be equipped with bluetooth connectivity capabilities. Even though
several ISM bands are available, the one centered around 2.45 GHz is the only one available
worldwide. Although bluetooth was not developed as a replacement for infrared links, the
inspiration acquired this technology will be exploited to develop a better standard.
LITERATURE SURVEY
Paper [1] describes about a 2.4 GHz BLE-compatible transmitter architecture for use in
ultra-low duty cycle applications. In paper [2], a nW power management unit (PMU) for an
autonomous wireless sensor that sustains itself by harvesting energy from the endocochlear
potential(EP), the 70100 mV electrochemical bio-potential inside the mammalian ear is
designed. Paper [3] briefs about a multi standard ultra-low-power (ULP) 2.36/2.4GHz
transceiver for personal and body-area networks (PAN/BAN). In paper [4], a transmitter is
designed using extensive power gating and a negative gate biasing technique help in achieving a
peak TX efficiency of 43.7% at an output power of +10.9dBm. Paper [5] describes about the
chip which consumes 6.45W while streaming raw motion data wirelessly over UWB for motion
capture with an ADXL362Z accelerometer.
OBJECTIVE
Bluetooth low energy Transceiver with high data rate under 2.4 GHz with Power gating
for Personal Area Network with Low Dropout Technique is expected to attain characteristics like
delivering low power, highly efficient data transfer, low BER, high gain Multi-standard
Transceiver IC using Cadence tool.
EXISTING METHOD
A 2.4 GHz BLE-compatible transmitter architecture for use in ultra-low duty cycle
applications. The bluetooth channels are each 1 MHz wide, frequency hopping occurs over the
79 channels. In standard bluetooth system, Gaussian frequency shift keying (GFSK) gives a
gross air data rate of 1 Mbps was used. In this digital modulation format, the modulated carrier
shifts between two frequencies representing a 1 and a 0. As a result, GFSK provides one bit
of data per symbol.
Limitations of existing method:
Transceiver couldnt deliver long service on battery operated systems.
Data rate not effectively achieved inspite of using 2.4 GHz band.
PROPOSED METHOD
As an enhancement to the Bluetooth standard, EDR uses different modulation schemes so
that data can be sent at higher transmission rates. EDR uses a combination of GFSK and Phase
Shift Keying modulation (PSK) with two variants, /4-DQPSK and 8DPSK. It can provide a

lower power consumption through reduced duty cycle. /4 DQPSK (Differential Quadrature
Phase-Shift Keying) - a differential format where the bits for a given symbol are determined by
the phase change from the previous symbol. "/4" adds an /4 offset to the phase changes
compared with the phase changes in plain DQPSK. Each point of DQPSK represents two bits of
data.
Advantages of proposed method:
Ultra low power Multi-standard 2.4 GHz Transceiver
Low hardware overhead
Low bit error rate
Efficient data rate architecture
PHASE I WORK SCHEDULE
Design and analysis of BLE transceiver design with modulation scheme using GFSK
over data rate of 1 Mbps with power gating will be undertaken. Simulation tool to be used for
implementation of design platform is Cadence Virtuoso (ic616).
PERFORMANCE METRICES
Power consumption
Gain
BER
Data rate
Distance of trans-reception
PHASE II
Design and analysis of EDR-BLR transceiver architecture will be proposed with /4
DQPSK modulation technique over data rate of more than 2 Mbps with low dropout voltage
technique.
REFERENCES
[1] Arun Paidimarri, Nathan Ickes and Anantha P. Chandrakasan, A +10 dBm BLE Transmitter
With Sub-400 pW Leakage for Ultra-Low Duty Cycles, IEEE Journal of Solid-State
Circuits, vol. 51, no. 6, June 2016, pp. 1331-1346.
[2] S. Bandyopadhyay, P. P. Mercier, A. C. Lysaght, K. M. Stankovic, and A. P. Chandrakasan,
A 1.1 nW energy-harvesting system with 544 pW quiescent power for next-generation
implants, IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 49, no. 12, Dec. 2014 , pp. 28122824.
[3] Y.-H. Liu, X. Huang, M. Vidojkovic, A. Ba, P. Harpe, G. Dolmans and H. de Groot, A 1.9
nJ/b 2.4 GHz multistandard (Bluetooth low energy/ZigBee/IEEE 802.15.6) transceiver for
personal/body-area networks, IEEE Int. Solid-State Circuits Conf. (ISSCC) Dig. Tech.
Papers, 2013, pp. 446447.
[4] A. Paidimarri, N. Ickes and A. Chandrakasan, A +10 dBm 2.4 GHz transmitter with sub 400
pW leakage and 43.7% system efficiency, IEEE Int. Solid-State Circuits Conf. (ISSCC) Dig.
Tech. Papers, 2015, pp. 13.
[5] A. Klinefelter, N. Roberts, Y. Shakhsheer, P. Gonzalez, A. Shrivastava, A. Roy, K. Craig, M.
Faisal, J. Boley, S. Oh, Y. Zhang, D. Akella, D. Wentzloff and B. Calhoun, A
6.45 W self-powered IoT SoC with integrated energy-harvesting power management and
ULP asymmetric radios, IEEE Int. Solid-State Circuits Conf. (ISSCC) Dig. Tech. Papers,
2015, pp. 13.